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Latest podcast episodes about bosses

HORROR WITH SIR. STURDY
HORROR WITH SIR. STURDY EPISODE 293 BLACK SHEEP MOVIE REVIEW

HORROR WITH SIR. STURDY

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 103:16


ARE YOU READY TO GET SLICIN & DICIN WITH SIR. STURDY HORROR FANS?   IF YOU DON'T KNOW BY NOW I AM YOUR HOST SIR. STURDY.   TUNE IN TUESDAY NIGHT AT  9PM EST WE WILL BE DISCUSSING DON'T FUCK IN THE WOODS (2006).  DIRECTED BY JONATHAN KING WRITTEN BY JONATHAN KING STARING OLIVER DRIVER STARING NATHAN MEISTER STARING TAMMY DAVIS IMDB  https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0779982/   LET US KNOW YOUR THOUGHTS AND RATINGS OF THIS MOVIE IN THE COMMENTS. DON'T BE SCARED TO LIKE SHARE & SUBSCRIBE WELCOME TO THE MADNESS!!!!!!!   RESTREAM $10 CREDIT     https://restream.io/join/sir.sturdy   SIR. STURDY'S LINKTREE  https://linktr.ee/SIR_STURDY   THE Z NETWORK LINKTREE https://linktr.ee/THEZNETWORK   THANK YOU ALL JOINING THE MADNESS.  PLEASE DON'T BE AFRAID TO LIKE SHARE & SUBSCRIBE. TELL YOUR FAMILY, FRIENDS, ENEMIES, CO-WORKERS, BOSSES, NEIGHBORS, STRANGERS, TELL EVERYBODY ABOUT HORROR WITH SIR. STURDY..   IF YOU EVER WANT TO COME ON HERE AND TALK SOME HORROR EMAIL ME AT  HORRORWITHSIR.STURDYGUESTS@GMAIL.COM  I'LL SEE YOU IN YOUR NIGHTMARES!!!! #sirsturdy #horrorwithsirsturdy #horrorpodcast #518podcast #watchwithsirsturdy #sturdymerch #livewithsturdy #hashbrownhank #anothermoviepodcast #podcast #supportindiepodcasts #horror #moviereview #ohcanada #4yearsofsturdy #happynewyear #happyholidays #spookyseason #livestreaming #livereview #liveshow #tuesdaynight #thursdaynight #8pmEst #horrormoviereview #BLACKSHEEP  #thankyouforbeingafriend #theznetwork #popcornandpints #deepfocuscinema #storiesfromabar #worstdamngamerevr #thecinematiccanon #anylastwords   #supportindiehorror #supporthorror #illseeyouinyournightmares #RIPDMX #RIPKODA

THE Leadership Japan Series by Dale Carnegie Training Tokyo,  Japan

Our image of leaders is often of someone giving orders or pontificating about what is supposed to happen.  Our leader monologue is always one way traffic and we may be laying down golden advice in English or our imperfect Japanese, but is it being received, understood, digested, accepted or employed?  In this modern, stressful, super busy life, we give the team a rapid burst from our content firehose and then we move on, because there is a lot for us to do.  Subsequently, we discover what we wanted wasn't done at all or was done incorrectly or was taken off on a tangent we never imagined possible.    This is more common than it should be and we must be cautious when we are engaging in linear communication with our teams.  The content is often published rules and regulations, policies and procedural guidelines.  We may have developed Standard Operation Procedures which outline how things are supposed to be done.  We send out our memos, emails, text messages using various broadcast media. The good thing is it is written down,  so for Japanese team members, it is easier to absorb than rapid fire conversation. These are some typical ways we launch our missives into the void and we are never sure if people actually read, noted or understood what we were saying.   We are the boss right, so they have to take careful note of what we say, especially when we take the time to get key messages in front of everyone.  We are busy people, so this type of activity by its nature will be reserved for the most important content.  Therefore, everyone should know that communication hierarchy and treat these contributions carefully and thoughtfully.  Except they don't always do that, do they.  Why?   Like their bosses, they are drowning in information, are subject to a constant bombardment of emails, messages on Teams or Slack, etc., updates on social media or from any of the other burdensome abominable conduits piling on the workload and filling up every minute of the day.  And it was in English.   So yes, we have to be articulate, concise and clear in our communication but we also have to use questions to clarify understanding and operate at the highest levels of listening capability.  Asking clarifying questions is relatively easy, but are we actually good listeners?  We assume we are, simply because we are too busy to pay any attention to how we listen. Let's explore the five levels of listening and see how we stack up.   Ignore. We might be thinking, “I never ignore the team member when they are speaking”.   Is that true though?  The person may say something which triggers a strong thought in our mind. We are now completely diverted from what they are saying, to what we are thinking.  In effect, we are no longer paying any attention to them, because we are consumed by our own thoughts.  Effectively, we are ignoring them.   Pretend. In this case, we are polite, considerate and very boss like.  We are nodding our head and looking like we are concentrating, but we may not be fully taking in what we are being told.  Again, our mind may be busily crafting what we are going to say in our clever response to their points.  Or we may have been given an indication from the team member about something that interests them and we are getting ready to give them the benefit of our genius ideas and brilliant experiences.  If we hear something that sounds like resistance to our idea, that gets an instant counter response.  We are now mentally consumed with getting our evidence ready, so that we can go into an argument with them.  We want to sort them out, get them to fly right and get them to agree with our “correct” opinion.   Selective. Bosses have a highly tuned ability to hear agreement with their opinion and may miss key information.  Our listening skills are directed only to hear a “yes” or a “no” response regarding our ideas and nothing else from subordinates.   There may be key information attached to that “yes” or “no”, but we are certainly not listening for that.  We are filtering what we hear, according to our interests and preferences.  Effectively, we are only partially listening to the person.  We are standing right there in front of them, but they do not have our full focus.  My wife assures me I am doing this at home too and she is probably right, so more work to be done here.   Attentive. In this case we are giving the team member our full attention.  We are not filtering for signs of agreement or resistance.  We are not cutting them off, finishing their sentences or redirecting them mid-sentence. We are patiently and politely waiting for them to finish what they want to say.  We then paraphrase back to them what we heard. We are not shortchanging them, thinking what we are going to say, because we are fully absorbed by what they are saying.   Empathetic. This is the highest form of listening, where we are listening with our eyes as well as our ears.  We are reading what is going on behind the words.  We are conscious of what is not being said and we are listening to the tone of how we are being told the information.  We are trying to meet the person “in the conversation going on in their mind”.   Churchillian long bursts of our brilliance may make us feel good, I certainly enjoy giving them, but as leaders we should be aiming for more interactive communication with our team.  We need to have them respond to what we have said to ensure we are on the same wavelength and that we have actually heard each other correctly.  If we discover there is a gap in understanding, then that reflection allows us to correct it on the spot.  “I never said that”, “That isn't what I meant”, “No, it is the other way around”, are all exchanges we want to avoid having to engage in.  When we are each speaking in another language, the opportunities for misunderstanding are rife.  Both sides never have enough vocabulary to completely frame entire thoughts and communicate the subtleties of the language in its original form.  English is very confronting and direct and Japanese is often vague and circuitous. Checking for understanding becomes obligatory.   However, even the act of checking is no guarantee.  If I don't completely understand what I am being told in Japanese, I may be smiling, nodding and looking like I get it, because it is tiresome and embarrassing to admit my linguistic skills are not perfect.  My Japanese team members do the same when we operate in English, so the linguistic bear traps are many.  We need to have our team members feed back to us what we think they understand, to see if it is a match.  Empathetic listening and habituated checking for understanding have to become our firm habits in Japan.

VO BOSS Podcast
BOSS Voces: When Things are Slow

VO BOSS Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 27:23


Although we wish it were true, companies don't need VO produced 365 days a year. So what do you do when things are slow? Anne & Pilar have learned that the ebb and flow is all part of the biz. The amount of auditions you receive is not indicative of your worth, but it does feel good to be busy. Filling your time with classes, coaching, and market research during down time can prepare you for when the busy season comes again, but slow days can also be times to relax + restore your hard working voice, mind, and body like a true #VOBOSS. Transcript >> It's time to take your business to the next level, the BOSS level! These are the premiere Business Owner Strategies and Successes being utilized by the industry's top talent today. Rock your business like a BOSS, a VO BOSS! Now let's welcome your host, Anne Ganguzza. Pilar: Hola, BOSS Voces. Bienvenidos al podcast con Anne Ganguzza y Pilar Uribe. Anne: Hey everyone. Welcome to the VO BOSS podcast. I'm your host Anne Ganguzza, and I am super excited to be back with special guest cohost Pilar Uribe. Hey Pilar. How are you today? Pilar: I am good, Anne, and it's, uh, it's a little slow today. Anne: Yeah. You know what? That happens in our industry. We have days where, gosh, every time I turn around, there's something else to do. And I love those days. They're crazy days. But then there are days when it's slow. Back in the early days, Pilar, I used to like question, oh my God is what's happening? Like, should I get out of the industry? Like I haven't heard from any of my clients. I didn't book any gigs today. So what do I even do? So that would be a good topic for discussion today. Pilar: It's funny because I think that voice actors tend to equate their worth with the amount of auditions they get, which has absolutely nothing to do with them. Anne: auditions and or jobs too. So don't forget about that. Right? 'Cause they're like, oh my God, it's been slow. I haven't, I didn't book anything. I didn't get any auditions. What am I doing wrong? Pilar: Exactly. And it generally, it has nothing to do with you. There are things that you can do of course, but just remember that it's not necessarily a reflection on your ability. It's just sometimes it's the wave of what the market is doing. Anne: Yeah. The wave of the market. Pilar: I mean, there, there have been so many waves when people didn't know what was happening. And so clients and companies are still trying to figure out where to put their advertising dollars, and then that's when you see, well, what's happening? Why isn't, why isn't this coming in? Anne: I know and then you immediately blame it on yourself. Pilar: Immediately. And that's so that's so unhealthy. Anne: Yeah. It's a good thing to remember. I tell people because we do our BOSS advertising, the BOSS Blast, and a lot of times it really comes down to like what you said about the market. It is so true. We are driven by the market, right? When the market needs voiceover, they buy, not that they're not going to completely not need voiceover any given day, but there are waves. And it's always good to remember that if you're getting auditions, or you're submitting to any particular clients, corporate clients, if you're doing your own marketing, a lot of times any one particular company doesn't need a voiceover necessarily every single day. They're advertising. I don't really know one company that's advertising every single day, like hiring a voice talent. Sure, they're advertising, but it might be print. It might be email. It might be social media. They may not always be hiring a voiceover talent every single day. So remember when you send that email or that advertisement or that email for your services, remember that not every company has a new commercial every day or has a new e-learning module to do today. And that has a lot to do with offers that may come by. It just may be a whole timing issue. Pilar: Yeah, exactly. And so when those days are slow -- Anne: What do we do? Pilar: What do we do, exactly. And so one of the things that you can do is look at the business of where you are in your voiceover career. Are you sending out emails? Are you -- Anne: What's your marketing plan? Pilar: What's your marketing plan? Are you being top of mind for certain people, without being a stalker, 'cause that's something that we have to be really aware of. If you've had a client that you worked with, let's say a year ago, and you haven't heard anything or you got a new demo and you can say, hey, I just did a spot and I have a new demo. There's certain things that you can do during the slow time, during the let's say holiday times or the winter or the summer months. I was just thinking about this one very specific, slow time of the year is let's say Christmas through New Year's -- Anne: Yup, yup. Pilar: -- because nobody's thinking about that. Everybody's dealing with their Christmas presents or their Hanukkah or whatever they're getting into. Anne: Well, the majority. Pilar: The majority, true. If you're not religious, that's fine too. Anne: Yeah. International clients might be working. So there is that. Pilar: Right. Anne: Yeah. But generally slower. Pilar: It's generally slower because people don't have that. They're getting together with their families. They're planning trips. They're not necessarily thinking about the office work, and it's also end of year. So everybody's wrapping up their financial business. Anne: Well, yeah, and anything that is needed for the new year, or to end the year for the holiday, for example, any holiday advertising, hopefully they've taken care of that months before. Right? And so during that end of the year, they're hopefully planning for what's happening, you know, in the beginning of the following year. Pilar: Right. But they're not concerned with, oh, I need to hire this. They're not necessarily as concerned as they would be let's say in a heavier year for that particular company, that particular business. So it's a great opportunity to sit there and look at your plans. Anne: Absolutely, absolutely. Look at where you are right now in your career and what can you do to grow? It's the most opportune time to market yourself or figure out, if you're not marketing yourself, how you can start or how you can market your better. Pilar: Exactly. So what can you do, let's say, in those slow months? Well, you can take a class, you can work on your craft. You can look at your emails from people you've done business with, people you want to do business with, do a little bit of research. Basically we are so lucky that we live in this day and age of the Internet, because all we have to do is Google a company and see what their practices are. You can see that the health and the range of a company you're going after, you know, XYZ company, say, well, what is it that they're, they're going after? What are their spots like? What are their radio spots like? What are their TV ads? What is their marketing push, and see what could be interesting for you, let's say if you're, if you're looking at a specific company. And then when you're looking at your own stuff, everyone has a different style. Some people are really organized. Some people are not. People have, you know, little tabs that they do. They have spreadsheets. Some people are fly by night. I'm a little bit of both. I like to make lists, but I'm not necessarily a spreadsheet kind of gal. So I'll sit there and look at -- I have a very specific list where I'll look at, you know, who have I heard from? Who have I not heard? Anne: I think it's a really good time to, if you don't have a CRM or if you either invest in a CRM or take a look at your list of clients that you do have. I have a couple of different CRMs that I work with, one of them specifically because I do a marketing program, the BOSS Blast for other clients. So I am looking at that CRM and finding out, when is the last time I contacted this person, if they're not on the list to get them on that list. And I love what you were talking about in terms of researching companies that you might want to try to reach out to and contact and investigate like what's their market like? What are their new products? What is their form of reaching out to potential clients? That's one of the things that I always tell my students to do is, hey, if you want to be aligned with a company, go check out their website, sign up for their mailing list. I know I'm like, I have so much email. This is why I have like 900,000 emails that are unread, but I sign up for a lot of company email lists so that I can find out how they are marketing. And this is part of my ongoing research anyway, to make sure that I'm current and relevant in the corporate realm of things, because I do a lot of corporate narration. But that also is a very good reference for commercials as well, because companies have products, and they advertise those products. So not just for corporate narrations but for commercials and basically all sorts of voiceover applications for researching companies and finding out who they're reaching out to. Maybe they're now reaching out to a younger demographic. So what does that mean for you? So keeping that research kind of at your fingertips can really help you for when you're auditioning starts picking back up or your jobs start picking back up because you're going to be really relevant and current with trends. And I think that that's so very important that you do that, especially if you're in the middle of your career, and you may not be actively coaching with anyone right now. It's something that I do almost on a daily basis. It's market research to find out what are the trends, what are, what's getting hired? How many people that I see posting on Facebook or that are just starting off that say they don't watch commercials. Oh my goodness, no. You have to watch commercials. That's like your homework. Pilar: Yeah. I think that that is just such a goldmine that people I don't think realize. And that's part of your homework. That's, as much as it is doing research on a company, it's being aware of like big events throughout the year. Anne: Sure. Pilar: Like the Olympics. Anne: Yeah. Cultural impact. Pilar: Like the Super Bowl. Like the Oscars, all those commercials that come on, inform us what the industries are interested in right now. Anne: And why am I watching the Super Bowl mostly this year? For the commercials? Pilar: Exactly. I don't want to downplay the, the actual Super Bowl -- Anne: Oh no, I'm not downplaying, but I -- look, if your team isn't in the Super Bowl, of course. Do you know what I mean? It's not, I'm not saying I'm not watching the Super Bowl for the Super Bowl, but I also, as much as I watch the Super Bowl for the Super Bowl, I watch it for the commercials. Pilar: Exactly. And it's so interesting when there's a big event going on, you're going to see the different patterns. Like for example, if you're watching the Olympics or any Olympics or any big event, whether it's the Emmys, or Country Music Awards -- Anne: Advertising changes, yeah. Pilar: -- they are focused. They have a very, very specific demographic that they're aiming for. So it's really key as a voiceover actor to see who are they aiming for and what is it that they want, and then contributing as part of that. Because if you don't put yourself in that whole part of the process, then you're missing out on a lot. So it's really important when you do have time to think of yourself as one of the cogs in the wheel that's getting this done as you are, you're planning your financial and your email marketing throughout the year. Anne: And speaking of spending time on yourself, right, while things are slow, you can absolutely take classes. There are so many wonderful opportunities out there for educating yourself and furthering your performance, furthering your, your business acumen, all types of classes that you can take, acting classes. You know, improv, we were just talking, we had a whole episode on improv, which was phenomenal. But yeah, doing something that can help you to really get your performance kicked up a notch so that you're ready for when those auditions do come around again. Pilar: Yeah. And even, even something as simple as yoga, tai chi, centering yourself, all of that is so important because that just adds, it just gives you colors and flavors. So when you go and you do an audition, it's basically like having your own proper tools to be able to stand in front of the booth when the time comes. Because for example, this has happened to me over and over again, where I'll get an audition the night before it's due the next day, you have to come up with this accent, or you have know about this product. And I'm like, I don't know about this product. So for me, like what you're doing in terms of looking at all those emails, all the marketing, seeing how these companies work, it basically for our general knowledge, it's always, it's always important to be sort of on the pulse of what's happening. Because when the time comes and you have that audition, you have to be able to just produce it, just like that, snap. So whatever it is, whether it's a new accent or it's a new product, or it's a new idea, and you're like, okay, what is this? So that, you know, you quickly have to Google, you want to be Googling and you want to be interested and looking at the world, because that's going to help you when you're sitting there by yourself, in the booth going, what is this? Anne: Oh, yes. Look at the, I like that. Look at while you're sitting there waiting, look at the world. That's such a cool concept though. Really, get out there and look at the world. And you know, what I really love too is if you're not watching television and listening to those commercials, right, which gives you a nice, I think, pulse on trends in voiceover coming up and as they are, you know, you can also go to a really great resource on the web, like YouTube or ispotTV is amazing if you want to go check out commercials. And you know what's interesting, really understanding and really listening. You know, how many times I've gone to, I spot and you listen to a commercial. You're like, okay, in my head, I hear it this way. But in reality, if you watch it, and I noticed that you had mentioned this before is to listen with no image, right? Don't look at it, but just listen to the voiceover. And I think that's a really, really great tip. I want you to just listen to the commercial and listen to the voiceover because there's so many times where we think we hear something, but yet when you really sit back and listen without any visual, without anything else that's disrupting your focus, you're going to be able to hear those nuances. And those nuances are so, so important. A lot of times with students, I'll be like, okay, go check out this YouTube. And I don't want you to watch it. I want you to just listen to the voice and how the notes are happening and the nuances and the emotion as this piece progresses. Listen to the nuances of the voice and how they are responding and telling the story and emoting and tugging at our heart strings. That I think is so, so important. That alone, if you spent a certain amount of time per day just doing that I think would really help your performance. Pilar: Yup. You would start knowing each company that advertises, they do have a signature. It's really subtle, but then you start learning what each company's signature is. And that's so important when you go into the booth because you know, when we go into the booth, we get a spot at 6:00, and everything's, it's always rushed. But if we take the time, when things are a little slower, and we're doing this on a daily basis -- again, I mean, I'm not saying spend all day watching TV, but you spend 10 minutes -- Anne: Consider it market research. Pilar: -- let's say a couple times a day in market research, it's for your own benefit. Anne: Sure. Pilar: Something that I, I really like doing, Anne, and I do this periodically is that I go over my old conference or class notes. How many times have you opened a book and go, oh yeah. I went to this class. Anne: That was a good class. I remember that. Yup. Pilar: Do I remember anything about it? No, probably not. But when I go and I look at my notes, I go, oh yeah, that, they made a really good point. That's really important. And I think that it's so important generally when you take a class, whatever it is. And let's say you write notes, go look at your notes immediately after you've taken the class, and then look at them again one week later. Because here's the thing about learning. You know, this, 'cause you have been an educator for such a long time. The very first time we get something or we hear it, we may not necessarily get it fully. Anne: Yeah. Get 100% of it. Yep. Pilar: So to maybe see it again, we need to -- Anne: Go back, review. Pilar: -- read it again. We need to explain it to somebody because that's when it really sinks in. Anne: Sure, if you have to teach -- that's so funny that you mentioned that because one of the things that I used to do when I was a teacher in front of the class was we would have project days where the students would propose to me something that they wanted to do for their grade, like a project. And so a lot of times I would say, all right, if you want to learn this, then I want you to teach it to me, teach it back to me. So that's a really great tip there is to go back and review because you'll, you'll get all those nuances that you might've missed the first time. It's like watching a great movie, right? When you watch it a second, third, fourth time, you get all the other nuances that you miss the first time. And that I think is a great analogy to reviewing your notes. And even if you have a recording of the session, I get a lot of conferences where I get the recordings, which I can look at later. Now how many times have you ordered a course online and then you forgot about it. Right? I actually have multiple courses. I actually have a bookmark of places to go where I've bought courses that I need to go and take, or I need to go back and listen again. And so I'm going to say probably that's going to be one of the biggest, best tips that we can give, because I know it's not just me that's kind of addicted once in a while of I want to learn this, let me buy this course. And then I promptly make a log-in, a password, and then I forgot about it until three months later. And then I'm like, oh wait, I bought that course. Let me go and actually take it. So that's a perfect thing to do when things are slow, make sure you have a place -- you know, I just have a bookmark of, of courses. And so it just reminds me to go back and revisit those courses again and again, and get my money's worth. Pilar: And get your money's worth, but also for me, it's always about how can I use it in the booth because it's that moment -- you know, VO BOSSes, I know you faced this. You're sitting in your booth and you're going, I don't know how to relate to this copy, or I'm tired. I want to go to bed. I'm falling asleep, but you have to push through because it's due at a certain hour. So it's, it's basically having those tools. And that's why it's so important to listen over and over to these things again, because they're all there to help you give your best performance in the booth, whether you're auditioning or whether you're working, we talk a lot about auditioning, but then you get the job, then what you do? So you, you have to be able to have all those tools at your disposal. So having that downtime enables us to be able to kind of just sort of hone them. It's kind of like, you know, filing your nails. Anne: You know what's so interesting too? You know what else you can do in your downtime? Pilar: Yeah? Anne: You can actually like take some downtime. Pilar: This is very true. Anne: That is actually going to -- like for me, like I'm working, working, working, working, working, and then all of a sudden, whoa. Now what? Actually, like, I don't know, take a nap, go play with your fur babies, watch a great movie. I always love to watch good movies to get inspired, listen to great commercials, that sort of thing. I watch the Dodo videos, which are all about animals, you know, being saved and helped and goodness with animals. And that always just gets me emotionally, and it makes me happy. And believe it or not, that helps my performance in the booth. So yeah, take some actual time for yourself as well, because it's important for you to refresh. Whatever, whatever it takes for you to feel good, go for a run, get on the treadmill, go floating, so many things, right, that can really just help you refresh and be -- live in the moment. You know, spend time with your family, go on a vacation. Pilar: And also it's knowing that slow time is not a reflection on your performance or your ability or anything, any of that. Anne: Right. Unless that slow time is extended like for six months or so. I mean, you, you want to make sure that that slow time -- but you know, I'll tell you what, a few days here and there a week, you know, it's, it's very, very common. So I remember those first in my career, first of all, if you can stick out your career, right, and you're in it for the long haul, you'll start to learn that these ebbs and flows are normal, and you'll get more used to them. You'll get better at, I think, working through them. But in the beginning, guys, it's okay. It happens. I know so many people that will come to me, like, I don't know, what am I doing wrong? It's just slow. And I'm like, well, you know, it's been a little bit slow. So, you know, give yourself some grace, right? And in the meantime, here's what you can do. The first thing is always educate, educate, educate, right? Educate yourself. Either build a CRM, educate yourself about your clients, educate yourself about the market, what's trending, take a class. Right? All of the things that we've already talked about, work on your marketing that can help you to educate and grow. It's just the best thing that you can do, whatever you can do to grow. Even if that means taking some time off, right? To relax and get your mental health back because it's so delicate, I think, in the beginning for people who are not used to this industry, right? It's very much a mental game, very much a mental game of confidence. And you need to know that it's okay, that you will have slow days, and you need to be able to do what you can to push through them, to build up your confidence, to build up your performance, do whatever you can to grow, grow, grow. And don't let it, you know, don't let the mind start to play tricks on you. Pilar: Something, I think that's also really important is reaching out for help. Anne: Oh yeah. Pilar: Because for years I didn't have a voice over agent in Miami. I just basically found the jobs by myself. I had an on-camera agent, but I didn't have a voiceover agent. So when I came to Los Angeles, I got a voiceover agent really quickly. And then I noticed that I, I worked and worked and worked on my auditions, and I started thinking, oh my gosh, what's, what's wrong? So I actually reached out to my agents and I said, okay, I'm not booking, what do I do? Anne: What a great idea. Pilar: And so they were so helpful, and they each had just one or two lines. I mean, you know, they're so busy. It's not like they have a whole bunch of time, but they suggested I get with a few coaches. I had actually gone to one or two that they mentioned, but then I went to some others. They had some really good, it's very short sentences of critiques. And I just took that. And I was like, okay, great. And I'm going to work on it. Anne: Yeah, I love that. Pilar: And I worked on it. Anne: I love that you reached out to your agents. I think people tend to forget that it is a two-way street. You guys are partners. And you know, I think it's wonderful. If your agent can take a moment and give you feedback. And I think any good agent will do that to help you, because you guys are partners. I mean, you help them make money. They help promote you. So I think that it's, it's important that you do reach out for help. And you know what, reach out for help from your peers too. I think peer groups can really help when things get tough -- Pilar: People that you trust, people that you trust. Anne: People that you trust, and when you get down on yourself or maybe you're, you're lacking confidence, a group like that can help. It's one of the reasons why I put together the VO Peeps group so long ago. We were also isolated and it was to have a community which we could lift each other up. And I think that that is, that is absolutely important, when things get slow and you start silently going, oh my God, do I even belong in this industry? That's time to reach out, you know, reach out to your community, reach out for help. We're all here for you. BOSSes. We're here for you. So you can always reach out and come to us for encouragement, confidence to lift each other up. Pilar: And if you don't see something like that in your community, go ahead and start one. Anne: Yeah. Pilar: Because for example, I, I, one day I just kind of lucked into this play reading class. They read new plays. It's every couple of weeks. And I go and I read. They give me a role and I read. Is there any monetary gain? No. Do I get a lot out of it? I get to read out loud. That's just priceless. I'm going to start another new reading accountability class. Anne: Yeah. I love that. I love that. Pilar: Just to read. D Anne: Don't let your auditions be your practice ground. Do you know what I mean? Pilar: Yes, yes. Anne: Like I think that, you -- remember, your auditions or your work so glad you brought that up because you know, like I tell my students every day -- I give them enough homework, you know, I just like, I don't want you to be bored ever. You need to do something every single day that is voiceover related, and you need to practice. I think if you're at a certain level, it's wonderful to have that support of the community and to be able to work out and perform in front of each other. Be careful because depending on the group, you want to make sure you have somebody that has some experience in there that can give you some critique that is valuable to you. I think if there's a ton of, you know, maybe beginners in the peer group, it may not be as effective as it could be with somebody that has some experience in casting or directing. But it is so very valuable for you to practice that read every day. And don't let that be on your auditions. Really. Pilar: Yes. Anne: If you can spend 20 minutes a day just reading scripts, I think that that really, really helps, and also working out, it's another, again, another reason why I have VO Peeps, and we have workouts every month. We have a couple of different workouts every month. It's just so, so valuable to keeping those, those skills honed, and you know, and in check. So. Pilar: And I will give a tip that I think is probably the most important tip that I will give. If you have a cat, you can read to him. Anne: I love it. I love it. Yes. You can read to your fur babies. And your babies. Pilar: I just did that last night. I'm preparing a monologue for an audition. And I was like, you know what? He's right there. What the heck, why not? Anne: They're our biggest supporters. Pilar: They are. Anne: What a great conversation, Pilar. Great tips. Thank you so much. I'm excited. So remember guys, when things are slow, they don't have to be slow. You've got a lot of, you've got a lot of stuff to do. There's a lot of alternatives here. Pilar: You have a lot of homework. Anne: Yeah. Pilar: That's important. Anne: There you go. So I would like to give a great, big shout-out to our sponsor, 100 Voices Who Care. This is a unique chance, guys, for you to use your voice and make a difference and give back to the communities that give to you. You can visit 100voiceswhocare.org to find out more. Also love to give a great, big shout-out to our long-time sponsor, ipDTL. You too can connect, and network like BOSSes like Pilar and I. Find out more at ipdtl.com. You guys, have an amazing week. We'll see you next week. Pilar: I'm so glad we had this time together. Anne: Good bye, goodbye. Pilar: Goodbye. Anne: Bye, guys. >> Join us next week for another edition of VO BOSS with your host Anne Ganguzza. And take your business to the next level. Sign up for our mailing list at voboss.com and receive exclusive content, industry revolutionizing tips and strategies, and new ways to rock your business like a BOSS. Redistribution with permission. Coast to coast connectivity via ipDTL.

The Todd Herman Show
“According to authorities'' - the era of the thought-bosses and how to end it; What Yale Law students think of us; Bill Gates says no one knew the Covid Flu was less deadly than the flu for most people until he figured it out; Gates also admits shutti

The Todd Herman Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 50:21


THE THESIS: The Party cannot function if people are able to reason from positions of actual authority--the Word of God--and what it creates: observable, falsifiable scientific fact; mathematical certantites; absolute moral clarity. That's why The Party is pushing “Appeal to Authority” down on people. We, though, have spiritual immunity to that tactic and must pass it on to people.  THE SCRIPTURE & SCRIPTURAL RESOURCES:  Matthew 5:1-12 5 Now when Jesus saw the crowds, he went up on a mountainside and sat down. His disciples came to him, 2 and he began to teach them. He said: 3 “Blessed are the poor in spirit,     for theirs is the kingdom of heaven. 4 Blessed are those who mourn,     for they will be comforted. 5 Blessed are the meek,     for they will inherit the earth. 6 Blessed are those who hunger and thirst for righteousness,     for they will be filled. 7 Blessed are the merciful,     for they will be shown mercy. 8 Blessed are the pure in heart,     for they will see God. 9 Blessed are the peacemakers,     for they will be called children of God. 10 Blessed are those who are persecuted because of righteousness,     for theirs is the kingdom of heaven. 11 “Blessed are you when people insult you, persecute you and falsely say all kinds of evil against you because of me. 12 Rejoice and be glad, because great is your reward in heaven, for in the same way they persecuted the prophets who were before you. THE NEWS & COMMENT: BLOCK 1 In what may be the purest distillation of Yale Law School of all time, YLS students declare, in chalk: “WE ARE THE LAW.” [AUDIO] - “We didn't understand that it's a fairly low fatality rate and that it's a disease mainly in the elderly, kind of like flu is, although a bit different than that.” - Bill Gates [AUDIO] - Bill Gates admits that shutting down schools was a bad call; it didn't stop case growth and the education deficit will take years to recover from. Lockdown skeptics were right again and punished for it. [AUDIO] - mRNA Vaccines Lead to Spike Protein Entering Nucleus, Rise in Vascular Events, 40 Percent Increase in ‘All Cause Deaths': Dr. Urso Union College Student Booted for Rejecting Vaccine Booster After Having Serious Side Effects  [AUDIO] - The average ballot trafficker made 38 TRIPS to drop boxes. And it's on tape! “Governor Kemp…covered it up for 7 months,” says #TrueTheVote founder Catherine Engelbrecht. #Georgia officials last week issued subpoenas to obtain the identities of individuals and NGOs who may have engaged in #BallotTrafficking. Florida Voter Integrity Law Reinstated By Appeals Court In Big Win For DeSantis; So no funny business is permitted in Florida elections under the law restricting ballot harvesting, dropboxes, and private money to run elections. Democrats are out of Zuck. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Retro Ridoctopus
S4E9 - Ep 076: Battlin' Like a Boss (with 8BitGlitch79)

Retro Ridoctopus

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 166:32


We welcome our buddy Shaun (8BitGlitch79) back to the show to talk about one of the most memorable aspects of any video game, the BOSSES!! Whether they're in charge of a single stage or are the final challenge waiting at the end, these characters are sure to make an impact. We'll tackle the more iconic "last guys" first, spotlighting iconic final bosses who come back again and again over multiple entries of a given series. Later on, we each choose 3 (possibly more obscure) battles that were really memorable to us personally. Thrown in the middle is a musical interlude of an OCTOPONDER, where we'll play your favorite boss battle theme! Overall, this is an episode that video game fans won't want to miss! Check out the 8BitGlitch79 channel on YouTube! ----------------------------------------Retro Ridoctopus is:• Parasite Steve (read)• 8-Bit Alchemy (listen)• Nintenjoe (subscribe)----------------------------------------All original heavy metal music by Enchanted Exile Retro Ridoctopus is part of the Dorkening Podcast Network, the Inebri-Art Podcast Network and is brought to you by Deadly Grounds Coffee! Find out more at https://retro-ridoctopus.pinecast.co This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

Boss Better Now with Joe Mull
Employee Intimidates Boss + Help Coming for Bosses

Boss Better Now with Joe Mull

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 41:02


How should you respond to an employee who challenges everything you say? In this week's episode, we answer a listener question about facing off with a wannabe manager. Plus, there's help coming for bosses in a lot of different places. That's ahead now on Boss Better Now.

The Sporting News 7
Showtime Shohei bosses it in Boston, the Penguins stand by their man, and it's welcome to Miami for the stars of Formula One

The Sporting News 7

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 7:09


The Sporting News 7 brings you the 7 biggest sports stories in 7 minutes at 7am. Building on the award-winning journalism of The Sporting News, you'll get all you need to know in one handy bitesize podcast. From NFL to NBA, the best of fight sports and all the international action, you won't miss a thing. Hosted by Demetria Obilor, the Sporting News 7 is a unique take on the day's big sports events - available to listen to wherever and whenever you want.For more great sporting insight, go to sportingnews.com or @sportingnews.Produced by Daft Doris.Related links:https://www.sportingnews.com/us/nba/news/dillon-brooks-grizzlies-flagrant-foul-suspended/nkb9mwvup9wkk5oeni9xqtgnhttps://www.sportingnews.com/us/boxing/news/canelo-alvarez-dmitry-bivol-best-division/tffx2qcixregznyim3ko8kryhttps://www.sportingnews.com/us/formula-1/news/formula-1-miami-schedule-2022-race-qualifying/a8p1jjbaqghu3o2b5ifojq12https://www.sportingnews.com/us/soccer/news/rangers-vs-rb-leipzig-score-europa-league-semi-final/lkkcfg2acu2iek7mleaolczhToday's episode includes the following:https://daftdor.is/3wbJTEvhttps://daftdor.is/387pVD3https://daftdor.is/37lwtxBhttps://daftdor.is/3LSMzO2https://daftdor.is/39IMazFhttps://daftdor.is/3KRcPqWhttps://daftdor.is/3vNrajDhttps://daftdor.is/3w7xXUuhttps://daftdor.is/3KNxL24https://daftdor.is/3shBEWn See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Pretty Rich
252. UNSTUCK YOURSELF WITH SHEILA BELLA, CEO OF PRETTY RICH BOSSES

Pretty Rich

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 13:15


Have you ever felt trapped indecision or like you can't move forward with promoting yourself or your beauty biz because something is holding your back. Well Sheila knows what that something is... you. But how do you conquer this fear of others judging your before even putting yourself out there? In this episode Sheila walks you throw her guide  on how to weigh in and make decisions towards your business in order to keep your needle moving forward.  //Download the worksheet to this episode by clicking on this link: www.sheilabella.com/unstuck  //VISIT https://www.sheilabella.com/financialhealth   //VISIT https://www.sheilabella.com/event to register for Pretty Ambitious Summit 2023   //Visit: Sheilabella.com/apply to sign up for a free 60-minute strategy call to learn more about Pretty Rich Bosses and set you on a path of success for your business.   RESOURCES: FREE RESOURCES   https://sheilabella.com/free   // F O L L O W Website | www.SheilaBella.com Instagram | www.instagram.com/RealSheilaBella   // PODCAST: https://www.sheilabella.com/prettyrichpodcast

Leadermorphosis
Ep. 74 Matt Perez on going from a fiat hierarchy to a radical company without bosses or employees

Leadermorphosis

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 44:50


Matt Perez realised that his successful career as a boss in a Silicon Valley tech company had made him a worse person and so he co-founded Nearsoft in 2007 to be a company that works for everyone. His recent book, Radical Companies Without Bosses or Employees, takes self-organisation one step further to include co-ownership so that people aren't dependent on what he calls ‘enlightened monarchs.' We talk about what he's been learning, including the development of a distribution mechanism that decentralises ownership and supports egalitarian and equitable wealth sharing based on contribution. Resources: Matt's book ‘Radical Companies' Related Leadermorphosis episodes: Listen to the episode with Anabel Montiel to learn more about Nearsoft Listen to the episode with Jabi Salcedo and Dunia Reverter from K2K

The Fighting Entrepreneur
[VIDEO BONUS] [Ask Anik] Should Employees Work Hard & Are Bosses Evil?

The Fighting Entrepreneur

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 54:41


Join Anik Singal on the very first official episode of “Ask Anik” with host Joe Ennis.    In today's episode, Anik reveals his thoughts on today's work culture, how to get the most out of the employee/employer relationship, and MUCH more.   Joe's interview with Anik is truly “no holds barred” and covers a ton of ground, including… How to find a true work/life balance…   Navigating the employee/employer relationship…   Finding “value” beyond money in your work…   What it means to “pay your dues” these days…   The attitude he took as an employee that served him so well…   His thoughts on the 2022 inflation problem…   It was truly a wide-ranging interview.   Plus, Anik touched on his transition to fatherhood and all the BIG changes happening in his life.   “Ask Anik” is a new series within The Fighting Entrepreneur Podcast that will go live every Friday.

The Fighting Entrepreneur
[Ask Anik] Should Employees Work Hard & Are Bosses Evil?

The Fighting Entrepreneur

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 54:34


Join Anik Singal on the very first official episode of “Ask Anik” with host Joe Ennis.    In today's episode, Anik reveals his thoughts on today's work culture, how to get the most out of the employee/employer relationship, and MUCH more.   Joe's interview with Anik is truly “no holds barred” and covers a ton of ground, including… How to find a true work/life balance…   Navigating the employee/employer relationship…   Finding “value” beyond money in your work…   What it means to “pay your dues” these days…   The attitude he took as an employee that served him so well…   His thoughts on the 2022 inflation problem…   It was truly a wide-ranging interview.   Plus, Anik touched on his transition to fatherhood and all the BIG changes happening in his life.   “Ask Anik” is a new series within The Fighting Entrepreneur Podcast that will go live every Friday.

19 Nocturne Boulevard
19 Nocturne Boulevard - B&B Investigations, Case 2: THE NAKED TRUTH (Reissue of the Week)

19 Nocturne Boulevard

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 33:01


Cold Read: https://discord.gg/c3jagscRVb Deadeye Kid:  http://www.19nocturneboulevard.net/all_show_pages/deadeye%20kid/DeadeyeKidmain.htm THE NAKED TRUTH B&B Investigations returns, and this time Paul and Donna have been hired by the personal assistant to Mr. Emperor (of Emperor Pictures), himself. (For case #1, check out Cry Wolf) Cast List Paul Bette - Joel Harvey Donna Bella - Julie Hoverson Captain Oftheguard - Reynaud LeBoeuf Willard  - Barry Northern (Cast Macabre) Tom - Justin Charles (1st Draft Productions) Dick - Big Anklevitch (Dunesteef Audio Magazine) Herbie Taylor - Glen Hallstrom Goldy Taylor - Crystal Thomson Mr. Emperor - Rish Outfield (Dunesteef Audio Magazine) Sherry - Gwendolyn Jensen-Woodard (Gypsy Audio) Shop Steward - Scott Pigg Argus - J. Christopher Dunn Soda Jerk - Mike Campbell Music by Somewhere Off Jazz Street and Incompetech.com Editing and Sound:   Julie Hoverson Cover Design:  Brett Coulstock   "What kind of a place is it? Why it's private investigator's office, can't you tell?" *********************************************** THE NAKED TRUTH Cast: Olivia Paul Bette Donna Bella Captain Oftheguard Willard Goldy Taylor Herbie Taylor Tom, Dick Mr. Emperor Sherry Shop steward Argus Soda Jerk OLIVIA     Did you have any trouble finding it?  What do you mean, what kind of a place is it?  Why, it's a private detective's office, can't you tell?  MUSIC 1_EMPLOYEE SOUND    OFFICE SOUND    DOOR UNLOCKS, OPENS PAUL    Right this way, sir.  Sorry to have kept you waiting. SOUND    STEPS, DOOR WILLARD    As one of Mr. Emperor's personal assistants, I am not used to-- PAUL    Of course not.  Please, step into my office and have a seat.  I'll get you some coffee? WILLARD    Don't you have staff for that? PAUL    This is pretty much a two-person office... WILLARD    Well, where's your assistant? PAUL    She's-- SOUND    OUTER DOOR OPENS, STEPS BREEZE IN DONNA    Paul?  You're here early. WILLARD    Speak of the devil? PAUL    Hold on just one moment.  SOUND    STEPS, DOOR SHUTS PAUL    Shh.  There's a client. DONNA    Oh?  Great! PAUL    Well, I think he thinks that-- WILLARD    [behind wall, raised voice] Mr. Emperor would never put up with tardiness in his employees. DONNA    [burning] Employees? PAUL    I didn't say anything, he just assumed. DONNA    What? PAUL    Don't get worked up - you know, this is the biz, sweetheart. DONNA    What? PAUL    The client is always right.  Humor him, and we'll have a plum job - he's a personal assistant to Mr. Emperor. DONNA    [big payoff] WHA--?  [then, back to normal suddenly] Of Emperor film studios?  Ooh! WILLARD    [raised, through door] I'm still waiting for my coffee! 2_VO_FEMALE MUSIC FOR VOICEOVER PAUL    The sad fact of detective work - it's just not a job you expect to find a female in, and people have a hard time accepting that my partner in the firm of B&B Investigations - and in fact one of said B's on the door - DONNA    The smarter B. PAUL    Don't be snippy.  It's really not my fault.  DONNA    [sigh] I know.  PAUL    Is Donna Bella, my partner. DONNA    It grates that so many men just don't seem to feel like women - particulary pretty women-- PAUL    Or beauties. DONNA    Me?  Oh, silly!  They don't feel that we can be more than princesses, secretaries, sorceresses, social climbers, or damsels in distress.  Sure, some women make it to prominence for their brains, and then every pair of pants around says "wow, ain't she unusual?" and we gals suffer in silence. PAUL    [hinting] On the other hand, it makes for a good cover - flying way under the radar - to be able to watch goings-on and take notes. DONNA    [reluctant] True. PAUL    Feeling any better? DONNA    A bit.  I guess. PAUL    I probably should... talk to the client? DONNA    Go on ahead.  I'll muse a moment longer. PAUL    [careful] Would you... bring us coffee when you're done?  [quickly]  I mean, let him think that you're-- DONNA    Yeah, yeah.  I'll give you the one without. PAUL    Without what? DONNA    [dark] I have't decided yet. PAUL    [goes off, chuckling] DONNA    The only thing that makes this job bearable - apart from the whole thrill of the chase, which is fun - is my partner, Paul Bette.  Big brute that he is, he never underestimates me.  I think he regards me as a little brother in a dress, which ain't a real pretty picture - you should see his little brother.  Sometimes, I wish he did see me as a woman - in a dress - and treat me like one.  Ah, forget it. MUSIC CUTS OUT 3_CHICORY SOUND    DOOR OPENS DONNA    [way too perky] Two coffees! WILLARD    And about time. PAUL    [sigh] I explained to you about the errend I sent her on-- WILLARD    Yes, yes of course.  But-- PAUL    And this office doesn't exactly put me in Mr. Emperor's class for choice of-- WILLARD    [accepting] Ah, well. [sips, smacks lips]  Interesting flavor. PAUL    [worried] What is it? DONNA    [daggers] Chicory. WILLARD    Hmm.  Yes.  Amusing.  PAUL    Can we get down to business? DONNA    Do you need me to stay? WILLARD    Doesn't she take shorthand or something? PAUL    She does, but [overriding her] she does it out at her desk, over the intercom.  Less distracting that way. DONNA    [huffs as she leaves] SOUND    TAPS OF HER FEET, DOOR SHUTS WILLARD    [confidential] If you plan to keep that one around for... looks, you simply must find an ugly one to do the work. PAUL    Not a bad idea.  Though a bit sexist. WILLARD    I am in the film business. PAUL    Ah.  Now what is the nature of your problem? WILLARD    You are familiar with the prestigious filmography of Mr. Emperor? PAUL    Golden idols, plaques, every movie a winner.  Of course. WILLARD    [coughs delicately] Almost every movie a winner. PAUL    [knowing] Oh, yes.  But still an impressive reputation. WILLARD    And not one to be trifled with.  Unfortunately, my master also suffers from a terrible case of ...hubris. PAUL    Shouldn't he see a doctor? WILLARD    [dry] Funny.  No, it's only-- [sighs, trying to find the right word]  PAUL    Be blunt, this is all confidential. WILLARD    [resigned sigh] It's his ego.  It has simply swollen so large he can no longer see past it.  PAUL    [confused] And you want me to help with that? WILLARD    No, no, it's the consequences which disturb me.  I just don't know where to start... PAUL    The beginning is usually a good bet. WILLARD    Six months ago, a consortium of ...people found their way into Mr. Emperor's social sphere... MUSIC FOR VOICEOVER 4_VO_RODOMONTADE DONNA    Goodness, what a mouth.  He must have it embroidered on his underwear somewhere - "thou shalt not utilize a single clear and plain word when ten or a dozen fancy choices will do the trick."  I was hard put not to fall asleep right on the intercom.  And what did it all boil down to?  He suspected a couple of scam artists of lining his boss up for a sting.  But could he just cut to the point and say that?  Indubitably in the negative. PAUL    The details were interesting but not conclusive. DONNA    There were actual details in there? PAUL    Yes.  This trio had wormed their way into emperor's inner circle, and pitched him on a movie they wanted to make.  He thought it sounded like a winner, didn't run it past anyone, and didn't even stop to read the script - just trusted his instinct that they would be "the next big thing."  He set them up in a closed soundstage, and handed them a check.  Since then, they've been needing more and more money for all those ...things movies have-- DONNA    Actors, costumes, sets, props, film-- PAUL    Yeah, but there's no proof they've ever spent a dime of it.  They've made a big deal of auditioning a bunch of hopefuls-- DONNA    Mostly by letting themselves be wined and dined by all the big names.  Or worse. PAUL    And no one even knows if this movie is actually being made.  DONNA    And Mr. Emperor doesn't suspect anything? PAUL    I dunno.  Willard seemed to think his boss might be beginning to suspect something, but he's got so much invested in the damn project, he can't step away.  His whole ego and reputation - both more monumental than his wallet - are so tied up in this.  He's never had a flop before-- DONNA    Well, there was the one. PAUL    Right - he mentioned something like that.  What's the deal? DONNA    A silly little flick called Gone with the Wind - ever see it? PAUL    Nope. DONNA    Well, neither did anyone else.  Who'd ever buy a story of three pigs and a wolf anyway? MUSIC    NOT QUITE A "WAH-WAH-WAH" 5_OFTHEGUARD SOUND    MUSIC IS INTERRUPTED BY A PHONE RINGING DONNA    Should I get that, [snotty] "Mister Bette"? PAUL    Would you? DONNA    [sullen] Fine.  SOUND    PHONE SNATCHED UP DONNA    [too sultry] B&B Investigations.  How may I direct your call, to B or B? OFTHEGUARD    [on the phone] Donna?  What's got into you? DONNA    Oh, Captain Oftheguard!  [hah!]  I'm just covering the front while we decide on hiring a new secretary. PAUL    A new secretary--? DONNA    Our last one...um... won a bundle of dough in a radio contest and ran off to Barbados.  Who'd'a thunk that being able to name all the dancing princesses--  OFTHEGUARD    Cut the malarkey, Donna.  Is Bette there?  I need to speak to him. DONNA    Yes.  Of course. OFTHEGUARD    [pointed] Alone. DONNA    [to Paul] Everyone wants you today.  SOUND    SLAMS THE RECEIVER ONTO THE TABLE DONNA    I'll just go... buy some shoes or some other feminine pursuit. SOUND    SHE LEAVES - FEET, RUSTLE PAUL    Donna?  What--? SOUND    DOOR SLAMS SOUND    VOICE ON THE PHONE, VERY SMALL AND DISTORTED PAUL    Damn.  [growl]  SOUND    SNATCHES UP THE PHONE PAUL    [still a growl] What? OFTHEGUARD    What brownie crawled in your shoe?  MUSIC IN DONNA    I left them to their little boy games and decided to do the one thing Paul would never think of.  Or approve of. PAUL    [distant] Huh?  What?  DONNA    See you in the movies, babe. PAUL    [getting closer] Movies?  What movies? MUSIC OUT PAUL    [echoey] Donna? OFTHEGUARD    No, it's Oftheguard.  Ain't Donna with you? PAUL    She just stormed out of here. OFTHEGUARD    That girl has a temper.  Anyway, I wanted to discuss her birthday. PAUL    Birthday?  What?  OFTHEGUARD    Didn't you know?  It's Friday night, and I was wondering what kind of arrangements you mighta made.  PAUL    Oh.  We've been really busy here--  [still wondering] Movies? OFTHEGUARD    What? PAUL    Nothing.  [back on point] Friday.  Birthday.  Arrangements.  Right. MUSIC IN 6_AUDITION DONNA    [quiet] I stood outside the studio where the fancy schmancy new movie was supposedly being filmed - a huge building out on the docks with no windows and only one door. MUSIC OUT AMB    PIER SOUND    DOORBELL BUZZER TOM    [on intercom]  Sorry!  Ain't hiring today.  Closed set. DONNA    [breathy, sexy] Oh, please!  I just came in on a bus from Punkinville, and want so badly to be in moving pictures! TOM    Step up to the peephole - there on the left.  Saaaaaay.  You're a real beaut, ain'tcha? DONNA    It has been said.  Back home in Peter Piper Iowa, I was the beauty queen! TOM    I thought you said you were from Punkinville. DONNA    [thinking madly] Oh... I-- [drops voice] Punkinville is the bad side of Peter Piper. TOM    Why don't you come on in?  [lecherous] I might be able to squeeze in a screen test. SOUND    BUZZ, DOOR OPENS DONNA    [deep breath] Thank you ever so.  [muttered] Just be careful what you're squeezing. SOUND    WALKS INTO ECHOEY SPACE 7_EXIT STAGE LEFT MUSIC IN PAUL    I had no idea where Donna had got to, after our little dustup that morning.  And I was skeptical about Oftheguard's ideas for a party.  SOUND    CAR SNEAKS IN PAUL    Seemed pretty frivolous for a captain of his standing, but he was also an old friend of Donna's.  I decided to cut right to the chase and go to the studio. SOUND    CAR BRAKES, SOUND OF PIER PAUL    Work can usually take my mind off of-- SOUND    DOOR BEING SLAMMED OPEN, BODY FALLING OUT TOM    Whoooooah!  [being tossed out] PAUL    I realized Donna had beaten me to the punch. SOUND    CAR DOOR OPENS PAUL    [gasp, startled] SOUND    DONNA GETTING IN DONNA    I don't want to talk about it. PAUL    What's in there? DONNA    I didn't get a chance to see much. PAUL    What happened? SOUND    SNAP FINGERS MUSIC IN SUDDENLY DONNA    I didn't want to talk about it, but he just couldn't seem to take a hint. PAUL    Got it.  Fine. DONNA    Since I hadn't seen more than ten feet into the building - MOST of that being hallway, it wouldn't do ANY good to hash it over anyway. PAUL    I've got it.  Seriously. DONNA    And all because I would not could not on a couch-- PAUL    He offered you breakfast? DONNA    Just drop it! MUSIC OUT 8_BACK TO OFFICE SOUND    MOMENT OF SILENCE, CAR STARTS PAUL    We need to find a way in. DONNA    [almost steaming again] Oh? PAUL    I'm thinking a little piecework. DONNA    [more] OH? PAUL    All it would take is a little pounding, drilling.  In and out.  Simple. DONNA    [furious] OOOOH? PAUL    [noticing her anger]  uh, do you have a problem with me doing some construction work? DONNA    Oh! PAUL    What did you think I meant? DONNA    Nothing! MUSIC IN PAUL    No, really. DONNA    I want to go back to the office.  We do have some bleach there, don't we? PAUL    [narrating]  Back at the office, the phone was ringing. SOUND    QUICK STEPS, PICK UP PHONE PAUL    Hello? WILLARD    Hello? PAUL    Yes, can I help you? WILLARD    Is there anyone there? PAUL    What? DONNA    The music! SOUND    SNAP FINGERS MUSIC OUT 9_PHONE PAUL    Right. WILLARD    Ah, I was wondering.  I have been phoning for simply ages.  Where's your assistant been? DONNA    [dark] I've been to the palace to see the queen. PAUL    [to her, covering handset] No need for that!  [back to the phone]  What did you need? DONNA    [walking away] And pussycat pussycat, what'd you do there? PAUL    [muttered aside] pattycake or not, it's dang sexy when she speaks foreign. DONNA    [almost gone, loud] I'm getting ready to kick what he puts in a chair! SOUND    DOOR SLAMS PAUL    [interested] Oooh! [back to the phone] Sorry about that.  Employee relations. WILLARD    You're not relating to her on MY time, are you? PAUL    [growling] Anything on YOUR time will turn up on an expense account, bub.  Now, what were you calling about? WILLARD    [grumbling] You still need a secretary for the real work.  [up]  Mr. Emperor has finally nailed them down on a debut - Friday night at Grimm's Chinese theater - and we have to DO something before then!  If this is another bomb, he will be ruined! PAUL    We're on it. WILLARD    as long as you're not both on it at the same time, I'll be happy.  Goodbye! PAUL    [GROWLS]  Music! MUSIC COMES IN, BUT DOOR OF OFFICE OPENS A1_GOLDY GOLDY    Hello? MUSIC CUTS OUT PAUL    Uh, what? GOLDY    You're looking for a secretary. PAUL    I'm - what? GOLDY    [long suffering sigh]  Look, I don't mind working for chump change, or even schlepping for a brute like you - no offense-- PAUL    None taken. GOLDY    But I do try to work for folks who get some vocabulary.  I learned.  Had a job once taking dictation from this big black bird.  Couldn't say nothing but-- PAUL    Nevermind.  I'm just surprised.  We haven't actually advertised yet. GOLDY    Oh, sorry!  I spoke with-- [deliberately trails off] PAUL    Donna? GOLDY    Is she here? PAUL    [yes] She's in her office. GOLDY    Then no, not her.  This was a... [thinks]  ...a client. PAUL    Oh, Mr. Emperor's assistant. GOLDY    Yeah.  Him.  He suggested I come by. PAUL    Can you type? GOLDY    You bet. PAUL    Answer phones? GOLDY    I got a gold-plated ear. PAUL    [serious] Really? GOLDY    No. PAUL    Cause I knew a girl once, with-- GOLDY    Do I get the job? PAUL    I have to check with Donna first.  [up] Donna? DONNA    [from off] Still annoyed! PAUL    This might cheer you up! SOUND    DOOR OPENS, SHE STRIDES IN DONNA    What? GOLDY    [admiring] Well, look at you. DONNA    Who's looking at me, kid? PAUL    She came here for the secretary job.  Donna Bella, this is-- uh-- GOLDY    Ms. Lox.  But you can call me Goldy. MUSIC IN PAUL    Goldy's resume looked good-- DONNA    --and freshly typed-- PAUL    So we left her in charge and went looking for a way into the soundstage. GOLDY    Is that the Emperor pictures soundstage you were talking about? PAUL    Hey, this is a voiceover, not a party line. GOLDY    Hmph.  Coulda fooled me. PAUL    Lets take a drive.  Get some privacy.  DONNA    [romantic] Really Paul?      It's so sudden. MUSIC CUTS OUT SUDDENLY A2_PRIVATE CAR SOUND    CAR TURNS ON PAUL    That's exactly what I'm worried about. DONNA    Huh? PAUL    The way she showed up.  Very sudden. DONNA    Oh.  Did you lock up the petty cash? PAUL    Doll, our cash is so petty it ain't worth it. DONNA    [chuckles] So why do you think she popped up just now?  With a freshly minted resume? PAUL    I'm thinking someone's caught onto that valet's worry, and wants to keep tabs on us. DONNA    The potential swindlers? PAUL    We'll see.  MUSIC IN PAUL    [muttered]  Follow my lead.  [up]  Since the front door approach had been nixed, I figured on checking out the loading docks. DONNA    Ah!  Drop me at the union hall, wouldja? PAUL    Donna had a promising line of inquiry.  [side of mouth, teasing] Voice over... DONNA    I figured if there was anything coming in and going out - apart from money, there'd be someone at the local 509 who kept an eye on it. PAUL    Can't do anything in the film industry without teamsters. DONNA    [back at him] Voice over.... [whispered] I'll take the voiceover in 15 minutes.  When you're done, you mention a llama. PAUL    [whispered] Beast or priest? DONNA    [whispered] Either way. PAUL    Dropping her off, I went on down to the docks, figuring on asking around, finding out who catered the shop.  Bye, sweets. DONNA    [blows a kiss]  See ya!  SOUND     CAR DOOR SLAMS PAUL    Smart as a whip.  [musing] That's just one of those things you say, but when you really think about it, how smart IS a whip?  And who would ever ask to be "whipped"? SOUND    DRIVING AGAIN PAUL    I found a parking space down at the end of the marina, out of sight, but close enough in case someone decided to take a run-out powder. DONNA    Speaking of powder, I decided to stop in at a Rex druggist for a new compact and a bite to eat. MUSIC OUT A3_SODA JERK DONNA    Bet you get a lot of movie folks in here. JERK    [squeaking] Here?  [clears his throat]  Here?  I mean, not so's you'd notice, why? DONNA    Aren't they making a film down on the pier, there? JERK    Are they?  I haven't heard anything.  Who's in it? DONNA    I was hoping you'd know. JERK    No, but I know who to ask. DONNA    Oh?  Who? JERK    There's this old guy comes in here a lot.  Big nose.  He seems to know everyone.  Baron, Baron--- DONNA    Munchausen?  Hah!  Oops, is that the time?  I was supposed to meet the local shop steward. MUSIC IN DONNA    There's two ways to deal with teamsters.  Hire them and pay them a good wage, or don't hire them and pay them anyway.  That was what all the hullabaloo was about the sorcerer's apprentice - making brooms that can tote water is the worst kind of scab labor. Of course, there are exceptions, and I found out this was one of those. MUSIC OUT A4_TEAMSTERS STEWARD    Foreign soil. DONNA    What? STEWARD    That pier.  Used to be the embassy for Atlantis. DONNA    But Atlantis sank. STEWARD    Yeah, but that pier is still foreign soil.  Any work done there is subject to the local laws.  Of Atlantis. DONNA    But what about things going in and out?  Surely you must be handling deliveries? STEWARD    We would have to.  But there ain't none.  None at all, and we've been keeping our sharpest eye on them.  [up] Argus? ARGUS    Yeah, boss? DONNA    Wow.  I'd hate to be your optometrist. ARGUS    Guess I'm lucky I got 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20-- DONNA     I got it. ARGUS    --vision, eh? DONNA    Yeah.  So, you haven't seen ANYone coming or going? ARGUS    Didn't say that - a couple guys are in and out.  Just not goods or anything that we'd have to handle. DONNA    But the film crew-- ARGUS    What film crew?  It's just these three guys.  No one else. STEWARD    So the crew must be living in there, too.  Which would be a housing board violation, except... DONNA    Foreign soil.  Right.  Thanks for the   help, guys.  Oops - I'm running a bit late.  Come on! SOUND    SNAP FINGERS MUSIC IN DONNA    I wonder when my new music will arrive.  [sigh, up]  It was a mystery all right.  Somehow they had a set with no setup, a cast with no costumes, and a crew with no shore leave.  Far as anyone might know, it could be a big empty building - empty except for the oodles of gold Emperor was pouring into it.  And if there was truly nothing - how to save the studio, avoid embarrassment, and catch the crooks, all at once.  It was about time to grab those three guys and set them adrift in a leaky tub. PAUL    Lama. DONNA    Just like that? PAUL    Yup. Can you get back to the office on your own? DONNA    Ain't a hackie I can't handle. PAUL    Meet you there.  I'll take this for a while. DONNA    Oh, right-- PAUL AND DONNA    [unison, teasing] Voice-over.  [both laugh] PAUL    I had found something - something very interesting - out back of the warehouse, and was bringing it back to the office to examine it more closely.  Too bad it was a little hard to fit into the car.  That was reason enough to get Donna to find her own way home. DONNA    Like a little lamb, dragging my tail behind me? PAUL    Only you could make pattycake sound sexy. DONNA    You should see what I can do with [very sexy] Pease porridge HOT. PAUL    [interested growl] Save it!  Rowr! DONNA    Can we get to the office, already? PAUL    Sounds good. MUSIC OUT A5_HERBIE SOUND    DOOR OPENS, SHE WALKS IN GOLDY    Welcome to B&B Investigations.  Can I-- Oh!  [shrug]  Ehh.  Good practice, I suppose. DONNA    [stunned]  What... happened? GOLDY    Whaddaya mean? DONNA    It's so... clean.  You didn't have a horde of magic forest animals in here, did you? SOUND    DOOR OPENS GOLDY    [hurried] Uh, no.  I just didn't have a lot to do.  [uneasy] I ain't real fond of forests.  Or animals. PAUL    Ahem. GOLDY    Present company excluded. PAUL    Good. SOUND    HE WALKS IN, STRUGGLING MAN WITH HIM HERBIE    Mrph.  Urk. [struggling noises, bag on head] GOLDY    But I draw the line at kidnapping!  What did you do to that poor mug?  PAUL    I put a bag on his head. HERBIE    [muffled] Goldy? GOLDY    [cussing] Oh, Porridge! DONNA    Oh, no, you're not going anywhere, sweetheart. SOUND    DOOR SLAMS, LOCKS GOLDY    You lemme go, or I swear I'll break a chair - on your pretty little auburn head! SOUND    BAG OFF OF HEAD HERBIE    Goldy!  What's all this about, my little housebreaker? DONNA    Whoever you are, you're not alone, and you're embarrassing Ms. Lox. GOLDY    Thank you.  HERBIE    Ms. Lox?  Yeah, twenty years ago, maybe.  Since then, she's been my wife, Goldy Tailor! DONNA    I thought I recognized you.  Aren't you that guy who--? GOLDY     Oh, don't bring it up.  Please! HERBIE    What's wrong with a man taking credit for his past achievements?  So I took out 7 in one blow. GOLDY    Yeah, twenty years ago, maybe.  And they were flies.  This is his big achievement. HERBIE    Honey.  Sweetie.  Who're these folks anyway? PAUL    We're the private investigators who've been hired to find out what's really going on with that "movie" you're filming HERBIE    [suddenly serious] Oh.  That. MUSIC IN DONNA    For all their bickering, I was jealous.  They'd been married for twenty years, and I could see what she really felt by the way she looked at him.  PAUL    That and the fact that he clearly didn't put her up to sneaking in and spying on the spies. GOLDY    You know I can hear you? DONNA    We are definitely going to have to do something about that. MUSIC OUT HERBIE    It started out as a little con job.  Or that's what they told me.  I came in late in the game. GOLDY    Yeah, you're innocent as a baby fresh from a cabbage patch.  And about as smart.  A pair of grifters like that-- HERBIE    They got me in because I know the garment trade, and they needed someone to handle the costumes. DONNA    But there... aren't any costumes? HERBIE    Yeah, that's the funny part.  They mostly needed someone who could write a convincing invoice for the things they weren't buying. GOLDY    I hope you got some decent pay for this. PAUL    You're really better off not discussing THAT in front of witnesses. HERBIE    At first, I thought it was just a joke, and then, suddenly... before I even knew it, I was in it right up to my cummerbund.  GOLDY    And none of this is admissible in court!  I clerked for enough lawyers in my day.  I know all about hearsay. PAUL    Tell us everything you know, Mr. Lox-- HERBIE    Tailor.  Herbie Tailor.  You can call me Herbie. PAUL    Herbie, and we'll do our best to keep your name out of it. HERBIE    Like I said, it's all a scam.  More shell companies than a town full of mermaids.  Constant demands for money - and all to make this movie they say will be over the heads of everyone in the audience.  PAUL    But why? HERBIE    I guess this producer wants to rise above the crowd-pleasing musicals and talking animal flicks he usually churns out-- GOLDY    Apart from that one-- HERBIE    Oh, yeah, that.  Anyway, he wants to do something all intellectual and deep - like a foreign film.  Make a new name for himself. PAUL    Just hoping that name won't be ... um...  [prompting] something bad. HERBIE    Aschenputtel? DONNA    Maleficent? PAUL    Shh!  That one's copyrighted. DONNA    Oh. GOLDY    Just say his name would be mud and move on. HERBIE    Look, if I'm gone for much longer, they're gonna get suspicious.  PAUL    Can you try and find out one thing?  If we agree to help keep you out of the hands of the guard? HERBIE    I dunno.  I don't want to-- GOLDY    [warning] Herbie!? HERBIE    Yeah, all right.  Whatever you want. PAUL    I want to know what they're planning to do.  There has to be something in it for them, or they'd'a cut and run long back. HERBIE    Yeah. I guess. DONNA    True - with the premiere coming up, they must have one last big payoff in mind. PAUL    Why don't you two get outta here? GOLDY    Me, too? PAUL    Sorry, but until this is finished, you're just gonna be in the way. DONNA    And stay out of our voiceovers! MUSIC IN DONNA    It was a pity, really.  Goldy had done a bang up job of cleaning the office. PAUL    Is that what happened?  DONNA    Yup.  But until the case was cleared, there was no way we could let her stick around.  Maybe after the gala on Friday-- MUSIC OUT A6_FRIDAY PAUL    Friday!  Holy cow! DONNA    Whazzat?  PAUL    Nothing.  I need to give Willard a call.  See if there's any new payments going down the line. DONNA    Why don't you let me handle that?  Isn't that what assistants are for? PAUL    We don't get paid if you hurt him. DONNA    Over the phone?  I'll be very nice. PAUL    You go on ahead, then.  I have a few other loose ends to tie up. DONNA    Like? PAUL    Nothing I can't handle.  You go on. DONNA    [suspicious] Riiiight.  I'm out. MUSIC IN PAUL    [long sigh]  I was going to have to call Oftheguard and let him know we were otherwise engaged this Friday.  I hoped he hadn't done much in the way of planning.  But I knew Donna wouldn't want to let anything get in the way of finishing a case.  I was even thinking he might be handy to have around when-- SOUND    PHONE RINGS PAUL    [checking if she's around] Donna?  Oh well.  Music? MUSIC OUT A7_WHISPERS SOUND     PHONE PICKED UP PAUL    Hello? HERBIE    [whispered] I got it. PAUL    Got what? HERBIE    What they're up to.  They plan to claim the film's been stolen, and cash in on the insurance.  Maybe even ask a ransom. PAUL    So - last minute, no film, and they're in the clear? HERBIE    Gotta go. SOUND    PHONE HANGS UP DONNA    Guess it's time to report to the client. PAUL    [surprised] Yah!  Didn't you leave? DONNA    Couldn't think of anything interesting to do.  SOUND    PHONE DIALING MUSIC IN DONNA    Sometimes, the P.I. biz is just a lot of waiting, false starts, and standing around in the rain.  MUSIC OUT A8_REPORT PAUL    Or giving bad news. WILLARD    [on phone] What bad news? MUSIC IN PAUL    I gave him the run-down, and he took it pretty well. MUSIC OUT WILLARD    [screaming] NooO!  You simply MUST do something! DONNA    [off] I could get him some more chicory! PAUL    We were hired to get info, not to-- WILLARD    Then I'm hiring you again!  Money is no object, as long as you save Mr. Emperor's reputation! PAUL    I guess we need to find someone who can make you a movie. SOUND    PHONE HANGS UP DONNA    In two days?  [idea] I'll handle that.  Why don't you figure out what to do with the crooks when we get them? PAUL    But-- DONNA    Then we can skip ahead to the denouement! PAUL    But-- DONNA    This should be fun! A9_EMPEROR SOUND    DOOR SHUTS PAUL    [weakly, disbelieving] In two days?  [sigh]  Well, they can't expect miracles... MUSIC IN PAUL    Oh, all right.  The night of the big show arrived.  The theater was full of all those glittering people who appear out of nowhere every time a red carpet unrolls.  Crowned heads and nouveau riche, stars and those who just had stars in their eyes.  I was with Mr. Emperor only moments before the curtain was to go up. EMPEROR     [emperor only speaks in bellows] [on phone] What are you talking about?  The canisters were just delivered! TOM    [On phone]  They what? EMPEROR    They're being set up this minute - you could have given them some more time, you know. TOM    But, the ransom call just came in! EMPEROR    Must be a hoax.  Come on down and enjoy the show. TOM    I don't-- PAUL    They really should be here to take their share of the credit. EMPEROR    The car should be there about now. SOUND    RECEIVER SLAMMED DOWN EMPEROR    You can go now.  The projector staff have the cans well in hand. PAUL    I'm supposed to stay and keep an eye on them after the debut also. WILLARD    I'll find him a seat somewhere.  EMPEROR    Fine, fine.  See you after the show. SOUND    DOOR SLAM PAUL    Is he angry? WILLARD    No, why? PAUL    Nothing. WILLARD    What if the film is bad? What do we do? PAUL    Plan b is set the projector room on fire after the first reel. WILLARD    Really? PAUL    No!  But what you need to do is go out there and give the film a big buildup.  Make a point that it's very highbrow and intellectual and that only the most perceptive people will understand and appreciate it.  You know the kind of thing - butter up the audience with one hand, threaten them with the other. WILLARD    I work for producers, of course I know. PAUL    Go for it. B1_FINALE MUSIC IN DONNA    The movie had a bit of a rough start, but once the people got used to the pace, they seemed to get into it.  Since there were no kids in the audience to get restless and start saying obnoxious things, it seemed to go over pretty well. PAUL    I made a point of being in the hallway outside emperor's box, and when the culprits tried to slink away at the last minute... MUSIC OUT PAUL    Where do you think you're going? TOM    uh... concessions.  Need more popcorn. DICK    Me too. PAUL    Movie's nearly over.  Don't you want to take your bows? DICK    But it ain't our-- TOM    Stifle!  He meant it ain't our style to be in the public eye, you see.  C'mon-- DONNA    Not so fast. DICK    A big guy and a pair of dames?  Don't make me laugh. PAUL    I wouldn't-- TOM    Oh, jeez!  It's her!  [muttered to dick] We'd have a better chance with the brute. DICK    Really? TOM    [up] What do youse guys want? DONNA     We want to avoid any unpleasantness for Mr. Emperor, so your job is to go out there and take your bows, and introduce your writer-director, Sherry here. SHERRY    Hi! DONNA    She's real good with a story, and saved everyone's butts. SHERRY    You wanted avant garde - and I was dying to try something new. PAUL     I still can't believe you finished it in two days. SHERRY    I had a good subject to work with. TOM    But what're we supposed to do after tonight? DONNA    I suggest take some filmmaking lessons - if this is a success, you're going to have half the studios around looking to hire you, and most are a bit more picky than Mr. Emperor. PAUL    Don't worry - you can always go into seclusion, after completion of your masterwork. SHERRY    Just as long as I get my credit - and since I mastered the final titles, I DO [laughs]. I'll get any work I want after this.  Picture it - "A Scherezade production" in big lights!  I'll keep 'em coming back, night after night. MUSIC IN B2_BIRTHDAY DONNA    And it went over with a bang - primed as they were, no one was willing to admit that the film "wooden you" - a more or less still shot of one guy's face as he answers a series of more and more odd and uncomfortable questions - was strange or incomprehensible, or even dull. PAUL    There was even a certain hush in the theater from time to time - waiting to see if his response would be a lie. DONNA    How she talked Pinocchio into it, we'll never know.  On the other hand, if there's one thing Sherry's good at, it's getting folks to listen to her. PAUL    Sorry to miss your birthday by the way. DONNA    Eek! PAUL    I said I was sorry! DONNA    [warning] Voice over! PAUL    We were just getting back to the office, when-- MUSIC OUT DONNA    ixnay on the irthday-bay. PAUL    I- what? DONNA    I was hoping everyone forgot. PAUL    Oh.  Sorry, then, for that. SOUND    KEY IN LOCK, DOOR OPENS, A COUPLE OF STEPS CROWD    Surprise! PAUL    I didn't - what the - not my fault! DONNA    What? OFTHEGUARD    Didn't mean to startle you - your secretary let us in. DONNA    What? GOLDY    Sorry boss.  Bosses.  Who can say no to such a face? PAUL AND DONNA    Bosses? GOLDY    Try getting rid of me.  Besides, I make a mean cuppa joe! CLOSING

HORROR WITH SIR. STURDY
HORROR WITH SIR. STURDY EPISODE 292 DON'TIN THE WOODS MOVIE REVIEW

HORROR WITH SIR. STURDY

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 42:18


ARE YOU READY TO GET SLICIN & DICIN WITH SIR. STURDY HORROR FANS?   IF YOU DON'T KNOW BY NOW I AM YOUR HOST SIR. STURDY.   TUNE IN TUESDAY NIGHT AT  9PM EST WE WILL BE DISCUSSING DON'T FUCK IN THE WOODS (2016).  DIRECTED BY SHAWN BURKETT WRITTEN BY SHAWN BURKETT STARING BRANDY MASON STARING SCOTT GILLESPIE STARING BRANDY BLANTON IMDB  https://www.imdb.com/title/tt3620452/   LET US KNOW YOUR THOUGHTS AND RATINGS OF THIS MOVIE IN THE COMMENTS. DON'T BE SCARED TO LIKE SHARE & SUBSCRIBE WELCOME TO THE MADNESS!!!!!!!   RESTREAM $10 CREDIT     https://restream.io/join/sir.sturdy   SIR. STURDY'S LINKTREE  https://linktr.ee/SIR_STURDY   THE Z NETWORK LINKTREE https://linktr.ee/THEZNETWORK   THANK YOU ALL JOINING THE MADNESS.  PLEASE DON'T BE AFRAID TO LIKE SHARE & SUBSCRIBE. TELL YOUR FAMILY, FRIENDS, ENEMIES, CO-WORKERS, BOSSES, NEIGHBORS, STRANGERS, TELL EVERYBODY ABOUT HORROR WITH SIR. STURDY..   IF YOU EVER WANT TO COME ON HERE AND TALK SOME HORROR EMAIL ME AT  HORRORWITHSIR.STURDYGUESTS@GMAIL.COM  I'LL SEE YOU IN YOUR NIGHTMARES!!!! #sirsturdy #horrorwithsirsturdy #horrorpodcast #518podcast #watchwithsirsturdy #sturdymerch #livewithsturdy #hashbrownhank #anothermoviepodcast #podcast #supportindiepodcasts #horror #moviereview #ohcanada #4yearsofsturdy #happynewyear #happyholidays #spookyseason #livestreaming #livereview #liveshow #tuesdaynight #thursdaynight #8pmEst #horrormoviereview #DON'TFUCKINTHEWOODS  #thankyouforbeingafriend #theznetwork #popcornandpints #deepfocuscinema #storiesfromabar #worstdamngamerevr #thecinematiccanon #anylastwords   #supportindiehorror #supporthorror #illseeyouinyournightmares #RIPDMX #RIPKODA

The Refresh from Insider
May 3rd, Final Edition: Leaked Roe opinion causes political earthquake

The Refresh from Insider

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 10:26


Hosts Rebeca Ibarra and Dave Smith bring you realtime news, updated when it happens. It's fresh like live radio, but on demand like podcasts. Welcome!Roe will be overturned: ReportLeaked memo shows Republicans abortion talking pointsWhat polling says about abortionWho gets an abortion?Stocks close higherComing up: Bosses can't just order workers back to the officeWebex by CiscoThe world's longest career – 84 years! Facebook gives up on podcastsHome energy prices spikingKardashians win in courtShanghai person mistaken for deadIs the age of the tyrannical boss over?Talk to you soon!

VO BOSS Podcast
BOSS Voces: Know Your Worth

VO BOSS Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 26:56


As a voice actor, you are often given the power (and burden) of setting your own rates. Now, where to begin? Anne & Pilar have been through taking low paying gigs, walking away from jobs, and even getting their way in financial negotiations. It all comes down to knowing your worth. Tune in to learn how to navigate price setting, negotiating with clients, finding strength in community, and getting paid as much as you are worth like a #VOBOSS. Transcript >> It's time to take your business to the next level, the BOSS level! These are the premiere Business Owner Strategies and Successes being utilized by the industry's top talent today. Rock your business like a BOSS, a VO BOSS! Now let's welcome your host, Anne Ganguzza. Pilar: Hola, BOSS Voces. Bienvenidos al podcast con Anne Ganguzza y Pilar Uribe. Anne: Hey everyone. Welcome to the VO BOSS podcast. I'm your host, Anne Ganguzza, and with me today is very, very special guest cohost Pilar Uribe. Pilar!   Pilar: Aloha. Anne: Hello, how are you? Pilar: I'm doing great today. And how are you doing? Anne: I am doing good. I'm doing really good. Except, ugh, I had a client that I had to let go the other day. Pilar: Why? Anne: Well, it was a new client that we were in a negotiation phase, and they wanted to kind of lowball me on a job. And it just turned out that what they wanted to pay, what their budget was, just did not align with where I am. And I was really standing tall and standing by what I'm worth. And I think that's a very valuable lesson that we should talk about for the BOSSes today is to know your worth. It is so very important. It's so hard to say no, to walk away from a client. Like it's terrifying I think for anybody starting out in the industry, right, to give up on an opportunity, especially when you felt like, well, I'm just getting started. I need the experience. Pilar: I wish I had known you when I was getting started, because I can't tell you how many times that happened to me. And it's interesting that you bring this up, Anne, because a lot of the times when we are starting out or let's say, you know, we've worked -- I did a lot of dubbing where the rates were standardized in Miami. Anne: So you didn't negotiate it. They were just, this is what we're paying you. Pilar: Exactly. So it's like, take it or leave it. And I was like, okay. But I think that voice actors sometimes think that there's something wrong with them because they don't know how to negotiate. And I think it's so important because this is such an industry where there is no standard set of -- there is a standard set of rates, yes, for the industry, but everybody offers a different price. So it really is up to you, the voice actor to figure out what it is that you are worth and to know how to negotiate. And so it's a skill that's learned. You may go into it, not knowing how to negotiate, but that doesn't make you any less of a voice actor. It's just, it's, it's a skill that has to be learned and it takes time. It's not something that happens immediately. Anne: It does. I think it's a skill that takes a little bit of practice. And I think you just have to be courageous. You have to be brave. And first of all, I want to just separate out, if you have an agent, the agent's job is to negotiate on your behalf, which is amazing. I love my agents who negotiate on my behalf. That's what they do. They get the work and then they negotiate the best price for us. And they're looking out for our best interests, hopefully for the most part, right? They're looking out for us getting the best price for who we are so they know what we're worth. So think about it. If you're put in a position where you are negotiating, and this job may not have come through an agent and you're got somebody that's inquiring on your website, I'd like to use your voice for this particular job, how much, that's where you have to stand firm in understanding that you are worthy of a fair market price, and a great place to go find out a baseline of rates is of course the GVAA, right? Who doesn't love the GVAA rate guide. There's also Gravy for the Brain. They have some good international rates there and SAG-AFTRA too. Pilar: SAG by the Numbers is the website. And I think that going to those different places gives you a gauge. So that will give you the confidence to be able to say, okay, this is how much I can command. Instead of taking the number out of a hat or allowing somebody to steam roll you. Anne: Yeah. It gives you a baseline. And I think too, the first time you say no, and then you're terrified, right, when you say no, or you walk away, and you're like, oh my gosh, I'll never get work in this town again. Because I've either made an assumption that is too large of a number, and everybody's laughing at me now because they're like, no, I can't pay that number -- that is part of the negotiation game, really. And you have to know that even if you're a beginner, you deserve as much as I do. I think we all deserve as much as the next person in terms of rates. Because there's so many new performers or new businesses, new voiceover artists that come to the game and say, well, I don't have the experience. You're not being hired for your experience. As a matter of fact, you're being hired for your voice and your performance. And your voice is just as worthy as my voice. So don't feel as though you cannot charge the same rate as I can. And I'm a big proponent of that because if you're not, and you're trying to undercut because you either feel you're not worthy, or maybe you just want to get the job, that doesn't do any favors to the industry either, bidding low. Because in reality, it's a market perception. I want to always bring it back to lipsticks or shoes. I have certain brands that I love, and I spend money for those brands. Let's say, maybe not lipstick or shoes, but yes, hair, but let's maybe talk tech, right? My Apple computer, my Apple iPhone. I buy brands and I pay the money. I pay the money. And so think of your voiceover business, the same way. I used to call myself Tiffany's. I don't go on sale. And I don't advertise my brand to be cheap. So anybody out here, you can do the very same. Now I'm not going to price myself out of, you know, I'm not going to be crazy high or anything, but that's where the rate guides come in handy. Right? You get a good baseline, and you take the chance to negotiate with a client. And most of the time, the best question that you can ask for this when you're starting in negotiation is do you have a budget? Okay? So if you're putting the position where they're asking you, how much would it cost? The best question to ask is, do you have a budget? Because sometimes their budget is a whole lot more than you thought. Um, that's happened to me multiple times. Well, I can't go over a $1000. Okay. I'll take that for a two-minute medical narration read. That's awesome. Yeah. I think I can make that work. That's what I've been known to say. And so it's a rule in negotiation that the person who mentions money first is usually the one that loses. So, so, there you go. So always have the question in the back of your head to ask if there is a budget. And then after that, if there is no budget, then go ahead and bid high or on the higher side of the range. Usually the rate guides, right, if you've looked at them, have ranges. Like a five minute corporate read could be $350 to $550 or whatever that is. Bid on the higher end. Because when you're starting a negotiation start high, because then the only place to go is not necessarily higher. Client's not going to say, oh no, let me pay you $800 instead of $500. Usually they're going to negotiate down. So pick the higher number that doesn't price you out of the competition like crazy and stand true to that. Because honestly, Apple doesn't care about, do you know what I mean? They're like your new iPhone is $2,000 or whatever it is, right? It's the price is that. And we choose to accept it or not. And so you as a business, same kind of thing. Pilar: Yeah. 'Cause it's like, when you go in and you buy a dress, and they tell you it's $100 or $500, you're not going to go and say, oh, can I buy $50 for the sleeve? No. Anne: Can I haggle that price? You might be able to haggle the price in some places, but not most stores that are retail. Pilar: Generally it's like, they're not going to sit there and give you half a dress because you're not going to -- Anne: At a garage sale maybe. Pilar: Maybe. Anne: Or consignment. You can negotiate those things down, but -- Pilar: We can start a trend, sleeves, just buying the sleeves. Yeah. But that's generally not going to happen. Anne: I'll take just the sleeve, please. Pilar: Exactly. Something, I think that's important though to mention is knowing your worth, yes, but also knowing your worth as to where you are and not trying to oversell yourself because I've seen this happen over and over where somebody throws out a number and then it turns out that they don't have a professional recording studio, for example. So there's nothing wrong with that. I mean, I know, I do know people who've actually worked with their USB mics. Great. So you need to be able to show your potential client, this is my studio. This is what my studio looks like. This is what my noise floor is. This is what my software is, everything. And then that way they know what they're dealing with instead of sort of projecting something that might not be true. Anne: I agree. But I feel that before you're in that position, right, before you're in the position of actually negotiating a job, you're going to make sure, hopefully, that you have a studio that can create great audio. But I totally agree with you there. If you're just starting out and you haven't had anybody evaluate that, that's one thing I think that's important, especially now, since the pandemic. We're all expected to have a quality space where we can generate great audio from. So yeah. Very important. Very important for you guys to know that. And yeah, you're right. There's that argument that demos don't necessarily showcase what your sound is like from the booth. I've actually known people to put sound files on their website. Here's what my booth sounds like, as kind of a precursor. And I actually think that's not a bad idea. I don't have it on my own website right now, but I actually thought about, here's a noise floor or here's a, here's a quick sample from my booth so you know what you're getting. Pilar: Yeah. Yeah. I think it's really important to show who you are, because just like when you walk into a store, you're seeing what the ground is like, the arrangement of the clothing, and the register, is the floor clean. So you want to be able to, since you are projecting a business out onto the world stage of voiceover, because you don't know who it's going to be reaching, you know, you want to have your office in order. And then that, that makes it just that much easier to be able to negotiate and to stand up for yourself. Anne: The presentation of a professional. I love that. Because they want to know that they're dealing with a business, right, that takes it seriously. Gosh, that brings up a whole other whole other side of things. So too like your website, right, you should have a domain name that is yourbusiness.com, anneganguzza.com. And that storefront should absolutely showcase who you are to the world professionally. A lot of times when I go to buy a product, right, online -- isn't that what we do all the time? Pilar: We Google people, we Google the product. Anne: We go to the website, we look at the -- if the website looks any kind of cheesy at all or not trustworthy, I don't buy. And so that's such a great thing that you brought up for people to understand that that helps so much in your negotiation, that you are representing yourself as a professional business. And I think it does help also in the negotiation process if, if you're known to be a full-time voice talent. If you're not, you don't necessarily have to state that. You just have to look like this is your business, and this is what you do. Sometimes I'll, if a customer's or a potential client is reaching out to me, I might throw in there full-time voice talent, just so they know that's all I do. Like I'm not, you know, doing three different jobs, and this is my business and this is how I make a living. So that's a -- what a great point that was, Pilar to present professional. Pilar: Yeah. You have to present yourself as a professional because otherwise, you know, you're not going to be taken seriously. You reminded me of when I was in my agent's office for the first time, and they were sweet as can be. And one of them was busy, and she was like, you know, don't pay attention to me because I've got all this stuff to do. Obviously she had a huge job that she had to get out at a certain time. And the only thing she said at the end, she piped up and she said, oh, we've looked at your website. We've listened to all of your material. Anne: Oh, don't you worry. Pilar: And I was like -- and it was just so interesting, 'cause I was like, oh, these people did their homework. So if somebody's looking at your stuff, believe me, they are checking you out regardless of -- Anne: Whether you know it or not. Pilar: Whether you know, but also it's, it's also a question of it doesn't have to be the fanciest thing or it doesn't have to have all the bells and whistles, just like a voiceover booth doesn't have to have all the bells and whistles. The important part is are you producing sound quality where you can literally hear where it's so quiet that you don't even hear a fish fart? I mean, I know of, I know this one very well known voice actor who does promos inside his car, and he is just fixed it so he's got the microphone, he does it in a certain way because a lot of the times he's driving, and he needs to do something. Anne: But yeah, he's not going to audition while he's driving. Just, just, just want to -- Pilar: No, no -- Anne: Just want to say that. Pilar: -- obviously, no he stops on the side of the road. He's out here and he'll have something from New York that's due at a certain time. He will stop on the side of the road. He's got his whole little preparation. I don't know what he does, but he's got a whole preparation. He does it. He sends it off. The promo gets aired that night. So it's really about, can you, you know, can you come up with the goods, and the goods are showing yourself, as you know, as I've been saying -- Anne: As a professional. Pilar: -- as a professional, this is, this is what my space is. This is where you can find my work. It's all here. It's all out on the table. It's, it'll be really easy to find. So you can hire me, and you can negotiate with me because I have all these parts of the puzzle. Anne: All the parts of the puzzle are together. Yeah. That -- absolutely. It's such a cool side piece that you don't think about, right, when you're talking about knowing your worth. I mean, understanding that you're prepared to deliver quality, audio quality performance from a quality storefront or booth, right? And also I am going to go so far as to say that your website says a lot about who you are professionally. And that has a lot to do with the power you can have in negotiation and also helping yourself know your worth. If you yourself are committed to doing this for a living and making money at it, then that is step one of knowing that you are worthy of getting paid for it and getting paid well for it, getting paid fairly. We can only hope that every job we do, we get paid well. And I will tell you, in the beginning, when I first started out in the industry, I didn't have a concept of what my worth was. And to be honest, there wasn't, you know, so long ago that there weren't many groups out there online. Again, this, one of the reasons why I created VO Peeps back in the day was to have a community online that we could talk and say, well, what did you charge? How do you handle negotiation? What is this job worth? And so now we have so many resources available at our fingertips. It only just says to me even more that we have to even more be vigilant about understanding who we are, what we're worth in this industry. And not that we even have to convince, but just showcase that we are worthy of getting paid something that's more than, oh my gosh, something like 8 cents a word. No, not at all. Those jobs exist. And those are the ones that you don't necessarily -- for me, I try not to align myself with jobs like that because if the client doesn't value the service, right, to begin with, and they're putting out budgets that don't value the service -- maybe they truly don't have the budget. But again, I think a budget is all in what you, all in what you make of it, right? I pay good money for certain services so that I can depend on them. And the same thing should be thought of you, right? So if your potential client doesn't value the service that you provide, then maybe you don't want to align yourself with them or work with them because trust me, there will be somebody out there that does value you and the courage that it takes for you to say no to those clients that don't value your services -- once you say no, it gives you the biggest sense of -- well, you're scared and you're terrified, but it allows the door to open for people who do value your services and that leaves the room for them to come in and pay you what you're worth. So I can't tell you -- you'll do it one time. And then that door will open and you will get paid by someone who believes in you and values your worth. And then that will give you all the confidence you need to go and just negotiate and understand your worth and put out those prices, put out those quotes that are worthy of your time, because you spent a lot of money. You spent a lot of time to get to where you are. There's training, there's demos, there's practice, there's you, your personal investment is what people are paying for, right? Your personal investment. And that is worth something. Pilar: Absolutely. I totally agree. Something also that I have found when I used to negotiate back in Miami, is that no doesn't always mean no forever. Anne: Yeah. Pilar: Because there's a way to stand your ground because a lot of things can happen between the time that a number's thrown out and you walk away. And I've had that happen to me more than once where I don't necessarily say, I'm not going to take any less. I say, this is my price. Anne: Yup. Pilar: And I've learned that from some amazing voiceover people in the industry when I was very, very green and I went to my first couple of conferences. I learned from them that they stand their ground basically. And they just, they stand up for themselves and they say, this is what I charge. And they're very, very specific. And there is room, there is wiggle room, and it is very important to throw out a decent number and not too low, but obviously not out of the range, but when you're in that negotiating stage, I've actually had people come back and say, okay, all right, let's do it. Anne: Yeah. I agree. Pilar: So it's just kind of funny. So it's just, maybe there's also a mental sort of attitude to have about that saying this is who I'm worth. So you're not necessarily closing the door, but basically saying, here, I invite you to partake of my services for this amount. Again, it doesn't happen always, but sometimes there's a door that can stay open. Anne: Sure, absolutely. I totally agree with that. And people might have gone and they had a budget that was lower. And so they went and hired somebody with that lower budget and they weren't as happy. Right? So they come back to you, and that has happened to me multiple times too. And again, it's one of those things where you have to have the confidence, and guys, if you're just starting out and you don't have the confidence, it's okay. We all were there. We were all there once. Right? You just have to take the step. You've got to have the courage to take the step, to stand by what you're worth and walk away if the client doesn't bite. And, and the thing of it is too, usually the clients that are offering a lower price are usually the ones that will nickel and dime you for everything. And I have run into that. I have lowered my price. You know, I've worked with a client's budget. I -- here's my number. We negotiated. And they said, I only have this. And I thought, okay, all right, I'll work with you. And it might've been lower than I would have wanted. At some point you get an idea, a sense of who this client will be. Sometimes clients will just, if they get that low ball price, they're just going to be painful. They're going to be painful clients that will want everything for no money. And you only have to work with a couple of those, like maybe one of them once. And you'll be like, okay, never again, never again, because the amount of time that you spent trying to please that client at that low rate could be better spent working with a client who did value you or does value you and doesn't try to nickel and dime you for a bunch of pickups afterwards. Pilar: You have to know when to walk away. Absolutely. But it's also an attitude that I think is so important. As we've been saying throughout this time, this is what I'm worth, here I am. When you walk into a, an Apple store, you know exactly what you're getting into. Anne: Apple doesn't go on sale, right? Pilar: Exactly. It's like, what you see is what you get. Anne: Chanel lipstick does not go on sale. I'm just saying, I am just saying, I have bought Chanel lipstick before. They do not go on sale. And the funny thing is, is in a way, it makes me relieved because I feel like sometimes when things do go on sale all the time, I'm like, oh my God, let me wait until the right price comes. But Chanel, they're just, I know they're dependable. I love them. They've got my colors. They last, and they're worth the money. And so think of that client hiring you. It's going to be, you know what, Anne, whatever, can you do this job? Sure. Give me an invoice. I love clients like that because that means that you've worked with them enough. They trust you. And they're just like, okay, whatever. They know they're going to get good value from you. And so it is something to be said to work with quality clients, rather than trying to just work your way up. And as I mentioned, I really, in the beginning I did, I didn't know better, but now BOSSes, we can't be the only podcast or the only people who have said know your worth. However, this is just another step where if you've listened to this podcast, you have to know your worth. You have no excuses now to take something that does not pay you what you are worth. And maybe you need the experience of working with a client who may not pay you what you think you're worth. And that's okay, because that's a learning and a growing experience for you. But we're here to tell you that you don't really have to go through that if you don't want to, because you, you are worthy, you are worthy of a fair price. Pilar: Yeah. I think it's really important to visualize yourself as a -- Anne: Yes. Pilar: Just because we are a voiceover, we are a brick and mortar store. We just do it from our own area. But why not visualize yourself as an Apple versus a -- Anne: Tiffany's, Apple, Chanel. Pilar: Yeah, exactly. You don't have to be a 7-11. I mean, 7-11 is great when you're, when you want a Slurpee, but why not visualize yourself as, as you know, this is who I am and this is what I have to offer? Anne: That's so important. I got so excited because you said visualize that you are worthy or manifest. Pilar: Yes. Anne: It's so important, manifest that you are worthy of it. And that will carry you really far, that whole belief and the manifestation that you are worthy of it will carry you really far in this industry. I just had to agree with you wholeheartedly. Pilar: And also that you are a working actor. Anne: Yes. Pilar: That you are a working voiceover actor capable of taking these jobs. I think that people think that when they visualize -- and you know, we could spend a whole podcast on this -- I think people think that when they visualize something, that all of a sudden it's just going to magically like [snaps], like that. That is not what happens when you see yourself and you present yourself. You put it out into the universe; it's not necessarily going to come back immediately, but it does come back. Because if you had told me over 12 years ago that I would be making a living doing voiceover -- Anne: Oh my gosh. Pilar: -- I would have said, are you kidding? There's no way. I'm an actor. I've done on camera. And I love this business. I just kept putting one foot in front of the other, seeing myself do this. And so there really is something to be said. It does take patience though. Anne: Yeah. Pilar: So, you know, you, you can get there and you can see yourself taking those steps. And once you're there, you can accept it. You can say, yep, it's done. It's done. And you just, what we're saying about knowing your worth is just that much closer to what it is that you want to accomplish. Anne: Yep. Yep. That successful business. And that's so funny. Like think of when you first started in this business. Did you ever believe -- like when I first started, I didn't really have a thought one way or the other. I just knew that I was passionate about it, and I just kept putting my head down and working. However, I will tell you in the beginning, it was a very different environment because coming from a corporate background, which I came from, you know, where that paycheck was given to me every two weeks or whatever, and I knew that money was coming -- coming into the entrepreneurship, and now all of a sudden being put in a position where I had to negotiate, my price was, oh my goodness. Like before people told me what I was worth, because I got a paycheck for it. Now it was me there to determine what was my worth. It's so interesting to go from the mentality of here, I've arranged a salary, and I work for this particular salary, and that's what I'm worth, to an environment and an entrepreneurship where I am determining what is my worth. That's a whole big pedagogical shift in your brain. And so yes, it takes time to learn how to do that. And it's okay guys. Just remember, there's always clients out there. I think if you make a choice, and you're brave, and you walk away from one client, there's always another client around the corner that opens the door for more clients and more work. You just have to manifest, and believe, and take that leap of faith. Pilar: Something definitely that you can learn to do. Anne: Good stuff, good stuff. Wow. So BOSSes, know your worth. You are worthy. So on that note, if you also want to make a difference and use your voice to make an immediate difference in our world, that will give back to the communities that are close to you, you can find out more and how to do that at 100voiceswhocare.org to commit. Wonderful, wonderful new sponsor. BOSSes, literally it takes less than a dollar a day, and you can make a humongous difference in a local organization of your choice. Visit 100voiceswhocare.org to find out more. Also, thank you so much to our amazing sponsor ipDTL, because I get to talk to Pilar every week, and we get to talk about really cool things about how wonderful you guys all are and how we are worthy. We are worthy. Much, much support, and thanks to ipdtl.com. Find out more at ipdtl.com. You guys, have a great week and we'll see you next week. Bye! Pilar: Goodbye, guys. >> Join us next week for another edition of VO BOSS with your host Anne Ganguzza. And take your business to the next level. Sign up for our mailing list at voboss.com and receive exclusive content, industry revolutionizing tips and strategies, and new ways to rock your business like a BOSS. Redistribution with permission. Coast to coast connectivity via ipDTL.

Armchair MBA
Mafia Surgeon Arrested | Mafia Snack | Armchair MBA

Armchair MBA

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 9:12


Giuseppe Guttadauro, was the head physician of the Civic hospital in Palermo, was arrested with his son during the nighttime raid. He served as a top Mafia boss related to the fugitive Matteo Massimo Denaro who has been on the run since 1993. Demaro is believed to be the Boss of Bosses in Sicily. Show Sponsor: JSV Captial for your business financing needs, check out: http://JSVCapital.com Hope you enjoyed your Mafia Snack!

The Legend of Zelda Lorecast
Episode 11: The Minish Cap Characters and Bosses

The Legend of Zelda Lorecast

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 54:37


This episode we discuss the characters and bosses of The Minish Cap.  Welcome to the Legend of Zelda Lorecast! Join us as we dive into the lore and material of the Legend of Zelda Franchise and explore all those questions that might be clawing their way into your brain. Email us your questions or episode ideas at: Allmightycrit@gmail.com Twitter: @LOZLorecast Discord: https://discord.gg/c3bAuPJCv4 Please Rate us, Share, And Enjoy! **Check out STL Ocarina and use our specific link to get 10% off: https://www.stlocarina.com/discount/LOZLore10 Promo Code: LOZLORE10 Check Out Our Merch: https://www.fumbling4store.com/ All sound effects and BGM were created and belong to the respective parties below: Intro/Outro Music by Bitonal Landscape: Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/artist/32oFEPdT33HPDPCJ7fB8wg YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/bitonallandscape Monument Studios Check them out at: https://www.monumentstudios.net Sonnis Check Them out at: https://sonniss.com/ Mid Break Links: Legend of Zelda Cookie Cutters- https://www.etsy.com/listing/598754212/legend-of-zelda-cookie-cutters-navi?ga_order=most_relevant&ga_search_type=all&ga_view_type=gallery&ga_search_query=legend+of+zelda&ref=sr_gallery-3-31&frs=1&bes=1&organic_search_click=1 Zelda Classics Are Coming To Switch This Year, Says Insider- https://www.gamingbible.co.uk/news/zelda-classics-reportedly-coming-to-switch-this-year-20220428 Digital Foundry Reassures Fans Zelda: Breath of the Wild 2 Will Still Be On Standard Switch- https://mynintendonews.com/2022/04/28/digital-foundry-reassures-fans-zelda-breath-of-the-wild-2-will-still-be-on-standard-switch/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

HORROR WITH SIR. STURDY
HORROR WITH SIR. STURDY EPISODE 291 SPOOKIES MOVIE REVIEW

HORROR WITH SIR. STURDY

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2022 74:47


ARE YOU READY TO GET SLICIN & DICIN WITH SIR. STURDY HORROR FANS?   IF YOU DON'T KNOW BY NOW I AM YOUR HOST SIR. STURDY.   TUNE IN THURSDAY NIGHT AT  9PM EST WE WILL BE DISCUSSING SPOOKIES  (1986).  DIRECTED BY GENIE JOSEPH DIRECTED BY THOMAS DORAN  (FOOTAGE FROM UNFINISHED FILM “TWISTED SOULS”) DIRECTED BY BRENDAN FAULKNER (FOOTAGE FROM UNFINISHED FILM “TWISTED SOULS”) WRITTEN BY ANN BURGUND (ADDITIONAL MATERIAL) WRITTEN BY THOMAS DORAN (SCREENPLAY) WRITTEN BY FRANK M. FAREL (SCREENPLAY TWISTED SOULS FOOTAGE) STARING FELIX WARD STARING MARIA PECHUKAS STARING DAN SCOTT    LET US KNOW YOUR THOUGHTS AND RATINGS OF THIS MOVIE IN THE COMMENTS. DON'T BE SCARED TO LIKE SHARE & SUBSCRIBE WELCOME TO THE MADNESS!!!!!!!   WANT YOUR FACEBOOK COMMENTS TO SHOW UP ON RESTREAM? CLICK THE LINK BELOW!! https://chat.restream.io/fb   RESTREAM $10 CREDIT     https://restream.io/welcome?ref=B21pJ     RESTREAM $10 CREDIT     https://restream.io/join/sir.sturdy   SIR. STURDY'S LINKTREE  https://linktr.ee/SIR_STURDY   THE Z NETWORK LINKTREE https://linktr.ee/THEZNETWORK   THANK YOU ALL JOINING THE MADNESS.  PLEASE DON'T BE AFRAID TO LIKE SHARE & SUBSCRIBE. TELL YOUR FAMILY, FRIENDS, ENEMIES, CO-WORKERS, BOSSES, NEIGHBORS, STRANGERS, TELL EVERYBODY ABOUT HORROR WITH SIR. STURDY..   IF YOU EVER WANT TO COME ON HERE AND TALK SOME HORROR EMAIL ME AT  HORRORWITHSIR.STURDYGUESTS@GMAIL.COM  I'LL SEE YOU IN YOUR NIGHTMARES!!!! #sirsturdy #horrorwithsirsturdy #horrorpodcast #518podcast #watchwithsirsturdy #sturdymerch #livewithsturdy #hashbrownhank #anothermoviepodcast #podcast #supportindiepodcasts #horror #moviereview #ohcanada #4yearsofsturdy #happynewyear #happyholidays #spookyseason #livestreaming #livereview #liveshow #tuesdaynight #thursdaynight #8pmEst #horrormoviereview #SPOOKIES  #thankyouforbeingafriend #theznetwork #popcornandpints #deepfocuscinema #storiesfromabar #worstdamngamerevr #thecinematiccanon #anylastwords   #supportindiehorror #supporthorror #illseeyouinyournightmares #RIPDMX #RIPKODA

Life on Planet Earth
GHOST ECONOMY: Robots and machines will eliminate millions of jobs worldwide. SAM ZIETZ, CEO of GRUBBRR, explains how it could be GREAT NEWS for workers and bosses

Life on Planet Earth

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2022 48:22


Ghost kitchens, or virtual kitchens "offsite," are one of the latest fastest-growing trends as more restaurants and eateries invest more heavily in automation in the face of labor shortage. Automation such as point of sale and order delivery apps, as well as robots, are eliminating thousands of jobs in the economy as employers seek cost-effective productivity solutions. More sobering statistics. In England, 1.5 million jobs are in danger of being automated. 25% of mundane and repetitive jobs are at risk of automation. 375 million jobs are expected to vanish by 2030. Artificial intelligence will displace 40% of jobs worldwide in the next 15 years. Artificial intelligence will generate 2.3 million jobs starting in 2020. Source: Lefronic.com About GRUBBRR Headquartered in Boca Raton, Florida, GRUBBRR says it is a leading global commerce automation company at the forefront of self-ordering technologies. GRUBBRR's award-winning eco-system, including kiosks, mobile ordering, contactless smart lockers and more, are proven to help businesses maximize revenue, decrease labor costs, and increase operational efficiency while improving the consumer experience. GRUBBRR's solutions are adaptable and beneficial to a multitude of businesses, and power both enterprise-level and small and medium businesses across verticals such as quick-service restaurants, fast casual restaurants, stadiums, movie theatres, casinos, micro-markets, retail, and more. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/john-aidan-byrne0/support

The Tightrope with Dan Smolen
Are Bosses Crushing Worker Dignity?

The Tightrope with Dan Smolen

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 49:10


Future of Work Sherpa Dan Smolen asks the question: are bosses crushing worker dignity? Answering this question, and many others, is Dr. Betty Johnson. She is the founder of Bridging the Difference LLC; it helps company leaders embrace diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) to ensure worker dignity. As the Covid pandemic ebbs, and more of their talent work remotely, managers are using Zoom sessions in ways that they may believe are effective, but actually rid their people of dignity. Requiring people to be "on camera" throughout long, heavily attended Zoom sessions, whether or not they participate in discussion, can have a toxic effect. And people of color and women--especially older women--are often the-most negatively affected by such "on camera" requirements. Dr. Johnson wants to change that. Main podcast segment begins at 2:58 In a wide ranging discussion, Dr. Johnson: Provides the unique value proposition for her company, Bridging the Difference LLC. Starts at 4:53 Describes the misuses of Zoom sessions by managers to gather their people. Starts at 6:07 Illustrates surface acting and its psychological impact on talent. Starts at 9:51 Explains the positive affects of "being listened to." Starts at 16:13 Digs into how bosses crush worker dignity and unintentionally create "drama triangles." Starts at 20:35 Offers strategies for making Zoom sessions better. Starts at 27:08 Defines Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) and provides ways to positively frame it for management to embrace. Starts at 40:35 Are bosses crushing worker dignity? Some are. But with intentional leadership from their management, people can find positive meaning in the work that they do. Main podcast segment begins at 2:58 About our guest: Dr. Betty Johnson is a keen observer of people in the workplace. She earned a Bachelor of Arts in English from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte and a Ph.D. in Leadership from Antioch University. Dr. Johnson lives and works in Charlotte, North Carolina. EPISODE DATE: April 29, 2022 Social media: – LinkedIn – LinkedIn/Company Page – Website – Website/Insights – Making Virtual Work/Book Page Please Subscribe to The Dan Smolen Podcast on: – Apple Podcast – Android – Google Podcasts – Pandora – Spotify – Stitcher – TuneIn …or wherever you get your podcasts. You may also click HERE to receive our podcast episodes by email. Image credits: Surface acting worker, TatyanaGI for iStock Photo; Betty Johnson Portrait, Bridging the Difference LLC; podcast button, J. Brandt Studio for The Dan Smolen Experience.

Career Tools
Dealing With Difficult Bosses - Bosses Who Don't Communicate

Career Tools

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022


Our guidance on bosses who don't communicate.

HORROR WITH SIR. STURDY
HORROR WITH SIR. STURDY EPISODE 290 CHEROKEE CREEK MOVIE REVIEW BIGFOOT MOTHA FU^K@

HORROR WITH SIR. STURDY

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 55:24


ARE YOU READY TO GET SLICIN & DICIN WITH SIR. STURDY HORROR FANS?   IF YOU DON'T KNOW BY NOW I AM YOUR HOST SIR. STURDY.   TUNE IN TUESDAY NIGHT AT  9PM EST WE WILL BE DISCUSSING  CHEROKEE CREEK A  BIGFOOT MOTHA MOVIE REVIEW FU#K@  (2018).  DIRECTED BY TODD JENKINS WRITTEN BY JARRETT BIGRLOW (ORIGINAL STORY CONCEPT)   WRITTEN BY BILLY BLAIR  (ORIGINAL STORY CONCEPT) WRITTEN BY ARACELIA JENKINS (ORIGINAL STORY CONCEPT) STARING TODD JENKINS STARING JUSTIN ARMSTRONG   IMDB https://www.imdb.com/title/tt6231784/   LET US KNOW YOUR THOUGHTS AND RATINGS OF THIS MOVIE IN THE COMMENTS.   DON'T BE SCARED TO LIKE SHARE & SUBSCRIBE WELCOME TO THE MADNESS!!!!!!!   WANT YOUR FACEBOOK COMMENTS TO SHOW UP ON RESTREAM? CLICK THE LINK BELOW!! https://chat.restream.io/fb   RESTREAM $10 CREDIT     https://restream.io/welcome?ref=B21pJ     RESTREAM $10 CREDIT     https://restream.io/join/sir.sturdy   SIR. STURDY'S LINKTREE  https://linktr.ee/SIR_STURDY   THE Z NETWORK LINKTREE https://linktr.ee/THEZNETWORK   THANK YOU ALL JOINING THE MADNESS.  PLEASE DON'T BE AFRAID TO LIKE SHARE & SUBSCRIBE. TELL YOUR FAMILY, FRIENDS, ENEMIES, CO-WORKERS, BOSSES, NEIGHBORS, STRANGERS, TELL EVERYBODY ABOUT HORROR WITH SIR. STURDY..   IF YOU EVER WANT TO COME ON HERE AND TALK SOME HORROR EMAIL ME AT  HORRORWITHSIR.STURDYGUESTS@GMAIL.COM  I'LL SEE YOU IN YOUR NIGHTMARES!!!!   #sirsturdy #horrorwithsirsturdy #horrorpodcast #518podcast #watchwithsirsturdy #sturdymerch #livewithsturdy #hashbrownhank #anothermoviepodcast #podcast #supportindiepodcasts #horror #moviereview #ohcanada #4yearsofsturdy #happynewyear #happyholidays #spookyseason #livestreaming #livereview #liveshow #tuesdaynight #thursdaynight #8pmEst #horrormoviereview #CHEROKEECREEKABIGFOOTMOTHAMOVIEREVIEWFU^K@ #thankyouforbeingafriend #theznetwork #popcornandpints #deepfocuscinema #storiesfromabar #worstdamngamerevr #thecinematiccanon #anylastwords   #supportindiehorror #supporthorror #illseeyouinyournightmares #RIPDMX #RIPKODA

VO BOSS Podcast
BOSS Voces: Improv

VO BOSS Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 27:23


Every script is the answer to a question. It's up to the actor to discover (and sometimes create) that question. In this episode, Anne & Pilar are here to keep you on your toes with improv techniques + exercises. They will teach you how to stay fresh with your reads, and - more importantly - why it's necessary to know the script, scene, and emotions for everything you read. Whether it be E-Learning, IVR, or commercial, you'll be ready to tackle it with authentic reactions + diverse copy interpretations like a #VOBOSS. Transcript >> It's time to take your business to the next level, the BOSS level! These are the premiere Business Owner Strategies and Successes being utilized by the industry's top talent today. Rock your business like a BOSS, a VO BOSS! Now let's welcome your host, Anne Ganguzza. Pilar: Hola, BOSS Voces. Bienvenidos al podcast, con Anne Ganguzza y Pilar Uribe. Anne: Hey Pilar. I'm trying to figure out how to lead into today's episode. And I've been thinking about different scenes that maybe I could place myself in. So maybe I'll come at the introduction not like I've come at the introduction like people expect, so I want to do something different. So what are you thinking? Where can I start? Pilar: Where can you start? "Let's start at the very beginning. A very good place to start." What's that from? Anne: I'm on a mountainside. Pilar: No, quick, what's that from? Anne: No wait. Okay. I'm on a mountain side in the sun and I'm feeling like I'm very happy, and I want to sing because I dunno, I like to sing when I'm happy. Pilar: And you're twirling your arms. Anne: I am twirling my arms, and I'm going to not have a dress on with an apron. Okay. So, well, let's just put it this way. I'll have a dress on that really works with the twirl, but it won't have an apron on. Pilar: Nix the apron, okay. Anne: And I'm going to be young with long flowing hair. Pilar: Long blonde flowing hair. Anne: Yep. That's it. That's it. And there's going to be animals. Pilar: Okay. Anne: There's going to be, well, there'll be cats. Of course. Actually -- Pilar: How about llamas? How about llamas? Anne: Okay, cats and llamas I think go well, lots of cats. Pilar: Except that llamas spit. Anne: Yeah, but they're not going to spit on the cats. They're going to spit on me because maybe I'm not in tune. Pilar: You're going to ride off into the sunset on top of a llama. Anne: But then I'll make friends with the llama, and I will carry the cats in my arms and hop on the llama, and ride off into the sunset because I've had a wonderful morning and day of singing on the mountain side. Pilar: And you're singing "Do, a deer" at the same time.   Anne: Yes, exactly. Wow. Pilar: That's improv. Anne: Hey BOSSes. That's improv with that said, hey, everyone. I completely was so in the scene that I forgot my introduction. Pilar: You forgot who you were. Anne: I forgot who I was for just a moment. So here we go. Hey everyone. Welcome to the VO BOSS podcast. I'm your host Anne Ganguzza, up on the mountain, singing and twirling with my cats and llamas, along with my special guest cohost Pilar Uribe. Pilar, come to the mountain and sing with me. Pilar: "The hills are alive with the sound of llamas." Anne: -- "VO BOSSes." Pilar: "Llamas and VO BOSSes." Anne: So Pilar, that was fun. Pilar: That was fun. Anne: I think understanding and practicing improv can really, really help us in our performance and in our business. So I think we should have today's episode featuring improv, and talking about improv, and how can we better our performances with improv? Pilar: Yes. Improv is something that I -- it's funny, 'cause I've always been scared of it, and I've never really understood it, although I've done it most of my acting career without realizing it. It's just really funny. We improv all the time in our lives when we're talking. So improv is all about taking what somebody is saying and you keep going. It's that? Yes. And moment with improv. That's that's like the biggest rule. Anne: Yes, and. Pilar: Yes, and, meaning -- Anne: Yes, and, and then what happens? Pilar: And then you add onto the story, and the intent is to be positive always. I mean, unless it's a tragedy kind of a thing which improv is, is really about it's taking whatever that person gives you and running with it, however you're going to do it, so. Anne: Well, I think it needs to fit into the context, right? So if we're going to try to improv and get ourselves into a scene for a script that already sits in front of us, so that maybe we can improve our auditions, right, there is some context to the script. Maybe we should just talk from genre specific right now, like commercial or corporate or e-learning, those types of -- versus character-driven spots like animation and video games. We can talk about that in a minute, but let's focus on the genres where people go in, and they have a commercial audition to get out the gate. Right? What is it that we're going to do once we look at the context of the script there, how are we going to work the improv into it? Pilar: What I've learned early on is it's so important to have a moment before. Anne: Yes. Agreed. Pilar: Especially if it's a product, let's say, that you don't know much about, or it's a storyline, let's say it's a medical narration, for example. And you're kind of, you know, what is this drug that has seven syllables? And I don't even know how to pronounce it. Well, you have to come in, if you're talking from a voice of authority, you have to come in with that knowledge. Anne: Right. Pilar: Now, you don't necessarily have to have knowledge of that particular drug. You can use something else that you have knowledge about. And then you set the stage by making up like a little sort of maybe 15-second play, which can be your lead-in which you don't have to record, but you're making the story up about this particular product and how it affected you. And you basically just start doing storytelling. Anne: Well, I think that's absolutely wonderful advice. And I think too, again, going with the context of it, let's kind of go with the medical, right? Because I do a lot of medical work, medical narration. I think it's important to know that in this storyline who you're talking to, and a lot of times people will, if want it to be conversational, they'll say something like, oh, as if you're talking to your best friend, but I think you need to go deeper into this, because you want to talk to a person that's genuinely going to be interested in that product because your task in most copy like that is either going to be to educate or to sell. So you need to be very clear as to who you're speaking with. And I think that that needs to come into your improv, understanding that let's say you might be a pharmaceutical representative, that's coming into an office and speaking to a doctor who might be interested in this particular medicine that might be able to help his patients. And so going with that, setting that scene and then improv-ing in that before you even open your mouth, because that will help you develop a point of view that makes sense and an emotion that makes sense and a voice that makes sense for that scene. Pilar: Yeah. Yeah. Very true. And what you were saying, which ties right into that is the more specific you are, the better. Anne: Yes. Agreed. Pilar: A lot of the times, if you're doing medical copy -- let's say you've got the job. It's not like you're going to rewrite it or change, necessarily change the words, but you can give it a little bit of flavor by imagining different scenarios while you're speaking. Anne: And thinking of different subtexts too. Pilar: Yeah. Even like, you know, breaths or -- Anne: Rhythm. Pilar: Yeah. And just like little inflections that aren't necessarily in the script itself are going to give it a different flavor. Anne: I like that. Pilar: Yeah. So because it can't be all about the reading. It's -- there has to be -- a lot of people say, oh, well, you know, they, they won't let me improv. And it's like, it's not necessarily, it's about using those moments of improv where you can just kind of give a little inflection here, do a little something over there. Anne: Absolutely. Absolutely. Like that scene is playing while you are voicing the script, right? There's a scene that's playing. And so that improv, it doesn't necessarily have to come out in words, right? The improv, like you said, can be in breaths. It can be in rhythm. It can be in, again, if it's a medical narration and you're informing somebody about the capabilities of the product, right, it can be that subtext where maybe you're looking at the person that you're speaking to and they're not quite understanding. So you become more confident or you've slowed down on that explanation a little bit more. And so the subtext is, let me help you understand better what I'm saying. And so that improv comes into your scene, as you are voicing and into the storyteller, the sell of the spot. It really is something that I think adds a really nice layer and a realistic, authentic layer to when you are voicing. And this, by the way, does not allow you any time to listen to what you sound like. Again, I say this over and over and over again. Right? You cannot listen to what you sound like and say, oh, does that sound like they want it? No, you have to be in that improv, that story, in that scene, and really being there and telling the story. Pilar: I just want to clarify something for the VO BOSS warriors, that everyone thinks of improv as Second City or Saturday Night Live, but improv, you can use some of those rules and those tips of improv to give your script a different flavor, whether it's medical narration, whether it's e-learning, whether it's even, let's say, IVR, and you're saying, you know, "please hold." You know, you don't have to sound like the mechanical thing that you've always heard. If you maybe make a joke to yourself right beforehand, or you imagine something very specific. Anne: Imagine the person that's picking up the phone and listening to you and they're angry. Pilar: There you go. Anne: Because they want to speak to a person, right? So you're in that scene, and they're screaming at the other end. Right? And you're like, "thank you for calling. Your call is important to us." So as they're screaming, so it can change your voice. Right? It can change the way you're responding in a very interesting way, because I always used to say that I love telephony because I imagine that that person is on the other end of the line, and that they're not happy and they're concerned, they want to get to somebody quickly. So I actually will speed up a little bit. As long as I'm articulate, I'll speed up. I'll be kinder. And I'll try not to be that annoying sound at the other end of the line that I even get annoyed with. Pilar: Yes. Yes. And the important thing is specificity, which you've just mentioned. It's just to be as specific as possible. Anne: Right, because your message, when you're, that let's say telephony, right -- and this is crazy. We're talking about improv with telephony and medical narration, like the two genres that nobody would think, right, that you would use improv with, but think about telephony for a doctor's office, right? People are typically, they're not feeling well, or they're calling for maybe a member of the family that's not feeling well; they're upset. They could be nervous. They could be scared. And so that puts a different light on how I'm going to voice my message, right? Versus maybe a party store, you know, so understanding that scene and who you're going to be talking to again, is paramount. It is so important to get yourself in that scene and then play that scene before you even start talking. Because again, that helps you hit the notes. It helps you hit the emotion, the point of view that you need to be in once you start voicing that copy. Pilar: Yeah. Yeah, absolutely. All true. Anne: Let's talk about a commercial, commercial genre, right? Pilar: Okay. Anne: Because I think a lot of people think that might be more resonant with them. It might come to them simpler if you're thinking about a commercial, because there's, I think there's more realms of scenes that can take place. There's more emotions that can take place. It could be a funny commercial. It could be a serious commercial. It could be all different types of commercials and scenarios that are, and you have to create that scene and improv your way into the voicing. Pilar: And here's the thing. If you listen to actors, when they talk about the roles that they did, when they admit, they say, well, no, actually it was all scripted, and you sit there and you go, oh, hey, how did they do that? It looked completely improv. That's because they had a very, very specific pre-life into going into the scene. Anne: Oh yeah, absolutely. Pilar: Since as voice actors, we don't have to memorize. We've got the copy right in front of us. We can mark our script up. We can imagine a scene beforehand. There's always the moment before, you know, who, what, when, where and why you're talking. Anne: Right. Pilar: And then you bring those colors in. And this is something that I always think about too, when I'm doing commercial copy. And this is Mary Lynn Wisner taught me this, what is the answer I'm giving? There's always a question. So put the question before, and then you give the answer. Anne: Right. Act, react. Pilar: Right, exactly. And all those things being specific and question and putting yourself in the scene, let's say you're a Taco Bell. Don't just read the Taco Bell. Imagine you're sitting at a Taco Bell and you're looking at, at the menu and you're going, oh my gosh, the waffle. I mean, I don't go to Taco Bell anymore because, cause I will order that big, huge mother of a waffle thing. And it's so delicious and it's so caloric. So I'd like I have to stay away from them. So I like, I give that to myself once a month as like a prize. But if you focus on the scene and that -- Anne: Maybe you're eating that in the scene. And so you'll have a different reaction. Pilar: Right. You're chomping on it. And it's like, you know, the, the sour cream and the avocados just spilling down your mouth and everything, you know, and the more colorful details you give yourself, the more that's going to come out in your read. Anne: Absolutely. Absolutely. And, and you know, what's interesting is commercial spot, I think sometimes when there's dialogue, it makes things easier for the improv when it's a dialogue or first person written. I know that when I do dialogue spots for, let's say, e-learning characters in e-learning -- when it's a written dialogue on the piece of paper, I find that there are so many -- it's harder than most people think, because I'll find that initially people will read the dialogue instead of being in the dialogue. And that's where improv can really help you because set that scene. And what it will do is if you are engaged in that scene -- Let's say you're walking in the hallway with your colleague, Sally, and you want Sally to make sure she gets the accounting numbers to Joe before Friday. You can, as you're walking along, "oh Sally." And then you imagine yourself walking, right? And so the rhythm of your line that you're going to say is going to change as you're thinking about, "oh, we need you to get these numbers to Joe by Friday because he's going to need them for this." So it will really change the rhythm as you're walking along or creating that scene, as you're thinking of things to say to Sally, in order to get your point across, because that's what will happen. All that like subtext, where she's looking at you going, "why do I have to get these to Joe by Friday? Because this is a lot of work, Anne." You know, so that kind of improv where you're imagining that as you were speaking of voicing, the dialogue can really, really help. Pilar: Yup. Yup. Absolutely. Location is so important. Putting yourself into the scene wherever you are, focusing on the here and now of it. Because a lot of the times we think, okay, I have to get through the copy or it's 30 seconds. Forget all that. The most important is what is going on right at this moment? What is the, the person who is not maybe physically there, but you are speaking to someone, are they standing next to you? Are they standing moving away from you? And you're trying to get their attention? "Oh my goodness, let me get your attention," and all that stuff you can put, you know, obviously you can put into your body, but you can put into your intention and that's how you can improv a scene or a, a commercial or, you know, a piece of longer copy. So the here and now, the establishing the location -- Anne: And establishing movement, movement through it. Pilar: Establishing movement. Yes. Anne: Yeah. That's the biggest thing I find people forget is they'll set the scene up, but then they'll forget to move through it. They'll set it up and the first sentence will be very much in the scene. But then after that first sentence, they just go into their own little monologue, and they forget about the scene. They forget about who they're interacting with. And again, that movement through the scene and the sound as if you're moving through the scene is super important. Now there's a lot to be said for leading in to help you get into that. But I think just the verbal lead-in is not enough to get you through an entire piece of copy, because we can't be completely improvising every single line, but we can certainly lead into a line that helps us get to the place where we need to be. And some of those can even be left -- I would say in the commercial genre, you can kind of, oh, you can kind of lead in with maybe a, a sound, I think, maybe a little bit of a word, but in other types of copy, let's say for narration, corporate narration, medical narration, telephony, you can't really keep those lead in words in there, but they can certainly help you as to get you in the place. And then you can, you can take them out. I mean, we all, we all know how to edit our stuff. So if it helps you get there, I say, leave it in and then take it out in post, you know? Pilar: Exactly. Yeah, absolutely. But like extending a sentence. We don't say words the same way. We don't talk the exact same rhythm, every single -- I mean, some people do, but I'm always speeding up and slowing down. So why wouldn't I put that in? I mean, and it depends, obviously, because sometimes, you know, if you're doing a biography, you do need to have a certain pace, but -- and I'm speaking specifically for commercial copy, but improv is also about changing. It's like how the character changes. In a 30-second piece, there's always like, there's a problem. It's described. Anne: There's a solution. Pilar: And then there's the solution at the end. So the person reading the copy is going to go through all these changes, and they're not necessarily going to say them at the same time. Anne: Right. Pilar: So change is a big part obviously of, of that, which you can incorporate into, into the copy. Anne: And change, even in the middle of sentences, right? 'Cause emotion, because right, you've got a problem. Commercial copy, usually you have a problem or an implied problem. And then you have a solution. So as you have this problem, you know, it's I kind of have this problem, but oh, now I've got a solution. You can hear the change, right? You can hear the change within even a sentence. And that's where that improv and subtexts and imagination and being in the scene can really help you to make that a more authentic and believable voicing. Now question, Pilar. What about commercial copy that's written very selly, that doesn't seem to have, you know, those are always the ones that people talk about. They're like, oh God, look at the way they wrote this copy. And now they want me to sound like I'm talking to my best friend. So what are your tips there? Pilar: Well, honestly, I mean, that's not true. I mean, I get pieces of copy and I go, wow, this is really good. But a lot of the times they'll tell you, you want to sound, you know, conversational. That's like the big, the big word, conversation -- Like you're not going to, you're going to sound like a robot, but conversational and not announcer-like, and then they give you this copy. And you're like, you know, what do I do with it? You break it down, you break it down into beats. You run through it. You sing it. Anne: Question, answer. Right? Act, react. Pilar: Yes, question, answer. Right. Anne: For every sentence. Pilar: Yes. But that's not what you're going to put into the final part of the copy. Anne: No, no. Pilar: But it's basically like when you've got a piece of copy that you have to work on, it's like stretching your body. You have to stretch your body. So whatever, like let's say, I'm stretching my arms right now, and I'm stretching them forward. I'm also going to stretch my arms up, and I'm going to stretch my arms to the back. I'm not just going to do it one way. I think voice actors get a little stuck, and they go, oh, okay. I did it this way. This sounds okay. Let me stay there. And then we get stuck. 'Cause that happens to me all the time, and I'll listen back and I'll be like, what are you talking about, Pilar? All three reads were exactly the same. So I have to go back and I have to like, and I think I've used this before on the podcast, but it's kind of like when my dog would turn around three times and then, you know, all of a sudden he would go and do something else. And my cat does the same thing. So I, I do that too, because I realized that if I turned around three times really quickly, I either get dizzy or I start laughing, but I don't go back to where I was before. So I need that change. You know, improv is all about change. So it's like, if you get stuck, all you need to do is shake it off, go outside, touch your toes, scream in the booth, and start again because that's going to give you a little bit of a different scenario so you don't slide into that sameness, that sameness of reading the copy the same way. Anne: Then when your director is asking you for that ABC take, right, improv is going to help you get there. I'm always like -- Pilar: Yes, yes. Anne: You know, and I've said this before on a previous episode, everybody thinks about let's do the different sounds. This is take A. This is take B. This is take C. And that just is a, a simple, like change in your pitch. It's not even -- I want you guys, you BOSSes out there to really improv your way into ABC. And that is a skill, that is a muscle that, if you work on it, can really improve your ABC reads or your second take. And that is so important that, that second take, that ABC, they're all different. And I think there could be an entire like course on ABC takes and how you can get to them better because they do have to be different. And there's a lot of times myself even, Pilar, where I'm like, okay, let me give a second read. Right? And I haven't done the work enough. And I listen to that second read. I'm like, oh, that's kind of sounds the same. So really spend the extra moments and figure out what's happening in the scene or a change in the scene that can give you a different, alternate take. And don't just do the start of it. Right? Don't just say, okay, well now I'm on a mountain. Here, I'm in my office. But start and continue throughout the script. As you're reading the script, things change, right? The product solves your problem. And so then there's an evolution, and it may evolve in a different way. So create the scene all the way through the text. I would say, create the scene, be in the scene between the periods of the copy. Pilar: Yeah. I mean, I think it's simple that you could say, let's say for example, off the top of my head, um, I'm going to the store this morning. So I could say it, oh my God, it's 10:00, I'm going to the store this morning. Anne: Exactly. PIlar: Oh my God. I forgot the tomato sauce. I'm going to the store this morning. Or, oh my God, they're coming. They're coming at 7:00 and at six 15, I'm going to the store. I'm going to the store this evening. You know, I mean, and I'm exaggerating, but I just did three to four ideas. Anne: You just got up and you had a plant. I'm going to the store this morning, right? Pilar: Right. Or, or like, I'm going to, I'm going to surprise you. I'm going to the store this morning. Anne: I like that. Pilar: So you've just created different worlds. Anne: You just had four or five different reads, exactly different worlds, different scenes to react to. And that's where, BOSSes, I want you to start practicing, take a sentence, a tagline, and think of three different scenarios for it. Or take every piece of copy that you ever auditioned for and give yourself different scenes. Or maybe just take a line out of it and give yourself different scenes so that you can read it differently. And don't think about what sounds like. Don't think about what it -- think about being in the scene and reacting to the scene and improv-ing that scene. That's what's going to get you that different read. Pilar: Yeah. It's really important too, because I, I didn't even know what improv was, even though I was doing it. I was always a little scared of it. And so like, when I was working in Colombia, I used to improv all the time, not realizing that that's what I was doing, but stuff would come out of my mouth, and I would just do it. And they'd be like, oh my gosh. Yeah, let's keep that. And then I finally finally, because I read books about it and I would take like classes here and there. But finally, when I came out here to LA, I took an improv class at Second City. And then all of a sudden it all came together because all this stuff I'd kind of heard willy nilly randomly and what I'd seen and the way television and movies, people improv-ing, I was like, oh, that's what it is. You know, there, there are rules and there are things that you can do. And so I, you know, I think it's important. I mean, you know, that we are still going through what we're going through, but there are classes online that you can take. Anne: Absolutely. I've got one coming up as a matter of fact. Pilar: Oh, oh really? Oh, okay. Anne: Yeah. Yeah. With Scott Parkin, who is amazing -- Pilar: He's awesome. Anne: He is awesome at improv. Pilar: Yeah, yeah. He's really good. Yeah. And so it's about becoming loose because that's the whole point. When you're in the booth, then that's why you need to take classes. 'Cause it's like exercising that muscle. Anne: Yes, it's a muscle. Pilar: So when you're in the booth by yourself, and you've got a piece of copy, and you're like, what do I do with it? You've got these tools that you can use, the yes, and, the imagining, the being specific, you know, the being goofy. And you never know what's going to come out, but allowing yourself the space to say something and fall down and maybe not have it be right, and that's okay. Anne: Absolutely. I mean, I think that that is all part of it. Right? If it didn't work out, no, that's okay. Right? This is improv. Right? You change the scene. Right? Pilar: Exactly. Exactly. Because one thing that's really important to know is that yes, improv is an art, but it's also a craft. You have to practice it. You have to work on it. Anne: Absolutely. Absolutely. I think that's a daily thing. Like honestly, I think you should take a sentence every day and give yourself three different scenes and three different ways. And I think do that, or do that with your auditions, right? Do that with your auditions daily. Even if you don't have an audition, take an old audition and do that. And I'll tell you what, it will keep you, I think, on your toes. And it will give you a better performance. What a great discussion, Pilar. Pilar: Yeah. Anne: So much fun. Pilar: That was really fun. Anne: So much fun. BOSSes, make sure that you get in the booth and practice, practice, practice, and that will help you perform at your very best. I'd like to give a great, big shout-out to our sponsor, ipDTL. You too can network like a BOSS and find out more at ipdtl.com. Thanks so much, Pilar. Pilar: Thank you. Anne: Yeah. Pilar: You know, there's a new song that just came into my head when you said that it could be like, "network like a BOSS, network like BOSS" Anne: Who! Pilar: "Network like a BOSS. Yeah. Yeah." Anne: Alright. BOSSes. Have a great week, and we'll see you next week. Pilar: Bye. Anne: Bye. >> Join us next week for another edition of VO BOSS with your host Anne Ganguzza. And take your business to the next level. Sign up for our mailing list at voboss.com and receive exclusive content, industry revolutionizing tips and strategies, and new ways to rock your business like a BOSS. Redistribution with permission. Coast to coast connectivity via ipDTL.

The Practice of the Practice Podcast | Innovative Ideas to Start, Grow, and Scale a Private Practice
Delegation Tips for Group Practice Bosses with Whitney Owens and Alison Pidgeon | PoP 703

The Practice of the Practice Podcast | Innovative Ideas to Start, Grow, and Scale a Private Practice

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 20:30


Do you find yourself exhausted at the end of the workweek? Do you struggle to get to everything on your plate? Are you still... The post Delegation Tips for Group Practice Bosses with Whitney Owens and Alison Pidgeon | PoP 703 appeared first on How to Start, Grow, and Scale a Private Practice| Practice of the Practice.

Make Me A Gamer
Episode 122 - The Toilet Paper of Bosses

Make Me A Gamer

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 69:54


It's Monday morning, and we're starting the week off fresh with a brand new episode of Make Me A Gamer! We're finishing up HarveyZ's BattleTech run as well as finally getting to talk a little about Triangle Strategy. And then for the main event: Atma takes HarveyZ through the first four sets of Mega Man X Mavericks and Harvey puts his brand of spin on a tier list - choosing which of these bosses are most worthy of having a place in his henchmen. We hope you enjoy! Make Me A Gamer on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/MakeMeAPodcast E-Mail Us at: makemeagamerpodcast@gmail.com Discord: https://discord.gg/xNVvTSB As always, thank you so much for listening and please leave us ratings and feedback however you're listening to our podcast! Please stay safe out there, get vaccinated, and wear a mask!

Hostile Work Environment with Marc and Dennis

Today: Strippers on strike! Birthday parties gone bad! Bosses gone berzerk! Find us on twitter: Marc: @saladpants Kate: @K8Bisch Check out our virtually never updated Facebook Page and YouTube Channel! Please leave a review! Disclaimer: Nothing in this podcast constitutes legal advice. Ever!

Evolve to Succeed
Chris Croft - "Why are so many bosses bad?"

Evolve to Succeed

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 63:11


In his second appearance on the Evolve to Succeed podcast, Chris Croft—one of the UK's top leadership and management trainers—elaborates on his article 'Why are so many bosses bad?' Listen if you dare...

HORROR WITH SIR. STURDY
HORROR WITH SIR. STURDY EPISODE 289 BRAM STOKER'S SHADOW BUILDER MOVIE REVIEW

HORROR WITH SIR. STURDY

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 24, 2022 61:25


ARE YOU READY TO GET SLICIN & DICIN WITH SIR. STURDY HORROR FANS?   IF YOU DON'T KNOW BY NOW I AM YOUR HOST SIR. STURDY.  BRAM STOKER'S SHADOW BUILDER (1998).    LET US KNOW YOUR THOUGHTS AND RATINGS OF THIS MOVIE IN THE COMMENTS.   DON'T BE SCARED TO LIKE SHARE & SUBSCRIBE WELCOME TO THE MADNESS!!!!!!!   WANT YOUR FACEBOOK COMMENTS TO SHOW UP ON RESTREAM? CLICK THE LINK BELOW!! https://chat.restream.io/fb   RESTREAM $10 CREDIT     https://restream.io/welcome?ref=B21pJ     RESTREAM $10 CREDIT     https://restream.io/join/sir.sturdy   SIR. STURDY'S LINKTREE  https://linktr.ee/SIR_STURDY   THE Z NETWORK LINKTREE https://linktr.ee/THEZNETWORK   THANK YOU ALL JOINING THE MADNESS.  PLEASE DON'T BE AFRAID TO LIKE SHARE & SUBSCRIBE. TELL YOUR FAMILY, FRIENDS, ENEMIES, CO-WORKERS, BOSSES, NEIGHBORS, STRANGERS, TELL EVERYBODY ABOUT HORROR WITH SIR. STURDY..   IF YOU EVER WANT TO COME ON HERE AND TALK SOME HORROR EMAIL ME AT  HORRORWITHSIR.STURDYGUESTS@GMAIL.COM  I'LL SEE YOU IN YOUR NIGHTMARES!!!! #sirsturdy #horrorwithsirsturdy #horrorpodcast #518podcast #watchwithsirsturdy #sturdymerch #livewithsturdy #hashbrownhank #anothermoviepodcast #podcast #supportindiepodcasts #horror #moviereview #ohcanada #4yearsofsturdy #happynewyear #happyholidays #spookyseason #livestreaming #livereview #liveshow #tuesdaynight #thursdaynight #8pmEst #horrormoviereview #BRAMSTOKER'SSHADOWBUILDER    #thankyouforbeingafriend #theznetwork #popcornandpints #deepfocuscinema #storiesfromabar #worstdamngamerevr #thecinematiccanon #anylastwords   #supportindiehorror #supporthorror #illseeyouinyournightmares #RIPDMX #RIPKODA

This is Game Boy
TIGB Lite - Episode 49 - Crappy Final Bosses

This is Game Boy

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 24, 2022 59:43


On this episode of This is Game Boy Lite, the airing of grievances. Get in touch with the hosts and producer through: Website: www.thisisgameboy.com Discord: discord.gg/f9MzZUv Email: tigbpodcast@gmail.com Support us through our Patreon: www.patreon.com/thisisgameboy Merch: merch.thisisgameboy.com

The Star Forge SWTOR Podcast
Episode 24 - Lair Bosses & Dailies

The Star Forge SWTOR Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 30:40


You're listening to the Star Forge podcast with Scya and Mal, two nerds who  have a lot to say about Star Wars: The Old Republic and all its 'features' - rest assured, the podcast is working as intended.⚠️ This podcast is rated E.S. for extremely silly and may contain bad words bad jokes and other bad content that is not suitable for children maybe it is we don't know we're not their parents.✨✨

THE Leadership Japan Series by Dale Carnegie Training Tokyo,  Japan
460: We Have To Know Our People In Order To Motivate Them

THE Leadership Japan Series by Dale Carnegie Training Tokyo, Japan

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 12:49


The concept of motivating people is a misnomer really.  It is a short form of saying, as the leader, we build the right relationship, the right culture and create the right environment where our people can motivate themselves to be successful.  Yelling at someone to “be motivated, be motivated, be motivated” sounds and is ridiculous.  We know that but do we have a good alternative?  The degree to which we know our people is the key.  Well we think we know them, but often it is only at a very superficial level.  Bosses are busy very people, time is short and there is a lot to do.  Getting to know our people in depth is a big task, one which takes considerable time and requires a sustained effort.  This is why most leaders don't bother.   When we take over the boss role we probably went around to everyone in the team and interviewed them about what they do, how they do it, how they like it and any issues they have which, we as the new face, may be able to solve for them.  This is probably the only time we interview them.  We catch up at performance review time, going over the Key Performance Indicators, but we don't really dig into the entrails about how they are going and what they think about the firm.  Then we move on to our next role and we repeat the same process.  The end result is we work with people, but we never really know them to any great or meaningful extent.  It doesn't have to be like this and we can get to know people in a way which will allow us to appeal to their nobler and highest motivations.   We use a methodology called not the “interview” but the “innerview”.  This is not a single encounter in the first thirty days of taking on the leader role for the team.  It is a piecemeal, gradual accumulation of understanding of our people.  It may be over coffee, a lunch, a casual conversation.  The word casual here is key.  Yes, there is intention.  We want to get to know our people so that we can provide what it is they want from the firm and the work, positioning ourselves as the leader who can deliver those things.  At the same time it cannot be an interrogation. It cannot be manipulative.  This is a fine line however. We need to get to know how they tick, in order to help them, without it becoming a cunning plan to use them for our own glorious, ever upward, brass ring grabbling, dastardly plot to climb to the top of the corporate ladder.   There are levels of depth in getting to know someone.  Factual questions are the simplest.  Where did you grow up, go to school, go to university, what did you study, what sports did you play, what are your hobbies, where have you travelled, who is in your family unit, where do you live, where else have you worked, etc.  Obviously we are not going to ask these like a barrage of rapid fire quiz show questions.  These types of context, background questions will get answered over time, through the natural flow of causal conversation.  We shouldn't be forcing it, like we are holding a clipboard survey with boxes to be checked, as we unearth each answer.  In these answers there are connectors with our own story.  We may have lived in the same city or studied a similar subject or even have gone to the same university.   Causative questions are the next layer down.  These are the deeper “why” and “what” questions, as we uncover the motivations and aspirations of the individual.  Why do they like this hobby? Why did they choose this city to live in or this university or this field of study or work?  Why did they move from one company to another.  The latter questions we may have asked during the hiring process, but that was a while ago and we may not recall the detail or they may have been somewhat guarded in their answers at that point in joining the firm or maybe they were already in the team and we are the new arrival.   The deepest level of questioning is around the value-based questions. Knowing the values of the person helps us a lot as the leader, because we can see if there is alignment or not with our own values and with the values of the firm.  These are rather sensitive, personal questions, so there has to be a certain level of trust already established through the earlier questions before we can get to this stage.  Busting right in with such a deep values based question might alarm the team member and they may feel some manipulation is going on.   After listening to them tell us about their career so far, we might ask, “looking back on your career so far is there anything you would do differently?”, “Many people have benefitted from mentors in their work, has that been the case for you”, “ What has been something in your work you look back on with great pride”, “ Life doesn't go in a straight line so do you have any advice for people who may be going through a tough patch at the moment”.   This whole process has to have the correct kokorogamae, or true intention, about why we are doing it.  If we are working out how best we can use people, then we will only damage the relationships, because people are not stupid.  If on the other hand, we are seeking to establish common ground, common needs and common values to deepen our understanding and therefore work out how we can help them to move upward in their career path, then we are on the right track.  Time, place and occasion are three considerations for holding these types of conversations.  We shouldn't feel we are on a schedule and be in a rush to get to know our people better through these innerview questions.  Authentic, casual, non-probing conversation is the key to learning how best to create the ideal work environment which will help our people to succeed.

St. Louis on the Air
Dream Builders 4 Equity focuses on making bosses out of local youth

St. Louis on the Air

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 21:06


Dream Builders 4 Equity has pioneered a new workforce development model in St. Louis over the last six years. CEO Michael Woods and the nonprofit's mentees share how the organization runs a successful workforce development model for area youth.

The Chris Voss Show
The Chris Voss Show Podcast – 100,000 First Bosses: My Unlikely Path as a 22-Year-Old Lawmaker by Will Haskell

The Chris Voss Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 17, 2022 23:58


100,000 First Bosses: My Unlikely Path as a 22-Year-Old Lawmaker by Will Haskell The underdog story of Will Haskell, who became a Democratic state Senator in 2018 at age twenty-two—taking on an incumbent who had been undefeated for Haskell's entire life and earning an endorsement from President Obama—and is determined to pave the way for his peers to transform government from the bottom up. President Obama left office with these parting words for Americans: “If you're disappointed by your elected officials, grab a clipboard, get some signatures, and run for office yourself.” Twenty-two-year-old Will Haskell decided to do just that. If he ran for office and won, he would become the youngest state Senator in Connecticut history. For years, Haskell's hometown had reelected the same politician who opposed passing paid family leave, fought increases in the minimum wage, and voted down expansions of voting rights. Haskell's own vision for Connecticut's future couldn't be more different, and he couldn't stand the idea of an uncontested election. In 2018, he would be a college grad looking for his first job. Why not state Senator? When Haskell kicks off his campaign in the spring of his senior year, he's an unknown college kid facing a popular incumbent who's been in office for over two decades—as long as Haskell's been alive. Haskell's campaign manager is his roommate and his treasurer is his girlfriend's mom. He doesn't have any professional experience. But he does have a powerful message: there's no minimum age to being on the right side of history. Six months later, Haskell's shocking upset victory gives him a historic seat in the state Senate and the responsibility to serve the 100,000 constituents in his district. Like any first job, his first term as a legislator is filled with trial and error. Creating a program that funds free tuition at Connecticut's community colleges—nice work. Falling asleep on the senate floor—needs improvement. In the tradition of Pete Buttigieg's Shortest Way Home and Greta Thunberg's No One Is Too Small to Make a Difference, 100,000 First Bosses is the story of how one twentysomething candidate waged the campaign of his young life, fought for change at the state capitol, and proved that his generation is ready to claim a seat at the table.

It is a Podcast.
S2 E13-15 Drop this episode on your bosses floor.

It is a Podcast.

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 16, 2022 86:28


Ryan Scott Jones, Bruce Myers and Matthew Jones review episodes of the office and make connections with life and other things.

HORROR WITH SIR. STURDY
HORROR WITH SIR. STURDY EPISODE 288 MIDNIGHT HORROR SHOW MOVIE REVIEW

HORROR WITH SIR. STURDY

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 38:08


ARE YOU READY TO GET SLICIN & DICIN WITH SIR. STURDY HORROR FANS?   IF YOU DON'T KNOW BY NOW I AM YOUR HOST SIR. STURDY. MIDNIGHT HORROR SHOW (2015).    LET US KNOW YOUR THOUGHTS AND RATINGS OF THIS MOVIE IN THE COMMENTS.   DON'T BE SCARED TO LIKE SHARE & SUBSCRIBE WELCOME TO THE MADNESS!!!!!!!   WANT YOUR FACEBOOK COMMENTS TO SHOW UP ON RESTREAM? CLICK THE LINK BELOW!! https://chat.restream.io/fb   RESTREAM $10 CREDIT     https://restream.io/welcome?ref=B21pJ     RESTREAM $10 CREDIT     https://restream.io/join/sir.sturdy   SIR. STURDY'S LINKTREE  https://linktr.ee/SIR_STURDY   THE Z NETWORK LINKTREE https://linktr.ee/THEZNETWORK   THANK YOU ALL JOINING THE MADNESS.  PLEASE DON'T BE AFRAID TO LIKE SHARE & SUBSCRIBE. TELL YOUR FAMILY, FRIENDS, ENEMIES, CO-WORKERS, BOSSES, NEIGHBORS, STRANGERS, TELL EVERYBODY ABOUT HORROR WITH SIR. STURDY..   IF YOU EVER WANT TO COME ON HERE AND TALK SOME HORROR EMAIL ME AT  HORRORWITHSIR.STURDYGUESTS@GMAIL.COM  I'LL SEE YOU IN YOUR NIGHTMARES!!!! #sirsturdy #horrorwithsirsturdy #horrorpodcast #518podcast #watchwithsirsturdy #sturdymerch #livewithsturdy #hashbrownhank #anothermoviepodcast #podcast #supportindiepodcasts #horror #moviereview #ohcanada #4yearsofsturdy #happynewyear #happyholidays #spookyseason #livestreaming #livereview #liveshow #tuesdaynight #thursdaynight #8pmEst #horrormoviereview #MIDNIGHTHORRORSHOW   #thankyouforbeingafriend #theznetwork #popcornandpints #deepfocuscinema #storiesfromabar #worstdamngamerevr #thecinematiccanon #anylastwords   #supportindiehorror #supporthorror #illseeyouinyournightmares #RIPDMX

Srsly Wrong
254 – No Bosses & Participatory Economics W/ Michael Albert

Srsly Wrong

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 110:03


Imagine a world without bosses! The Wrong Boys speak to Michael Albert, author of “No Bosses,” about Participatory Economics, democratic workers councils, fair job complexes, and the process of building a participatory...

HORROR WITH SIR. STURDY
HORROR WITH SIR. STURDY EPISODE 287 DEVIL MOVIE REVIEW

HORROR WITH SIR. STURDY

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 57:24


ARE YOU READY TO GET SLICIN & DICIN WITH SIR. STURDY HORROR FANS? IF YOU DON'T KNOW BY NOW I AM YOUR HOST SIR. STURDY. TONIGHT THE MOVIES WE ARE REVIEWING IS  DEVIL (2010).  LET US KNOW YOUR THOUGHTS AND RATINGS OF THIS MOVIE IN THE COMMENTS. DON'T BE SCARED TO LIKE SHARE & SUBSCRIBE WELCOME TO THE MADNESS!!!!!!!   RESTREAM $10 CREDIT     https://restream.io/join/sir.sturdy   SIR. STURDY'S LINKTREE  https://linktr.ee/SIR_STURDY   THE Z NETWORK LINKTREE https://linktr.ee/THEZNETWORK   THANK YOU ALL JOINING THE MADNESS.  PLEASE DON'T BE AFRAID TO LIKE SHARE & SUBSCRIBE. TELL YOUR FAMILY, FRIENDS, ENEMIES, CO-WORKERS, BOSSES, NEIGHBORS, STRANGERS, TELL EVERYBODY ABOUT HORROR WITH SIR. STURDY.. IF YOU EVER WANT TO COME ON HERE AND TALK SOME HORROR EMAIL ME AT  HORRORWITHSIR.STURDYGUESTS@GMAIL.COM  I'LL SEE YOU IN YOUR NIGHTMARES!!!! #sirsturdy #horrorwithsirsturdy #horrorpodcast #518podcast #watchwithsirsturdy #sturdymerch #livewithsturdy #hashbrownhank #anothermoviepodcast #podcast #supportindiepodcasts #horror #moviereview #ohcanada #4yearsofsturdy #happynewyear #happyholidays #spookyseason #livestreaming #livereview #liveshow #tuesdaynight #thursdaynight #8pmEst #horrormoviereview #DEVIL    #thankyouforbeingafriend #theznetwork #popcornandpints #deepfocuscinema #storiesfromabar #worstdamngamerevr #thecinematiccanon #anylastwords   #supportindiehorror #supporthorror #illseeyouinyournightmares #RIPDMX

Tales from the Backlog
Break from the Backlog: Bloodborne Bosses Tier List (FULL SPOILERS) (with Andrew & Dylan from Your Friendly Neighborhood Gamers)

Tales from the Backlog

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 171:40


Dave is joined by Andrew Kimball and Dylan Wren from Your Friendly Neighborhood Gamers to tier rank the Bloodborne bosses. This episode contains full spoilers for Bloodborne! Find Your Friendly Neighborhood Gamers on your podcast platform of choice, YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRgS_YRAM8_PlWNvxrjQshA), Twitch (https://www.twitch.tv/neighborhood_gamers) or their website (https://www.fngamers.com/) and follow them on Twitter (https://twitter.com/F_N_Gamerz) and Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/yourfriendlyneighborhoodgamers/). Tales from the Backlog: Join the Discord! (https://discord.gg/V3ZHz3vYQR) Social Media: Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/talesfromthebacklog/) Twitter (https://twitter.com/tftblpod) Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/TalesfromtheBacklog/) Cover art by Jack Allen- find him at https://www.instagram.com/jackallencaricatures/ and his other pages (https://linktr.ee/JackAllenCaricatures)

Omega Metroid Podcast
Episode 108 – Discussing Metroid Dread's New Boss Rush Mode!

Omega Metroid Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 67:43


We're back and talking all things Bosses in this special Boss Rush edition of the podcast. Dak and Doom talk about the new feature in Metroid Dread and if they enjoyed running through the gauntlet of bosses or not, and then discuss which bosses from previous Metroid games would have rounded up the Dread roster, including, of course, Ridley. That's not all, as we're taking fan questions at the end like which 3D boss would work well in a 2D setting and the sweet spot when it comes to amount of bosses in a Metroid game. Come and hang with us, and let us know your best scores in Boss Rush Mode!   Visit OmegaMetroid.com!   Subscribe! Podbean x iTunes x Spotify Support us on Patreon! Omega Metroid Patreon Follow us on Twitter! @OmegaMetroidPod x @Spiteri316 x @dakcity_ x @DoominalCross Chat with us in Discord! Omega Metroid Discord INTRO SONG – Listen here! OUTRO SONG – Listen here!  

VO BOSS Podcast
BOSS Voces: Move in the Booth

VO BOSS Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 28:07


Acting is more than just using your voice. It requires whole body movement, agility, and engagement. In this episode, Anne & Pilar share their favorite stretches, exercises, and warmups that can be done in and out of the booth. From Pilar's jaw release warmup to Anne's neck stretch, by the end of this episode you'll be warmed up + ready to perform like a #VOBOSS. More at https://voboss.com/move-in-the-booth Transcript >> It's time to take your business to the next level, the BOSS level! These are the premiere Business Owner Strategies and Successes being utilized by the industry's top talent today. Rock your business like a BOSS, a VO BOSS! Now let's welcome your host, Anne Ganguzza. Pilar: Hola, BOSS Voces. Bienvenidos al podcast, con Anne Ganguzza y Pilar Uribe. Anne: Hey everyone. Welcome to the VO BOSS podcast. I'm your host Anne Ganguzza. And I am so excited to bring back to my booth, my special guest cohost Pilar Uribe. Pilar, how are you? Pilar: Hello, Anne. Anne: Look, I feel I'm very spry. I'm very spry today in the booth. And you know why? Do you know I'm spry? Pilar: Why are you spry? Why are you spry? Why are you spry, Anne? Anne: Because I did a little warmup, so I'm kind of feeling good in the booth. And I think it's important that we always do awesome warmups and move around in the booth so we can have good energy going forth into our voiceover. Pilar: I totally agree. Anne: Thoughts? Pilar: That that is something that I, something that I just did. Do as I say, not as I do. Try not to do what I just did, honestly. VO BOSSes -- Anne: Drink dairy? Pilar: Because, well, that's one thing. Yes, of course. I had dairy. I had yogurt this morning, so of course I'm all phlegmy. Anne: Me too. Pilar: That's not, that's not fun, especially when you're going to do an audition. That's not great. So drink your water. But one of the things that I was told by a professional is it's really bad to clear your throat. You know, like when people [clear throat noise], that is like the worst thing you can do. Drink water, wait till it passes, stop doing that. But that's literally like putting sandpaper on your throat. It's the worst thing you can do. Anne: Yes, I have heard the same, and it's very hard because I think it's like a habit from before voiceover. That would be BF -- BFO, before voiceover, before voiceover, when I used to scream and do all sorts of harmful things to my vocal cords, before I realized that we need to treat this like gold, because it is our livelihood. Pilar: Okay. I have one question though. Did you say BFO? Anne: Did I say BF -- Pilar: You meant BVO, BVO. Anne: BVO, okay, okay. I was thinking like best friend in VO. So I kind of combined -- Pilar: Anne, Anne -- Anne: Pilar, that's how I think of you. Pilar: Anne, will you be my BFO? Anne: My BFO. there's -- Pilar: Will you be my BFO? Anne: -- best friend, best friend in VO. So hey -- Pilar: I love it. Anne: So being best friends, I think I want all of our BOSS listenership -- they're our friends. And I think it would be a really great episode if we talked about how moving in the booth and how warming up and just physicality in the booth can really help us to perform better and just be better all around, better mental, spiritual, physical to improve our performances. Pilar: Okay. So since we are starting our day, Anne, I invite you to do something with me. Anne: Okay. All right. Pilar: We're going to do it all together. Anne: What is this, a warmup? Pilar: This is a warmup exercise. It's a jaw release. Anne: Oh yes. Pilar: Which we don't even realize half the time how much tension we're carrying in our jaw. Anne: You know what's so funny, that I actually really need this because the other day, I woke up, and my ear was hurting, but it wasn't like an earache kind of hurt. It was an ear hurting because I might've clenched my jaw at night. And I, I know so many people that clench their jaws at night, and anything to relieve this ache in my jaw will be very helpful. Yes. Pilar: Okay. Cool. Anne: I'm ready. Pilar: All right. So I want you to place your palms on the sides of your face. Okay? I'll hold it on my headphones. You can still hear me, right? Okay. So you're going to place your palms on the side of your face and slowly massage the jaw and the cheek muscles. Okay. So you're taking the palm, and you're massaging the jaw line up and down the jaw line and also your cheekbones and, and with small circular motions. Anne: Good for when you have sinus issues too. Pilar: Yes. Anne: Or you feel it. Can you hear me going, can you hear it? Like, I'm very close to the mic. I am in circular motions. Pilar: So you can, you can go all the way up to where your cheekbone is and massage there, and you can go all the way towards the ear. Anne: Okay, BOSSes, you're doing this, I hope you're doing this with us, BOSSes. Pilar: Absolutely. Just try it. And then you go all the way down to your jaw line and go way up almost to your, your ear, almost to the ear. So continue to massage while lowering and raising your jaw. Now -- Anne: You're lowering and raising the jaw while you're doing this. Pilar: Yeah, so you're going, ahhh, in the jaw. Anne: Are we saying anything when we're doing? Pilar: No, not yet. Not yet. Just lower and raise your jaw. I can't speak right now. Anne: But you're my -- you're instructing us, so. Pilar: I am instructing you. Okay. Now -- Anne: I don't know if you can do it while you're instructing. Pilar: I will. You're going to hear it in a minute. So now keep lowering and raising your jaw while you're massaging. And now you're going to add the sound ma ma ma with a very light lip contact. So it's not, mmm. It's just a light lip contact for the mic. Anne: Now what is ] that doing? Pilar: And then you're going to change to whoa, whoa, Anne: Wait. I'm still massaging, right? Pilar: Yeah. You're still massaging, and you're changing from ma ma to wa wa. Anne: Oh, I can feel the vibration. Pilar: VO BOSSes, if you're doing this, you're hearing the resonance. That's really important because that means that you're using all those muscles. Anne: That's awesome. Pilar: We tend to think that we're just using the vocal box and that's it. And sometimes we can hear the chest. Anne: No, it's our entire it's like facial jaw. Pilar: Exactly. It's that whole, and it goes up practically -- it's like, like you're using all those muscles and all that movement there, and that will help your sound as it comes out. Anne: Love it. Pilar: So do you wanna try another one? Anne: Yeah, let's try another one. Let's try another one. Pilar: It's a lip trill. Okay. So this releases lip tension, which we tend to do and we don't even realize it. And it also helps you to connect your breathing and speaking. So place your lips loosely together. Okay? And you're going to release air in a steady stream to create a trill or a raspberry kind of a sound. So it's like [whistle-like breathing] Anne: That's a raspberry sound? Pilar: I'm not really sure what a raspberry sound is. Anne: [lip trill] Isn't that what it is, the trill? Pilar: But that's what I say -- yeah, yeah, yeah. But you can also do this. [whistle breathing] What is a raspberry sound? That is a raspberry sound, but it's like, what I'm trying to do is I'm trying to get the sound out without moving my lips, which is really cool. Hold on. [lip buzzing] That's a raspberry sound. That's a raspberry. [lip buzzing] So first try. So our microphone is getting a lot of action here. First, try it with an H sound. Then try it with a B sound. Anne: Oh my God, that tickles. Pilar: Yeah, it does, it tickles, right? Anne: I can not, I can not do it. It's like when the dentist does the teeth cleaning, the polishing, and it gets on my lip, it just, I can't. It makes me tear up. Pilar: So first try it with an H sound and then repeat with a B sound. Okay? And then [sound]. And it seems like it wouldn't be, but it is different. It's a different feeling. So now I want you to try doing the B trill. It can be either [lip trill] or it can be [lip buzz] and go up and down the scales. Okay? And whatever's comfortable. You don't have to go all the way -- whatever's comfortable at the top or the bottom. Anne: I really think for the trill, you have to let your lips just trill like that. Pilar: Because there's two ways to do it. There's [one way] which is more the H sound. And then there's the [lip trill]. Anne: That's easy. Okay. My lips are relaxed now. Pilar: Yeah. Don't they feel kind of like, they feel like you can kind of feel the reverberations. Anne: Well, once the tickle goes away, I'll, yeah. I'm not sure I can do this everyday 'cause it just tickles. I wonder if I'll get used to it. Pilar: Yeah. And there's more, there, there are other things, there's tongue trills. There's lip buzzing. We kind of did the lip buzzing, and here's one thing that's really important: humming. You can do this anywhere. You can do this while you're walking. Humming is really great. So [hums]. Anne: Oh yes. Pilar: So if you do humming and you concentrate, you will feel it in different parts of your face. Anne: Oh yeah, absolutely. Pilar: You will, you'll be able to feel it in your teeth, in your lips, and in your facial bones. So let's just try that really quickly. Just the humming. Anne: BOSSes are humming. Pilar: And if you go low, It's a different feeling from when you go high. And in your nose, if you concentrate on feeling it in your nose, you're going to feel all this vibration. Anne: Yep. I feel it my nose. And I think if you visualize where it's coming from, that helps, that helps. Now this is doing some vocal lip, trills, and hums. Now I also think any exercise around your head, neck, muscles, shoulders is very helpful in the booth. So I feel like I do a lot of the neck stretches where you take your right hand, place it on your left ear and tilt your head to the side. Right? So right hand -- Pilar: Hold on, right hand, left ear. Anne: Right-hand, left ear. Pilar: Is your hand over your head or is it under? Anne: It's over my head, over my head. And so as you breathe in through your nose for three seconds, then exhale, pull your head more to the right. Breathe in for three seconds. Hold it. And as you exhale, stretch your neck further towards your right shoulder. Breathe in for three and then exhale and stretch even further to your shoulder. And then you basically take your head and do on the other side. So take your left hand, put your left hand over your right ear. Pilar: I was doing it, I was doing it the wrong way at first. I'm like, she's crazy. And then I realized I was doing it wrong. Anne: Yeah. Breathe in through your nose. And then when you exhale, bring that head down towards your shoulder, toward the left shoulder. Exactly. Then breathe in again. And then as you exhale, bring it further towards your left shoulder. So you're stretching that neck. Pilar: Oh, that feels good. Oh yeah, you can feel it. Anne: Yeah. And then you can do that also forward. So take your hand, your right hand, put it on the top of your head, and breathe in for three through your nose and then exhale and then pull your head down to your chest. So chin to your chest. Pilar: Oh my God. I can feel it all up and down the back of my neck. Anne: So yeah, those muscles around your neck, when you warm them up, right, your vocal cords are right there. So it's super that that's warmed up as well. And in addition to the physical, like, and I also do head rolls, right? So from left to right, roll your head around the back 'til it reaches your right shoulder and then back again towards your left, and that will help you to relax those muscles around your vocal cords. Pilar: Okay. Very important. Yeah. And one other that I will suggest is interlocking your hands in front of you and then twisting them and pushing your palms out. Anne: Oh, forward, yeah. Pilar: Forward. So you're stretching those, those shoulders. Anne: Shoulder muscles. Yeah. Pilar: And then you can bring them up and, and then, and you can actually pull your left -- Anne: Over your head, right? Pilar: Over your head and then pull your left wrist with your right hand and then go to the right. Oh. And you can feel all up and down the arm. Anne: And so you're stretching to the left. So you're doing that -- Pilar: Your side. Anne: Yeah. You're doing a side stretch. Pilar: You're doing a side stretch. Right. And you're doing, yeah. And then you go to the other side. You can feel all the way up and down the side of your body. Because when you're in the booth, you're using everything. I know that a lot of people sit in terms of moving in the booth. That's an important part of this. People ask me all the time, do you sit or do you stand? And it's like, I do both. It depends on the read. However, whatever it is that you do, make sure you don't -- if you're standing for a very long time, make sure you have a chair that you can sit. And if you're sitting for a long time, make sure you get up, move around, touch your toes, raise your arms up, you know, lift your knees a little bit, because sitting or standing in the same position for a very long time will lead you to feeling tension and -- Anne: Exactly. Pilar: And so, you know, it's like, you want to be flexible. You want to be easy. Anne: So we've warmed up, and we're moving in the booth as we sit. And literally this takes a few minutes. You don't even have to spend an hour doing this, but every little bit helps. And I think that not only just warming up in the booth by moving around, 'cause now I'm like, wow, I've got some heat going on in this booth. Maybe you do it outside the booth if you don't have any ventilation, but wherever you do the, the exercises and the movement, the lip trills, and the head rolls, and the neck rolls, and all of the side stretches, that's wonderful before you get into do your auditioning for the day. And once you're there too, you can physicate while you're performing your script. And that actually is something that I tell my students every single day, get physical behind the mic. Because number one, it helps you be much more believable because it's taking away all of that energy that you focus specifically just on the words coming out of your mouth. And a lot of times that doesn't make things realistic because if all you're moving is your mouth and your vocal cords, things become very consistent, right? There's no other energy coming out of you to kind of move or shape a rhythm. That would be something that we do when we're talking to one another, right? When we talk to one another or we converse or we're interacting with other people, which is kind of what you're doing with your audience behind the mic, right, you're interacting with people, you're moving your arms. You're moving your body. You have facial expressions. There's all of this movement happening behind the mic or behind your voice. And that helps us to sound the way that we do. I mean, it, it has every bit of influence on how we sound. So if I'm just standing or sitting or standing here and I'm just here, I'm just moving my mouth and that's what I'm doing, you can notice that I sound a little bit more staccato. I don't really have a lot of, I don't know, depth or feeling. Right? So now I'm just going to like, I'm going to move stuff around. I'm going to move my hands because I really love to move around because that's what I do when I talk to people, like that's that Ganguzza, you know, moving the hands around and, and all of the expression. And if I want to really convince you of something, you can tell, you can hear it. Right? You can hear it come out in my voice. What do you do, Pilar? Pilar: I'm all about, of course, I want to use my imagination all the time. But for example, even something as simple as a raising an eyebrow, like, I'll, I'll be like, oh yeah, right. Instead of saying, oh yeah, right. But if I raise my eyebrow, I've already changed the expression. Oh yeah. Right. And it can be an ironic raising of an eyebrow. Anne: I'm confused. There's my furrowed eyebrow. Confused eyebrow. I have a confused eyebrow. Pilar: Or it could be like, I'm confused. That's like an ironic raising of an eyebrow. I'm confused. Anne: No, you're not. That's a sarcastic eyebrow. Pilar: Exactly. Anne: That would be a sarcastic eyebrow. Pilar: Right, right. It's a sarcastic eyebrow. Anne: Eyebrows, they really help. Pilar: They really do. They really do. Anne: They really help to give you that point of view, to give you that little bit of nuanced emotion about that read, and I'll tell you over and over again, that's what we keep hearing. Right? It is that kind of emotion, that point of view that, the you that you bring to the script that helps you to bring yourself to the script. Otherwise we're just spewing words into the microphone. Pilar: Exactly. Anne: We don't want to spew words. Let's not spew. Pilar: Like an inward chuckle, like -- Anne: Yeah. Pilar: You know, just the shrugging of the shoulders that we, that you know, that you mentioned in your minute. And like, for example, when you, when you say your name, you can say your name, Pilar Uribe, or you can say Pilar Uribe. So I just shrugged my shoulders Pilar Uribe. Anne: Pilar! Or Pilar Uribe. Pi-lar. Pilar: Yeah. And so we have this whole stretch of body, which is our shoulders that we can do so much. We can shrug one shoulder. We can shrug to shoulders. We can shrug kind of just like a little kind of a yeah, right. We're just kind of like a little inward chuckle. I just raised my shoulder. So you've got all these parts of your body that you can use that can help you when you're doing a read. Like right now I'm using my hands. You know, what you were saying before, I can be pointing to somebody. I can be gesticulating. I can be raising my arms. You know, another one we were talking about earlier is just when you do a read and you put your hands behind your back. There's kind of like -- Anne: Yeah. Yeah, here I am. Pilar: Hands behind your back. Anne: Or hands behind your head, right? So you're just, you're casual. If you happen to be standing or sitting, and you want to relax a little bit -- because sometimes when people are trying hard to sound a particular way, their focus is all upfront and it's all here, like in their mouth and in their, like, I feel like it's all around their face. And when you are moving your hands, moving other parts of your body, it just dissipates that energy and really reshapes the tone of what you sound like. Because we're very physical people when we talk, I think, just to each other, when we engage with one another, we're using those hands. And so why should that stop once we're in the booth, right? Because we want it. We're still engaging with our audience. Pilar: Yeah, exactly. And it's something as simple as putting your arms on your shoulders if you're playing a character, that's in a protective stance or is scared and it's like, this is the way I am now. Or if you've got your hands on the side of your waist, and you're just speaking like this, and you're sticking your chest out, that's a completely different read because you've put something in front of it instead of just speaking here and being really intense. It's almost like you have to trick your mind and you have to give your body an assignment. And then that way, when you give your body an assignment, the tension kind of dissipates as we were talking about. And then you can give a more interesting read and then that's what stops the monotony. You know, even just when you're like, when you're doing long-form, just changing your body stance because it's very hard sometimes to keep the momentum and not be boring. Anne: Well, exactly. I'm so glad you mentioned that. Because a lot of times I work with a lot of students on, on long format narration like e-learning or corporate narration, something that, anything that's longer than even like 30 seconds, right? We have such small attention spans these days. And so you need to really be conscious and focused on keeping that audience engaged for longer than a minute, in between the periods, in between the sentences, right? There's still things happening. And if you kind of forget about that scene and engaging with the person who's listening, then it becomes a monologue. It just becomes you speaking out into the air. A lot of times I'll refer to you're reading the PowerPoint, and that does not engage with us because you're no longer speaking to me, the listener behind the mic, you're speaking off into the air, and it's only serving yourself. And that, that comes out in the read, that comes out in the emotion that -- well, are you really talking to me? Are you concerned about how I feel? Not really, because you're reading that PowerPoint. And when you introduce physicality behind the mic, what happens, it will take the focus off of the monologue and bring it back hopefully to where you're engaging or you're not giving a consistent metronome-like read where we all become bored. It becomes more engaged on you. So I would think the only thing that you don't do when you are physicating behind the mic is take your eyes off the page because that's the one thing that's different, right? Unless you're an actor and you're on stage and you've memorized your lines or on camera, then you can obviously not use the piece of paper, but with us, we're not memorizing.   So if we play the paper -- I was told that a long time ago, play the paper. So the person you're talking to is the person right behind the words on the paper. So if that paper became a transparency for us people who are of a certain age and know what a transparency is, you can see a face or think of it as like a teleprompter with you. You can see faces behind it. You're talking to the people behind it, but you are never taking your eyes off that word or the words, because a lot of times, if you do, and I know with my actor students, I know exactly when they're taking their eyes off the paper, because they're missing words. They're stumbling and that's, that's a telltale sign, but play the paper and physicate like crazy. And nobody's, I mean, we can all be silly, right? I mean, nobody's watching you. I mean, maybe they are. Pilar: Obviously, as long as you don't make noise, there are things that you can do. Like, for example, this is just something that I've done. And then I was thinking, how could it translate to a man? So sometimes what I'll do is I've got my hair up in a ponytail, and I'll just kind of whip my hair out. And just the movement of my head, you know, like a slow motion, like, you know, those hair commercials when they move their hair slowly, that'll give me a different reason. Anne: I've got a visual now. The brat girl, she's like the brat girl. Pilar: Exactly, exactly. So that'll give me a different read. And so for men, you know, if you have short hair, it's harder, but like just even putting a hat on and taking the hat off, just like the slow motion of it. Because a lot of the times when we're doing reads, you know, we want to get it done -- Anne: Yes, quickly. Pilar: -- or not that we want to get it done quickly, but we want to get it over with, and it's in that moment, it's in that present moment that it's so important to be feeling, yes, you're reading, but you can also be doing other things with your arms, and your shoulders, and your head, and just give it that full body because that will -- even though we think it doesn't, it's going to come out in the read. Anne: I like the full body. Yeah. And I'm glad that you said that because I tell people when they're making movements behind the mic, right, in order to make a point, sometimes it takes more of an effort. Like, 'cause I could just sit here, like here I am behind the mic, and I want to demonstrate a large circle. Right? So I use my hands and I draw a circle with my hand, right? So I say here's a large circle, but I didn't really draw a large circle. I just drew a circle in front of me. What I want to do is I want to draw a large circle. And so if you can hear what just happened is I actually drew a larger circle, and it just kind of drew my voice into a different sound and a different tone. And you may not want to go that large, but a lot of times you have to go a little bit larger than the immediate inch or two in front of your face. Pilar: If you're doing video games, you definitely have to go larger. Anne: Even narration. As a matter of fact, narration, because God, you've got to make sure that those nuances come out. They may not be grand emotions, but they're going to be -- I really want you to listen to this next line. It's really important. And let me talk about the circumference of this large circle over here. And so, as opposed to let me talk about the circumference of this large circle over here, right? There's a big difference when I don't move versus when I do move. And so you need to make that corresponding physical movement that gives it enough point of view, enough emphasis enough passion, whatever that is. I just -- see, I got so passionate. I plosived on my mic. I heard that. And so, or I might've hit the mic with my hand, but you've got to give that performance behind the mic that allows you to express something that people are listening to because remember you're reeling them back into the story because they don't have to listen to you. If you're in front of someone and you're actually engaging with them, right, they're physically in front of you. And so you've got your body that you can use to help like control the conversation. Maybe not control, but use your body and your face and your hands and your voice to keep people engaged. But behind the mic, it's an imaginary audience that we're playing to, so. Pilar: Well, and I think it's really important because along the lines of what you just said, what are we doing as voice actors? Whether we're doing long-form or we're doing an audition, our goal is not to get the words out or not to say the words in the pretty way. Just like in a conversation, you are engaging the person who's in front of you. Anne: Yeah, absolutely. Pilar: That's the whole point of it. You're doing it for the other person. You're not doing it for yourself. Anne: Right. Pilar: So in that sense, you have to be as if that person were right there in the booth with you. So you have to engage, and whatever it is, you can be physical about it. And the great thing about being in the booth is that nobody has to see you making these silly faces. You know, so if you're doing your exercises, you know, and it's like -- Anne: It's so true. Pilar: -- you're going by them as -- this is a great exercise -- my name is -- and so you open your mouth wide and you go "my name is Tommy, the wide-mouthed frog." And that -- Anne: Tommy, okay, Tommy. Pilar: "My name is -- hi! I'm Tommy!" And you just opened your mouth so much. And then when you go to do the normal stuff -- Anne: Yeah. Pilar: -- also those kinds of silly exercises, you know, the big black bug -- Anne: Break the tension. Pilar: Yep. Yeah. And then they bring you to another space if you're stuck and you're going, my gosh, this sounds the same. What am I going to do? You know, it's like, you turn yourself around, and then boom, you're in a different space and you can continue. Anne: Yep. So you didn't think that voiceover was so physical, did you, BOSSes? Because it is, it really is. Whether we're warming up our vocal cords, whether we're warming up our muscles around the vocal cords, or whether we're performing in the booth and expressing physicality behind the mic, it is extra, extra, super, uber important. Pilar: Agreed. Anne: Then it really can help your performance. Pilar: It's a lifelong thing. Anne: That's right, that's right. Pilar: Really and truly, if you're a voice actor and you're just starting out or you've been doing it for 20 years or you've been doing it for five, you can always pick up new tips and incorporate them. And that's going to make your voiceover time in the booth that much richer. Anne: Yeah. Great stuff today, Pilar. You guys, you BOSSes, get moving in the booth. Big shout-out to our sponsor ipDTL, where we can connect and move in the booth with our colleagues and clients. Find out more at ipdtl.com. You guys, have an amazing week and keep on moving. We'll see you next week. Pilar: See you next week. Anne: Bye! Pilar: Bye. >> Join us next week for another edition of VO BOSS with your host Anne Ganguzza. And take your business to the next level. Sign up for our mailing list at voboss.com and receive exclusive content, industry revolutionizing tips and strategies, and new ways to rock your business like a BOSS. Redistribution with permission. Coast to coast connectivity via ipDTL.

Pretty Rich
245. PRETTY RICH BOSSES 2022 RETREAT TAKEAWAYS WITH CEO OF PRB, SHEILA BELLA AND THE PRB STAFF

Pretty Rich

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 21:49


Have you ever wondered what would happen if you stopped hustling, stopped pushing yourself, or just simply gave up when times were hard? How your actions ultimately could effect the lives of others. Several years ago, so many people lost their jobs due to the pandemic, including Sheila. She basically lost everything, but the moral is she didn't give up. And now she is the CEO of a seven figure online buisness and boss to 30 some women. In this episode, Sheila and some of her staff reflect on meeting each other in person at the PRB 2022 retreat after having worked together for a full year entirely online.  Shout out to our photographer for the weeknd, Krista Mason. Check out her work on IG @Kristamasonphotography //VISIT https://www.sheilabella.com/financialhealth   //VISIT https://www.sheilabella.com/event to register for Pretty Ambitious Summit 2023   //Visit Sheilabella.com/apply to sign up for a free 60-minute strategy call to learn more about Pretty Rich Bosses and set you on a path of success for your business.   RESOURCES: -FREE RESOURCES   https://sheilabella.com/free //APPLY FOR OUR HIGH LEVEL MASTERMIND PRETTY RICH BOSSES AND GET 1+1 COACHING FOR YOUR BEAUTY BUSINESS!!! SPACE IS LIMITED!  https://www.sheilabella.com/apply   // F O L L O W Website | www.SheilaBella.com Instagram | www.instagram.com/RealSheilaBella   // PODCAST: https://www.sheilabella.com/prettyrichpodcast  

The Evening Edge with Todd
The Evening Edge with Todd Hollst 4.11.2022; National Pet Day and how people talk to their pets; 3 cars crashing into buildings; Guys masturbating on domestic flights; Bosses forcing you to d

The Evening Edge with Todd

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 73:31


'The Evening Edge with Todd Hollst' heard on WHIO, Dayton, WSB, Atlanta, WOKV, Jacksonville, KRMG, Tulsa. @EveningEdgeTodd

The Pogcast
#97 - New Bosses, Shotgun Balance, & Tarkov's Realism Problem

The Pogcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 127:50


On this episode of the Pogcast we dive in to why shotguns have felt so overpowered recently and how cost and availability of ammo really impacts the meta of Tarkov. We also talk again about the concept of Realism and how in order to make the most realistic game possible, you have to break the rules sometimes. Battle State Games also recently revealed some art for three of the new bosses coming to the Lighthouse location and they look mean! Check it out! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/pogcastlive/message

Scav Talk
Tarkov Podcast - Lighthouse Bosses leaked + Chads speak up | ScavTalk Ep .68

Scav Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 114:16


Lighthouse bosses have been teased by Battle State Games. These bosses appear to be a tactical squad that will protect the rogue water treatment facility on lighthouse. Also, Jesse Kazam hosted a podcast with Tigz, HyperRat, and Rengawr where they discuss the current state of Tarkov. JesseKazam's Video - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iMNNyVsURSs Taeyeoff's video - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xqxmcchd25k Get featured in our next episode! Leave us a message here: https://anchor.fm/scavtalk/message Join the Discord! - https://discord.gg/T9QA2DuFcP Church1x1 - Twitter https://twitter.com/Church1x1 GigaBeef - YT https://www.youtube.com/Gigabeef - Twitter https://twitter.com/Gigabeef --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/scavtalk/message

Deb & Kev Pod
Ep. 174 Hiring Red Flags & UAPs

Deb & Kev Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 71:05


It's Masters weekend and Deb & Kev don't talk an ounce of golf, instead they're focusing on;- New UFO and UAP information- Airplane travel and kicked off passengers- Bosses red flag warnings when hiring - A brand new segment called, What's Deb?- What's for dinner with their new eating regimen- Why they are thankful this week for very different thingsAs always, special thanks to Lauren Taylor for the episode art work and Gwyneth Galvin and BenSound www.bensound.com for providing the voiceover and music for the intro and outro!

WOMEN OF LYN
Episode 3: "Mom Boss: Advice For Expectant Mom Bosses" ft. Kara Marie

WOMEN OF LYN

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 9, 2022 27:51


Listen in on this episode as our Host, Tamani Lyn, continues our 'Mom Boss' series with your favorite WOL Boss Moms! This week, we are sitting down with Kara Marie of Kara Marie Services and Pretty Committee for advice for expectant Mom Bosses.

Pretty Rich
243. HOW TO CONVERT YOUR LEADS INTO CLIENTS WITH CEO AND BEAUTY BUISSNESS COACH SHEILA BELLA AND HER SALES TEAM AT PRETTY RICH BOSSES

Pretty Rich

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 42:37


Are you constantly posting on social media with posts, Reels, Stories, etc. thinking “I finally have leads, but why is not one booking appointments?” Tune in to hear from Sheila Bella and the multi-million dollar sales team at Pretty Rich Bosses who know all about how to convert leads off social media into paying clients!  #BeautyMarketing #PMUmarketing #Sheilabella   //APPLY FOR OUR HIGH LEVEL MASTERMIND PRETTY RICH BOSSES AND GET 1+1 COACHING FOR YOUR BEAUTY BUSINESS!!! SPACE IS LIMITED!  https://www.sheilabella.com/apply   //VISIT https://www.sheilabella.com/event to register for Pretty Ambitious Summit 2023   RESOURCES: -FREE RESOURCES     https://sheilabella.com/free   // F O L L O W Website | www.SheilaBella.com Instagram | www.instagram.com/RealSheilaBella   // PODCAST: https://www.sheilabella.com/prettyrichpodcast

The FOX News Rundown
Did the CDC Prioritize "Union Bosses" Over Students?

The FOX News Rundown

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2022 34:37


New reports reveal that the Center for Disease Control and Prevention and the American Federation of Teachers shared an uncommonly close relationship when crafting guidelines pertaining to when schools should reopen during the pandemic. The CDC is said to have given the AFC access to edit exclusive medical documents, an unprecedented privilege that played a large role in schools remaining closed for months on end. House Republican Whip Rep. Steve Scalise joins to discuss why this collaboration was harmful to both American students and parents. He also shares his thoughts on the continued Russian invasion of Ukraine, President Biden's 2023 budget proposal, and the issues he believes will be important to voters as we approach the midterm elections.   Filmmaker Ken Burns has teamed up with PBS for a documentary that provides a deep dive into the life of one of the most prominent and compelling founding fathers, Ben Franklin. The two-part series premieres Monday, April 4th. Director and executive producer of Benjamin Franklin, Ken Burns joins to explain how he approached providing a fresh angle on Franklin's life and how Franklin's humble beginnings inspired his passion for civic good. Burns also shares details about a new project he is working on dealing with the American Revolution. Plus, commentary by Fox Nation host Tammy Bruce. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Ken Coleman Show
The 4 Bosses Everyone Should Fire

The Ken Coleman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 29:42


The Ken Coleman Show is here to help answer your questions about career, passion and talent so you can maximize your potential and get closer to landing your dream job.     The Ken Coleman Show is here to help answer your questions about career, passion and talent so you can maximize your potential and get closer to landing your dream job. Do you have a question for Ken? Call us live from 1-2 p.m. ET at 844-747-2577 or email ask@kencoleman.com.   Free Guides & Resources The Proximity Principle Facebook Community Subscribe to The Newsletter Articles by Ken

bosses ken coleman show
The Daily Zeitgeist
Biden's Busted Budget, James Bond The Game Show 3.30.22

The Daily Zeitgeist

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2022 70:41


In episode 1215, Miles and guest co-host Jacquis Neal are joined by musician Illingsworth to discuss… About 37% of American jobs can be done remotely..Bosses miss the office most, Biden's new budget has no ambition…surprise!, That Convoy wasn't shit, FINALLY! The James Bond game show and more! About 37% of American jobs can be done remotely..Bosses miss the office most Biden's new budget has no ambition…surprise! ‘Ricky Bobby' Causes Ruckus at Trucker Convoy, Watches His Buddy Get Arrested People's Convoy Gives Up, Will Leave D.C. After 3 Weeks of Doing Absolutely Nothing FINALLY! The James Bond game show illingsworks.bandcamp.com/ LISTEN: RIP M.F. Doom (Prod. by Illingsworth) by Open Mike Eagle See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.