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Communist state in Europe and Asia that lasted from 1922 to 1991

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Dan Snow's History Hit
Operation Barbarossa: The Lost Diaries

Dan Snow's History Hit

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 27:27


Operation Barbarossa saw a clash of arms between Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union of unprecedented scale and savagery, but what was it really like to serve on the front lines of the Eastern Front? The historian Rob Schäfer has given History Hit exclusive access to the diaries of Lt. Friedrich Sander, a Panzer officer and one of the 3 million German troops involved in Operation Barbarossa. The diaries are brutal in their honesty openly describing the atrocities Sander was involved in and his opinions about Jews and the Soviet population. They also describe the horror of combat and his doubts about the cause, in whose name, he fights. In this episode, Rob describes how he came into possession of the diaries and why they offer such a unique insight into the mindset of someone fighting for the Wehrmacht. At the end of this podcast, you will also hear extracts from the audiobook History Hit recently released based on Lt. Sander's diaries read by Stephen Erdman. Listen to The Barbarossa Diaries.History Hit has also created what we believe to be the most historically accurate Operation Barbarossa documentary ever made with accurate footage and sound effects from the period which bring this titanic struggle to life. Watch part one of Barbarossa: The Lost Diaries. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk
How Many Times Per Week Are You Being Cyber Attacked? From Where? How? Why?

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 84:46


How Many Times Per Week Are You Being Cyber Attacked? From Where? How? Why? We've got a new study out showing that North American organizations, businesses, and others, are being hit with an average of 497 cyber attacks per week, right here in the good old USA. [Following is an automated transcript] This is a study by checkpoint software technologies. Checkpoint, I used, oh my gosh. It would have been back in the nineties back then. They were one of the very first genuine firewall companies. And it was a system that I was putting in place for my friends over at troopers. I think it was New England telephone. It might've been Verizon by then. I can't even remember, man. [00:00:41] It's been a little while, but it was, a system we were using in front of this massive system that I designed, I made the largest internet property in the world. At that time called big yellow. It morphed into super pages. It might be familiar with. But it was me and my team that did everything. We built the data center out. [00:01:05] We wrote all of the software. Of course they provided all of the yellow pages type listing so we can put it all in. And we brought it up online and we were concerned. Well, first of all, You know, I've been doing cyber security now for over 30 years. And at this point in time, they wanted something a little more than my home grown firewall. [00:01:29] Cause I had designed and written one in order to protect this huge asset that was bringing in tens of millions of dollars a year to the phone company. So they said, Hey, listen, let's go ahead and we'll use checkpoint and get things going. We did, it was on a little, I remember it was a sun workstation. If you remember those back in the. [00:01:52] And it worked pretty well. I learned how to use it and played with it. And that was my first foray into kind of what the rest of the world had started doing, this checkpoint software, but they've continued on, they make some great firewalls and other intrusions type stuff, detection and blocking, you know, already that I am a big fan, at least on the bigger end. [00:02:17] You know, today in this day and age, I would absolutely use. The Cisco stuff and the higher end Cisco stuff that all ties together. It doesn't just have the fire power firewall, but it has everything in behind, because in this day and age, you've got to look at everything that's happening, even if you're a home user. [00:02:37] And this number really gets everybody concerned. Home users and business users is. Businesses are definitely under bigger attacks than home users are. And particularly when we're talking about businesses, particularly the bigger businesses, the ones that have a huge budget that are going to be able to go out and pay up, you know, a million, $10 million ransom. [00:03:05] Those are the ones that they're after and this analysis. Point software who does see some of those attacks coming in, showed some very disturbing changes. First of all, huge increases in the number of cyber attacks and the number of successful ransoms that have been going on. And we're going to talk a little bit later, too, about where some of those attacks are coming from, and the reason behind those attack. [00:03:36] According to them right now, the average number of weekly attacks on organizations globally. So far, this year is 40% higher than the average before March, 2020. And of course that's when the first lockdowns went into effect and people started working from home in the U S the. Increase in the number of attacks on an organizations is even higher at 53%. [00:04:07] Now you might ask yourself why, why would the U S be attacked more? I know you guys are the best and brightest, and I bet it, I don't even need to say this because you can figure this out yourself, but the us is where the money is. And so that's why they're doing it. And we had president Biden come out and say, Hey, don't attack the. [00:04:27] well, some of those sectors are under khaki for more after he said that then before, right. It's like giving a list to a bad guy. Yeah. I'm going to be gone for a month in June and yeah, there won't be anybody there. And the here's the code to my alarm. Right. You're you're just inviting disaster checkpoints. [00:04:49] Also showing that there were more. Average weekly attacks in September 21. That's this September than any time since January, 2020. In fact, they're saying 870 attacks per organization globally per week. The checkpoint counted in September was double the average in March, 2020. It's kind of funny, right? [00:05:14] It's kind of like a before COVID after COVID or before the Wu Han virus and after the Wu Han virus, however, we might want to know. So there are a lot of attacks going on. Volume is pretty high in a lot of different countries. You've heard me say before some of my clients I've seen attack multiple times a second, so let's take a second and define the attack because being scanned. [00:05:40] I kind of an attack, the looking to see, oh, where is there a device? Oh, okay. Here's a device. So there might be a home router. It might be your firewall or your router at the business. And then what it'll do is, okay, I've got an address now I know is responding, which by the way is a reason. The, we always configure these devices to not respond to these types of things. [00:06:04] And then what they'll do is they will try and identify it. So they'll try and go into the control page, which is why you should never have when. Configuration enabled on any of your routers or firewalls, because they're going to come in and identify you just on that because all of a sudden them brag about what version of the software you're running. [00:06:26] And then if it's responding to that, they will try and use a password. That is known to be the default for that device. So in a lot of these devices, the username is admin and the password is admin. So they try it and now off they go, they're running. Some of these guys will even go the next step and we'll replace the software. [00:06:52] In your router or firewall, they will replace it so that it now directs you through them, everything you are doing through them. So they can start to gather information. And that's why you want to make sure that the SSL slash TLS. That encryption is in place on the website. You're going to, so if you go to Craig peterson.com right now, my website, I'm going to go there myself. [00:07:22] So if you go to Craig peterson.com, you're going to notice that first of all, it's going to redirect you to my secure site and it doesn't really matter. You won't see it. Okay. But you are there because if he. Typically at the left side of that URL bar where it says, Craig peterson.com. You'll see, there's a little lock. [00:07:44] So if you click that lock, it says connection is secure. Now there's a lot more we could go into here. But the main idea is even if your data is being routed through China or. Both of which have happened before many tens of thousands, hundreds of thousands of time times. I'm not even sure of the number now. [00:08:06] It's huge. Even if your data is being routed through them, the odds are, they're not going to see anything. That you are doing on the Craig Peterson site. Now, of course you go into my site, you're going to be reading up on some of the cybersecurity stuff you can do. Right. The outages what's happened in the news. [00:08:27] You can do all of that sort of thing on my side, kind of, who cares, right? Um, but really what you care about is the bank, but it's the same thing with the bank. And I knew mine was going to be up there. And when everybody just check it out anyway, so. So the bad guys, then do this scan. They find a web page log in. [00:08:47] They try the default log in. If it works, the Le the least they will do is change. What are called your DNS settings. That's bad because changing your DNS settings now opens you up to another type of attack, which is they can go ahead. And when your browser says, I want to go to bank of america.com. It is in fact, going to go out to the internet, say is bank of America, the bad guys. [00:09:18] Did, and they will give you their bank of America site that looks like bank of America feels like bank of America. And all they're doing is waiting for you to type into your bank of America, username and password, and then they might redirect you to the. But at that point, they've got you. So there are some solutions to that one as well, and Firefox has some good solutions. [00:09:44] There are others out there and you had to have those that are in the works, but this is just an incredible number. So here's what I'm doing, right. I have been working for weeks on trying to figure out how can I help the most people. And obviously I needed to keep the lights on, right? I've got to pay for my food and gas and stuff, but what I'm planning on doing and what we've sketched out. [00:10:10] In fact, just this week, we got kind of our final sketch out of it is we're going to go ahead and have a success path for cyber security. All of the basic steps on that success path will be. Okay. So it will be training that is absolutely 100% free. And I'll do a deeper dive into some of these things that I'm doing that I'm doing right now here on the radio, because you can't see my desktop. [00:10:40] It's hard to do a deep dive and it's open to anybody, right? If you're a home user or if you're a business user, all of the stuff on that free. Is going to help you out dramatically. And then after that, then there'll be some paid stuff like a membership site. And then obviously done for you. If the cybersecurity stuff is just stuff that you don't want to deal with, you don't have the time to deal with. [00:11:05] You don't want to learn, because believe me, this is something that's taken me decades to learn and it's changing almost every day. So I understand if you don't want to learn it to. That is the other option. I'll give you, which is done for you, which we've been doing now for over 20, 30 years. Stick around. [00:11:25] We'll [00:11:25] So which sectors are economy are being hacked? I mentioned that in the last segment, but yeah, there are some problems and the sectors that president Biden lined out laid out are, are the ones that are under, even more attack after his message. [00:11:42] 497 cyber attacks per week. On average here in the US, that is a lot of attacks. And we started explaining what that meant so that we talked about the scan attacks that are automated and some person may get involved at some point, but the automated attacks can be pretty darn automated. Many of them are just trying to figure out who you are. [00:12:09] So, if it shows up, when they do that little scan that you're using a router that was provided by your ISP, that's a big hint that you are just a small guy of some sort, although I'm shocked at how many bigger businesses that should have their own router, a good router, right. A good Cisco router and a really good next generation firewall. [00:12:34] I'm shocked at how many don't have those things in place, but when they do this, That's the first cut. So if you're a little guy, they'll probably just try and reflash your router. In other words, reprogram it and change it so that they can start monitoring what you're doing and maybe grab some information from. [00:12:56] Pretty simple. If you are someone that looks like you're more of a target, so they connect to your router and let's say, it's a great one. Let's say it's a Cisco router firewall or Palo Alto, or one of those other big companies out there that have some really good products. Uh, at that point, they're going to look at it and say, oh, well, okay. [00:13:18] So this might be a good organization, but when they get. To it again, if when access has turned on wide area, access has turned down, that router is likely to say, this is the property of, uh, Covina hospital or whatever it might be, you know? And any access is disallowed authorized access only. Well, now they know. [00:13:42] Who it is. And it's easy enough just to do a reverse lookup on that address. Give me an address anywhere on the internet. And I can tell you pretty much where it is, whose it is and what it's being used for. So if that's what they do say they have these automated systems looking for this stuff it's found. [00:14:02] So now they'll try a few things. One of the first things they try nowadays is what's called an RDP attack. This is a remote attack. Are you using RDP to connect to your business? Right? A lot of people are, especially after the lockdown, this Microsoft. Desktop protocol has some serious bugs that have been known for years. [00:14:25] Surprisingly to me, some 60% of businesses have not applied those patches that have been available for going on two years. So what then button bad guys will do next. They say, oh, is there a remote desktop access? Cause there probably is most smaller businesses particularly use that the big businesses have a little bit more expensive, not really much more expensive, but much better stuff. [00:14:51] You know, like the Cisco AnyConnect or there's a few other good products out there. So they're going to say, oh, well, okay. Let's try and hack in again. Automate. It's automated. No one has to do anything. So it says, okay, let's see if they patch, let's try and break in a ha I can get in and I can get into this particular machine. [00:15:14] Now there's another way that they can get into their moat desktop. And this apparently has been used for some of the bigger hacks you've heard about recently. So the other way they get in is through credential stuff. What that is is Hey, uh, there are right now some 10 billion records out on the dark web of people's names, email addresses, passwords, and other information. [00:15:43] So, what they'll do is they'll say, oh, well this is Covina hospital and it looks it up backwards and it says, okay, so that's Covina hospital.org. I have no idea if there even is a Gavino hospital, by the way, and will come back and say, okay, great. So now let's look at our database of hacked accounts. Oh, okay. [00:16:04] I see this Covina hospital.org email address with a password. So at that point they just try and stuff. Can we get in using that username and password that we stole off of another website. So you see why it's so important to be using something like one password, a password generator, different passwords on every site, different usernames on every site, et cetera, et cetera. [00:16:29] Right. It gets pretty important per te darn quickly. So now that they're in, they're going to start going sideways and we call that east west in the biz. And so they're on a machine. They will see what they can find on that machine. This is where usually a person gets some. And it depends in historically it's been about six days on average that they spend looking around inside your network. [00:17:00] So they look around and they find, oh yeah, great. Here we go. Yep. Uh, we found this, we found that. Oh, and there's these file server mounts. Yeah. These SMB shares the, you know, the Y drive the G drive, whatever you might call it. So they start gaining through those and then they start looking for our other machines on the network that are compromised. [00:17:23] It gets to be really bad, very, very fast. And then they'll often leave behind some form of ransomware and also extortion, where that extort you additionally, for the threat of releasing your data. So there, there are many other ways they're not going to get into them all today, but that's what we're talking about. [00:17:43] Mirman, we're talking about the 500 cyber attacks per week against the average. North American company. So we have seen some industry sectors that are more heavily targeted than others. Education and research saw an 60% increase in attacks. So their education and I've tried to help out some of the schools, but because of the way the budgets work and the lowest bidder and everything else, they, they end up with equipment. [00:18:17] That's just totally misconfigured. It's just shocking to me. Right. They buy them from one of these big box online places. Yeah. I need a, a Cisco 10, 10. And I need some help in configuring it and all, yeah, no problems or we'll help you. And then they sell it to the school, the school installs it, and it is so misconfigured. [00:18:38] It provides zero protection, uh, almost zero, right. It provides almost no protection at all. And doesn't even use the advanced features that they paid for. Right. That's why, again, don't buy from these big box. Guys just don't do it. You need more value than they can possibly provide you with. So schools, 1500 attacks per week research companies, again, 1500 attacks per week, government and military. [00:19:10] Entities about 1100 weekly attacks. Okay. That's the next, most highest attacked. Okay. Uh, health care organizations, 752 attacks per week on average. Or in this case, it's a 55% increase from last year. So it isn't just checkpoints data that I've been quoting here. That, that gives us that picture. There are a lot of others out there IBM's has Verizon's has all of these main guys, and of course in the end, They've got these huge ransoms to deal with. [00:19:50] Hey, in New Hampshire, one of the small towns just got nailed. They had millions of dollars stolen, and that was just through an email trick that they played in. K again. I T people, um, I I've been thinking about maybe I should put together some sort of coaching for them and coaching for the cybersecurity people, even because there's so much more that you need to know, then you might know, anyways, if you're interested in any of this. [00:20:22] Visit me online. Craig peterson.com/subscribe. You will get my weekly newsletter, all of my show notes, and you'll find out about these various trainings and I keep holding. In fact, there's one in most of the newsletters. Craig peterson.com. Craig Peterson, S O n.com. Stick around. [00:20:43] We've been talking about the types of attacks that are coming against us. Most organizations here in north America are seeing 500 cyber attacks a week, some as many as 1500. Now, where are they coming from? [00:21:00] Whether they're scanning attacks, whether they're going deeper into our networks and into our systems who are the bad guys and what are they doing? Microsoft also has a report that they've been generating, looking at what they consider to be the source of the attacks. Now we know a lot of the reasons I'm going to talk about that too, but the source is an interesting way to look at. [00:21:29] Because the source can also help you understand the reason for the attacks. So according to dark reading, this is kind of an insider, a website you're welcome to go to, but it gets pretty darn deep sometimes, but they are showing this stats from Microsoft, which you can find online that in the last year rush. [00:21:53] Has been the source of 58% of the cyber cat tax. Isn't that amazing now it's not just the cyber attacks. I, I need to clarify this. It's the nation state cyber tech. So what's a nature's nation state cyber attack versus I don't know, a regular cyber attack. Well, the bottom line is a nation state cyber attack is an attack that's occurring and is actually coordinated and run by and on behalf of a nation state. [00:22:31] Uh, So Russia at 58% of all nation state attacks is followed by North Korea, 23% Iran, 11% China, 8%. Now you probably would have thought that China would be. Right up there on that list, but Russia has 50% more of the nation state cyber attacks coming from them than from China. And then after China is south Vietnam, Viet, or I should say South Korea, Vietnam, and Turkey, and they all have less than 1%. [00:23:14] Now, this is this new pool of data that Microsoft has been analyzing. And it's part of this year's Microsoft digital defense report, and they're highlighting the trends in the nation state threat cyber activity hybrid workforce security. Disinformation and your internet of things, operational technology and supply chain security. [00:23:35] In other words, the whole gambit before, before all of this, now the data is also showing that the Russian nation state attacks are increasingly effective, calming from about a 21% successful compromise rate last year to 32%. So basically 50% better this year at effectiveness there, Russians are also targeting more government agencies for intelligence gathering. [00:24:10] So that jumped from 3% of their victims last year to 53%. This. And the Russian nation state actors are primarily targeting guests who us, right? The United States, Ukraine and the United Kingdom. Now this is all according to the Microsoft data. So why has Russia been attacking us? Why is China been attacking us and why the change this. [00:24:38] Well, Russia has been attacking us primarily to rent some us it's a cash cow for them just like oil and gas. They are making crazy money. Now that president Biden has made us dependent on foreign oil supplies. It's just insanity and even dependent on. Gas coming from other places. Well guess where the number one source of gases now for Europe and oil it's Russia. [00:25:08] So we are no longer going to be selling to Europe. Russia is so they're going to be making a lot of money off of. But before then they were actually counted on ransomware to help fund the Russian federal government, as well as of course, these Russian oligarchs, these people who are incredibly rich that have a substantial influence on the government. [00:25:33] Don't if you're wondering who they might be, just think of people like, oh, I don't know. Bill gates and, uh, w who are on the, some of the other big guys, you know, Tim cook, uh, Amazon's Jeff bayzos Elon Musk, right? Those are by my definition and looking it up in the dictionary, they are all a. They get exemptions to laws. [00:25:58] They get laws passed that, protect them. In fact, most of regulations actually protect these big companies and hurt small companies. So I would call them oligarchs and that's the same sort of thing in Russia in Russia. Okay. They probably have a little bit more underhanded stuff than these guys here do, but that's what Russia has been. [00:26:21] China has been continually going after our national secrets, national defense, the largest database of DNA of Americans DNA, of course, is that unique key. If you will building block for all of us, that's what DNA is. And the largest database of all of that uniquely identifying information is in. China stole from the office of personnel management records of a federal employees, their secret clearance, all of their background check information who was spoken with, what did they have to say? [00:27:03] And on and on. So China has been interested in infiltrating our businesses that provide things to the military and the military themselves and the federal state, and even the local governments that's who they've been targeting. And that's why there's 8% number might seem small. Although, as I just mentioned this year, Russia moved, moved dramatically. [00:27:30] They used to be about 3% of their attacks or against the government agencies. And now it's 53%. So Russia. And China are going after our national secrets and they can use them in a cold war, which as I've said, I think the first shots of the third world war have been fired. And frankly, they're all cyber, it's all online and Russia. [00:27:57] Isn't the only nation state actor who's changing its approaches here as espionage is the most common goal amongst all nation state groups as of this year. Tivity of hackers reveals different motivations in Iran, which quadrupled its targeting of Israel. Surprise, surprise. Over the last year. And Iran has been launching destructive attacks, things that will destroy power, power plants, et cetera, and North Korea, which is targeting cryptocurrency companies for profit. [00:28:29] So they're stealing these various crypto coins again, funding their government. So it's, it's a problem. Absolute problem. Government sectors are some of the most targeted 48%. These NGOs non-government organizations that act kind of a quasi government functions and think tanks are 31%. Uh, and Microsoft, by the way, has been alerting customers of nation, state attack, attack attempts. [00:29:01] Guess how many this year that they had to warn about 20,500 times in the past three years. So that's a lot and Microsoft is not a company that's been out there at the front lines. It never has been it's in behind. So to have them come out and say, this is. And okay, by the way, your stolen username and password run for a buck per thousand, and it's only gonna take you hundreds of hours to get it all cleared up. [00:29:32] Isn't that nice spear fishing for a hire can cost a hundred to a thousand dollars per successful account takeover and denial of service attacks are cheap from protected sites, roughly $300. Per month. And if you want to be ransomware king, it's only going to cost you 66 bucks upfront 30% of the profit. [00:29:54] Okay. Craziness. Hey, visit me online. Sign up Craig, peter.com/subscribe. [00:30:03] I had an interesting mastermind meeting this week. There's six of us. We're all business owners and it opened my eyes pretty dramatically because one of the members got hacked, but that's not what I really want to emphasize. [00:30:20] This whole cybersecurity thing gets pretty complicated, pretty quickly. And a friend of mine who is in one of my mastermind groups had a real problem. And the here's here's what went on. We'll call him Walt for back of a letter, lack of a better name since that is his name. [00:30:40] And he doesn't mind me sharing this with you. Walt has a very small business that he and his wife run, and they have a couple of contractors that help out with some things, but his business is very reliant on advertising and primarily what he does is Facebook advertising. Now I've been talking for two years, I think in this mastermind group about cyber security and the fact that everyone needs good cyber security. [00:31:13] And he always just kind of pole hum to, uh, wow. You know, and it's just too complicated for me. I got to thinking for a, you know, a bit, really a few weeks, what does he mean to complicated? Cause there's some basic things you can do. So this week on Tuesday, I was on our mastermind groups meeting and I explained, okay, so here's what happened to Walt. [00:31:42] He had $40,000 stolen, which by the way, it's a lot of money for a teeny tiny husband wife company. And. Uh, well, here's what we did. He, we helped them. We got the FBI involved and, you know, with our direct ties, cause we work with them on certain types of cases and he got back every dime, which is just totally unheard of. [00:32:06] But um, without going into all of the details there, I spent a problem. 1520 minutes with the whole group and the mastermind explaining the basics of cyber security. And that really kind of woke me up, frankly, because of their responses. Now these are all small business owners and so they're making pretty decent money. [00:32:31] In fact, every one of them and they all have some contractors and some employees all except for Walt and his wife, they had just have contractors and. I had two completely different responses from two members of this group that no. Let me tell you this was really eye opening for me. And this is why you might've heard me in the first segment talking about this, but this is why I have really changed my view of this stuff, this cybersecurity stuff, because I explained. [00:33:08] If you're using things like Norton antivirus or McAfee, antivirus, or really any of them, even the built-in Microsoft defender this year, those standard antivirus system. I have only been able to catch about 30% of the malware out there, 30%, you know, that's like having a house and you've got a security guard posted out front. [00:33:39] He's armed, he's ready to fight. And yet all of your windows are open and all of your doors are unlocked. And all someone has to do is crawl in the side window because that guy that's posted up front, he's not going to be able to stop. So 30% effectiveness. And of course, Walt had all of the basic stuff. [00:33:59] He thought he was good enough. It's not worth spending time or money doing any of this. And of course it turned out to be well worth the time and money if he had done it. But he has a friend who has contacts and, and made things happen for him. So I guess he's kind of, kind of lucky in that regard, but I explained that and I said, do you know the, the way you. [00:34:21] To go. If you're a small business, it's about $997 a month for a small business, with a handful of employees to get the type of security you really need. There's going to catch. 90 something 98%. Maybe if, if things go well of the stuff going on, in other words, you don't just have an armed guard at the front door. [00:34:46] You've got all the windows closed and blocked and the doors closed and locked as well. So yeah, somebody can still get in, but they got to really want to get in and risk getting caught. So that's kind of the analogy that I used now. One of the members of my. Of my mastermind thought, well, okay. Cause you're just being Frank with me. [00:35:09] Right? We're all friends. She said, well, initially I thought, oh Craig, I'm going to have to have you help out with stuff here. Cause my, you know, I'm concerned about my security. I make some good money. Uh, she's the one that has employee. She has a million dollar plus a year business and she wants to keep it safe. [00:35:26] But then she. Uh, you know, but, but you know, you were talking about all of this Norton and stuff and that it doesn't work. So I, I just, I don't have any hope. And that's when the another member jumped in and this other member said, well, Uh, oh, that's not what I got at all. I got the, the normal off the shelf stuff that you buy that you're going to get from Amazon, or you're going to get from PC connection or wherever that stuff is not going to work, but there is stuff that does, but it's only professional stuff. [00:36:02] You can only get it from professionals that are trained in certified. Which is the right message. Right. That was the message I was trying to relay. Yeah. Don't try and do it yourself because you can't even get the right tools that you need. That is frankly a problem. So that really got me to think. In, in a very big way, because here are two people that have heard me talk about cybersecurity and their eyes probably glazed over, but now their eyes, I know at least one of these ladies definitely glazed over. [00:36:36] So I've come to the realization that sometimes I. A little too deep into things. And although I can explain it quite well to many people, sometimes people glaze over and I get emails from you guys saying kind of the same thing. I really appreciate it. I don't understand a lot of what you're saying, Craig, but thanks for being there. [00:36:59] Listen to you every week here on the radio. Uh, then that's good. That's reassuring, but now I've come to realize a few things. One is. The I've got to be a lot clearer in my messaging, because even when talking to my friends, it is a little bit overwhelming for them sometimes. Right. And then the next thing is everybody needs help because you're being lied to. [00:37:29] Right. How are people getting ransomware? If the stuff that they're buying work. Maybe it's just me, but I think there's a disconnect there. So a lot of you guys have gone out and you've hired people and I want to spend just a few minutes right now, going through some red flags that you need to be looking out for in vendor security assessment. [00:37:56] Now I'm putting one together. As well, right yet another one. Uh, and what I'm trying to do is help you out, right? This is not as sales tool. It is trying to help you figure out where you're at. I'm putting together a webinar that I'm going to be holding these what I'm calling bootcamps, where I go through and show you exactly how to do the basic steps that you need to do in order to be safe on. [00:38:25] Okay. If an online, all that means is your, is plugged in, right. Okay. It doesn't mean you're going out and doing a lot of stuff out there on the internet just means it's connected. So those are going to be coming out. I will send an email out as soon as all of that. Stuff's ready. Cause. Absolutely free. And these assessments, I have the basic one that you can do yourself. [00:38:47] It's a self-assessment. And then I have the more advanced ones that I do that are five grand. Okay. So you've got to be a decent sized business for this to make sense where we look for all of the security problem. On all of your computers and your networks, and then give you a list of things you need to do and how to do them. [00:39:10] Okay. So it's well worth it for them, but if you're a very small company and you're trying to do some of this yourself, I want to help you. So that's what these boot camps are going to be all over. And also what the scorecard is going to be all about. So that's coming up, but here are some good red flags and an assessment. [00:39:30] I found this again on dark reading. This is kind of an insider website for those of us in the cybersecurity business, but, um, How can you verify the information that vendors are giving you about their own cybersecurity posture? We've heard in the news and I've talked about them all year, this year, and for years past. [00:39:56] That are we're vendors can be our worst nightmare because some of these hacks come in through our vendors. So you've got yourself, a cybersecurity company. How do you know if they are really telling you the truth? And man, is that hard for you to know? Right. You're going to ask him questions and the salesmen are going to say, oh yeah, yeah, yeah. [00:40:21] That's why we don't have salesmen. Right. We have engineers. You talk to me, you might talk to my son or my daughter, people who have been doing this with me, who I have trained and helped out. So this guy who wrote the article and there's this on attributed, I don't see an attribution on here on this page. [00:40:41] I definitely want to give him, probably I heard is John Babinec wrote this thing and he is a principle threat hunters. What he calls himself over at net and rich. So he says, here's what you got to do. And if you're trying to be cost-effective, he puts it in. What I call an ed month clause. And one of these days I'll tell you that story, but he calls it a validity check question so that an honest vendor would tell you, no, they don't do X and give you a good reason why they don't like it's not cost effective. [00:41:17] It's outside of a reasonable risk model. Does that make sense to you? So when you're trying to evaluate a vendor, who's going to be doing your cyber security put in one of these validity checks put in one of these questions. It doesn't really matter to you, but it's something that would be very hard for one of these cybersecurity companies to do. [00:41:42] And maybe it doesn't fit the risk model that you have. I think it's just absolutely brilliant. Probably one of the better ways when you're trying to evaluate an MSSP as cybersecurity managed or otherwise provider stick in something like that. So you have a red flag that just stands out for you. All right. [00:42:04] Make sure you are registered online. Craig Peter sohn.com/subscribe. So you can find out about all of these trainings coming up. [00:42:17] If you've never heard of the Carrington event, I really hope, frankly, I really, really do hope we never have to live through one of these. Again, there is a warning out there right now about an internet apocalypse that could happen because of the Sun. [00:42:34] Solar storms are something that happens really kind of all of the time. The sun goes through solar cycles. About every seven years, there are longer cycles as well. You might know. I have an advanced class amateur radio license I've had for a long time, and we rely a lot when we're dealing with short wave on the solar cycle. [00:42:59] You see what happens is that the sun charges, the atmosphere. You see that if you've ever seen the Northern light, that is. Part of the Sunzi missions, hitting our magnetic field and kind of getting sucked into the core of the earth, if you will, as they get caught in that field. And the more charged the atmosphere is, the more bounce you get. [00:43:24] That's what we call it bounce. And the reason us hams have all these different frequencies to use is because of the battle. We can go different frequencies with different distances, I should say, using different frequencies. So think about it right now. You've got the earth and I want to talk from Boston to Chicago. [00:43:47] For instance, I know about how many miles it is, and I have to figure out in the ionosphere up in the higher levels of the atmosphere, what frequency. To use in order to go up into the atmosphere, bounce back, and then hit Chicago. That's the idea. It's not quite as simple or as complex in some ways, as it sounds, a lot of people just try different frequencies and a lot of hams just sit there, waiting for anybody anywhere to talk to, particularly if they are. [00:44:20] It's really quite fun. Now what we're worried about, isn't so much just the regular solar activity. We get worried when the sun spots increase. Now, the solar cycle is what has primary image. On the temperature on earth. So no matter what, you might've heard that isn't your gas, guzzling car or a diesel truck that causes the Earth's temperature to change. [00:44:49] Remember the only constant when it comes to the Earth's temperature has been changed over the millions of years. We had periods where the earth was much warmer than it is now had more common that carbon dioxide in the atmosphere than it does now had less. In fact, right now we are at one of the lowest levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere in earth, long, long. [00:45:15] So the sun, if you might remember, comes up in the morning, warms things up, right? And then it cools down. When the sun disappears at nighttime, it has a huge impact. It's almost exclusively the impact for our temperatures. If there's other things too, for instance, eruption can spew all to hold a lot of carbon dioxide. [00:45:40] In fact, just one, just Mount St. Helens wanted erupted, put more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere than man has throughout our entire existence. Just to give you an idea, right? So these alarms that are out there, uh, you know, come on, people. Really, and now we're seeing that in, uh, this last year we had a 30% increase in the ice cap up in the, in, up in the north, up in Northern Canada, around the polls. [00:46:12] Uh, we also had some of these glaciers growing. It was so funny. I saw an article this year, or excuse me, this week that was showing a sign that was at one of our national parks. And it said this glacier will have disappeared by 2020. Of course it hasn't disappeared. In fact, it has grown now and it's past 2020. [00:46:34] Anyhow, the sun has a huge impact on us in so many ways. And one of the ways is. Well, something called a coronal mass ejection. This is seriously charged particles. That tend to be very, very directional. So when, when it happens, when there's one of these CMS coronal, mass ejections, it's not just sending it out all the way around the sun everywhere. [00:47:02] It's really rather concentrated in one. One particular spot. Now we just missed one not too long ago. And let me see if I can find it here. Just mast, a cm E near miss. Here we go. There a solar super storm in July, 2012, and it was a very, very close shave that we had most newspapers didn't mention it, but this could have been. [00:47:33] AB absolutely incredible. We'd be picking up the pieces for the next 50 years. Yeah. Five, zero years from this one particular storm. And what happens is these, these solar flares, if you will, are very, very extreme, they CME. You're talking about x-rays extreme UV, ultraviolet radiation, reaching the earth at the speed of light ionizes, the upper layers of atmosphere. [00:48:02] When that happens, by the way, it hurts our communications, but it can also have these massive effects where it burns out saddle. And then causes radio blackouts, GPS, navigation problems. Think about what happened up in Quebec. So let me just look at this call back, uh, hit with an E and yeah, here we go. And March 13th, 1989. [00:48:33] Here we go. Here's another one. Now I remembered. And this is where Quill back got nailed. I'm looking at a picture here, which is, uh, looking at the United States and Canada from the sky and where the light is. And you can see Quebec is just completely black, but they have this massive electrical blackout and it's becomes. [00:48:57] Of this solar storm. Now they, these storms that I said are quite directional, depending on where it hits and when it hits things can get very, very bad. This particular storm back in 1989 was so strong. We got to see their Rora Borealis, the Northern lights as far south, as Florida and cue. Isn't that something, when we go back further in time to this Carrington event that I mentioned, you could see the Northern lights at the equals. [00:49:35] Absolutely amazing. Now the problem with all of this is we've never really had an internet up online. Like we have today when we had one of the storms hit. And guess what we're about to go into right now, we're going into an area or a time where the sun's going to be more active, certainly on this, this 11 year cycle and possibly another bigger cycle too, that we don't really know much about. [00:50:07] But when this hit us back in the 1850s, what we saw was a, uh, a. Telegraph system that was brought to its knees. Our telegraphs were burned out. Some of the Telegraph buildings were lit. They caught on fire because of the charges coming in, people who were working the telegraphs, who are near them at the time, got electric shocks or worse than that. [00:50:34] Okay. 1859 massive Carrington event compass needles were swinging wildly. The Aurora Borealis was visible in Columbia. It's just amazing. So that was a severe storm. A moderate severity storm was the one that hit in Quebec here, knocked out Quebec, uh, electric. Nine hour blackout on Northeast Canada. What we think would happen if we had another Carrington event, something that happened to 150 years ago is that we would lose power on a massive scale. [00:51:13] So that's one thing that would happen. And these massive transformers that would likely get burned out are only made in China and they're made on demand. Nobody has an inventory. So it would be at least six months before most of the country would get power back. Can you believe that that would be just terrible and we would also lose internet connectivity. [00:51:39] In fact, the thinking that we could lose internet connectivity with something much less than a severe storm, maybe if the Quebec power grid solar, a massive objection here. Maybe if that had happened, when. The internet was up. They might have burned out internet in the area and maybe further. So what we're worried about is if it hits us, we're going to lose power. [00:52:07] We're going to lose transformers on the transmission lines and other places we're going to lose satellites and that's going to affect our GPS communication. We're going to lose radio communication, and even the undersea cables, even though they're now no longer. Regular copper cables. It's now being carried of course, by light in pieces of glass. [00:52:32] The, those cables need to have repeaters about every 15 miles or so under underwater. So the power is provided by. Copper cables or maybe some other sort of power. So these undersea cables, they're only grounded at extensive intervals, like hundreds or thousands of kilometers apart. So there's going to be a lot of vulnerable components. [00:52:59] This is all a major problem. We don't know when the next massive. Solar storm is going to happen. These coronal mass ejections. We do know they do happen from time to time. And we do know it's the luck of the draw and we are starting to enter another solar cycle. So be prepared, everything. Of course, you're listening to Craig Peterson, cybersecurity strategist. [00:53:28] If you'd like to find out more and what you can do, just visit Craig peterson.com and subscribe to my weekly show notes. [00:53:39] Google's got a new admission and Forbes magazine has an article by Zach Dorfman about it. And he's saying you should delete Google Chrome now after Google's newest tracking admission. So here we go. [00:53:55] Google's web browser. Right? It's been the thing for people to use Google Chrome for many years, it's been the fastest. Yeah, not always people kind of leapfrog it every once in a while, but it has become quite a standard. Initially Microsoft is trying to be the standard with their terrible browser and yeah, I to Exploder, which was really, really bad and they have finally completely and totally shot it in the head. [00:54:29] Good move there on their part. In fact, they even got rid of their own browser, Microsoft edge. They shot that one in. They had to, I know I can hear you right now saying, oh, Craig, I don't know. I just use edge browser earlier today. Yeah. But guess what? It isn't edge browser. It's actually Google Chrome. The Microsoft has rebranded. [00:54:52] You see the guts to Google Chrome are available as what's called an open source project. It's called chromium. And that allows you to take it and then build whatever you want on top of. No, that's really great. And by the way, Apple's web kit, Kat is another thing that many people build browsers on top of and is part of many of these browsers we're talking about right now, the biggest problem with the Google Chrome. [00:55:22] Is they released it so they could track you, how does Google make its money? Well, it makes us money through selling advertising primarily. And how does it sell advertising if it doesn't know much or anything about you? So they came out with the Google Chrome browser is kind of a standard browser, which is a great. [00:55:43] Because Microsoft, of course, is very well known for not bothering to follow standards and say what they have is the actual standard and ignoring everybody else. Yeah. Yeah. I'm picking on Microsoft. They definitely deserve it. Well, there is what is being called here in Forbes magazine, a shocking new tracking admission from. [00:56:05] One that has not yet made headlines. And there are about what 2.6 billion users of Google's Chrome worldwide. And this is probably going to surprise you and it's frankly, Pretty nasty and it's, I think a genuine reason to stop using it. Now, as you probably know, I have stopped using Chrome almost entirely. [00:56:31] I use it when I have to train people on Chrome. I use it when I'm testing software. There's a number of times I use it, but I don't use. The reality is the Chrome is an absolute terror. When it comes to privacy and security, it has fallen way behind its rivals in doing that. If you have an iPhone or an iPad or a Mac, and you're using safari, apple has gone a long ways to help secure your. [00:57:09] Well, that's not true with Chrome. In fact, it's not protecting you from tracking and Dave up data harvesting. And what Google has done is they've said, okay, well, we're going to get these nasty third party cookies out of the whole equation. We're not going to do that anymore. And what they were planning on doing is instead of knowing everything specifically. [00:57:34] You they'd be able to put you in a bucket. So they'd say, okay, well you are a 40 year old female and you are like driving fast cars and you have some kids with a grandkid on the way, and you like dogs, not cats, right? So that's a bucket of people that may be a few hundred or maybe up to a thousand. As opposed to right now where they can tell everything about you. [00:58:04] And so they were selling that as a real advantage because they're not tracking you individually anymore. No, we're putting you in a bucket. Well, it's the same thing. Right. And in fact, it's easier for Google to put you in a bucket then to track everything about you and try and make assumptions. And it's easier for people who are trying to buy ads to place in front of you. [00:58:28] It's easier for them to not have to kind of reverse engineer all of the data the Google has gathered in instead of. To send this ad to people that are in this bucket and then that bucket. Okay. It makes sense to you, but I, as it turns out here, Google has even postponed of that. All right. They really have, they're the Google's kind of hiding. [00:58:54] It's really what's going on out there. Uh, they are trying to figure out what they should do, why they should do it, how they should do it, but it's, it's going to be a problem. This is a bad habit. The Google has to break and just like any, anybody that's been addicted to something it's going to take a long time. [00:59:16] They're going to go through some serious jitters. So Firefox is one of the alternatives and to Google Chrome. And it's actually a very good one. It is a browser that I use. I don't agree with some of the stuff that Mozilla and Firefox does, but again, right. Nobody agrees on everything. Here's a quote from them. [00:59:38] Ubiquitous surveillance harms individually. And society Chrome is the only major browser that does not offer meaningful protection against cross cross site tracking and Chrome will continue to leave users unprotected. And then it goes on here because. Uh, Google response to that. And they admit that this massive web tracking out of hand and it's resulted in, this is a quote from Google and erosion of trust, where 72% of people feel that almost all of what they do online is being. [01:00:19] By advertisers, technology firms or others, 81% say the potential risks from data collection outweigh the benefit by the way, the people are wrong. 72% that feel almost all of what they do on online is being tracked. No, no. The answer is 100% of what you do is probably being tracked in some way online. [01:00:41] Even these VPN servers and systems that say that they don't do log. Do track you take a look at proton mail just last week. Proton mail it's in Switzerland. Their servers are in Switzerland. A whole claim to fame is, Hey, it's all encrypted. We keep it safe. We don't do logging. We don't do tracking, uh, guess what they handed over the IP addresses of some of the users to a foreign government. [01:01:10] So how can you do that? If you're not logging, if you're not tracking. Yeah, right. They are. And the same thing is true for every paid VPN service I can think of. Right. So how can Google openly admit that their tracking is in place tracking everything they can, and also admit that it's undermining our privacy and. [01:01:38] Their flagship browser is totally into it. Right? Well, it's really, it's gotta be the money. And Google does not have a plan B this anonymized tracking thing that they've been talking about, you know, the buckets that I mentioned, isn't realistic, frankly. Uh, Google's privacy sandbox is supposed to Fitbit fix it. [01:02:00] I should say. The, the whole idea and the way it's being implemented and the way they've talked about it, the advertisers on happy. So Google's not happy. The users are unhappy. So there you go. That's the bottom line here from the Forbes article by Zach Dorfman, delete Google Chrome. And I said that for a long time, I do use some others. [01:02:27] I do use Firefox and I use. Which is a fast web browser, that some pretty good shape. Hey, if you sign up for my show's weekly newsletter, not only will you get all of my weekly tips that I send to the radio hosts, but you will get some of my special reports that go into detail on things like which browser you shouldn't be using. [01:02:52] Sign up right now. Craig peterson.com. [01:02:57] Many businesses have gone to the cloud, but the cloud is just another word for someone else's computer. And many of the benefits of the cloud just haven't materialized. A lot of businesses have pulled back and are building data centers again. [01:03:14] The reason I mentioned this thing about Microsoft again, and the cloud is Microsoft has a cloud offering. [01:03:23] It's called Microsoft Azure. Many people, many businesses use it. We have used it with some of our clients in the past. Now we have some special software that sits in front of it that helps to secure. And we do the same thing for Amazon web services. I think it's important to do that. And we also use IBM's cloud services, but Microsoft is been pitching for a long time. [01:03:51] Come use our cloud services and we're expecting here probably within the next month, a big announcement from Microsoft. They're planning on making it so that you can have your desktop reside in Microsoft's cloud, in the Azure cloud. And they're selling really the feature of it doesn't matter where you are. [01:04:17] You have your desktop and it doesn't matter what kind of computer you're on. As long as you can connect to your desktop, using some just reasonable software, you will be able to be just like you're in front of a computer. So if you have a Chromebook or a Mac, Or a windows or tablet, whatever, and you're at the grocery store or the coffee shop or the office, you'll be able to get it, everything, all of your programs, all your files. [01:04:47] And we, Microsoft will keep the operating system up to date for you automatically a lot of great selling points. And we're actually looking into that. Not too heavily yet. We'll give them a year before we really delve into it at all. Cause it takes them a while to get things right. And Microsoft has always been one that adds all kinds of features, but most of the time, most of them don't work and we can, we can document that pretty easily, even in things like Microsoft. [01:05:18] Well, the verge is now reporting that Microsoft has warned users of its as your cloud computing service, that their data has been exposed online for the last two years. Yeah, let me repeat that in case you missed it, you, uh, yeah. I'm I'm I might've misspoken. Right. Uh, let me see, what does it say? It says, um, users of Azure cloud competing service. [01:05:48] So that's their cloud. Microsoft's big cloud. Okay. Um, their data has been. Exposed online. Okay. So that means that people could get the data, maybe manipulate the data that sort of exposed means for the last two years. Are you kidding me? Microsoft is again, the verge. Microsoft recently revealed that an error in its Azure cosmos database product left more than 3,300 as your customers data. [01:06:24] Completely exposed. Okay guys. So this, this, this is not a big thing, right? It can't possibly be big thing because you know who uses Azure, right. Nobody uses a zer and nobody uses hosted databases. Come on, give me a break. Let me see, what else does this have to say? Oh, okay. It says that the vulnerability was reported, reportedly introduced into Microsoft systems in 2019, when the company added a data visualization feature called Jupiter notebook to cosmos DB. [01:06:59] Okay. Well, I'm actually familiar with that one and let's see what small companies let's see here. Um, some Azure cosmos DB clients include Coca Cola. Liberty mutual insurance, Exxon mobile Walgreens. Hmm. Let me see. Could any of these people like maybe, maybe Liberty mutual insurance and Walgreens, maybe they'd have information about us, right. [01:07:26] About our health and social security numbers and account numbers and credit cards. Names addresses. Right, right. That's again, why I got so upset when these places absolutely insist on taking my social security number, right? It, it, first of all, when it was put in place, the federal government guaranteed, it would never be used for anything other than social security. [01:07:53] And the law even said it could not be used for anything other than social security. And then the government started expanding it. Right. And the IRS started using it. To track all of our income and you know, that's one thing right there, the government computers, they gotta be secure. Right. All of these breaches we hear about that. [01:08:12] Can't be true. Uh, so how about when the insurance company wants your personal information? Like your social security number? What business is it of? There's really no. Why do they have to have my social security number? It's a social security number. It's not some number that's tattooed on my forehead. [01:08:36] That's being used to track me. Is it this isn't a socialist country like China is, or the Soviet union was right. It's not socially. So why are they tracking us like that? Walgreens? Why do they need some of that information? Why does the doctor that you go to that made the prescription for Walgreens? Why do they need that information? [01:09:00] And I've been all over this because they don't. Really need it. They want, it makes their life easier, but they don't really need it. However, it exposes us. Now, if you missed the email, I sent out a week ago, two weeks ago now, I guess. You missed something big because I, in my weekly newsletter went through and described exactly what you could do in order to keep your information private. [01:09:35] So in those cases where websites asking for information that they don't really need, right? You don't want to lie, but if they don't really need your real name, why you're giving them your real name? Why do you use a single email address? Why don't you have multiple addresses? Does that start make sense to you guys? [01:09:54] And now we find out that Microsoft Azure, their cloud services, where they're selling cloud services, including a database that can be used online, a big database, uh, 3,300 customers looks like some of them are actually kind of big. I don't know. ExxonMobil pretty big. Yeah. I think so. Walgreens, you think that that might be yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. [01:10:22] Y. Why are we trusting these companies? You know it, if you have a lot of data, a lot of customers, you are going to be a major target of nation states to hack you and bat just general hackers, bad guys. But you're also, if, if you've got all this information, you've also got to have a much higher level of security than somebody that doesn't have all of that information. [01:10:52] Does that make sense too? Did I say that right? You don't need the information and, and I've got to warn anybody that's in a business, whether you're a business owner or you're an employee, do not keep more data than you need the new absolutely need to run your company. And that includes data about your customers. [01:11:16] And maybe, maybe it's even more specifically data about your customer. Because what can happen is that data can be stolen and we just found. That? Yes, indeed. It could have been, it was exposed Microsoft the same. We don't know how much it was stolen. If anything was stolen. Um, yeah, Walgreens. Hey, I wonder if anyone's going to try and get some pain pills illegally through, uh, this database hack or a vulnerability anyways. [01:11:47] All right, everyone. Stick around. We'll be back. Of course, you listening to Craig Peterson. I am a cybersecurity strategist for business, and I'm here to help you as well. You can ask any question any time, uh, consumers are the people I help the most, you know, I wish I got a dime for every time I answered a question. [01:12:09] Just email me@craigpeterson.com me@craigpeterson.com and stick around. [01:12:18] Whether or not, you agree with the lockdown orders that were put in place over this COVID pandemic that we had. Uh, there are some other parts of the world that are doing a lot more. [01:12:34] Australia has, I don't know. I think that they went over the deep end. The much, the same thing is true right next door to them. [01:12:45] And I am looking at a report of what they are doing with this new app. Uh, you might be aware that both apple and Google came out with an application programming interface. That could be used for contract tack tracking, contact tracking. There you go. Uh, it wasn't terribly successful. Some states put some things in place. [01:13:13] Of course you get countries like China. I love the idea because heaven forbid you get people getting together to talk about a Tannen square remembrance. Now you want to know who all of those people were, who were in close proximity, right? So, you know, good for China a while, as it turns out, Australia is putting something in place they have yet another COVID lockdown. [01:13:39] They have COVID quarantine orders. Now I think if you are sick, you should stay on. I've always felt that I, you know, I had 50 employees at one point and I would say, Hey, if you're sick, just stay home. Never required a doctor's note or any of that other silliness, come on. People. If someone's sick, they're sick and let them stay home. [01:14:04] You don't want to get everybody else in the office, sick and spread things around. Right. Doesn't that just kind of make sense. Well, they now in Australia, don't trust people to stay home, to get moving. Remember China, they were, they were taking welders and we're going into apartments in anybody that tested positive. [01:14:22] They were welding them into their apartment for minimum of two weeks. And so hopefully they had food in there and they had a way to get fresh water. Australia is not going quite that far, but some of the states down under. Using facial recognition and geolocation in order to enforce quarantine orders and Canada. [01:14:47] One of the things they've been doing for very long time is if you come into the country from out of the country, even if you're a Canadian citizen, you have to quarantine and they'll send people by your house or you have to pay to stay for 10 days in a quarantine hope. So you're paying the course now inflated prices for the hotel, because they're a special quarantine hotel. [01:15:14] You have to pay inflated prices to have food delivered outside your door. And that you're stuck there for the 10 days, or if you're at home though, they, you know, you're stuck there and they'll send people by to check up on you. They'll make phone calls to check up on you and. They have pretty hefty find. [01:15:36] Well, what Australia has decided to do is in Australia is Charlene's even going from one state to another state are required to prove that they're obeying a 14 day quarantine. And what they have to do is have this little app on their phone and they, the app will ping them saying, prove it. And then they have to take a photo of themselves with geo location tag on it and send it up via the app to prove their location. [01:16:15] And they have to do all of that within 15 minutes of getting the notification. Now the premier of the state of south Australia, Steven Marshall said we don't tell them how often or when on a random basis, they have to reply within 15 minutes. And if you don't then a police, officer's going to show up at the address you're supposed to be at to conduct an in-person check. [01:16:43] Very very intrusive. Okay. Here's another one. This is a, an unnamed government spokesperson who was apparently speaking with Fox news quote. The home quarantine app is for a selected cohort of returning self Australians who have applied to be part of a trial. If successful, it will help safely ease the burden of travel restrictions associated with the pandemic. [01:17:10] So there you go. People nothing to worry about. It's just a trial. Uh, it will go away. Uh, just like, uh, for instance, income tax, as soon as rule, number one is over, it will be removed and it will never be more than 3% and it will only apply to the top 1% of wage-earners. So there you go. Right. And we all know that world war one isn't over yet. [01:17:34] Right. So that's why they still have it in somehow. Yeah, some of the middle class pays the most income tax. I don't know. Interesting. Interesting. So there you go. Little news from down under, we'll see if that ends up happening up here. News from China, China has, uh, China and Russia have some interesting things going on. [01:17:55] First of all, Russia is no longer saw. Country, they kind of are. They kind of aren't, they are a lot freer in many ways than we are here in the United States. Of course, China, very heavily socialist. In fact, they're so socialists, they are communist and China. And Russia both want their kids to have a very good education in science, engineering, and mathematics. [01:18:23] Not so much on history, not so much on, on politics. Right. But definitely heavy on the, on the sciences, which I can see that makes all the sense. I think everybody should be pretty heavily on the science. Well, according to the wall street journal this week, gamers under the age of 18 will not be allowed to play online games between 8:00 PM and 9:00 PM on Friday, Saturdays and Sundays. [01:1

Mad at the Internet
Soviet Janny Republik

Mad at the Internet

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 110:36


A trip to the Pridnestrovia, a call with Pamela Swain, the 4.55 million dollar question, a letter from Jesús Christine, and Peetz becomes the GF.

VIA VHS Podcast
License to Kill - Rewind Review

VIA VHS Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 78:43


As the Cold War wanes and the Soviet villain is becoming passe, James Bond finds a new foe in America's other ongoing war with drugs. This is an odd Bond film but perhaps one of the best. Unfortunately, an absolutely stacked box office and a new geopolitical era on the horizon caused this Bond film to be lost in the shuffle, calling into question the future of the franchise as a whole. In this episode of VIA VHS Rewind Review, Wes and Spencer revisit Timothy Dalton's last outing in his all to brief run as Bond, License to Kill.

Mystery Wire with George Knapp
Skinwalkers at the Pentagon - A conversation between authors Dr. James Lacatski, Dr. Colm Kelleher, and George Knapp

Mystery Wire with George Knapp

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 17:18


Skinwalkers at the Pentagon unmasks the massive scope of the Pentagon's landmark UFO study that ran from the Defense Intelligence Agency in Washington, D.C. The Advanced Aerospace Weapon System Applications Program, or AAWSAP investigated the “Tic Tac” and other “nuts and bolts” UFO events, analyzed intrusions of UFOs onto US military bases, as well as probed the plethora of bizarre phenomena that government investigators encountered on Skinwalker Ranch.Written by two program insiders and a respected journalist, Skinwalkers at the Pentagon comes to a conclusion that has never before been revealed!Encountering UFOs often led to the “attachment” of strange phenomena to military personnel who visited the Ranch and brought “something” home to their families, resulting in frightening eruptions of paranormal events in their households that terrorized and sometimes injured their children.By the end of the two-year program, more than 100 separate technical reports, some of which ran to hundreds of pages, were delivered to the Defense Intelligence Agency. Among them was a 149-page report on the Soviet (and now Russian) UAP investigation/analysis capability. Another details the design and build of a functional prototype for an autonomous Unidentified Aerial Phenomena surveillance platform.

New Books in Jewish Studies
Eliyana R. Adler, "Survival on the Margins: Polish Jewish Refugees in the Wartime Soviet Union" (Harvard UP, 2020)

New Books in Jewish Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 63:34


Between 1940 and 1946, thousands of Jewish refugees from Poland lived and toiled in the harsh Soviet interior. They endured hard labor, bitter cold, and extreme deprivation. But out of reach of the Nazis, they escaped the fate of millions of their coreligionists in the Holocaust. In Survival on the Margins: Polish Jewish Refugees in the Wartime Soviet Union (Harvard University Press, 2020), Eliyana Adler provides the first comprehensive account in English of their experiences. Eliyana Adler is Associate Professor of History and Jewish Studies at Pennsylvania State University. Schneur Zalman Newfield is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Borough of Manhattan Community College, City University of New York, and the author of Degrees of Separation: Identity Formation While Leaving Ultra-Orthodox Judaism (Temple University Press, 2020). Visit him online at ZalmanNewfield.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/jewish-studies

New Books Network
Eliyana R. Adler, "Survival on the Margins: Polish Jewish Refugees in the Wartime Soviet Union" (Harvard UP, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 63:34


Between 1940 and 1946, thousands of Jewish refugees from Poland lived and toiled in the harsh Soviet interior. They endured hard labor, bitter cold, and extreme deprivation. But out of reach of the Nazis, they escaped the fate of millions of their coreligionists in the Holocaust. In Survival on the Margins: Polish Jewish Refugees in the Wartime Soviet Union (Harvard University Press, 2020), Eliyana Adler provides the first comprehensive account in English of their experiences. Eliyana Adler is Associate Professor of History and Jewish Studies at Pennsylvania State University. Schneur Zalman Newfield is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Borough of Manhattan Community College, City University of New York, and the author of Degrees of Separation: Identity Formation While Leaving Ultra-Orthodox Judaism (Temple University Press, 2020). Visit him online at ZalmanNewfield.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in History
Eliyana R. Adler, "Survival on the Margins: Polish Jewish Refugees in the Wartime Soviet Union" (Harvard UP, 2020)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 63:34


Between 1940 and 1946, thousands of Jewish refugees from Poland lived and toiled in the harsh Soviet interior. They endured hard labor, bitter cold, and extreme deprivation. But out of reach of the Nazis, they escaped the fate of millions of their coreligionists in the Holocaust. In Survival on the Margins: Polish Jewish Refugees in the Wartime Soviet Union (Harvard University Press, 2020), Eliyana Adler provides the first comprehensive account in English of their experiences. Eliyana Adler is Associate Professor of History and Jewish Studies at Pennsylvania State University. Schneur Zalman Newfield is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Borough of Manhattan Community College, City University of New York, and the author of Degrees of Separation: Identity Formation While Leaving Ultra-Orthodox Judaism (Temple University Press, 2020). Visit him online at ZalmanNewfield.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

Nature Podcast
How electric acupuncture zaps inflammation in mice

Nature Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 25:37


The neurons behind acupuncture's effect on inflammation, and how antibiotics affect gut bacteria.In this episode:00:54 The neuronal basis for acupuncture's effect on inflammationIn mice, electroacupuncture has been shown to reduce inflammation, but only when certain points on the body are stimulated. Why this is has puzzled scientists, but now, researchers have identified the specific neurons that are involved. They hope that this knowledge could be used in future to help treat certain inflammatory-related diseases.Research article: Liu et al.News and Views: Electroacupuncture activates neurons to switch off inflammation07:28 Research HighlightsThe Aztec origins of an obsidian ‘spirit mirror', and the damage done by a Soviet plutonium complex.Research Highlight: A ‘spirit mirror' used in Elizabeth I's court had Aztec rootsResearch Highlight: Cold-war spy pictures reveal a Soviet nuclear ‘cloud generator'10:18 Assessing antibiotics' collateral damage.Antibiotics are known to cause damage to the communities of bacteria that live in our guts. To better understand why this happens, a team has mapped the effects that different antibiotics have on individual gut-bacteria species, which may offer new insights into preventing this collateral damage.Research article: Maier et al.17:32 Briefing ChatWe discuss some highlights from the Nature Briefing. This time, the latest species to be declared extinct in the US, and a potential planet that orbits three stars.New York Times: Protected Too Late: U.S. Officials Report More Than 20 ExtinctionsNew York Times: This May Be the First Planet Found Orbiting 3 Stars at OnceSubscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Ongoing History of New Music
The Unsung Heroes of Music: Part 1

Ongoing History of New Music

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 27:41


Not everyone who managed to change the world is famous…it is possible to do something absolutely, monumentally world-shaking and not receive any recognition for it… I'll give you a name: Vasyli Arkipov…it's possible that this guy is the only reason any of us are still alive…seriously… October 27, 1962…it's the height of the Cuban missile crisis…the soviets had nukes in Cuba aimed at the u.s. and more were on the way…John Kennedy responded by setting up a blockade around the island… The USS Randolph was one of the ships in charge of enforcing the blockade…they spotted a Soviet sub that was sent to protect the flotilla of Russian ships approaching the island with more missiles on board…this one particular sub—a Foxtrot class b-59—was armed with nuclear missiles…Arkhipov was the second in command… The Randolph began dropping depth charges in an effort to get the sub to surface…b-59 suffered damage…the crew couldn't breathe…they wanted to fight back…the sub commander tried to raise soviet command for permission to fire—but he couldn't reach them… Because they'd been cruising submerged for days, they hadn't heard anything from Soviet high command…but they had been monitoring American civil broadcasts which offered non-stop coverage of the crisis…and now they were under attack…maybe the war had finally begun…if that was the case, shouldn't they launch their missiles?... Captain Valentín Savitsky was in favour of an attack…so was political officer Ivan Maslennikov…but in order to launch the nukes, Stavisky and Maslennikov also needed agreement from Arkhipov…“what do you say, Vasyli?...do we engage the Americans with our special weapon?”… Vasyli took a breath and replied “nyet…we do not fire…we have no proof that we are at war…what if we're wrong?...if we launch, we risk starting an all-our nuclear war and  wipe out all life on the planet”… The commander wasn't happy with that, but rules were rules and he ordered that the crew stand down…no nuke would be fired that day…and when the sub did surface, it was confirmed that hostilities had not broken out…this is why Vasyli Arkipov is widely regarded as the man who single-handedly prevented a global nuclear war on October 27, 1962…yet how many people know his name?... Now let's take a big pivot into music…what kind of unsung heroes might we find there?... See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Jacobin Radio
Dig: Afghanistan with Tariq Ali

Jacobin Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 115:41


Legendary socialist scholar Tariq Ali on the long history of Afghanistan: the 19th and early 20th-century wars against the British Empire; the communist coup, Soviet invasion, and US-backed mujahideen war; the rise of the Taliban; and the 2001 US-led NATO invasion through the recent US defeat and withdrawal. Plus, a lot about Pakistan. Pre-order Ali's forthcoming book The Forty-Year War in Afghanistan: A Chronicle Foretold versobooks.com/books/3939-the-forty-year-war-in-afghanistanSupport this podcast at Patreon.com/TheDig and receive our weekly newsletter

The Dig
Afghanistan with Tariq Ali

The Dig

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021


Legendary socialist scholar Tariq Ali on the long history of Afghanistan: the 19th and early 20th-century wars against the British Empire; the communist coup, Soviet invasion, and US-backed mujahideen war; the rise of the Taliban; and the 2001 US-led NATO invasion through the recent US defeat and withdrawal. Plus, a lot about Pakistan. Pre-order Ali's forthcoming book The Forty-Year War in Afghanistan: A Chronicle Foretold versobooks.com/books/3939-the-forty-year-war-in-afghanistan Support this podcast at Patreon.com/TheDig and receive our weekly newsletter

Into the Impossible
Chris Hadfield: The Apollo MURDERS!

Into the Impossible

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 57:07


In 1973: a final, top-secret mission was planned to go to the Moon. Three astronauts in a tiny spaceship, a quarter-million miles from home. A quarter-million miles from help. NASA is about to launch Apollo 18. While the mission has been billed as a scientific one, flight controller Kazimieras "Kaz" Zemeckis knows there is a darker objective. Intelligence has discovered a secret Soviet space station spying on America, and Apollo 18 may be the only chance to stop it But even as Kaz races to keep the NASA crew one step ahead of their Russian rivals, a deadly accident reveals that not everyone involved is quite who they were thought to be. With political stakes stretched to the breaking point, the White House and the Kremlin can only watch as their astronauts collide on the lunar surface, far beyond the reach of law or rescue. The Apollo Murders is a high-stakes thriller unlike any other. Chris Hadfield captures the fierce G-forces of launch, the frozen loneliness of space, and the fear of holding on to the outside of a spacecraft orbiting the Earth at 17,000 miles per hour as only someone who has experienced all of these things in real life can. We also discussed touring with David Bowie's band, the time he met Sir Arthur C. Clarke, his dream aviation 'hangar', and even aliens! I found him incredibly vulnerable, authentic, and honest. His thoughts on how best to lead life… and grapple with death plus his one regret in life. "An exceptional debut thriller and “exciting journey” into the dark heart of the Cold War and the space race from New York Times bestselling author and astronaut Chris Hadfield" (Andy Weir, author of The Martian and Project Hail Mary), past guest: https://youtu.be/JuoDANMASLc “Nail-biting . . . I couldn't put it down.” —James Cameron, writer and director of Avatar and Titanic “Not to be missed.” —Frederick Forsyth, author of The Day of the Jackal “An explosive thriller by a writer who has actually been to space . . . Strap in for the ride!” —Gregg Hurwitz, author of Orphan X Get the Apollo Murders here: https://amzn.to/3aCJLn7 LinkedIn Jobs is the best platform for finding the right candidate to join your business this fall. It's the largest marketplace for job seekers in the world, and it has great search features so that you can find candidates with any hard or soft skills that you need. And now, you can post a job for free. Just visit linkedin.com/impossible to post a job for free.  Audible is hands-down my favorite platform for consuming podcasts, fiction and nonfiction books! With an Audible membership, you can download titles and listen offline, anytime, anywhere. The Audible app is free and can be installed on all smartphones and tablets. You can listen across devices without losing your spot. Audible members don't have to worry about using their credits right away. You can keep your credits for up to a year—and use them to binge on a whole series if you'd like! And if you're not loving your selection, you can simply swap it for another.Start your free 30-day trial today:  Audible.com/impossible or text “impossible” to 500-500

New Books in Jewish Studies
John-Paul Himka, "Ukrainian Nationalists and the Holocaust: OUN and UPA's Participation in the Destruction of Ukrainian Jewry, 1941-1944" (Ibidem Press, 2021)

New Books in Jewish Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 60:39


One quarter of all Holocaust victims lived on the territory that now forms Ukraine, yet the Holocaust there has not received due attention. John-Paul Himka's Ukrainian Nationalists and the Holocaust: OUN and UPA's Participation in the Destruction of Ukrainian Jewry, 1941-1944 (Ibidem Press, 2021) delineates the participation of the Organization of Ukrainian Nationalists (OUN) and its armed force, the Ukrainian Insurgent Army (Ukrainska povstanska armiia--UPA), in the destruction of the Jewish population of Ukraine under German occupation in 1941-44. The extent of OUN's and UPA's culpability in the Holocaust has been a controversial issue in Ukraine and within the Ukrainian diaspora as well as in Jewish communities and Israel. Occasionally, the controversy has broken into the press of North America, the EU, and Israel. Triangulating sources from Jewish survivors, Soviet investigations, German documentation, documents produced by OUN itself, and memoirs of OUN activists, it has been possible to establish that: OUN militias were key actors in the anti-Jewish violence of summer 1941; OUN recruited for and infiltrated police formations that provided indispensable manpower for the Germans' mobile killing units; and in 1943, thousands of these policemen deserted from German service to join the OUN-led nationalist insurgency, during which UPA killed Jews who had managed to survive the major liquidations of 1942. Steven Seegel is Professor of Slavic and Eurasian Studies at The University of Texas at Austin. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/jewish-studies

New Books in History
John-Paul Himka, "Ukrainian Nationalists and the Holocaust: OUN and UPA's Participation in the Destruction of Ukrainian Jewry, 1941-1944" (Ibidem Press, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 60:39


One quarter of all Holocaust victims lived on the territory that now forms Ukraine, yet the Holocaust there has not received due attention. John-Paul Himka's Ukrainian Nationalists and the Holocaust: OUN and UPA's Participation in the Destruction of Ukrainian Jewry, 1941-1944 (Ibidem Press, 2021) delineates the participation of the Organization of Ukrainian Nationalists (OUN) and its armed force, the Ukrainian Insurgent Army (Ukrainska povstanska armiia--UPA), in the destruction of the Jewish population of Ukraine under German occupation in 1941-44. The extent of OUN's and UPA's culpability in the Holocaust has been a controversial issue in Ukraine and within the Ukrainian diaspora as well as in Jewish communities and Israel. Occasionally, the controversy has broken into the press of North America, the EU, and Israel. Triangulating sources from Jewish survivors, Soviet investigations, German documentation, documents produced by OUN itself, and memoirs of OUN activists, it has been possible to establish that: OUN militias were key actors in the anti-Jewish violence of summer 1941; OUN recruited for and infiltrated police formations that provided indispensable manpower for the Germans' mobile killing units; and in 1943, thousands of these policemen deserted from German service to join the OUN-led nationalist insurgency, during which UPA killed Jews who had managed to survive the major liquidations of 1942. Steven Seegel is Professor of Slavic and Eurasian Studies at The University of Texas at Austin. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books Network
John-Paul Himka, "Ukrainian Nationalists and the Holocaust: OUN and UPA's Participation in the Destruction of Ukrainian Jewry, 1941-1944" (Ibidem Press, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 60:39


One quarter of all Holocaust victims lived on the territory that now forms Ukraine, yet the Holocaust there has not received due attention. John-Paul Himka's Ukrainian Nationalists and the Holocaust: OUN and UPA's Participation in the Destruction of Ukrainian Jewry, 1941-1944 (Ibidem Press, 2021) delineates the participation of the Organization of Ukrainian Nationalists (OUN) and its armed force, the Ukrainian Insurgent Army (Ukrainska povstanska armiia--UPA), in the destruction of the Jewish population of Ukraine under German occupation in 1941-44. The extent of OUN's and UPA's culpability in the Holocaust has been a controversial issue in Ukraine and within the Ukrainian diaspora as well as in Jewish communities and Israel. Occasionally, the controversy has broken into the press of North America, the EU, and Israel. Triangulating sources from Jewish survivors, Soviet investigations, German documentation, documents produced by OUN itself, and memoirs of OUN activists, it has been possible to establish that: OUN militias were key actors in the anti-Jewish violence of summer 1941; OUN recruited for and infiltrated police formations that provided indispensable manpower for the Germans' mobile killing units; and in 1943, thousands of these policemen deserted from German service to join the OUN-led nationalist insurgency, during which UPA killed Jews who had managed to survive the major liquidations of 1942. Steven Seegel is Professor of Slavic and Eurasian Studies at The University of Texas at Austin. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Aufhebunga Bunga
OK BUNGER! The Problem of Generations, pt. 4

Aufhebunga Bunga

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 70:19


The fourth in a special five-part series on generational consciousness and conflict.   In this episode, we examine Generation X – the generation of the End of History. How was this generation overshadowed by the Boomer's failures? In the Eastern Bloc, the fall of Soviet regimes was a traumatic moment – how did this shape consciousness? And how did the Iranian Revolution – and subsequent war – shape the political perspectives of Iranians?   Guests include: Maren Thom, film scholar Alexei Yurchak, professor of anthropology at Berkeley  Jennie Bristow, senior lecturer in sociology at Canterbury Christ Church University Josh Glenn, semiotician, author, and publisher of HiLoBrow Arash Azizi, historian of Iran at New York University Felix Krawatzek, political scientist at the Centre for East European and International Studies in Berlin Original music by: Jonny Mundey   Additional music: Kit Kruger / Freakin' Freefall / courtesy of epidemicsound.com  

New Left Radio
In the Shadow of American Empire- Interview w/ David Klion

New Left Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 61:53


Fan of the show? https://www.patreon.com/newleftradio (Support us on Patreon)! We're joined by the Brooklyn Bad Boy himself, journalist David Klion for a wide ranging conversation on his path to left politics from his childhood in the Washington, DC suburbs, Israel/Palestine and the cognitive dissonance of Liberal Zionism, left foreign policy in a technocratic system, and American Empire with Canada in its shadow. Links https://jewishcurrents.org/ (Jewish Currents) https://jewishcurrents.org/category/from-the-newsletter (Jewish Currents Newsletter) https://muckrack.com/david-klion (Articles by David) https://twitter.com/davidklion?s=21 (Follow David on Twitter) About David Klion David Klion is an editor at Jewish Currents and has written for The Nation, The New York Times, The New Republic, and other publications. He has a master's degree in Soviet history from the University of Chicago and has lived and worked in Russia. About Jewish Currents As an award-winning magazine of politics, culture, and ideas, Jewish Currents publish quarterly in print and daily online. Currents has received acclaim for it's in-depth reporting, trenchant analysis, and rigorous cultural criticism, and for it's attention to literary quality and style.  Issues Jewish Currents covers include the uses and misuses of antisemitism, the inner workings of Jewish communal organizations, Israel/Palestine politics on the ground and internationally, race and racialization, strategies and horizons of American left movements, the global rise of the far right, diasporic cultural expression, labor, climate, incarceration, immigration, and feminism. Since relaunching in 2018 with an all-new staff and design, the magazine has quickly established itself as an essential voice in the contemporary conversation. Stay connected with the latest from New Left Radio by https://newleft.us6.list-manage.com/subscribe?u=8227a4372fe8dc22bdbf0e3db&id=e99d6c70b4 (joining our mailing list) today! _________ Support this podcast

The John Batchelor Show
1756: The nuclear arms race slips back into the shadows. Peter Huessy. @GordonGChang, Gatestone, Newsweek, The Hill

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 12:25


Photo:  "He's driving me nuts - I'm on the verge of blowing my top" Ed. Valtman '62 (Herblock) Editorial cartoon drawing shows two hairy, muscular, anthropomorphic atomic bombs labeled "U.S. A-Tests" and "Soviet Intransigence" sitting at a table on which is a ringing alarm clock and a paper waiting to be signed that is labeled "A-Test Inspection Treaty." The U.S. atomic bomb is about to blow his top waiting for the Soviet atomic bomb to sign the treaty; the Soviet Union refused to accept on-site inspections of its nuclear weapons program, which caused a delay in the signing of a nuclear test-ban treaty. The nuclear arms race slips back into the shadows.  Peter Huessy. @GordonGChang, Gatestone, Newsweek, The Hill https://www.usnews.com/news/national-news/articles/2021-10-06/us-state-department-discloses-number-of-nuclear-weapons-in-stockpile Peter Huessy, director of Strategic Deterrent Studies of the Mitchell Institute of the Air Force Association.

THIS IS REVOLUTION >podcast
THIS IS REVOLUTION>podcast Ep. 194: The Bossless World of Participatory Economics w/ Michael Albert

THIS IS REVOLUTION >podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 83:28


Perhaps one of the greatest paradoxes of the modern era is that, while capitalism is in perpetual crisis, there seems to be no alternative. Once upon a time, Soviet style central planning at least attempted to present an alternative paradigm. However, with the USSR gone and China embracing its own brand of state-led capitalist development, the prospects of a post-capitalist mode of economic organization appear more distant than ever. As discontent grows, both liberals and conservatives scramble for answers within the existing frameworks to questions of economic inequality, social alienation, and environmental crisis. But are there alternatives? Is it possible to organize the economy differently? And is it possible to have a world without bosses?   Michael Albert: Michael Albert (born April 8, 1947) is an American economist, speaker, writer, and political critic. Since the late 1970s, he has published books, articles, and other contributions on a wide array of subjects. He has also set up his own media outfits, magazines, and podcasts. He is known for helping to develop the socioeconomic theory of participatory economics.   Listen to Michael on his Revolution Z podcast here: https://zcomm.org/revolutionz/     Thank you, guys, again for taking the time to check this out. We appreciate each and every one of you. If you have the means, and you feel so inclined, BECOME A PATRON! We're creating patron only programing, you'll get bonus content from many of the episodes, and you get MERCH!   Become a patron now https://www.patreon.com/join/BitterLakePresents?   Please also like, subscribe, and follow us on these platforms as well, (specially YouTube!)   THANKS Y'ALL   YouTube: www.youtube.com/thisisrevolutionpodcast   Twitch: www.twitch.tv/thisisrevolutionpodcast www.twitch.tv/leftflankvets   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Thisisrevolutionpodcast/   Twitter: @TIRShowOakland Instagram: @thisisrevolutionoakland   The Dispatch on Zero Books (video essay series): https://youtu.be/nSTpCvIoRgw   Medium: https://jasonmyles.medium.com/i-was-a-teenage-anarchist...   Pascal Robert's Black Agenda Report: https://www.blackagendareport.com/author/PascalRobert   Get THIS IS REVOLUTION Merch here: www.thisisrevolutionpodcast.com   Get the music from the show here: https://bitterlakeoakland.bandcamp.com/.../coronavirus...

Dollar & Sense
Industrial decline and the rise of populists in Russia, the U.S., and Britain

Dollar & Sense

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 27:59


Brookings senior fellow Fiona Hill, a leading expert on Russia and Vladimir Putin and former senior director for European and Russian affairs on the National Security Council, joins David Dollar to discuss her new book, “There Is Nothing for You Here: Finding Opportunity in the 21st Century” (Mariner Books). In her memoir, Hill describes growing up in a rapidly de-industrializing and decaying area in northeast England in the 1970s and ‘80s, how she came to study Soviet and Russian affairs in college, and how rapid economic transformations have led to the rise of populist leaders in Russia and recently in the United States. Hill tells Dollar that we need collective will that transcends politics to deal with current and emerging challenges in the U.S. and abroad. Dollar & Sense is part of the Brookings Podcast Network. Send feedback to bcp@brookings.edu, and follow us on Twitter at @policypodcasts.

History Storytime - For Kids

Sophie (age 7) and Ellie (age 5) tell the story of the Cold War.----more---- At the end of World War Two the Soviet Union (the old name for Russia) and the United States of America were suspicious of each other. The Soviet Union would not let their newly conquered lands in Eastern Europe be free. They also would not disband their armies. This worried the capitalist and democratic countries of what we call the West. They agreed to protect each other. The Americans had nuclear weapons which the Soviets did not have. These weapons could destroy whole cities. The Soviets though had spies. Their spies in America and Britain stole the secrets to the Nuclear weapons. Then the Soviets could build their own. Both America and the Soviet Union built thousands of bombs. They built enough to kill everyone on earth. Both countries started to experiment with travelling into space. They wanted to explore. However, they also wanted to learn how to make missiles so they could put bombs on the top of them. There wasn't a lot of difference between a nuclear missile and a space rocket. Sometimes the people in Eastern Europe would rebel. The Soviet soldiers would crush them. Whenever people in the Soviet Union complained they were sent to Siberia, which is very cold, and forced to work. One of the most difficult places was Berlin. This city was divided. West Berlin was free but East Berlin was ruled by the Soviets. The Soviets wanted the Americans to leave so they tried to starve the people of West Berlin to get the Americans to go home. America and her allies sent in enough food by place to keep the people alive. Then so many people were trying to escape from East Berlin that the Soviets made a wall through the centre of the city, dividing west from east Berlin. Anyone who tried to climb over the wall would be shot. The West tried hard to make sure that other countries did not become communist. Sometimes they did bad things to stop this from happening. Then the Americans decided to build weapons in space that could shoot down the Russian missiles in space. The Soviets did not have enough money to carry on. They had a new leader who was young called Mikhail Gorbachev. When the people of East Berlin started protesting, Gorbachev did not attack them. They pulled down the wall and freed themselves. Then people in the Soviet Union started protesting and wanting to end the Soviet Union. Again, Gorbachev let them win. People were now free. The Cold War was over. PATRONS CLUBS If you would like to join our Patrons' Club you can at www.patreon.com/historystorytime.

Russian Rulers History Podcast
The Enabler's - Part Three

Russian Rulers History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021


Today, we finish the three part series about the men who helped Joseph Stalin terrorize the Soviet Union.

Subliminal Jihad
[PREVIEW] #87 - ENTERPRISE WERWOLF: The Escape of Martin Bormann

Subliminal Jihad

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 32:27


Dimitri and Khalid discuss Paul Manning's “Martin Bormann: Nazi in Exile” (1981) and William Stevenson's “The Bormann Brotherhood” (1973), tracing the sinister deeds and mysterious disappearance of Nazi Reichsleiter Martin Bormann after the Fall, as well as: conspiracy and fraud in identifying the “bodies” of Bormann and Heinrich “Gestapo” Mueller, Bormann and Mueller covering up Hitler murdering his niece/lover in 1931, the original Mueller Report investigating/covering up Hitler's Jewish (Rothschild?) lineage, the “Musk Ox” Bormann becoming Hitler's psychosexual puppet master, Gerta Bormann's Aryan cuckqueen fetish, the Bormann flight capital network to South America, the complicity of IG Farben, Krupp, Thyssen, Daimler-Benz et al, Reinhard Gehlen's claim that Bormann was actually a deep cover Soviet spy, parallels with the 70s Soviet TV miniseries “Seventeen Moments of Spring”, and whether the Bormann network still infests the global economy and intelligence world today. For access to full-length premium episodes and the SJ Grotto of Truth Discord, subscribe to the Al-Wara' Frequency at patreon.com/subliminaljihad.

Science History Podcast
Episode 47. The Demarcation Problem: Michael Gordin

Science History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 104:58


How do we distinguish real science from hogwash? How does real science evolve over time into pseudoscience? Why will science always be plagued with sister movements on the fringe that make us cringe? With us to explore these topics and their relationship to the demarcation problem is Michael Gordin. Michael is the Rosengarten Professor of Modern and Contemporary History and the director of the Society of Fellows in the Liberal Arts at Princeton University. He specializes in the history of modern science in Russia, Europe, and North America, especially issues related to the history of fringe science, the early years of the nuclear arms race, Russian and Soviet science, language and science, and Albert Einstein. He is the author of On the Fringe, which we discuss today, as well as The Pseudoscience Wars: Immanuel Velikovsky and the Birth of the Modern Fringe, Scientific Babel: How Science Was Done Before and After Global English, and Red Cloud at Dawn: Truman, Stalin, and the End of the Atomic Monopoly. Today we discuss diverse topics in fringe science, including Bigfoot, extra sensory perception, UFOs, astrology, alchemy, the ether, Aryan physics, Lysenkoism, phrenology, cryptozoology, Velikovsky, Mesmerism, Uri Geller, cold fusion, and where all of this leaves us as we navigate the waters between science and pseudoscience.

The Slavic Connexion
"Frozen by the Thaw": The Soviet Masculinity Crisis of the Long Sixties with Marko Dumančić

The Slavic Connexion

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 42:32


On this episode, Marko Dumančić joins Lera and Cullan to talk about his recently published monograph entitled Men Out of Focus: The Soviet Masculinity Crisis in the Long Sixties wherein he unpacks the changing conceptions of men in post-Stalinist society by taking a deeper look at Soviet films made at the time. This is a fun conversation, riddled with film talk. We hope you enjoy! ABOUT THE GUEST https://cseees.unc.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/282/2018/10/fullsizeoutput_d03.jpeg Marko Dumančić is an associate professor at Western Kentucky University's History Department. He works on a range of topics involving gender and sexual identity in the Soviet Union during the Cold War and in former Yugoslavia during the 1980s and 1990s. His first monograph, Men out of Focus: The Soviet Masculinity Crisis in the Long Sixties, examines the causes undergirding changing conceptions of masculinity in post-Stalinist society. His current research looks at the concept of genocidal masculinities in Bosnia during the 1990s and seeks to determine the motivations of soldiers who committed wartime human rights abuses. His work has appeared in Journal of Cold War Studies, Cold War History, Studies in Russian and Soviet Cinema, and The Cambridge History of Communism. You can find Men Out of Focus here (https://www.amazon.com/Dumancic-Men-Focus-Marko-Duman%C4%8Di%C4%87/dp/1487505256/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=men+out+of+focus&qid=1633818233&sr=8-1). https://mail.google.com/mail/u/1?ui=2&ik=7aed11d76b&attid=0.0.1&permmsgid=msg-f:1710259909750369228&th=17bc10539a432bcc&view=fimg&sz=s0-l75-ft&attbid=ANGjdJ9DZ0Rg0n1tFqBOc6RIaSotw-x0zPMJD_cYgVv1_EdhP6GIyvTH_6EN9GPHwC3VfNFXRhLZEpMumZTG-sVmQRg2-DWM7Fj_4fgOb-f4-8epLnCQMaV0ULD7zBw&disp=emb PRODUCER'S NOTE: This episode was recorded on June 15th, 2021 via Zoom. To reach us via email, send a message to slavxradio@utexas.edu if you have questions, suggestions, or would like to be a guest on the show! CREDITS Co-Producer: Lera Toropin (@earlportion) Co-Producer: Cullan Bendig (@cullanwithana) Associate Producer: Zach Johnson Assistant Producer: Sergio Glajar Assistant Producer: Misha Simanovskyy Associate Producer/Administrator: Kathryn Yegorov-Crate Executive Assistant: Katherine Birch Recording, Editing, and Sound Design: Michelle Daniel Music Producer: Charlie Harper (Connect: facebook.com/charlie.harper.1485 Instagram: @charlieharpermusic) www.charlieharpermusic.com (Main Theme by Charlie Harper and additional background music by Charlie Harper, Ketsa, Scott Holmes) Additional sound effects and clips from movies referenced in the episode come from YouTube. Executive Producer & Creator: Michelle Daniel (Connect: facebook.com/mdanielgeraci Instagram: @michelledaniel86) www.msdaniel.com DISCLAIMER: Texas Podcast Network is brought to you by The University of Texas at Austin. Podcasts are produced by faculty members and staffers at UT Austin who work with University Communications to craft content that adheres to journalistic best practices. The University of Texas at Austin offers these podcasts at no charge. Podcasts appearing on the network and this webpage represent the views of the hosts, not of The University of Texas at Austin. https://files.fireside.fm/file/fireside-uploads/images/9/9a59b135-7876-4254-b600-3839b3aa3ab1/P1EKcswq.png Special Guest: Marko Dumančić.

National Day Calendar
October 9, 2021 – I Love Yarn Day | National Chess Day

National Day Calendar

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 2:30


If You Watched This Game In Real Time, You'll Remember The Surprise Ending! Welcome to October 9, 2021 on the National Day Calendar. Today we celebrate a soft spot for wool and a warm spot in the Cold War.  In 1974, the sci-fi classic Doctor Who cast a new actor in the lead role. Costume designer James Acheson was given the task of creating a unique look for the Doctor. He thought the costume should have a scarf and he asked his friend Begonia Pope to knit one. Acheson dropped off several balls of yarn and went on his way. Begonia began knitting, and because she wasn't sure how long the scarf should be, she didn't stop until every last inch of yarn had been used. The result was a ridiculously long scarf that was about 18 feet long. This colorful accessory became the trademark look for Tom Baker's incarnation of Doctor Who. On I Love Yarn Day, express your own textile taste and don't be afraid to go over the top! During the Cold War, the Soviet Union seemed invincible at the game of chess.  For decades, every single World Championship was won by a Soviet player.  When an American named Bobby Fischer made it to the championships in 1972, the whole world was watching to see what would happen.  Fischer lost the first two matches to the reigning champ Boris Spassky and it looked as if the Soviet streak would continue.  Then Fischer staged one of the greatest comebacks in the history of competitive chess.  His performance was so impressive that the crowd broke out into applause after his win.  Even Spassky gave Fischer a standing ovation.  On National Chess Day, celebrate the ultimate game of strategy that can still bring the world together.  I'm Anna Devere and I'm Marlo Anderson.  Thanks for joining us as we Celebrate Every Day.

Cold War Conversations History Podcast
Pete - a BRIXMIS driver behind enemy lines in East Germany (203)

Cold War Conversations History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 57:22


Pete Curran served with BRIXMIS, the British Military Liaison Mission in East Germany. Their operation was established by a post-WWII Allied occupation forces' agreement, where British, US and French missions had relative freedom to travel and collect intelligence throughout East Germany from 1947 until 1990.  Pete's story starts with details of his vetting interview, driver training, and his first tour in East Germany. We also hear of the intelligence scoops he was involved in and some of his close scrapes while evading both the Soviets and the Stasi including one with a Soviet helicopter.We also hear of the role of the driver in the three-man teams, the incredible camaraderie of the unit, as well as the pressure on their loved ones. I know from my stats that a lot of you really enjoy the podcast. It is an absolute passion for me to save these stories from being forgotten and sharing them weekly for free for everyone to hear. Whilst this is a passion, I am asking if each listener could make either a one-off or better still sign up for monthly donations to help me to find the time to produce and finance the project.If you'd like to know more just go to https://coldwarconversations.com/donate/If a financial contribution is not your cup of tea, then you can still help us by leaving written reviews wherever you listen to us as well as sharing us on social media. It really helps us get new guests on the show.I am delighted to welcome Pete Curran to our Cold War conversation…UK BRIXMIS books https://amzn.to/3ljkK6IUS BRIXMIS books  https://amzn.to/3ae2HZsThere's further information including videos here. https://coldwarconversations.com/episode203If you can't wait for next week's episode do visit our Facebook discussion group where guests and listeners continue the Cold War Conversation. Just search Cold War Conversations in Facebook.Thank you very much for listening. It is really appreciated.HELP US WIN AN AWARD!Just go to https://coldwarconversations.com/vote/ and vote for us in the Best History podcast category. Thanks so much for your support ! Have a look at our store and find the ideal gift for the Cold War enthusiast in your life? Just go to https://coldwarconversations.com/store/Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/coldwarpod)

Unconditioning: Discovering the Voice Within
Episode Twenty-Four. Marina Byezhanova: Authenticity in Personal Branding and Finding your Voice in Censorship and Immigration

Unconditioning: Discovering the Voice Within

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 32:36


Marina Byezhanova is a Soviet-born, Ukraine-raised, Canada-based entrepreneur whose mission is to scale the reach of people's voices. Co-Founder of a personal branding agency called Brand of a Leader, Marina has been quoted and referenced in such publications as Inc.com, Forbes.com, Fast Company, Success Magazine, Wall Street Journal and the Financial Post, and has spoken to audiences of entrepreneurs and business executives in North America, Asia, Europe, and the Middle East. Marina is a proud member of Entrepreneurs' Organization and is presently the Canadian Social Media Expert serving on the Regional Board of Directors. In this episode we discuss: Marina's childhood and growing up in Ukraine / Soviet Union Finding her place and voice in Canada Her journey to becoming a speaker Marina's philosophy on censorship Brand of a Leader Marina's message to the world   www.brandofaleader.com

Hard Fried History
Ep 105: Osama bin Laden p1 - Shifting Sands

Hard Fried History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 61:05


What do you really know about Osama bin Laden? This week we look at the first 35 years of America's, if not the world's, most infamous terrorist, covering the circumstances of his birth and childhood, his service in the Soviet-Afghan war and how his radical beliefs were shaped by the events and people around him. Also covered is the US' initial reaction to the emergence of bin Laden on their intelligence radars, the negotiation of Afghanistan's national identity after the Soviet withdrawal and the beginnings of the First Persian Gulf War. Part two coming within the next couple days!

You Are Here
It Gets Worse: American Cities Dying As Violence Rises | Guests: John Doyle & Sara Gonzales| 10/5/21

You Are Here

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 96:42


As violence continues to rise in cities, officials who initially backed defunding the police are coming up with creative ways to stem the tide of shootings and murders. In Portland, they're using traffic barrels as a way to stop the high-speed shootings plaguing the city. Will this new tactic actually save anyone from the increasing gun violence? Given how Portland officials are handling everything recently, it's difficult to have confidence in their new initiatives. As the country deteriorates, the tension and anger among the population are growing palpable. With criminals emboldened, upstanding citizens are struggling to contain the rage festering in seemingly lawless lands. The Canadian pastor arrested for refusing to close his church issues a warning to Americans that a Soviet-style government is coming.  Start Mail: Be like Elijah and Sydney, start securing your email privacy with StartMail! Sign up today and you'll get 50% off your first year! Go to https://www.startmail.com/youarehere. That's Start Mail with a “T” for 50% off your first year! Subscribe to You Are Here YouTube: https://bit.ly/2XNLhQw Watch MORE You Are Here on BlazeTV: https://bit.ly/38WB2vw Check out Elijah Schaffer's YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/3C0yWH8 Check out Sydney Watson's YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2YIedK5 Follow Sydney Watson on Twitter: https://twitter.com/SydneyLWatson Follow Elijah Schaffer on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ElijahSchaffer Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Russia sees dialogue opportunity with Taliban decades after its own messy Afghanistan exit

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 5:56


As the United States continues to manage the fallout from its withdrawal from Afghanistan, in Moscow there's a sense of deja vu. Russia's departure after the Soviet war there led to a protracted period of chaos and civil war, which culminated with the U.S. invasion in 2001. But Russian veterans see some essential differences between both withdrawals. Special correspondent Stuart Smith reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - World
Russia sees dialogue opportunity with Taliban decades after its own messy Afghanistan exit

PBS NewsHour - World

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 5:56


As the United States continues to manage the fallout from its withdrawal from Afghanistan, in Moscow there's a sense of deja vu. Russia's departure after the Soviet war there led to a protracted period of chaos and civil war, which culminated with the U.S. invasion in 2001. But Russian veterans see some essential differences between both withdrawals. Special correspondent Stuart Smith reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Sofa King Podcast
A Sofa King Classic: Andrei Chikatilo

Sofa King Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 81:54


This episode of the Sofa King Podcast explores the grisly killing spree of the most famous Soviet serial killer, Andrei Chikatilo, aka “The Butcher of Rostov.” Between 1978 and 1990, he was thought to have killed a total of 56 people throughout the USSR, and he was responsible for one wrongful execution and several suicides. This was an especially interesting case because the investigation was hampered by the Soviet government who publicly claimed there was no such thing as a Russian serial killer and that this was a sickness only the decadent West could catch. Andrei Chikatilo fits many of the key ingredients of serial killers—he had a major illness as a child, an oppressive mother, sexual dysfunction, high intelligence, and of course a cold cunning. He grew up in Stalin's Ukraine during the massive food shortages and famines that his regime caused, and Chikatilo also lived with the shame of a father who was captured by the Germans during WWI (it was a major taboo for them). The worst part was that his childhood hydrocephalic condition caused him to wet his bed well into his later years and kept him from being able to get an erection. The sexual frustration and humiliation of his childhood years twisted him into a monster and killer. So who were his targest? He mostly liked underage girls, but he would take anyone. He wasn't that picky. All of his targets met the same horrible end. He would stab them at least 20 times, using the knife as a surrogate penis. He would tie them up, stuff leaves and dirt in their mouths, and ejaculate on them as their death struggle sexually excited him. He would also cut off body parts and even bite off nipples. Yes, he was really crazy and horrible. So, how did he eventually get caught if the government didn't publicly admit he existed? What lead to him being called the “Forest Strip Killer?” How did he father children if he could never get an erection? Why would Andrei Chikatilo gouge out the eyes of his victims? What body parts would he nibble on? Listen, laugh, learn.

The John Batchelor Show
1739: #AfterAfghanistan: The Haqqani Family Supreme @BillRoggio @ThomasJoscelyn @LongWarJournal

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 9:05


Photo:  Mazrak Khan Zadran (Pashto: زمرک خان ځدرا; fl. 1900s – 1972) was a Zadran chieftain who fought against the Afghan government during the Afghan tribal revolts of 1944–1947. Picture taken 1925 or earlier. Among his political progeny are the Haqqani network. CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow #AfterAfghanistan: The Haqqani Family Supreme.  @BillRoggio @ThomasJoscelyn @LongWarJournal https://www.longwarjournal.org/archives/2021/09/testimony-to-receive-testimony-on-afghanistan.php "The Haqqani network was founded in 1970 by Jalaluddin Haqqani, a fundamentalist of the Zadran tribe, who fought for Yunus Khalis's mujahideen faction against the Soviets in the 1980s. Jalaluddin Haqqani died in 2018 and his son Sirajuddin Haqqani now leads the group. The Haqqani network was one of the Reagan administration's most CIA-funded anti-Soviet groups in the 1980s."

Women Today
How to Support Afghan Women Now

Women Today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 69:03


This week's guest, Fereshta Ramsey, is an inspiration and a force who is courageously sharing her voice and perspectives on the current situation in Afghanistan.If you, like me, have been heartbroken, enraged, concerned and/or confused regarding the events of the past two months (and prior) in Afghanistan--this interview is for you.This conversation covers:Fereshta's personal journey of fleeing Afghanistan as a young child and how she and her parents received political asylum in the U.S.Sustainable activism, what it is, how it's practiced and why it is so critical right now.  A brief history lesson about both Soviet and U.S. involvement in Afghanistan and why that matters in relationship to what's going on today.Which types of women are most at risk under Taliban rule and why.A trauma-informed, empathy and boundaries based perspective on the Taliban, who they are, how they have come to be and what will be required to create a more peaceful existence for all Afghan people in the future.A holistic perspective on gender issues including toxic masculinity, female oppression and empowerment.Concrete action steps that we can take to support Afghan women and girls right now.Why we MUST remember that every life matters and act accordingly.If you're ready to take action now, you can support women in Afghanistan by donating here:https://www.protectafghanwomen.org/https://www.hrw.org/news/2021/08/17/fragility-womens-rights-afghanistan#https://urgentactionfund.org/To learn more about Fereshta and her work please check her out below:https://www.rocknrollspiritual.com/https://www.instagram.com/fereshtacoaching/

The Steve Gruber Show
Steve Gruber, Biden's Soviet-raised pick for Treasury post sought end to banking ‘as we know it'

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 8:30


Steve Gruber discusses news and headlines.

HISTORY This Week
The Night Witches

HISTORY This Week

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 31:04


October 4, 1938. Soviet pilot Marina Raskova beats a world record: the longest continuous flight ever recorded by a woman. She'll soon break another barrier-- she'll lead the first-ever female air force pilots to fly on the front lines of World War Two. One of her regiments in particular will wreak havoc on Nazi German soldiers and become the most notorious night bombers in the entire Soviet Union. They'll become known as the Night Witches. Who were these barrier-breaking pilots? And how did they become some of the most feared forces on the Eastern front?Thank you to our guests, Claudia Hagen, author of "Tonight We Fly!" The Soviet Night Witches of WWII, and to Christer Bergström, author of "Black Cross Red Star - Air War over the Eastern Front: Volume 1 Operation Barbarossa." See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Left Shelf
Episode 25: Soviet and Post-Soviet Georgia (and Journey to Karabakh by Aka Morchiladze)

Left Shelf

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 67:51


What is freedom and captivity? Can these concepts be talked about without a proper material basis? In this episode, we use the book Journey to Karabakh by Aka Morchiladze as a basis to talk about Soviet and post-Soviet Georgia and how romanticization of suffering has changed public sensibilities and reshaped memories of the USSR. Read Journey to Karabakh (free): hereFollow the show on:TwitterFacebookEmail - leftshelfpodcast@gmail.com Website InstagramYoutube Become a monthly contributor on Patreon: www.patreon.com/leftshelf.Support the show (https://patreon.com/leftshelf)

The Theatre of Others Podcast
TOO Episode 82: Audio New Play Festival, Justin Tan and Sabina Gerardi's TALES FROM THE ARCADIA

The Theatre of Others Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 32:21


Tales from the Arcadia is set in a Generation Ship dispatched from Earth to ensure humanity's continued survival. Hundreds of thousands will live and die without seeing their origin or destination. These three short records across time are an incomplete snapshot into how humanity might - with every action - d/evolve into.Creative TeamPlaywright: Justin Tan & Sabina GerardiDramaturg: Steven GaultneyDirector: Justin Tan & Sabina GerardiSound Engineer & Composer: Jack Burmeister  CastCaptain Michaels: Jing-Xuan ChanCommander Sol: Alexandros PettasCouncillor Braxton: Guy KnowlerCouncillor Shaheed: Farah AishahNewsreader: Kim Anne TanTaylor: Rupert BevanAinslie: Jess LuNurse: Sabina GerardiCaptain Fletcher: Frazer ShepherdsonLeo: Oliver TappCaptain Ismail: Abdul Min MuhaiminJude: Laura StrøbechCaptain Paris: Stefanie FalascaNydmius: Justin TanPLAYWRIGHT'S BIOGRAPHIESJustin Tan is a graduate of Company 2020's BFA Acting course at the Victorian College of the Arts. A Singaporean of Chinese descent currently based in Melbourne and a lover of history, Justin hopes to create work that questions and challenges our understanding of our modern world. This is his first time writing an original work.At the VCA, Justin has played the titular ‘King John', Allie in ‘Snore', and Johnnypateenmike in ‘The Cripple of Inishmaan'. With a background in TV and Radio production, Justin has also provided commentary at the 28th Southeast Asian Games, voiced and edited SAFTI MI's Corporate Video 2015-17, and hosted the “Throwback Thursday Show” on Radio Heatwave.Sabina Gerardi is a theatre-maker and actor. She is a 2020 BFA Theatre graduate of the Victorian College of the Arts, with additional training in screenwriting, mask, and puppetry. Sabina is a research-led devisor, with a particular interest in political history and social satire. At the VCA, Sabina devised an experimental piece, 'The General Secretariat and I', a marathon, audience-led fake Soviet history writing saga, with Finn McGrath.Since lockdown, Sabina has been exploring digitally-driven story-telling. She co-devised Detective Attention for Zoom, Jerry for headphones, and Baccarat (by The German Romantics) with both pre-filmed and live online elements. The latter was selected for The Theatre Times' International Online Theatre Festival 2021. Sabina also co-hosts 'Fib: a podcast about lies' with Clare Taylor.WRITERS' NOTETales from the Arcadia came about from a conversation at a bar, and a shared interest in history and human behavior. Pitched as a highly ambitious epic and scaled-down accordingly, we wanted to explore how past actions shape future societies, and how far might social customs be pushed due to circumstance and decision.This audio play would not be possible without the dramaturgy provided by Steven Gaultney, the audio engineering and composition of Jack Burmeister, and the wonderfully talented and diverse ensemble cast giving voice to the characters.

SPYCRAFT 101
The True Story of the Poison Gun and the KGB Defector with Dr. Serhii Plokhy

SPYCRAFT 101

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 71:17


Today, Dr. Serhii Plokhy shares the story of KGB assassin Bogdan Stashinsky. Stashinsky is best known for assassinating a man on a bridge using a gun that contained a poison pellet as opposed to a bullet, ultimately killing his target in a way that appeared to be natural causes. Following his defection, his case involved a highly publicized assassination trial in 1962. Thanks to his honesty, Soviet leaders were finally implicated in many of the killings they had ordered and the KGB was put under pressure to reform their cruel tactics.Check out Dr. Plokhy's book, The Man with the Poison Gun, here.https://www.amazon.com/Man-Poison-Gun-Cold-Story/dp/0465035906/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=Connect with Spycraft 101:IG: @spycraft101Patreon: Spycraft 101Buy the book: here on Amazonhttps://www.amazon.com/Spy-Shots-Tales-World-Espionage/dp/B09BY3WH71/ref=tmm_pap_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1628473373&sr=1-2Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/spycraft101)

Bro History - Geopolitics & Foreign Policy

Bro History The Soviet Atomic Bomb On todays episode, we discuss the origins of the Soviet Atomic program. Support our Sponsor Conflict of Nations: WW3. Find it on the appstore / playstore or the web game at ww3.tv. Support on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/brohistory #212 The Soviet Atomic Bomb szamotah

LowcoSports Lowdown

LowcoSports.com's Justin Jarrett and Wes Kerr interview key figures in the local sports scene each week on the Lowco Sitdown podcast. You can hear excerpts from these extended interviews on the LowcoSports Lowdown podcast. This week's interview is with professional basketball player Ryle Owens. The Beaufort High alumnus recently signed with TSU Tbilisi in the former Soviet republic of Georgia.

Who New Podcast
Episode 708 – Cold War

Who New Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 68:01


It's the 80's The Doctor & Clara appear on a Soviet submarine that's discovered something under the ice. Something that is not pleased to be disturbed. Join us as we discuss Episode 708: Cold War Onboard a Soviet submarine, the biggest issue, next to Duran Duran, is the escape of an old enemy of the ...

Sean's Russia Blog
Cuban-Soviet Scientific Exchanges

Sean's Russia Blog

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 83:00


Guest: Clare Ibarra on scientific exchange between Cuba and the Soviet Union during the Cold War. The post Cuban-Soviet Scientific Exchanges appeared first on SRB Podcast.

The John Batchelor Show
1726: Vladimir Putin gone fishing in spectacular Tuva. Felix Light, Moscow Times, @felix_light, @CBS News, @Moscow Times

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 11:00


Photo: A Russian stamp:  "World Natural Heritage of Russia. Tyva Republic. Ubsunur Basin" Tuva, once named Tannu Tuva, is a Vajrayana/Tibetan Buddhist territory south of the enormous Krasnoyarsk Krai in Russia.  Tuva is due south of Khakassia, which is a subregion of indigenous Turkic peoples; north of Mongolia and adjacent to Buryatia, both also Buddhist.  The exceptional American physicist Richard Feynman once found a Tuvan postage stamp, realized he had no knowledge of the country, and decided to visit.  Under the Soviet Union internal travel was severely limited, and the distinguished Dr Feynman did not get there.  In his effort, "Leighton and Feynman tried many ploys to get to Tuva. They even enrolled as delegates at a throat-singing conference to be held in Hovd, Mongolia. Throat-singing, a bizarre style peculiar to Tuva [and strongly Mongolian], involves making two notes simultaneously. Alas, the conference was cancelled at the last minute."         "  . . .  In 1988, Leighton and Feynman pulled off a coup, bringing to Los Angeles ‘Nomads of Eurasia', an exhibition that included ancient Tuvan artefacts. The Soviet authorities would be sure to reward them with a trip to Tuva, they reasoned. But on 15 February 1988 – just three days before an invitation arrived – Feynman's borrowed time ran out.        "Leighton went to Kyzyl without Feynman, and stood before the monument to the centre of Asia. ‘It seemed like Richard's grave,' he says." ..  https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg13318095-100-review-richard-feynmans-lost-journey/#ixzz77u8dBMKg   https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg13318095-100-review-richard-feynmans-lost-journey/#ixzz77u8ChISt Vladimir Putin gone fishing in spectacular Tuva.  Felix Light, Moscow Times,  @felix_light, @CBS News, @Moscow Times https://www.themoscowtimes.com/2021/09/27/putin-joins-defense-minister-shoigu-on-taiga-trek-a75150

The John Batchelor Show
1723: Does containment work? Jeff McCausland. @mccauslj @CBSNews @dickinsoncol

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 12:15


Photo:  It worked in the last century  . . .  Here:  The Soviet flag in the Moscow Kremlin lowered and changed with the Russian flag on December 25, 1991 Does containment work? Jeff McCausland.  @mccauslj @CBSNews @dickinsoncol https://foreignpolicy.com/2021/09/28/southeast-asia-asean-australia-aukus-china-united-states/

Madigan's Pubcast
Episode 58: Sam Adams' Illegal Beer, Warren Buffett's Breakfast, & The Largest Cruise Ship In The World

Madigan's Pubcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 80:03


Kathleen opens the show drinking a Singing Frog Golden Lager from The Wynn in Las Vegas, sipping the beer from her Seamus McDaniel's pub pint glass. Kathleen then shares with the Termites all off her favorite highlights from her show at The Ryman in downtown Nashville, thrilled that she got to finally meet her Twitter friend Stella Parton, whom she can't wait to drink red wine with. Kathleen then gives an update on her birthday plans taking place on September 30th: she's going to the Ozarks to golf with her parents and see some friends, and then is excited to be heading to Johnny Morris's Big Cedar Lodge to golf with her siblings and cousins and drink in a cave bar. TERMITE SHOUTOUTS: Kathleen gives thanks to the Termites who leave notes at shows and send mail to her PO Box. She begins by thanking Termites from the Savannah Bananas for her new baseball-style t-shirt, and from Termite Baba Valentino for the cool golf balls. She then thanks Termite Donna from Abilene, TX for her homemade Pubcast sign and funky gravy boat. “GOOD BAD FOOD”: In her quest for new and delicious not-so-nutritious junk food AND in continuing her search for the best Ranch, Kathleen samples Drew's Creamy Ranch dressing from Vermont, which she loves. She moves on to taste Cap'N Crunch Chocolate Caramel Crunch, which she thinks is too sweet, and prefers Crunch Berries. Kathleen rounds out her tasting menu sampling the limited edition Cool Ranch Doritos, which she likes but still prefers the original or taco flavored Doritos. UPDATE ON KATHLEEN'S QUEEN'S COURT: Kathleen has limited updates on the Queens this week, but hopes that recent music releases and tour activity will provide more activity for next week's report. MOBSTER TIED TO ISABELLA STEWART GARDNER MUSEUM DIES: Kathleen provides an update that alleged mobster Robert Gentile, thought to have been the last person alive with knowledge of who committed the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum art heist, has died at the age of 85 of a stroke. THERANOS TRIAL UPDATE: Kathleen continues her obsession with seeing the downfall of Elizabeth Holmes, providing an update on Theranos trial currently taking place in California. She reads an article specifically reviewing Holmes' crazy emails sent in the middle of the night to employees while she was at the company's helm, as well as her defense strategy of trying to block testimony on her extravagant personal expenses while SAM ADAMS' ILLEGAL BEER: Kathleen is thrilled to read an article announcing that brewer Sam Adams is releasing the latest beer in their Utopias collection, which is available in limited capacity every 2 years. This release is so strong, it's illegal in 15 states because this year, the brews carry a staggering 28 percent alcohol by volume or ABV. By comparison, the classic Samuel Adams Boston Lager is just 5 percent ABV.CHINA BANS KIDS FROM MIDWEEK GAMING: Kathleen reads an article from China where new rules recently published by China's National Press and Publication Administration are allowing kids and teens under 18 years old be limited to three hours per week to play online video games. Kathleen laughs at the outcry that would happen in the US if such a move was made. THE WORLD'S LARGEST CRUISE SHIP DEBUTS: Never being a lover of cruise ship travel, Kathleen reads an announcement from Royal Caribbean advising that their newest ship, the Wonder of the Seas, has been authenticated as the largest cruise ship in the world. Originally meant to set sail from China, the ship will now begin sailing from Florida to the Caribbean in March 2022. The Wonder of the Seas will feature 8 “neighborhoods” and revised amenities such as a full waterslide. All of Kathleen's thoughts on cruise ship travel can be heard on her bits “Cruise Ship Day 1” and “Cruise Ship Day 2.”THE OLDEST LOBSTER TRAPPER IN MAINE: Kathleen is thrilled to read an article from Maine profiling Virginia Oliver, who has been fishing for lobsters for over a century. Despite having surpassed the typical retirement age decades ago, the Rockland, Maine-based fisherwoman works with her son, Max, catching lobsters three days a week from May through November. Kathleen applauds Virginia's efforts and work ethic, stating that the only other person that she could envision working into a second century would be her father, Jack. THE ‘SUEZ CANAL ON RAILS' UNVEILED: As listeners know, Kathleen loves a train ride and has a mad appreciation for any improvement to infrastructure. She's envious to read of plans in Cairo, Egypt where the Egyptian government has signed a $4.45 billion deal for a high-speed electric rail line to link its Red Sea and Mediterranean coasts. The 410-mile rail link will include a mainline designed to carry more than 30 million passengers annually as well as a freight line and will run between the Red Sea port of Ain Sokhna and 2 Mediterranean ports. Kathleen laughs that she's waited her entire life for a train to connect St. Louis and the Lake of the Ozarks, and wouldn't care how fast it traveled as long as there was a bar car made available. RUSSIAN CHESS STAR SUES NETFLIX: Like many Termites, Kathleen loved the premises of the Netflix series “The Queen's Gambit.” She reads an update where a former Soviet chess champion, Nona Gaprindashvili, is suing Netflix for defamation over the incorrect chronological sequence of the final episode where Gaprindashvili is referenced by name as not having ever faced male opponents, when in fact she HAD by 1968, the year that the last episode was situated in. No further details have been released from Netflix, but you can bet that Mama T will be on the lookout for an update!HOW TO BE LIKE WARREN BUFFETT: (or at least eat like him ☺) Kathleen loves reading about billionaire Warren Buffett, not only because he's a true Midwest delight but also because he's chosen to remain in Omaha his entire life and doesn't mind sharing some of the simple financial practices that he uses in his everyday life. Kathleen reads an article that outlines 9 frugal habits of Buffett's that we can incorporate to save money, and she laughs at her own approach to “wealth management” and her arguments with her brother Patrick over the cost of a cup of Starbucks coffee. She DOES agree with Buffett's love of McDonald's Egg McMuffin for breakfast and recommends not skipping out on an accompanying Diet Coke just because you can save more money buying the soda by the 12-pack. RALEIGH'S LOST COLONY: Kathleen loves history, and is excited to read an article announcing that archaeologists are embarking on a search for the lost colony of Roanoke in an attempt to determine what happened to the 117 people who completely vanished after its settlement. It's one of the nation's great mysteries: The first permanent colony of English settlers in what would become the United States, specifically North Carolina in 1587 by Sir Walter Raleigh, disappeared three years after it was erected with virtually no trace.THE MOB CHILDREN VS THE FBI: Kathleen laughs out loud reading an article announcing that a fugitive consigliere in Colombo crime family was recently arrested after his son taunted the FBI with a Florida poolside post of his father a day after his suspected mob family was arrested in a New York City raid. The taunting post was hurriedly deleted, but not in enough time for Federal Agents to screengrab the information and enact an arrest plan. Ralph DiMatteo, 66, was the only person mentioned in the federal indictment to evade arrest, and that's because it was able to be proven that he was soaking up the Florida rays. Kathleen muses that even “the children” can be caught at their own games.WHAT TO WATCH THIS WEEK: Kathleen recommends finishing “Nine Perfect Strangers” on Hulu, continuing through Season 2 of “Wu-Tang: An American Saga” on Hulu, and also listening to upcoming weekly episodes of the ABC News podcast “The Dropout” that is closely following the Elizabeth Holmes trial. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Ron Paul Liberty Report
Follow The Science? CDC Director Throws Expert Committee Under The Bus

Ron Paul Liberty Report

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 39:59


CDC Director Rochelle Walensky has chosen to ignore the recommendation of her own panel of medical professional experts that booster shots were not necessary for the vast majority of the population. Walensky has sided with the vax manufacturers and endorsed boosters, promising even more astronomical profits for Big Pharma. Science...or politics? Also today: Norway dumps all existing coronavirus restrictions while Netherlands adopts Soviet-style internal digital passports, allowing only vaxxed to take part in daily life? Science and science?

Freedomain Radio with Stefan Molyneux
4910 STOP BULLYING YOURSELF! Locals Livestream 23 Sep 2021

Freedomain Radio with Stefan Molyneux

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 86:01


Philosophy Stefan Molyneux discusses how to take control of your life, stop bullying yourself, and learn to live in the moment!https://freedomain.locals.com