Podcasts about innovate

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  • 1,807PODCASTS
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  • May 19, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about innovate

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Latest podcast episodes about innovate

TED Talks Daily (SD video)
How great leaders innovate -- responsibly | Ken Chenault

TED Talks Daily (SD video)

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 12:17


In times of uncertainty, leaders have a responsibility to inspire hope. Sharing hard-won wisdom, business leader Ken Chenault talks about what it takes to enact positive, enduring change -- and why it's more important than ever to invest in responsible innovation that uplifts people and centers equality and fairness. (This conversation was hosted by TED current affairs curator Whitney Pennington Rodgers.)

TED Talks Daily
How great leaders innovate -- responsibly | Ken Chenault

TED Talks Daily

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 12:17


In times of uncertainty, leaders have a responsibility to inspire hope. Sharing hard-won wisdom, business leader Ken Chenault talks about what it takes to enact positive, enduring change -- and why it's more important than ever to invest in responsible innovation that uplifts people and centers equality and fairness. (This conversation was hosted by TED current affairs curator Whitney Pennington Rodgers.)

TED Talks Daily (HD video)
How great leaders innovate -- responsibly | Ken Chenault

TED Talks Daily (HD video)

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 12:17


In times of uncertainty, leaders have a responsibility to inspire hope. Sharing hard-won wisdom, business leader Ken Chenault talks about what it takes to enact positive, enduring change -- and why it's more important than ever to invest in responsible innovation that uplifts people and centers equality and fairness. (This conversation was hosted by TED current affairs curator Whitney Pennington Rodgers.)

The EdUp Experience
437: How to Innovate to Personalize Learning at Scale - with Dr. Michael Crow, President of Arizona State University (ASU)

The EdUp Experience

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 42:15


We welcome YOU back to America's leading higher education podcast, The EdUp Experience! It's YOUR time to #EdUp In this episode, President Series #150, YOUR guest is Dr. Michael Crow, President of Arizona State University (ASU), YOUR guest cohost is Ryan Stowers, Executive Director at The Charles Koch Foundation, YOUR host is Dr. Joe Sallustio, & YOUR sponsor is Google! Want to know how to innovate to personalize learning at scale? Listen in to find out! YOU can not miss this episode! Michael M. Crow is an educator, knowledge enterprise architect, science & technology policy scholar, & higher education leader. He became the 16th president of Arizona State University in July 2002 & has spearheaded ASU's rapid & groundbreaking transformative evolution into one of America's best public metropolitan research universities. As a model “New American University,” ASU simultaneously demonstrates comprehensive excellence, inclusivity representative of the ethnic & socioeconomic diversity of the United States, & consequential societal impact. Under his leadership, ASU has established 25 new transdisciplinary schools, including the School of Earth & Space Exploration, the School for the Future of Innovation in Society, & the School of Human Evolution & Social Change, & launched trailblazing multidisciplinary initiatives including the Biodesign Institute, the Julie Ann Wrigley Global Futures Laboratory, & important initiatives in the humanities & social sciences. Thank YOU so much for tuning in. Join us on the next episode for YOUR time to EdUp! Connect with YOUR EdUp Team - Elvin Freytes & Dr. Joe Sallustio ● Join YOUR EdUp community at The EdUp Experience! We make education YOUR business! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/edup/message

WarDocs - The Military Medicine Podcast
COL David R. King, MD, FACS- Trauma Surgeon Responds to the Boston Marathon Bombing and Provides and Innovates Surgical Critical Care for Special Operations and Civilian Trauma Patients.

WarDocs - The Military Medicine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 70:38


  In this episode you will hear how Dr. King walked into a Boston Army Recruiting Office and said “Hey, I'm a Doctor and I want to join the Army”, a very uncommon scenario in the recruiting world!  He describes what drew him to a career in Trauma and Critical Care and how he was part of the initial discussions of developing an Army Trauma Training platform at Ryder Trauma Center in Miami.   He shares stories from his initial deployments on a Forward Surgical Team and working in a Combat Support Hospital in Iraq and how those experiences helped prepare him to care for casualties from the Boston Marathon bombing in April 2013 (after finishing the Marathon himself!).  He shares some important lessons learned from that episode which he helped translate into common practice.   COL King has supported the US Army Joint Special Operations Command for more than 8 years and describes a remarkable case of a critically wounded Army Ranger that required surgical repair of bleeding within the chest cavity (trauma thoracotomy) during a cardiac arrest in the most austere of conditions. This intervention saved the Soldier's life and allowed him to recover and later attend medical school.   Dr. King describes his research interests in stopping traumatic bleeding using novel technologies such as self-expanding foams and expanding the accessibility and familiarity with tourniquets within the EMS and civilian population.    He shares many insights and lessons learned over a distinguished career and provides some valuable advice for all listeners.  You don't want to miss this episode!   Find out more about Dr. King at wardocspodcast.com/guest-bios and visit our webpage and become part of Team WarDocs at wardocspodcast.com.                                              WarDocs- The Military Medicine Podcast is a Non-Profit, Tax-exempt-501(c)(3) Veteran Run Organization.  All donations are tax-deductible, and 100% go to honoring and preserving the history, experiences, successes, and lessons learned in military medicine. Please take a moment to follow/subscribe, rate and review WarDocs on your preferred Podcast platform.   Follow Us on Social Media Twitter: @wardocspodcast Facebook: WarDocs Podcast Instagram: @wardocspodcast

Ozarks at Large Stories
Arkansas Foster Care System, Advocates Continue to Innovate as Pandemic Eases

Ozarks at Large Stories

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 9:16


During the worst of the pandemic, Arkansas Division of Children and Family Services, as well as faith-based partners and nonprofits like Project Zero had to get creative to maintain their mission to help find secure homes for infants, children and teens in crisis.

Time4Coffee Podcast
982: How to Innovate on the Job With David Kotowski, Elevate Sports and Marketing [K-Cup TripleShot]

Time4Coffee Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 10:18


David Kotowski is the CEO and founder of Sports Business Networks also known as SBN, which is a network of current and former athletes, who help each other be the best they can be. The post 982: How to Innovate on the Job With David Kotowski, Elevate Sports and Marketing [K-Cup TripleShot] appeared first on Time4Coffee.

Robert McLean's Podcast
Quick Climate Links: The Sweaty Penguin; The Net-Zero Innovate podcast; Great Barrier Reef bleached, again

Robert McLean's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 2:24


Here is something different, "The Sweaty Penguin" podcast, argued to be "Antarctica's Hottest Podcast". Take a listen to the Business Green podcast: "Net Zero Innovate Podcast 2 Lord Adair Turner and the exciting world of green industrial innovation". Other Quick Climate Links for today are: "‘Criminalising our right to protest': green groups' anger over public order bill"; "Queensland floods: woman dies after vehicle is swept away as more heavy rain forecast"; "‘Shocking' coral bleaching report quietly released after accusations of political interference"; "Nigeria, 10 other countries demonstrate actions to meet climate goals"; "There will never be a better time to save the planet"; "What pundits don't say about climate change"; "Things I Read: A solar future isn't just likely — it's inevitable"; "Electricity prices are spiking, ten times as much as normal. Here are some educated guesses as to why"; "Climate change hits low-income earners harder – and poor housing in hotter cities is a disastrous combination"; "Australia has rich deposits of critical minerals for green technology. But we are not making the most of them … yet"; "The Biggest Potential Water Disaster in the United States"; "The Southwest's Drought and Fires Are a Window to Our Climate Change Future"; "Insights. Ideas. Integration. Impact."; "Revealed: the ‘carbon bombs' set to trigger catastrophic climate breakdown" "‘We will believe it when we see it': the unanswered questions surrounding the Dungowan Dam"; "‘AFL players are concerned': how the black summer fires spurred Tom Campbell to act on climate change"; "‘Our ancestors are in the rocks': Australian gas project threatens ancient carvings – and emissions blowout"; "Coalition urges integration of climate resilience measures in WASH"; "New Energy Nexus"; "Renewable energy uptake surges globally despite war, COVID pandemic"; "Prairie Island Indian Community uses nuclear waste fund for net-zero carbon goal"; "Therapy dogs help wildland firefighters relieve stress"; "Radon – yet another higher risk from thawing permafrost"; "Inside Just Stop Oil: the 'hooligan' climate protesters taking on the tankers – video"; "‘We are living in hell': Pakistan and India suffer extreme spring heatwaves"; "Swapping 20% of beef for microbial protein ‘could halve deforestation"; "EVs can be cheaper on a monthly basis than gas-powered cars"; "Illinois' new climate bill is ambitious, justice-focused and a model for the nation"; "The Allied for Climate Transformation 2025"; "The Goulburn Broken Catchment Management Authority (GBCMA) is the regional floodplain management authority within the Goulburn and Broken Catchments in Victoria"; "Katrina Survivors Were Told They Could Use Grant Money to Rebuild. Now They're Being Sued for It."; "Labor pledges more money to protect Great Barrier Reef from climate change if elected"; "An election guide: fact checking Morrison and Albanese on climate claims"; "Aware Super under pressure ahead of AGL coal split vote"; "What the next Australian government must do to save the Great Barrier Reef"; "Climate change isn't just making cyclones worse, it's making the floods they cause worse too – new research"; "‘Like 20 tip trucks pouring sand on every metre-wide strip': how extreme storms can replenish beaches, not just erode them"; "4 reasons why the Morrison government's forestry cash splash is bad policy"; "Political will for climate ambition, but what about action?"; "Ex-Green MPs question Govt's climate record"; "Living near wildfires ups cancer risk"; "Climate change is devastating the Global South"; "Think about climate policy when you vote"; "91% Of Surveyed Corals Bleached Along Great Barrier Reef, Australia Says"; "US fracking boom could tip world to edge of climate disaster"; "Rare UK seabirds put at risk by ‘alarming loophole', say campaigners"; "GB News chairman has history of dismissing threat of climate crisis"; "Living costs in outer suburbs would be slashed under plan to ‘electrify everything', analysis finds"; "New Zealand's dairy industry should stop using Māori culture to pretend it's sustainable"; "Climate chaos certain if oil and gas mega-projects go ahead, warns IEA chief". Enjoy "Music for a Warming World". Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/climateconversations

How Soccer Explains Leadership Podcast
Innovating Youth Soccer with Evan Dabby, Executive Director of NJ Youth Soccer

How Soccer Explains Leadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 57:27


In Episode 81, Evan Dabby, Executive Director of NJ Youth Soccer and former MLS executive, talks with Phil about his innovative work with New Jersey Youth Soccer, including the Growing the Girls Game and Innovate to Grow initiatives, how we can make high-level youth sports more accessible to more under resourced kids, the importance of collaboration, what we can do about referee abuse, and a common quality shared by some of the best players in US history who hailed from NJ. Specifically, Evan discusses: His story, how he developed his passion for soccer and leadership, and how he ended up leading a state youth soccer association (1:33) His personal why and how he is living it out every day (3:34) The mission, vision, and values of NJYS and what is going well with the association (7:39) Some of the things he hopes to improve upon during his tenure at NJYS (14:31) The NJYS Growing the Girls Game (G3) Initiative, and what impact he hopes it will have on the girls' game in NJ and across the US (16:52) The Innovate to Grow Initiative and how it is working to include underrepresented communities in youth soccer in NJ (18:08) How we can make high-level youth sports more accessible to under resourced populations (20:32) The importance of collaboration and how NJYS is collaborating with other states on some really cool projects (23:39) Referee abuse, what it tells us about ourselves, our youth, and the state of youth soccer, and what we can do about it (32:41) How he is using lessons learned from soccer in his leadership of NJYS (42:22) How he has used lessons learned directly from sports in his marriage and parenting (45:19) His recommendations for us (50:28) Resources and Links from this Episode Uncut Video of the Episode New Jersey Youth Soccer Website Growing the Girls Game Initiative Innovate to Grow Initiative HSEL Facebook Group Coaching the Bigger Game information Warrior Way information Phil Darke's email address Ted Lasso (TV show on Apple TV+)

Developer Tea
Tradeoffs Of Control Optimized To Serve Your Goals

Developer Tea

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 10:50


The background noise in today's episode wasn't just a mistake, it was a choice. A tradeoff.Tradeoffs represent a decision of control and energy. You will make them every day, but towards what goal?When you make a tradeoff and decide where to put your energy, you are necessarily deciding not to put it elsewhere. So, do so with purpose and intention.

5G Talent Talk With Carrie Charles Podcast
Creating A Culture To Disrupt And Innovate With Christian Hillabrant Of Tillman

5G Talent Talk With Carrie Charles Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 31:39


Would you choose to join a startup that's still developing its culture over the well-established company? Christian Hillabrant picked Tillman Infrastructure over other massive opportunities, and it's paying off big time. In this episode, your host Carrie Charles sits down with the Chief Operating Officer of Tillman as they talk about all things culture development, having a customer-first mentality, and what it takes to nurture talent for the future of the industry. Love the show? Subscribe, rate, review, and share! http://broadstaffglobal.com/

Transform My Dance Studio – The Podcast For Dance Studio Owners
The Most Important Questions You'll Ever Need To Answer In Your Studio

Transform My Dance Studio – The Podcast For Dance Studio Owners

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 27:26


Is your business truly a reflection of your vision?  Or is it a collection of other people's opinions and definitions of success?

Mooroo Podcast
Mehrub Moiz Awan

Mooroo Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 87:18


Mehrub's motto is Decolonise, Innovate, Reclaim. | صوفی | حق موجود | عاشق #shumailabhatti gofund.me/5cbc3bc2 https://www.instagram.com/unrelentlesslyyours/

PaschOn PodCast with Brian Pasch
CarWars Continues To Innovate With Urban Science Partnership

PaschOn PodCast with Brian Pasch

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 26:21


Join me as I sit down with Ford Kirk from CarWars to discuss their latest updates to their call management and measurement platform. We will discuss some exciting new data integrations with Urban Science that will save dealers time and money and also make their BDC agents happy! This is another great conversation as part of the Road to DMSC podcast series. Join us today. 

eCommerce Fuel
How to Innovate So Your Business Doesn't Become Irrelevant

eCommerce Fuel

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 47:23


How do you invest in innovation to stay relevant in the marketplace without starving the products that are the bread and butter of your business? Joel Heath is the co-founder of FluidStance.com and he joins me to talk all about innovation - how to think about it in a way that can keep your business relevant without sacrificing what made it successful to begin with. Tune in as we explore Joel's experience with innovating to the point of alienation and the lessons he learned through that process, what the golden ratio for innovation is, and the importance of taking care of the base first. We also discuss the challenges of selling your business and watching somebody else run and raise it and what the three boxes to check are when you're thinking of selling your business. You can find show notes and more information by clicking here: https://bit.ly/3KnSzwV Interested in our Private Community for 7-Figure Store Owners?  Learn more here.   Want to hear about new episodes and eCommerce news round-ups?  Subscribe via email.

Student of Intention
Biohacks Innovate The Hotel Space with Raj Singh

Student of Intention

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 47:09


This episode of Quotaless features Raj Singh, Founder and CEO of Go Moment, which was acquired by Revinate where Raj stays on as their Chief Marketing Officer. Innovation in the hospitality industry couldn't come at a better time when the world was ground to a halt by COVID.Raj shares how Ivy Offer became a game-changer for them and how their strategic partnerships ensured a profitable business model even with the crisis. He talks about the positive impact of their biohacks like the 4-and-a-half day work week and their focus on customer experience and success. HIGHLIGHTSThe shift from Founder to CMOInnovating Go Moment's Ivy Offer to thrive during COVIDAlign sales and marketing and focus on SQLsOn-ramp and create value for customer success  Bio-hacks: 4-and-a-half day work week and breathing exercisesQUOTESRaj: "Similar to Go Moment, we didn't just bring a product into the market where four, five alternatives already existed. We created an entire new category of products and that's exactly what Revinate is doing as well, which is bringing in a new category of products into market."Raj: "We created Ivy Offer. We made it very easy for guests to order food and beverage, limos instead of Ubers, all that kind of good stuff, when they're celebrating and, of course, with the pent-up travel demand. And what we saw is in the first 12 months, which was one of our clients, we drove $15 million of revenue for them with this brand-new product we created during the pandemic. In 12 months of the beta period."Raj: "Maybe the most important metric in your entire business, assuming your retention and all that stuff is all taken care of, is sales qualified leads because that's where marketing needs sales. If your SQLs are doing well, your business is probably doing pretty well."Raj: "It's all about the quality of the delivery that ultimately is the best sales tool." Raj: "We're only a couple of months in at this point. We're about a month in at this point, so it's going great and we've actually seen productivity stay very much steady, maybe even going up in certain cases, and I'd say the other thing that's also been very helpful is just having the kind of team." Find more about Raj by checking out the links below:LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/rajsinghla/Website: https://www.revinate.com/

Closers Are Losers with Jeremy Miner
How to Get Your Brand to Stand Out In the Marketplace

Closers Are Losers with Jeremy Miner

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 28:56


Many business owners want their brand to stand out in the marketplace, but they're confused as to where they should even begin.    This confusion usually happens due to a wrong understanding of what a brand is. We associate a brand with logos, colors, and aesthetics, but in reality, it is more than that.    That's what my guest, Matt Lyles, shares to us in this podcast episode. He gives us a simple explanation of what a brand means and how your audience plays a huge role in identifying what your business brand is all about.    He simplifies branding and communicates it to his audience in a way that we can all understand. You wouldn't want to miss this episode.    Also, if you're an avid Closers are Losers podcast listener and viewer you can get a hold of Matt Lyles free copy of the SIMPLE Playbook.  In this episode, we cover: [0:00] Introduction [2:56] Why Matt Lyles wrote the SIMPLE Playbook [4:07] What is a simple customer experience?  [6:19] Branding out from the crowd  [7:29] What your audience thinks about you is what your brand is  [8:05] Stop focusing on what your competitors do [10:16] Behaviors make up simple experiences [12:17] Simple never stops [12:42] Innovate to stay ahead  [13:06] Minimize barriers [14:16] Prune it back  [15:14] Lose the jargon  [18:55] Empathize with your customers  [20:00] How brands can innovate their experiences [24:22]  Delivering simplicity to your employees [26:14] Matt's biggest piece of advice to listeners  ✅ If you're looking to take your sales to the 7th level, book a “Clarity Call” below and let's see if you're a good fit for our sales training program!

Take as Directed
Dr. Dylan George: “We Need to Build an Internal Team That Can Move at a Moment's Notice”

Take as Directed

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 32:57


Dr. Dylan George is the Director of Operations for the Center for Forecasting and Outbreak Analytics (CFA), newly established at the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Dr. George joins J. Stephen Morrison and Andrew Schwartz for this 135th episode following the April 19th White House CFA launch. Its mission: Predict, Inform, Innovate. Its data science team will strengthen advance warning of biological emergencies, with a heavy emphasis on improved communications. Building trust is a major challenge, including navigating privacy sensitivities. Sustained funding is essential, and an outstanding question. If successful, CFA will provide the tools people need to keep their families safe while improving decision-making at the local, state, and federal levels. Like extreme weather communications, CFA will make complex models accessible.

Construction Genius
How To Innovate, Add Value And Set Yourself Apart From Your Competition With Jack Aspenson

Construction Genius

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 42:09


The construction industry has been one of the most affected fields in recent years with supply chain issues, geopolitical pressures, rising fuel prices, to name a few. So how do you innovate and add/create value and give yourself a competitive edge? Jack Aspenson is the CEO and President of S3 Surface Solutions, a disruptive, client-driven organization that focuses on providing environmentally friendly, simple surface systems that are long-lasting and cost-effective. In this episode, Jack sits down with host Eric Anderton to share the key strategies he used for his business to stay afloat and come out the other end successfully during such a volatile time in the industry. Tune in as he shares his thoughts on the blue ocean vs. red ocean strategy, environmental impact, supply chain issues, and manufacturing back in the US. Jack also gives solid advice to leaders and business owners on innovation and relationship building. Stay tuned.

Power Prosperity Podcast with Randy Gage
Episode 497: Space to Innovate

Power Prosperity Podcast with Randy Gage

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 3:48


This episode is taken from Prosperity TV. The secret to manifesting prosperity is through ideas. And you need to put yourself in an environment that fosters them. This week we look at how you set yourself up for innovation and creativity.

The James Altucher Show
844 - How to find the right innovations in the challenging time with Former President of Nintendo Reggie Fils-Aimé

The James Altucher Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 58:43


What does it takes to take the famous but underperforming (at that time) company, Nintendo, elevate them and create a whole culture following behind them? And how to take a food court brand, Panda Express, and make them a national chain restaurant?In this episode, I was joined by Reggie Fils-Aimé, is an American businessman best known for being the president and chief operating officer of Nintendo of America, the North American division of the Japanese video game company Nintendo to talk about his new book, Disrupting the Game: From the Bronx to the Top of Nintendo.We explore Reggie's origin story, what makes him take up his role in Nintendo, how he turns Pizza Hut and Panda Express into a national chain, what's his philosophy when he faces any challenges, and more importantly, why does he likes to take up task and roles that are in the most challenging situation!We also talked about how he became the meme man, and gaming community!Visit Notepd.com to read more idea lists, or sign up and create your own idea list!My new book Skip The Line is out! Make sure you get a copy wherever you get your new book!Join You Should Run For President 2.0 Facebook Group, and we discuss why should run for president.I write about all my podcasts! Check out the full post and learn what I learned at jamesaltucher.com/podcast.Thanks so much for listening! If you like this episode, please subscribe to “The James Altucher Show” and rate and review wherever you get your podcasts:Apple PodcastsStitcheriHeart RadioSpotify Follow me on Social Media:YouTubeTwitterFacebook

Customer Service Secrets by Kustomer
How to Manage Effective Journey Mapping | Jochem Van Der Veer

Customer Service Secrets by Kustomer

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 23:06


Today we're talking about mapping to management and I always like talking about journey mapping, but this has a slightly different twist and to do this I've got on Jochem Van Der Veer, who is currently the co-founder and CEO of TheyDo. He has a lot of experience and understanding of the whole journey mapping process and the various dynamics and angles you have to look at and understand to create a useful and productive map for your business. His background and what he does at TheyDo 0:56The continued problem with people mapping 4:53How to move from mapping to managing 8:34It may get more complex as you go 12:45Where to go once your framework is established 13:55Keeping the map active and advice to stepping up your game with journey mapping 18:06“Their life cycle is basically time based, right? From left to right, but when you look at it vertically, you can look at it from different dimensions and one of them is, for instance, regions. So think about how different regions like Europe vs US go, or different customer types. New customers vs existing customers, or maybe even different dimensions that are relevant to your business.” 12:03@joch_mwww.theydo.io

ESADE Business & Law School
Innovate or die: “We're having a pandemic of loneliness and the cure are open spaces”

ESADE Business & Law School

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 16:44


The smart city concept has evolved since its launch in the mid-2000s. Although media focus has diminished since the early years, technology and innovation has improved and made possible some of the ideas that promise to make cities more sustainable, efficient, and citizen-friendly. In this podcast, Esteve Almirall, Esade lecturer in innovation and data analysis, talks with Hila Oren, CEO at Tel Aviv Foundation, on the future of smart cities and their relationship with technology and innovation.

Electric Runway Podcast
This Rihanna-Backed Startup is using Machine Learning to Innovate Fit

Electric Runway Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 20:22


There is no shortage of software trying to serve the fashion industry, but few products really understand the industry itself.  A crop of startups throughout the world are all trying to solve the problem of fit when it comes to shopping for apparel. If you're a regular listener to this podcast, you know the challenge of fit is something we've talked about again and again and will likely continue to talk about until one company dominates this category. Fit matching tools—that is, tools that help shoppers find their size in apparel items when shopping in-store or online—vary in their approach, but they have one thing in common; they're all jockeying to become the standard for shopping. My guest on the show today is Haniff Brown. He's the Founder and CEO of FIT:MATCH, a startup that uses machine learning technology to eliminate friction in the shopping experience for hard-to-fit categories like intimates and swimwear. As you'll hear in our conversation, they've caught the attention of business billionaire Rihanna, and the brand has since launched in Savage Fenty stores across the USA and are planning on rolling out the experience online.Learn more about our sponsor, Threedium: https://unlimited3d.com/ Electric Runway:Visit Electric Runway: http://electricrunway.com/More podcast episodes: https://electricrunway.com/the-podcast/Subscribe on Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/15F6eMSFReREEp8fVgNA0L?si=62e6b01855c643acSubscribe to the Electric Runway podcast Apple: https://podcasts.apple.com/ca/podcast/electric-runway-podcast/id1064514329 Social Links:Follow Electric Runway on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/electric_runway/Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/electricrunway?sub_confirmation=1Follow Electric Runway on Twitter:  https://twitter.com/Electric_RunwaySign up for our email newsletter: https://electricrunway.us12.list-manage.com/subscribe/post?u=c19c412b7bb4d91525f92fa00&id=65332c724e Amanda Cosco Social Links:Follow Amanda Cosco on Twitter: https://twitter.com/amanda_coscoInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/amanda_cosco/LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/amandacosco Guest Links:Fit:Match Website: https://www.fitmatch.ai/Fit:Match LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/fit-match/Haniff Brown on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/haniff-brown-09802289/

Good Future
Reece Proudfoot: The WWF approach to impact investment and regeneration

Good Future

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 28:35


This week, I'm speaking to Reece Proudfoot, he's Head of Innovation & Impact Investment at WWF Australia. That's right, the charity with the Panda as it's logo, that's worked hard for decades on conservation and saving animal habitats. They're going beyond their projects in the field and they're also investing in systems change by supporting high-impact enterprises. And that's what we're all about here on the Good Future podcast, I'm your host John Treadgold, and I'm asking the big questions about the business of sustainability, the new economy, and how your spending and investment decisions can have an impact. Reece found his way to WWF as a campaigner, but he knew all too well the challenge of raising awareness as the world has grown noisier, as well as raising money when people have so many worthy causes in front of them. Like all good startup founders, he made a pivot, and helped launch Panda Labs, WWF's impact accelerator program. Since them they've seeded and grown enterprises like OpenSC, a supply chain platform that tracks food sources on the blockchain. And more recently, the business ImpactIO, which brings people together around a central challenge, and then links project leaders, with both supporters and investors. Their most recent Challenge is called Innovate to Regenerate and it's a partnership with Damon Gameau who has released a new short film, all about bringing people together to Regenerate Australia. Now I'm sure you'd hear Reece talk about it, so let's get into it. All the links and show notes are on my website at www.johntreadgold.com, and if you'd like to leave a review, which would be greatly appreciated, you can do that over on Apple podcasts. Alright here's my conversation, with Reece Proudfoot, here we go!

Tech for Non-Techies
How to innovate at a corporate - lessons from Apple and Intel

Tech for Non-Techies

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 45:19


Every company wants to be innovative, but how do you balance the risk of innovation with the need to keep the lights on? Listen to this interview with Kapil Kane, Head of Innovation at Intel China, to find out. Learning notes from this episode: Most tech innovations die because they do not have a solid business case. As much as non-techies need to learn to speak tech, techies need to learn to speak business. “No matter how smart you are, if you are not able to get your idea across in the language of a lay person, you are missing out a lot,” says Kapil. To structure creativity within an organisation, Kapil advises learning from Apple, where teams often worked on projects that other teams did not know about. This meant that they could focus on their work, while upper management connected the dots. The innovation accelerator at Intel China Kapil set up brings in revenue, but that is not the only benefit. It serves as a training ground for ambitious people “If you are able to nurture your innovate talent in your organisation, you will grow them and they will deliver good results for you.” Resources mentioned in this episode: Innovate, but how? (Abstract): free guide on 6 types of innovation and how to know which one is right for you. Innovate, but how? The Pragmatist's Guide To Growth: based on research conducted by Sophia Matveeva and researchers from the University of Chicago on how the world's largest companies approach innovation.  To attend Tech for Non-Technical Founders in London on May 10 2022 in London, book your ticket here and use PODCAST to get 20% off the price.   ----- If you like learning about how tech products and profits get made, you'll like our newsletter. It's funny too. Sign up here. ----- There are 2 ways to apply this work to your unique challenges: For companies: We create learning and innovation programmes, to help companies make the most out of digital transformation and help them become more entrepreneurial. Happy clients include Techstars x Blackstone Launchpad, Constellation Brands and Oxford University. Get in touch with us about bespoke training & consulting on info@techfornontechies.co For individuals, if you want to: Build tech a venture as a non-technical innovator Succeed in tech as a non-techie Then Tech For Non-Techies membership is for you. We love hearing from our readers and listeners. So if you have questions about the content or working with us, just get in touch on info@techfornontechies.co Say hi to Sophia on Twitter and follow her on LinkedIn. Following us on Facebook and Instagram will make you smarter. 

Developer Tea
Busting False Coupling and Finding Positive Negotiation Positions

Developer Tea

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 12:09


In this episode, we'll discuss the importance of breaking false ties in a negotiation scenario. This happens more often than we realize, and the best way to do this is by breaking down the problem of "what is important" to each side in a negotiation.

Nerdin' About
Bonus: Let's Innovate with Rebecca Baron

Nerdin' About

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 18:28


This week we're sharing a bonus episode in your feed from Let's Innovate, another podcast hosted by your favourite space nerd Michael Unger. In this episode, Michael speaks with Rebecca Baron, a student at the University of British Columbia and co-host of the Women's Health Interrupted podcast. Rebecca shares her Science Fair Foundation experience, her TEDx talk in 2016 and how learning about the health benefits from plants ultimately led her to a gold medal and platinum award! A transcript of the episode can be found here: https://bit.ly/3EQmjBk Check out the Women's Health Interrupted podcast here: https://bit.ly/3LiAEsP

Mastery with Science, featuring JB and The Doctor
Guillaume Wiatr will Inspire You to Innovate a Strategic Narrative

Mastery with Science, featuring JB and The Doctor

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 44:49


Hello there ROCKSTARS! Welcome to The Entrepreneur Mastery Lab Podcast Episode 87 ~ Guillaume Wiatr will Inspire You to Innovate a Strategic Narrative This week inside the Lab, we are joined by Guillaume Wiatr of MetaHelm. A strategy consultant and leadership coach, Guillaume Wiatr guides CEOs and Founders to align people and accelerate innovation adoption. He is the Founder of MetaHelm; a consulting firm focused on building strategic narratives for established companies. For Guillaume, traditional business storytelling is dead. Innovation happens when you build a new narrative instead. As he says, "people will pay for a story, but they will die for a narrative". After helping to save a 20M euros venture during the dot-com boom, Guillaume went on a mission to turn every company into a source of inspiration that few can resist. Since then, he's been working with startup founders as well as senior executives of companies like Alaska Airlines, The Gates Foundation, AIG, L'Oréal, Spencer Stuart, GAP, Google, Microsoft, and the US and French governments. His commitment to education led him to become an instructor and a mentor to young entrepreneurs at the University of Washington, the School of Visual Concepts, and EMLyon international business school in France. Guillaume publishes daily insights in his newsletter–The Next Narrative–where you can find a canvas he designed to get you started with your strategic narrative.   How to contact Guillaume (here's a few ways): guillaume@metahelm.com https://www.metahelm.com/ http://strategicnarrative.com/     Join our private Facebook Community Group, The Entrepreneur Mastery Lab ~ A Place for Service Professionals to Give & Grow A Freebie from us!  6 Methods To Make Sure Your Business Doesn't Fail   https://www.jbandthedoctor.com/freegift/   Click for all of our Links and Social Media   Please Like, Subscribe and Give Us a Review (5 stars sounds like the best option) 

Leaders in the Trenches
How to Empower Employees to Innovate with Keith Murphy at Astrawatt Solar

Leaders in the Trenches

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 23:05


Innovation takes a different style of leadership. When you want to empower employees to innovate, you want to create a place of psychological safety. This means that failure is part of the path. This is an absolute requirement when innovation is the goal. Today's guest is Keith Murphy, CEO & Founder at Astrawatt Solar. Astrawatt Solar specializes in the design, engineering, and installation of premium solar energy products. Keith and I talk about how to empower employees to innovate. He shares what is working for his team. Discover what it takes to empower employees to innovate in today's fast-paced world.   Get the show notes for How to Empower Employees to Innovate with Keith Murphy at Astrawatt Solar Click to Tweet: Listening to a fantastic episode on Growth Think Tank featuring #KeithMurphy with your host @GeneHammett https://bit.ly/gttKeithMurphy   #EmpowerEmployeestoInnovate #GeneHammettPodcast #Inc2021 #GHepisode881 #premiumsolarenergy Give Growth Think Tank a review on iTunes!

StudioOne™ Safety and Risk Management Network
Ep. 197 Surety Industry Forced to Innovate

StudioOne™ Safety and Risk Management Network

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 5:19


Rancho Mesa's Alyssa Burley and Account Executive of the Surety Department Andy Roberts talk about how the surety industry is innovating to keep up with changes in technology. Show Notes: Subscribe to Rancho Mesa's Newsletter. Director/Producer/Host: Alyssa Burley Guest: Andy Roberts Editor: Lauren Stumpf Music: "Home" by JHS Pedals, “News Room News” by Spence © Copyright 2022. Rancho Mesa Insurance Services, Inc. All rights reserved.

Hatchcast
Hatchcast Extra! Innovate State, ft. Brittney Urich

Hatchcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 59:26


The Innovate State Speaker Series brings both emerging and accomplished Spartans back to campus for a fireside chat-style interview. These 60-minute sessions offer the chance for guests to share their perspectives on a wide array of topics like innovation, startup life, investments, and career paths. Students get the opportunity to hear firsthand about the hard knocks of the entrepreneurship & innovation hustle to maintaining work/life balance. These are stories of success, stories of failures, and stories of uncommon will—and you do not want to miss them.Today's episode features Brittney Urich. Brittney is a UX Designer who specializes in helping others understand content strategy and implement it on design projects. She is passionate about crafting digital experiences that solve problems in a human-centered, empathetic way. As a champion for integrating content strategy and user experience design, Urich delivers presentations and interactive workshops about the two disciplines. She also speaks/hosts interactive workshops revolving around experience design and content strategy.During Brittney's time at MSU, she helped co-found a company called Conector to help engage college students with their communities through events. Throughout building Conector, Brittney helped grow it to six figures while establishing more than 100 partnerships. Urich enjoys exploring national parks and hiking in Colorado with her dog Izzy._______Like what you hear? Let us know! Subscribe and share—we really appreciate it.Have ideas or comments for us? Email us at hatchcast@msu.edu. For behind-the-scenes content, check us out on Facebook and Instagram.   Hatchcast is made possible by the Burgess Institute for Entrepreneurship & Innovation at Michigan State University in collaboration with the MSU Innovation Center, the MSU Entrepreneurship Association, & MSU Women in Entrepreneurship.Original Music & Sound Design by Kakia Gkoudina and Karina Stankowski Engineered & Edited by Will RowanThe Hatchcast is co-hosted and produced by Gabe Hales, Gabe Berke, Diego Fernandez, Danielle Tice, Karina Stankowski, Charlotte Bachelor, Will Rowan, & Aaryn Richard.

Customer Service Secrets by Kustomer
Tune Up Your Relationship with Your Customers | Gabe Larsen

Customer Service Secrets by Kustomer

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 14:16


Something that we all want and could all use is the knowledge and ability to turn the customer into an ambassador of your brand. I'm taking here from a post that Grace Lau, Director of Growth at Dialpad did for Kustomer. It was such a great summary of this topic, that I wanted to give you a little bit of an overview of some of the takeaways I had on it. To see more about that post, you can check it out on the Kustomer blog: www.kustomer.com/blogThe most trusted source of recommendations 1:30What a brand ambassador is 2:25Communication needs to go both ways and provide omnichannel customer support 5:07Customer experiences in digital marketing can really help build trust 8:27“I think to retain customers you don't just want contact deals, you gotta engage with them. That means communication must go both ways. Competitions, freebies, promotions, or limited edition products, great ways to start to reward your loyal customers and keep that mailing list engaged.” 5:07

Screaming in the Cloud
Allowing Aspiration to Lead with Tom Totenberg

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 41:50


About TomTom enjoys being a bridge between people and technology. When he's not thinking about ways to make enterprise demos less boring, Tom enjoys spending time with his wife and dogs, reading, and gaming with friends.Links Referenced: LaunchDarkly: https://launchdarkly.com Heidi Waterhouse Twitter: https://twitter.com/wiredferret TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: Couchbase Capella Database-as-a-Service is flexible, full-featured and fully managed with built in access via key-value, SQL, and full-text search. Flexible JSON documents aligned to your applications and workloads. Build faster with blazing fast in-memory performance and automated replication and scaling while reducing cost. Capella has the best price performance of any fully managed document database. Visit couchbase.com/screaminginthecloud to try Capella today for free and be up and running in three minutes with no credit card required. Couchbase Capella: make your data sing.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Revelo. Revelo is the Spanish word of the day, and its spelled R-E-V-E-L-O. It means “I reveal.” Now, have you tried to hire an engineer lately? I assure you it is significantly harder than it sounds. One of the things that Revelo has recognized is something I've been talking about for a while, specifically that while talent is evenly distributed, opportunity is absolutely not. They're exposing a new talent pool to, basically, those of us without a presence in Latin America via their platform. It's the largest tech talent marketplace in Latin America with over a million engineers in their network, which includes—but isn't limited to—talent in Mexico, Costa Rica, Brazil, and Argentina. Now, not only do they wind up spreading all of their talent on English ability, as well as you know, their engineering skills, but they go significantly beyond that. Some of the folks on their platform are hands down the most talented engineers that I've ever spoken to. Let's also not forget that Latin America has high time zone overlap with what we have here in the United States, so you can hire full-time remote engineers who share most of the workday as your team. It's an end-to-end talent service, so you can find and hire engineers in Central and South America without having to worry about, frankly, the colossal pain of cross-border payroll and benefits and compliance because Revelo handles all of it. If you're hiring engineers, check out revelo.io/screaming to get 20% off your first three months. That's R-E-V-E-L-O dot I-O slash screaming.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. Today's promoted episode is brought to us by our friends at LaunchDarkly. And it's always interesting when there's a promoted guest episode because they generally tend to send someone who has a story to tell in different ways.Sometimes they send me customers of theirs. Other times they send me executives. And for this episode, they have sent me Tom Totenberg, who's a senior solutions engineer at LaunchDarkly. Tom, thank you for drawing the short straw. It's appreciated.Tom: [laugh]. Anytime. Thank you so much for having me, Corey.Corey: So, you're a senior solutions engineer, which in many different companies is interpreted differently, but one of the recurring themes tends to pop up is often that is a different way of saying sales engineer because if you say sales, everyone hisses and recoils when you enter the conversation. Is that your experience or do you see your role radically differently?Tom: Well, I used to be one of those people who did recoil when I heard the word sales. I was raised in a family where you didn't talk about finances, you know? That's considered to be faux pas, and when you hear the word sales, you immediately think of a car lot. But what I came to realize is that, especially when we talk about cloud software or any sort of community where you start to run into the same people at conferences over and over and over again, turns out the good salespeople are the ones who actually try to form relationships and try to solve problems. And I realized that oh, I like to work with those people. It's pretty exciting. It's nice to be aspirational about what people can do and bring in the technical chops to see if you can actually make it happen. So, that's where I fit in.Corey: The way that I've always approached it has been rather different. Because before I got into tech, I worked in sales a bunch of times and coming up from the—I guess, clawing your way up doing telesales was a polite way of describing—back in the days before there were strong regulations against it, calling people at dinner to sell them credit cards. And what's worse is I was surprisingly effective at it for a kid who, like, you grew up in a family where we didn't talk about money. And it's easy to judge an industry by its worst examples. Another one of these would be recruiting, for example.When everyone talks about how terrible third-party recruiters are because they're referring to the ridiculous spray-and-pray model of just blasting out emails to everything that hold still long enough that meets a keyword. And yeah, I've also met some recruiters that are transformative as far as the conversations you have with them go. But some of that with sales. It's, “Oh, well, you can't be any fun to talk to because I had a really bad experience buying a used car once and my credit was in the toilet.”Tom: Yeah, exactly. And you know, I have a similar experience with recruiters coming to LaunchDarkly. So, not even talking about the product; I was a skeptic, I was happy where I was, but then as I started talking to more and more people here, I'm assuming you've read the book Accelerate; you probably had a hand in influencing part of it.Corey: I can neither confirm nor deny because stealing glory is something I only do very intentionally.Tom: Oh okay, excellent. Well, I will intentionally let you have some of that glory for you then. But as I was reading that book, it reminded me again of part of why I joined LaunchDarkly. I was a skeptic, and they convinced me through everyone that I talked to just what a nice place it is, and the great culture, it's safe to fail, it's safe to try stuff and build stuff. And then if it fails, that's okay. This is the place where that can happen, and we want to be able to continue to grow and try something new.That's again, getting back to the solutions engineer, sales engineer part of it, how can we effectively convey this message and teach people about what it is that we do—LaunchDarkly or not—in a way that makes them excited to see the possibilities of it? So yeah, it's really great when you get to work with those type of people, and it absolutely shouldn't be influenced by the worst of them. Sometimes you need to find the right ones to give you a chance and get in the door to start having those conversations so you can make good decisions on your own, not just try to buy whatever someone's—whatever their initiative is or whatever their priority is, right?Corey: Once upon a time when I first discovered LaunchDarkly, it was pretty easy to describe what you folks did. Feature flags. For longtime listeners of the show, and I mean very longtime listeners of the show, your colleague Heidi Waterhouse was guest number one. So, I've been talking to you folks about a variety of different things in a variety of different ways. But yeah, “LaunchDarkly. Oh, you do feature flags.”And over time that message has changed somewhat into something I have a little bit of difficulty to be perfectly honest with you in pinning down. At the moment we're recording this, if I pull up launchdarkly.com, it says, “Fundamentally change how you deliver software. Innovate faster, deploy fearlessly, and make each release a masterpiece.”And I look at the last release I pushed out, which wound up basically fixing a couple of typos there, and it's like, “Well, shit. Is it going to make me sign my work because I'm kind of embarrassed by a lot of it.” So, it's aspirational, I get it, but it also somehow [occludes 00:05:32] a little bit of meaning. What is it you'd say it is you do here.Tom: Oh, Office Space. Wonderful. Good reference. And also, to take about 30 seconds back, Heidi Waterhouse, what a wonderful human. wiredferret on Twitter. Please, please go look her up. She's got just always such wonderful things to say. So—Corey: If you don't like Heidi Waterhouse, it is a near certainty it is because you've not yet met her. She's wonderful.Tom: Exactly. Yes, she is. So, what is it we'd say we do here? Well, when people think about feature flags—or at this point now, ‘feature management,' which is a broader scope—that's the term that we're using now, it's really talking about that last bit of software delivery, the last mile, the last leg, whatever your—you know, when you're pushing the button, and it's going to production. So, you know, a feature flag, if you ask someone five or ten years ago, they might say, oh, it's a fancy if statement controlled by a config file or controlled by a database.But with a sort of modern architecture, with global delivery, instant response time or fraction of a second response time, it's a lot more fundamental than that. That's why the word fundamental is there: Because it comes down to psychological safety. It comes down to feeling good about your life every day. So, whether it is that you're fixing a couple typos, or if you're radically changing some backend functionality, and trying out some new sort of search algorithm, a new API route that you're not sure if it's going to work at scale, honestly, you shouldn't have to stay up at night, you shouldn't have to think about deploying on a weekend because you should be able to deploy half-baked code to production safely, you should be able to do all of that. And that's honestly what we're all about.Now, there's some extra elements to it: Feedback loops, experimentation, metrics to make sure that your releases are doing well and doing what you anticipated that they would do, but really, that's what it comes down to is just feeling good about your work and making sure that if there is a fire, it's a small fire, and the entire audience isn't going to get part of the splash zone, right? We're making it just a little safer. Does that answer your question? Is that what you're getting at? Or am I still just speaking in the lingo?Corey: That gets it a lot closer. One of the breakthrough moments—of course I picked it up from one of Heidi's talks—is feature flag seems like a front end developer thing, yadda, yadda, yadda. And she said historically, yeah, in some ways, in some cases, that's how it started. But think about it this way. Think about separating out configuration from your deploy process. And what would that mean? What would that entail?And I look at my current things that I have put out there, and there is no staging environment, my feature branches main, and what would that change? In my case, basically nothing. But that's okay. Because I'm an irresponsible lunatic who should not be allowed near anything expensive, which is why I'm better at stateless things because I know better than to take my aura near things like databases.Tom: Yeah. So, I don't know how old you are Corey. But back—Corey: I'm in my mid-30s, which—Tom: Hey—Corey: —enrages my spouse who's slightly older. Because I'm turning 40 in July, but it's like, during the pandemic, as it has for many of us, the middle has expanded.Tom: There you go. Right. Exa—[laugh] exactly. Can neither confirm nor deny. You can only see me from about the mid-torso up, so, you know, you're not going to see whether I've expanded.But when we were in school doing group projects, we didn't have Google Docs. We couldn't see what other people were working on. You'd say, “Hey, we've got to write this paper. Corey, you take the first section, I'll take the second section, and we'll go and write and we'll try to squish it back together afterward.” And it's always a huge pain in the ass, right? It's terrible. Nobody likes group projects.And so the old method of Gitflow, where we're creating these feature branches and trying to squish them back later, and you work on that, and you work on this thing, and we can't see what each other are doing, it all comes down to context switching. It is time away from work that you care about, time away from exciting or productive work that you actually get to see what you're doing and put it into production, try it out. Nobody wants to deal with all the extra administrative overhead. And so yeah, for you, when you've got your own trunk-based development—you know, it's all just main—that's okay. When we're talking about teams of 40, 50, 100, 1000 suddenly becomes a really big deal if you were to start to split off and get away from trunk-based development because there's so much extra work that goes into trying to squish all that work back together, right? So, nobody wants to do all the extra stuff that surrounds getting software out there.Corey: It's toil. It feels consistently like it is never standardized so you always have to wind up rolling your own CI/CD thing for whatever it is. And forget between jobs; between different repositories and building things out, it's, “Oh, great. I get to reinvent the wheel some more.” It's frustrating.Tom: [laugh]. It's either that or find somebody else's wheel that they put together and see if you can figure out where all those spokes lead off to. “Is this secure? I don't know.”Corey: How much stuff do you have running in your personal stuff that has more or less been copied around for a decade or so? During the pandemic, I finally decided, all right, you know what I'm doing? That's right, being productive. We should fix that. I'm going to go ahead and redo my shell config—my zshrc—from scratch because, you know, 15 years of technical debt later, a lot of the things I used to really need it to do don't really apply anymore.Let's make it prettier, and let's make it faster. And that was great and all, but just looking through it, it was almost like going back in time for weird shell aliases that I don't need anymore. It's, well, that was super handy when I ran a Ruby production environment, but I haven't done that in seven years, and I haven't been in this specific scenario that one existed for since 2011. So maybe, maybe I can turn that one off.Tom: Yeah, maybe. Maybe we can get rid of that one. I mean, when's the last time you ran npm install on something you were going to try out here and paid attention to the warnings that came up afterward? “Hey, this one's deprecated. That one's deprecated.” Well, let's see if it works first, and then we'll worry about that later.Corey: Exactly. Security problems? Whatever. It's a Lambda function. What do I care?Tom: Yeah, it's fine. [laugh]. Exactly. Yeah. So, a lot of this is hypothetical for someone in my position, too, because I didn't ever get formal training as a software developer. I can copy and paste from Stack Overflow with the best of them and there's all sorts of resources out there, but really the people that we're talking to are the ones who actually live that day in, day out.And so I try to step into their shoes and try to feel that pain. But it's tough. Like, you have to be able to speak both languages and try to relate to people to see what are they actually running into, and is that something that we can help with? I don't know.Corey: The way that I tend to think about these things—and maybe it's accurate, and maybe it's not—it's just, no one shows up hoping to do a terrible job at work today, but we are constrained by a whole bunch of things that are imposed upon us. In some of the more mature environments, some of that is processes there for damn good reasons. “Well, why can't I just push everything I come up with to production?” “It's because we're a bank, genius. How about you think a little bit before you open your mouth?”Other times, it's because well, I have to go and fight with the CI/CD system, and I'm just going to go ahead and patch this one-line change into production. Better processes, better structure have made that a lot more… they've made it a lot easier to be able to do things the right way. But I would say we're nowhere near its final form, yet. There's so much yak-shaving that has to go into building out anything that it's frustrating, on some level, just all of the stuff you have to do, just to get the scaffolding in place to write nonsense. I mean, back when they announced Lambda functions it was, “In the future, the only code you'll write is business logic.”Yeah, well, I use a crap-ton of Lambda here and it feels like most of the code I write is gluing all of the weird formats and interchanges together in different APIs. Not a lot of business logic in that; and awful lot of JSON finickiness.Tom: Yeah, I'm with you. And especially at scale, I still have a hard time wrapping my mind around how all of that extra translation is possibly going to give the same sort of performance and same sort of long-term usability, as opposed to something that just natively speaks the same language end-to-end. So yeah, I agree, there's still some evolution, some standardization that still needs to happen because otherwise we're going to end up with a lot of cruft at various points in the code to, just like you said, translate and make sure we're speaking the same language.Getting back to process though, I spent a good chunk of my career working with companies that are, I would say, a little more conservative, and talking to things like automotive companies, or medical device manufacturers. Very security-conscious, compliant places. And so agile is a four-letter word for them, right, [laugh] where we're going faster automatically means we're being dangerous because what would the change control board say? And so there's absolutely a mental shift that needs to happen on the business side. And developers are fighting this cultural battle, just to try to say, hey, it's better if we can make small iterative changes, there is less risk if we can make small, more iterative changes, and convincing people who have never been exposed to software or know the ins and outs of what it takes to get something from my laptop to the cloud or production or you know, wherever, then that's a battle that needs to be fought before you can even start thinking about the tooling. Living in the Midwest, there's still a lot of people having that conversation.Corey: So, you are clearly deep in the weeds of building and deploying things into production. You're clearly deep into the world of explaining various solutions to different folks, and clearly you have the obvious background for this. You majored in music. Specifically, you got a master's in it. So, other than the obvious parallel of you continue to sing for your supper, how do you get from there to here?Tom: Luck and [laugh]. Natural curiosity. Corey, right now you are sitting on the desk that is also housing my PC gaming computer, right? I've been building computers just to play video games since I was a teenager. And that natural curiosity really came in handy because when I—like many people—realize that oh, no, the career choice that I made when I was 18 ended up being not the career choice that I wanted to pursue for the rest of my life, you have to be able to make a pivot, right, and start to apply some of the knowledge that you got towards some other industries.So, like many folks who are now solutions engineers, there's no degree for solutions engineering, you can't go to school for it; everyone comes from somewhere else. And so in my case, that just happened to be music theory, which was all pedagogy and teaching and breaking down big complex pieces of music into one node at a time, doing analysis, figuring out what's going on underneath the hood. And all of those are transferable skills that go over to software, right? You open up some giant wall of spaghetti code and you have to start following the path and breaking it down because every piece is easy one note at a time, every bit of code—in theory—is easy one line at a time, or one function at a time, one variable at a time. You can continue to break it down further and further, right?So, it's all just taking the transferable skills that you may not see how they get transferred, but then bringing them over to share your unique perspective, because of your background, to wherever it is you're going. In my case, it was tech support, then training, and then solutions engineering.Corey: There's a lot to be said for blending different disciplines. I think that there was, uh, the naughts at least, and possibly into the teens, there was a bias for hiring people who look alike. And no, I'm not referring to the folks who are the white dudes you and I clearly present as but the people with a similar background of, “Oh, you went to these specific schools”—as long as they're Stanford—“And you majored in a narrow list of things”—as long as they're all computer science. And then you wind up going into the following type of role because this is the pedigree we expect and everything, soup to nuts, is aligned around that background and experience. Where you would find people who would be working in the industry for ten years, and they would bomb the interview because it turns out that most of us don't spend our days implementing quicksort on whiteboards or doing other algorithmic-based problems.We're mostly pushing pixels around a screen hoping to make ourselves slightly happier than we were. Here we are. And that becomes a strange world; it becomes a really, really weird moment, and I don't know what the answer is for fixing any of that.Tom: Yeah, well, if you're not already familiar with a quote, you should be, which is that—and I'm going to paraphrase here—but, “Diverse backgrounds lead to diversity in thought,” right? And that presents additional opportunities, additional angles to solve whatever problems you're encountering. And so you're right, you know, we shouldn't be looking for people who have the specific background that we are looking for. How it's described in Accelerate? Can you tell that I read it recently?Which we should be looking for capabilities, right? Are you capable? Do you have the capacity to do the problem-solving, the logic? And of course, some education or experience to prove that, but are you the sort of person who will be able to tackle this challenge? It doesn't matter, right, if you've handled that specific thing before because if you've handled that specific thing before, you're probably going to implement it the same way, again, even if that's not the appropriate solution, this time.So, scrap that and say, let's find the right people, let's find people who can come up with creative solutions to the problems that we're facing. Think about ways to approach it that haven't been done before. Of course don't throw out everything with the—you know, the bathwater out with a baby or whatever that is, but come in with some fresh perspectives and get it done.Corey: I really wish that there was more of an acceptance for that. I think we're getting there. I really do, but it takes time. And it does pay dividends. I mean, that's something I want to talk to you about.I love the sound of my own voice. I wouldn't have two podcasts if I didn't. The counterargument, though, is that there's an awful lot of things that get, you know, challenging, especially when, unlike in a conference setting, it's most people consider it rude to get up and walk out halfway through. When we're talking and presenting information to people during a pandemic situation, well, that changes a lot. What do you do to retain people's interest?Tom: Sure. So, Covid really did a number on anyone who needs to present information or teach. I mean, just ask the millions of elementary, middle school, and high schoolers out there, even the college kids. Everyone who's still getting their education suddenly had to switch to remote learning.Same thing in the professional world. If you are doing trainings, if you're doing implementation, if you're doing demos, if you're trying to convey information to a new audience, it is so easy to get distracted at the computer. I know this firsthand. I'm one of those people where if I'm sitting in an airport lobby and there's a TV on my eyes are glued to that screen. That's me. I have a hard time looking away.And the same thing happens to anyone who's on the receiving end of any sort of information sharing, right? You got Slack blowing you up, you've got email that's pinging you, and that's bound to be more interesting than whatever the person on the screen is saying. And so I felt that very acutely in my job. And there's a couple of good strategies around it, right, which is, we need to be able to make things interactive. We shouldn't be monologuing like I am doing to you right now, Corey.We shouldn't be [laugh] just going off on tangents that are completely irrelevant to whoever's listening. And there's ways to make it more interactive. I don't know if you are familiar, or how much you've watched Twitch, but in my mind, the same sorts of techniques, the same sorts of interactivity that Twitch streamers are doing, we should absolutely be bringing that to the business world. If they can keep the attention of 12-year-olds for hours at a time, why can we not capture the attention of business professionals for an hour-long meeting, right? There's all sorts of techniques and learnings that we can do there.Corey: The problem I keep running into is, if you go stumbling down that pathway into the Twitch streaming model, I found it awkward the few experiments I've made with it because unless I have a whole presentation ready to go and I'm monologuing the whole time, the interactive part with the delay built in and a lot of ‘um' and ‘ah' and waiting and not really knowing how it's going to play out and going seat of the pants, it gets a little challenging in some respects.Tom: Yeah, that's fair. Sometimes it can be challenging. It's risky, but it's also higher reward. Because if you are monologuing the entire time, who's to say that halfway through the content that you are presenting is content that they want to actually hear, right? Obviously, we need to start from some sort of fundamental place and set the stage, say this is the agenda, but at some point, we need to get feedback—similar to software development—we need to know if the direction that we're going is the direction they also want to go.Otherwise, we start diverging at minute 10 and by minute 60, we have presented nothing at all that they actually want to see or want to learn about. So, it's so critical to get that sort of feedback and be able to incorporate it in some way, right? Whether that way is something that you're prepared to directly address. Or if it's something that says, “Hey, we're not on the same page. Let's make sure this is actually a good use of time instead of [laugh] me pretending and listening to myself talk and not taking you into account.” That's critical, right? And that is just as important, even if it feels worse in the moment.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at ChaosSearch. You could run Elasticsearch or Elastic Cloud—or OpenSearch as they're calling it now—or a self-hosted ELK stack. But why? ChaosSearch gives you the same API you've come to know and tolerate, along with unlimited data retention and no data movement. Just throw your data into S3 and proceed from there as you would expect. This is great for IT operations folks, for app performance monitoring, cybersecurity. If you're using Elasticsearch, consider not running Elasticsearch. They're also available now in the AWS marketplace if you'd prefer not to go direct and have half of whatever you pay them count towards your EDB commitment. Discover what companies like Equifax, Armor Security, and Blackboard already have. To learn more, visit chaossearch.io and tell them I sent you just so you can see them facepalm, yet again.Corey: From where I sit, one of the many, many, many problems confronting us is that there's this belief that everyone is like we are. I think that's something fundamental, where we all learn in different ways. I have never been, for example—this sounds heretical sitting here saying it, but why not—I'm not a big podcast person; I don't listen to them very often, just because it's such a different way of consuming information. I think there are strong accessibility reasons for there to be transcripts of podcasts. That's why every 300-and-however-many-odd episodes that this one winds up being the sequence in, every single one of them has a transcript attached to it done by a human.And there's a reason for that. Not just the accessibility wins which are obvious, but the fact that I can absorb that information way more quickly if I need to review something, or consume that. And I assume other people are like me, they're not. Other people prefer to listen to things than to read them, or to watch a video instead of listening, or to build something themselves, or to go through a formal curriculum in order to learn something. I mean, I'm sitting here with an eighth-grade education, myself. I take a different view to how I go about learning things.And it works for me, but assuming that other people learn the same way that I do will be awesome for a small minority of people and disastrous for everyone else. So, maybe—just a thought here—we shouldn't pattern society after what works for me.Tom: Absolutely. There is a multiple intelligence theory out there, something they teach you when you're going to be a teacher, which is that people learn in different ways. You don't judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree. We all learn in different ways and getting back to what we were talking about presenting effectively, there needs to be multiple approaches to how those people can consume information. I know we're not recording video, but for everyone listening to this, I am waving my hands all over the place because I am a highly visual learner, but you must be able to accept that other people are relying more on the auditory experience, other people need to be able to read that—like you said with the accessibility—or even get their hands on it and interact with it in some way.Whether that is Ctrl-F-ing your way through the transcript—or Command-F I'm sorry, Mac users [laugh]; I am also on a Mac—but we need to make sure that the information is ready to be consumed in some way that allows people to be successful. It's ridiculous to think that everyone is wired to be able to sit in front of a computer or in a little cubicle for eight hours a day, five days a week, and be able to retain concentration and productivity that entire time. Absolutely not. We should be recording everything, allowing people to come back and consume it in small chunks, consume it in different formats, consume it in the way that is most effective to them. And the onus for that is on the person presenting, it is not on the consumer.Corey: I make it a point to make what I am doing accessible to the people I am trying to reach, not to me. And sometimes I'm slacking, for example, we're not recording video today, so whenever it looks like I'm not paying attention to you and staring off to the side, like, oh, God, he's boring. No. I have the same thing mirrored on both of my screens; I just prefer to look at the thing that is large and easy to read, rather than the teleprompter, which is a nine-inch screen that is about four feet in front of my face. It's one of those easier for me type of things.On video, it looks completely off, so I don't do it, but I'm oh good, I get to take the luxury of not having to be presentable on camera in quite the same way. But when I'm doing a video scenario, I absolutely make it a point to not do that because it is off-putting to the people I'm trying to reach. In this case, I'm not trying to reach you; I already have. This is a promoted guest episode you're trying to reach the audience, and I believe from what I can tell, you're succeeding, so please keep at it.Tom: Oh, you bet. Well, thank you. You know this already, but this is the very first podcast I've ever been a guest on. So, thank you also for making it such a welcoming place. For what it's worth, I was not offended and didn't think you weren't listening. Obviously, we're having a great time here.But yeah, it's something that especially in the software space, people need to be aware of because everyone's job is—[laugh]. Whether you like it or not, here's a controversial statement: Everyone's job is sales. Are you selling your good ideas for your product, to your boss, to your product manager? Are you able to communicate with marketing to effectively say, “Hey, this is what, in tech support, I'm seeing. This is what people are coming to me with. This is what they care about.”You are always selling your own performance to your boss, to your customers, to other departments where you work, to your spouse, to everybody you interact with. We're all selling ourselves all the time. And all of that is really just communication. It's really just making sure you're able to meet people where they are and, effectively, bridge your point of view with theirs to make sure that we're on the same page and, you know, we're able to communicate well. That's so especially important now that we're all remote.Corey: Just so you don't think this is too friendly of a place, let's go ahead and finish out the episode with a personal attack. Before you wound up working at LaunchDarkly. You were at Perforce. What's up with that? I mean, that seems like an awfully big company to cater to its single customer, who is of course J. Paul Reed.Tom: [laugh]. Yeah. Well, Perforce is a wonderful place. I have nothing but love for Perforce, but it is a very different landscape than LaunchDarkly, certainly. When I joined Perforce, I was supporting product called Helix ALM, which, they're still headquartered—Perforce is headquartered here in Minneapolis. I just saw some Perforce folks last week. It truly is a great place, and it is the place that introduced me to so many DevOps concepts.But that's a fair statement. Perforce has been around for a while. It has grown by acquisition over the past several years, and they are putting together new offerings by mixing old offerings together in a way that satisfies more modern needs, things like virtual production, and game development, and trying to package this up in a way that you can then have a game development environment in a box, right? So, there's a lot of things to be said for that, but it very much is a different landscape than a smaller cloud-native company. Which it's its own learning curve, let me tell you, but truly, yeah, to your Perforce, there's a lot more complexity to the products themselves because they've been around for a little bit longer.Solid, solid products, but there's a lot going on there. And it's a lot harder to learn them right upfront. As opposed to something like LaunchDarkly, which seems simple on the surface and you can get started with some of the easy concepts in implementation in, like, an hour, but then as you start digging deeper, whoof, suddenly, there's a lot more complexity hidden underneath the surface than just in terms of how this is set up, and some of those edge cases.Corey: I have to say for the backstory, for those who are unfamiliar, is I live about four miles away from J. Paul Reed, who is a known entity in reliability engineering, in the DevOps space, has been for a long time. So, to meet him, of course I had to fly to Israel. And he was keynoting DevOpsDays Tel Aviv. And I had not encountered him before, and it was this is awesome, I loved his talk, it was fun.And then I gave a talk a little while later called, “Terrible Ideas in Git.” And he's sitting there just glaring at me, holding his water bottle that is a branded Perforce thing, and it's like, “Do you work there?” He's like, “No. I just love Perforce.” It's like, “Congratulations. Having used it, I think you might be the only one.”I kid. I kid. It was great and a lot of different things. It was not quite what I needed when I needed it to but that's okay. It's gotten better and everyone else is not me, as we've discussed; people have different use cases. And that started a very long-running joke that J. Paul Reed is the entirety of the Perforce customer base.Tom: [laugh]. Yeah. And to your point, there's definitely use cases—you're talking about Perforce Version Control or Helix Core.Corey: Back in those days, I don't believe it was differentiated.Tom: It was just called Perforce. Exactly right. But yeah, as Perforce has gotten bigger, now there's different product lines; you name it. But yeah, some of those modern scalable problems, being able to handle giant binary files, being able to do automatic edge replication for globally distributed teams so that when your team in APAC comes online, they're not having to spend the first two hours of their day just getting the most recent changes from the team in the Americas and Europe. Those are problems that Perforce is absolutely solving that are out there, but it's not problems that everybody faces and you know, there's just like everybody else, we're navigating the landscape and trying to find out where the product actually fits and how it needs to evolve.Corey: And I really do wish you well on it. I think there's going to be an awful lot of—Tom: Mm-hm.Corey: —future stories where there is this integration. And you'd say, “Oh, well, what are you wishing me well for? I don't work there anymore.” But yeah, but isn't that kind of we're talking about, on some level, of building out things that are easy, that are more streamlined, that are opinionated in the right ways, I suppose. And honestly, that's the thing that I found so compelling about LaunchDarkly. I have a hard time imagining I would build anything for production use that didn't feature it these days if I were, you know, better at computers?Tom: Sure. Yeah. [laugh]. Well, we do have our opinions on how some things should work, right? Where the data is exposed because with any feature flagging system or feature management—LaunchDarkly included—you've got a set of rules, i.e. who should see this, where is it turned on? Where is it turned off? Who in your audience or user base should be able to see these features? That's the rules engine side of it.And on the other side, you've got the context to decide, well, you know, I'm Corey, I'm logging in, I'm in my mid-30s. And I know all this information about Corey, and those rules need to then be able to determine whether something should be on or off or which experience Corey gets. So, we are very opinionated over the architecture, right, and where that evaluation actually happens and how that data is exposed or where that's exposed. Because those two halves need to meet and both halves have the potential to be extremely sensitive. If I'm targeting based off of a list of 10,000 of my premium users' email addresses, I should not be exposing that list of 10,000 email addresses to a web browser or a mobile phone.That's highly insecure. And inefficient; that's a large amount of text to send, over 10,000 email addresses. And so when we're thinking about things like page load times, and people being able to push F12 to inspect the page, absolutely not, we shouldn't be exposing that there. At the same time, it's a scary prospect to say, “Hey, I'm going to send personal information about Corey over to some third-party service, some edge worker that's going to decide whether Corey should see a feature or not.” So, there's definitely architectural considerations of different use cases, but that's something that we think through all the time and make sure is secure.There's a reason—I'm going to put on my sales engineer hat here—which is to say that there is a reason that the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services is our sponsor for FedRAMP moderate certification, in process right now, expected to be completed mid-2022. I don't know. But anybody who is unfamiliar with that, if you've ever had to go through high trust certification, you know, any of these compliances to make your regulators happy, you know that FedRAMP is so incredibly stringent. And that comes down to evaluating where are we exposing the data? Who gets to see that? Is security built in and innate into the architecture? Is that something that's been thought through?I have went so far afield from the original point that you made, but I agree, right? We've got to be opinionated about some things while still providing the freedom to use it in a way that is actually useful to you and [laugh] and we're not, you know, putting up guardrails, that mean that you've got such a narrow set of use cases.Corey: I'd like to hope—maybe I'm wrong on this—that it gets easier the more that we wind up doing these things because I don't think that it necessarily has been easy enough for an awful lot of us.Tom: When you say ‘it,' what do you mean?Corey: All of it. That's the best part, I suppose the easy parts of working on computers, which I guess might be typing if you learn it early enough.Tom: Sure. [laugh] yeah. Mario Teaches Typing, or Starcraft taught me how to type quickly. You can't type slowly or else your expansion is going to get destroyed. No, so for someone who got their formal education in music or for someone with an eighth-grade education, I agree there needs to be resources out there.And there are. Not every single StackOverflow post with a question that's been asked has the response, “That's a dumb question.” There are some out there. There's definitely a community or a group of folks who think that there is a correct way to do things and that if you're asking a question, that it's a dumb question. It really isn't. It's getting back to the diverse backgrounds and diverse schools of thought that are coming in.We don't know where someone is coming from that led them to that question without the context, and so we need to continue providing resources to folks to make it easy to self-enable and continue abstracting away the machine code parts of it in friendlier and friendlier ways. I love that there are services like Squarespace out there now, right, that allow anybody to make a website. You don't have to have a degree in computer science to spin something up and share it with the world on the web. We're going to continue to see that type of abstraction, that type of on-ramp for folks, and I'm excited to be part of it.Corey: I really look forward to it. I'm curious to see what happens next for you, especially as you continue—‘you' being the corporate ‘you' here; that's like the understood ‘you' are the royal ‘you.' This is the corporate ‘you'—continue to refine the story of what it is LaunchDarkly does, where you start, where you stop, and how that winds up playing out.Tom: Yeah, you bet. Well, in the meantime, I'm going to continue to play with things like GitHub Copilot, see how much I can autofill, and see which paths that takes me down?Corey: Oh, I've been using it for a while. It's great. Just tab-complete my entire life. It's amazing.Tom: Oh, yeah. Absolutely.Corey: [unintelligible 00:36:08] other people's secrets start working, great, that makes my AWS bill way lower when I use someone else's keys. But that's neither here nor there.Tom: Yeah, exactly. That's a next step of doing that npm install or, you know, bringing in somebody else's [laugh] tools that they've already made. Yeah, just a couple weeks ago, I was playing around with it, and I typed in two lines: I imported the LaunchDarkly SDK and the configuration for the LaunchDarkly SDK, and then I just let it autofill, whatever it wanted. It came out with about 100 lines of something or other. [laugh]. And not all of it made sense, but hey, I saw where the thought process was. It was pretty cool to see.Corey: I really want to thank you for spending as much time and energy as you have talking about how you see the world and where you folks are going. If people want to learn more. Where's the best place to find you?Tom: At launchdarkly.com. Of course, any other various different booths, DevOpsDays, we're at re:Invent, we're at QCon right now. We're at all sorts of places, so come stop by, say hi, get a demo. Maybe we'll talk.Corey: Excellent. We will be tossing links to that into the [show notes 00:37:09]. Thanks so much for your time. I really appreciate it.Tom: Corey, Thank you.Corey: Tom Totenberg, senior solutions engineer at LaunchDarkly. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry and insulting comment, and then I'll sing it to you.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Going North Podcast
Ep. 497 – “The Financial Mindset Fix” with Joyce Marter (@Joyce_Marter)

Going North Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 31:28


“Don't let fear be your mode of operation.” – Joyce MarterToday's featured author is Renowned Psychotherapist, International Speaker, CEO, Entrepreneur, and Mental Health Thought Leader, Joyce Marter. Joyce and I have a chat about her new book, “The Financial Mindset Fix: A Mental Fitness Program for an Abundant Life”, what holds us back from cultivating abundance, and more!! Key Things You'll Learn:Why going to therapy is good for your overall well-beingWhat holds people back from having an abundance mentality.One of the hardest lessons that Joyce needed to learn to advance further in business.The 3 daily habits that contribute to Joyce's success. Joyce's Site: https://www.joyce-marter.com/Joyce's Book: https://www.joyce-marter.com/book/the-financial-mindset-fix/ The opening track is titled “UVERWorld verR” by Rukunetsu aka Project R. To listen to and download the whole track, click the following link. https://soundcloud.com/rukunetsu/uverworld-verr You May Also Like… #Holiday Bonus Ep. – “Happy Money” with Ken Honda (@KenHondaHappy): https://www.goingnorthpodcast.com/holiday-bonus-ep-happy-money-with-ken-honda-kenhondahappy/ Ep. 407 – “Financial Alchemy” with Morgana Rae (@morganarae): https://www.goingnorthpodcast.com/ep-407-financial-alchemy-with-morgana-rae-morganarae/ #GNPYear3 Bonus Episode 5 – “Money Honey” with Rachel Richards (@MoneyHoneyRach): https://www.goingnorthpodcast.com/gnpyear3-bonus-episode-5-money-honey-with-rachel-richards-moneyhoneyrach/ Ep. 359 – “Think Yourself Confident & Successful” with Nathalie Plamondon-Thomas (@thinkyourselfAc): https://www.goingnorthpodcast.com/ep-359-think-yourself-confident-successful-with-nathalie-plamondon-thomas-thinkyourselfac/ 261 – “How Thoughts Become Things” with Douglas Vermeeren (@DougVermeeren): https://www.goingnorthpodcast.com/261-how-thoughts-become-things-with-douglas-vermeeren-dougvermeeren/ 275 – “How Thoughts Become Things” with Dr. Marina Bruni (@DrMarinaBruni): https://www.goingnorthpodcast.com/275-how-thoughts-become-things-with-dr-marina-bruni-drmarinabruni-1/ 147 - "The Connector's Advantage" with Michelle Tillis Lederman (@mtlederman): https://www.goingnorthpodcast.com/147-the-connectors-advantage-with-michelle-tillis-lederman-mtlederman/ 96 - "Fit Money" with Julia Carlson (@fitmoneydr): https://www.goingnorthpodcast.com/96-fit-money-with-julia-carlson-fitmoneydr/ 17 - "The Abundance Mentality" with Daniel Ally (@danielallyway): https://www.goingnorthpodcast.com/17-the-abundance-mentality-with-daniel-ally-danielallyway-1/ Ep. 399 – “Money Is An Energy Game” with Madeline Gerwick (@MadelineGerwick): https://www.goingnorthpodcast.com/ep-399-money-is-an-energy/ Ep. 455.5 – “From Triggered to Tranquil” with Dr. Susan Campbell (@drsusan99): https://www.goingnorthpodcast.com/ep-4555-from-triggered-to-tranquil-with-dr-susan-campbell-drsusan99/ 9 - "Life Liberation" with Dr. Sinclair Grey III (@DrSinclairGrey): https://www.goingnorthpodcast.com/9-life-liberation-with-dr-sinclair-grey-iii-drsinclairgrey/ Ep. 491 – “Intentionally Fabulous” with Kelli Calabrese: https://www.goingnorthpodcast.com/ep-491-intentionally-fabulous-with-kelli-calabrese/ Ep. 488.5 – “Create, Innovate & Dominate” with Tracy Hazzard (@hazzdesign): https://www.goingnorthpodcast.com/ep-4885-create-innovate-dominate-with-tracy-hazzard-hazzdesign/ 250 – “Turn Down the Noise” with Justin Rambo (@JustinRambo3): https://www.goingnorthpodcast.com/250-turn-down-the-noise-with-justin-rambo-justinrambo3-1/

Let's Talk Data Podcast
Ep. 50: SAP and Sodales: How to innovate, build, and monetize your SAP BTP solutions

Let's Talk Data Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 24:15


Sodales Solutions builds solutions for a company's health, safety, and environment management - and they do so using SAP Business Technology Platform (SAP BTP). Through their ongoing innovation and reliance on SAP BTP, Sodales is making the most out of the white spaces they identify. Listen to what the "SAP BTP role model" has to say and learn more about their innovation approach, thoughts about the SAP store, hiring criteria, and more. Speakers: Sana Salam - President & Founder, Sodales Solutions Thorsten Leiduck - SVP & Co-Lead Global SAP Ecosystem, P&T Find out more about SAP BTP: https://bit.ly/3HR0nXK Discover Sodales' solutions here: https://bit.ly/3vrx9tc

Reimagining Justice
How actress America Ferrera helps us to understand why we don't innovate more

Reimagining Justice

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 15:20


In episode no. 76 I share my comments from an International Women's Day event in Brisbane in early March, hosted by 9 University of Queensland and Queensland University of Technology clubs.   I share what breaking the bias means to me and how I apply it in practice, and a particular bias each of us possess and need to be aware of if we are to innovate and bring about social change. Also, as the title suggests, how actress America Ferrera helps us to understand why we don't innovate more! Proudly sponsored by Neota Logic  Links: Your identity is your superpower International Womens Day Cocktail Evening Neota Logic Solution Gallery Neota Logic Churchill Trust Project Andrea Perry-Petersen – LinkedIn - Twitter @winkiepp – andreaperrypetersen.com.au Twitter - @ReimaginingJ Facebook – Reimagining Justice group

IdeaScale Nation
ePolicyWorks: Innovate, Rinse, Repeat

IdeaScale Nation

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 30:09


ePolicyWorks is a collaborative approach to federal policymaking that coordinates the flow of ideas and information between federal policymakers and key stakeholders in the public. It has become a model for national policy-building efforts and, most recently, as part of the Department of Labor's efforts to support American workers and position the economy for a strong rebound in an unprecedented pandemic, the department hosted a couple of national online dialogues to solicit ideas about challenges that may be faced as businesses reopen and how best to help employers and workers reopen America's workplaces safely. Those ideas played a crucial role in informing USDOL's rapid public policy response and helped secure safer workplaces in these exceptional times. Since then they've begun to focus on diversity, equity, and inclusion programs and have begun to leverage their best practices that they've perfected over the past seven years to solve bigger and more complex issues. They have run over 60 ePolicyWorks challenges over the years and now Katia Albanese and Hope Adler, both leaders at Concept Communications which supports several of the US Department of Labor's Office of Disability Employment Policy initiatives, including ePolicyWorks are here to share what they have learned. 

The Long and The Short Of It
186. Bad Ideas

The Long and The Short Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 19:14


Jen and Pete dive into one of their brainstorming tactics, which is to tell each other, "This might be the worst idea ever uttered by man."Specifically, in this episode Jen and Pete talk about:Why is it important to share bad ideas?What is the effect of framing something as a bad idea?How might bad ideas lead to good ideas?To hear all Episodes and read full transcripts visit The Long and The Short Of It website: https://thelongandtheshortpodcast.com/.You can subscribe to our Box o' Goodies here (https://thelongandtheshortpodcast.com/) and receive a weekly email full of book and podcast recommendations, quotes, videos and other interesting things Jen and Pete are noodling on. To get in touch, send an email to: hello@thelongandtheshortpodcast.comLearn more about Pete's work here (https://humanperiscope.com/) and Jen's work here (https://jenwaldman.com/).

You Inc. & YouTune
You Inc. Episode 140: Innovate Part 2 with Guest Joe Bourdow

You Inc. & YouTune

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 22:31


Welcome back to our special two-part series on Innovation! In this installment, Ria is joined by Joe Bourdow, station manager of 2Rogues station partner Radio St. Pete!

Developer Tea
Finding Perspective On Purpose - Make it Visible, Make it Clear

Developer Tea

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 9:29


In today's episode we talk about finding perspective and purpose through the lens of two principles and one bonus exercise.

Fast Casual Nation Podcast
106. A Company That Innovates The Future of Food | The Culinary Edge

Fast Casual Nation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 23:46


The Fast Casual Nation Podcast offers exclusive interviews with experts ranging from top chefs and brand makers to executives and restaurants who work in one of the fastest-growing segments of the restaurant industry. In this episode, Pepe chats with Graham Humphreys, Chief Executive Officer, and Haley Kabus, Associate Director of Strategy at The Culinary Edge, about creating new fast casual concepts, launching virtual brands and how cryptocurrency can impact a restaurant's bottom line.Humphreys brings an extensive design experience background to The Culinary Edge. He talks about creating branding that not only engages the user's sense of sight, touch and sound, but smell and taste as well. He talks about the diverse team at the company that he collaborates with everyday from design experts, anthropologists, researchers and MICHELIN Star Chefs. He says, “We're an innovation agency for the food and food service industries.” He adds, “If you haven't heard our name, you've probably tasted our food.”Kabus talks about her history working with big brands in the advertising and marketing space and how her real love and passion for working in the food and beverage industry led her to The Culinary Edge. She talks about driving food to the forefront of culture. She shares that this is definitely an area that has been propelled by COVID because it brought people back into the kitchens or into the kitchen for the first time, igniting a new passion for cooking. She says, “For the vast majority of us, our relationship with food has never been more personal or more fun and engaging.”When Pepe asks Humphreys about the advantages and disadvantages of trying new concepts versus tried and true mainstream brands, Humphrey shares that the company actually spends a lot of time on both. He talks about how virtual brands and ghost kitchens have given brands more direct access to the market than ever before and can therefore scale more quickly. He provides an example with MRBEAST BURGER,  a virtual brand that was able to open out of the back line of an existing restaurant and it managed to scale to over 1000 locations within 18 months. He says, “That kind of growth, scale and reach, it might have been possible before, but it certainly didn't happen very much. But it's all being facilitated now by big changes in what makes a restaurant a restaurant.”Pepe asks Kabus about what she has seen with regard to cryptocurrency and the restaurant industry. Kabus shares that crypto is becoming another way that people are looking at what it means to be a restaurant, and what payment looks like today. She shares that according to Yahoo Finance almost 50% of people aged between 24-40, already own cryptocurrency. Major mainstream companies like Yum Brands, Taco Bell and KFC are starting to accept these payments. She says, “But for the most part what we love about embracing crypto is really the signal it sends to your customers about your brand being modern and adaptable and built for the future.”To hear more from Humphreys and Kabus about cryptocurrency, how TikTok is shaping user experience, and what's next for The Culinary Edge, listen to this episode of Fast Casual Nation on Apple Podcasts.

The Charles Mizrahi Show
The Story of PayPal — Jimmy Soni

The Charles Mizrahi Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 51:27


Elon Musk, Peter Thiel, and hundreds of the biggest names in Silicon Valley started at PayPal. Known as the “PayPal Mafia,” these free-thinking entrepreneurs created the blueprint for tech companies today. Author Jimmy Soni sits down with host Charles Mizrahi to discuss the untold story of PayPal's founding and how it paved the way for companies like Tesla, Facebook, YouTube, and SpaceX. Topics Discussed: An Introduction to Jimmy Soni (00:00:00) Silicon Valley Has PayPal to Thank (00:01:38) PayPal's Start (00:7:30) The Origins of Elon Musk (00:17:01) PayPal's Unique Recruitment Process (00:27:33) Peter Thiel's Management Style (00:30:13) Thiel's Story (00:32:56) Why PayPal Founders Are Driven to Innovate (00:40:44) What We Can Learn (00:43:59) Guest Bio: Jimmy Soni is an award-winning author. He previously served as managing editor of HuffPost and was named in Forbes' “30 Under 30” list. Soni has co-authored several books with Rob Goodman, winning the 2017 Neumann Prize for A Mind at Play. Their essays have been featured in Politico, HuffPost, and Business Insider. Soni's recent solo book (below) tells the story of PayPal's founding. Resources Mentioned: · https://www.amazon.com/Founders-Paypal-Entrepreneurs-Shaped-Silicon/dp/1501197266 (The Founders: The Story of PayPal and the Entrepreneurs Who Shaped Silicon Valley) · https://www.amazon.com/Mind-Play-Shannon-Invented-Information/dp/1476766681 (A Mind at Play: How Claude Shannon Invented the Information Age) Transcript: https://charlesmizrahi.com/podcast/podcast-season-7/2022/04/12/story-paypal-jimmy-soni/ (https://charlesmizrahi.com/podcast/)  Don't Forget To... • Subscribe to my podcast! • Download this episode to save for later • Liked this episode? Leave a kind review! Subscribe to Charles' Alpha Investor newsletter today: https://pro.banyanhill.com/m/1962483 (https://pro.banyanhill.com/m/1962483)

You Inc. & YouTune
Episode 139: Innovate Part 1 with Guest John Messmere

You Inc. & YouTune

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 17:12


Join us for this special You Inc. two-part series on Innovation! For our first installment, Ria talks with Sweet Sage Cafe owner John Messmere.

Hatchcast
Hatchcast Extra: Innovate State ft. Rob Smith

Hatchcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 64:53


Rob Smith, CEO & Founder, The Phluid Project / GET Phluid / The Phluid Foundation has created a brand, combining his retail profession with his passion: a commitment to social justice. After graduating from Michigan State University, Rob began a thirty-year retail career orchestrating multi-billion dollar businesses through merchandising, e-commerce, marketing, product development, and supply chain management. He worked his way through Macy's for over two decades, working within four divisions and finishing with his final position as GMM/EVP Macy's Corporate in product merchandising. Gaining new experiences, Rob became GMM/EVP at Victoria's Secret direct. He was the Children's Global Chief Product Officer for Nike, Levi's Jordan, Hurley, and Converse with Haddad Brands. Rob mentors numerous fashion brands and designers, leads the CSR committee as a member of Steve Madden Ltd's Board of Directors, and raises critical funds for LGBTQIA+ organizations. Today, Rob leads and manages The Phluid Project, a leader in gender-free fashion. Phluid, joining a global movement of freedom, authenticity, and self-expression, leads with values, a powerful community, and a fearlessness to challenge the status quo. Phluid thoughtfully expands into new spaces where they can offer insight, education, and impact, including GET Phluid (gender-expansive training) and The Phluid Phoundation, a nonprofit supporting the most at-risk members of the LGBTQIA+ community (trans women of color and homeless queer youth). Rob lives in NYC with his husband, Rod Grozier, and his dog, Jackson. _______Like what you hear? Let us know! Subscribe and share—we really appreciate it.Have ideas or comments for us? Email us at hatchcast@msu.edu. For behind-the-scenes content, check us out on Facebook and Instagram.   Hatchcast is made possible by the Burgess Institute for Entrepreneurship & Innovation at Michigan State University in collaboration with the MSU Innovation Center, the MSU Entrepreneurship Association, & MSU Women in Entrepreneurship.Original Music & Sound Design by Kakia Gkoudina and Karina Stankowski Engineered & Edited by Will RowanThe Hatchcast is co-hosted and produced by Gabe Hales, Gabe Berke, Diego Fernandez, Danielle Tice, Karina Stankowski, Charlotte Bachelor, Will Rowan, & Aaryn Richard.

The Gut Show
Navigating Pregnancy & Motherhood with IBS

The Gut Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 69:50


IBS and other gastrointestinal issues are already hard enough to deal with, but what happens to the percentage of the population who not only suffer from IBS but are concerned about their fertility or are pregnant?   In today's episode I am talking to Lindsey Davis,  a registered dietician who has been with Innovate for the past year. As part of our practice, she works one to one with clients who are dealing with IBS motility disorders like gastroparesis, GERD and she also specializes in disordered eating with IBS.   During our conversation Lindsey shares her own experience being diagnosed with IBS and navigating pregnancy and motherhood. She talks about the importance of self compassion as you navigate motherhood, body image throughout pregnancy, postpartum changes and IBS and what life is actually like after having kids.   In this episode, we cover: Lindsey shares more about herself and how she became a dietician [3:34] Motherhood and IBS [8:21] The actual changes your body experiences during pregnancy with IBS [13:24] Is life different after having kids? [29:43] The best skill to have as a mother is the ability to be adaptable [45:46] Approaching the IBS conversation with kids [52:58] Empathy, tough conversations and motherhood [01:00:11]   This episode is brought to you by Gourmend. Cooking on the low FODMAP diet can be a bit bland, especially without garlic and onion. Gourmend is changing the game for those with food intolerances by offering unique flavor substitutes that are more gut-friendly, including green onion powder, garlic scape powder, and garlic chive powder. They also have a low FODMAP, filler free chicken broth that's made with high quality ingredients. Their products have no additives, natural flavors, or preservatives, so you can bring gourmet taste with ingredients that you can trust to your kitchen. Try them out at gourmendfoods.com and save 15% off your order with code ERINJUDGE. You can also check out their cooking and low FODMAP resources on their website!   About our guest Lindsey Davis, RDN, LDN:    Lindsey was diagnosed with IBS around 12 years old. With little guidance, she fell into the trap of only eating "safe foods" that she knew didn't trigger symptoms. She lived many years under-nourished and in fear of foods.   Now, as a dietitian at Gutivate, Lindsey has learned how to manage her IBS by taking care of both her mind and body. She no longer fears food and now nourishes her body with a variety of tastes and textures every day. She is passionate about helping you find that same freedom!   You can work with Lindsey in our 1:1 or group programs, and connect with her more on Instagram @gutivate.   Join The GUT Community: The Facebook group for those with IBS and digestive health conditions to connect, encourage one another, and dive deeper into the topics we cover on The Gut Show.  Join here: facebook.com/groups/thegutcommunity   Connect with Erin & the Gutivate team IG: @erinjudge.rd or @gutivate Website: www.gutivate.com Schedule a consult: bit.ly/jnwconsultcall   FREE: IBS Fundamentals Mini Course https://www.ibsmastermethod.com/ibs-fundamentals-sign-up   Start taking control of your IBS with the MASTER Method Foundations Course bit.ly/mmfoundations   Track your symptoms & understand your body better My Gut Journal is a 90 day gut tracker to build awareness in your mind & body. Get yours at www.gutivate.com/store/mygutjournal     

Going North Podcast
Ep. 491 – “Intentionally Fabulous” with Kelli Calabrese

Going North Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 29:50


“It brings you closer to your dreams when you celebrate.” - Kelli CalabreseToday's featured bestselling author is Wellness Mompreneur, mindset pro, speaker, entrepreneur, and certified divorce coach, Kelli Calabrese. Kelli and I have a high-energy chat about some of the habits of super achievers, recovering from a painful divorce, and more!!! Key Things You'll Learn:Why it pays to write your vision and set written goals to make them manifest.What led Kelli to become a divorce coach.The concept of self-forgiveness and how it helped Kelli after her divorce.The major key to living a life of freedom.Why you need to celebrate after achieving a goal. Kelli's Site: https://kellicalabrese.com/Kelli's Books: https://www.amazon.com/Kelli-Calabrese/e/B071P765DG/ref=dp_byline_cont_pop_book_1The Compass Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=InVq3PTHePw&ab_channel=JohnSpencerEllis The opening track is titled "Pilot Wings Remix" by Rukunetsu (aka Project R). Click on the following link to listen and cop the full tune. https://soundcloud.com/rukunetsu/pilotwings-4-results You May Also Like… 290 – “The Forgiveness Solution” with Rev. Misty Tyme (@Rev_Misty_Tyme) #C2H: https://www.goingnorthpodcast.com/290-the-forgiveness-solution-with-rev-misty-tyme-rev_misty_tyme-c2h/ 292.5 (Charm City Bonus Episode) – “Divorce Is Worse Than Death” with Stanley McCluskey: https://www.goingnorthpodcast.com/2925-charm-city-bonus-episode-divorce-is-worse-than-death-with-stanley-mccluskey/ 292 – “Surviving a High Conflict Divorce with a Covert Narcissist” with Lorilyn Bridges: https://www.goingnorthpodcast.com/292-surviving-a-high-conflict-divorce-with-a-covert-narcissist-with-lorilyn-bridges-c2h/ Ep. 308 – “Every Day Is A New Day” with Kim O'Neill (@KimsONaMission): https://www.goingnorthpodcast.com/ep308-every-day-is-a-new-day-with-kim-oneill-kimsonamission/ Ep. 309 – “Home Worthy” with Sandra Rinomato (@SandraRinomato): https://www.goingnorthpodcast.com/ep-309-home-worthy-with-sandra-rinomato-sandrarinomato/ Ep. 488.5 – “Create, Innovate & Dominate” with Tracy Hazzard (@hazzdesign): https://www.goingnorthpodcast.com/ep-4885-create-innovate-dominate-with-tracy-hazzard-hazzdesign/ Ep. 429 – “Too Happy to Be Sad Girl” with Angel Aviles (@2Happy2BSadGirl): https://www.goingnorthpodcast.com/ep-429-too-happy-to-be-sad-girl-with-angel-aviles-2happy2bsadgirl/ 276 – “Over My Dead Body” with Jen Gaudet (@jen_coaching): https://www.goingnorthpodcast.com/276-over-my-dead-body-with-jen-gaudet-jen_coaching/ 277 – “Entrepreneurs Rocket Fuel” with Kimberly Hobscheid (@EntrepreneursR4): https://www.goingnorthpodcast.com/277-entrepreneurs-rocket-fuel-with-kimberly-hobscheid-entrepreneursr4/ Ep. 479.5 – “How Entrepreneurs Can Be More Productive, Make Better Decisions, & Increase Their Bottom Lines” with Belinda Ellsworth (@stepintosuccess): https://www.goingnorthpodcast.com/ep-4795-how-entrepreneurs-can-be-more-productive-make-better-decisions-increase-their-bottom-lines-with-belinda-ellsworth-stepintosuccess/ Ep. 480 – “Applying Your God-given Passions to Everyday Life” with Marnie Swedberg (@MentorMarnie): https://www.goingnorthpodcast.com/ep-480-applying-your-god-given-passions-to-everyday-life-with-marnie-swedberg-mentormarnie/ 259 – “Positive Aging” with Stephanie Raffelock (@SRaffelock): https://www.goingnorthpodcast.com/259-positive-aging-with-stephanie-raffelock-sraffelock/ Ep. 379.5 – “Awaken Your Inner Awesomeness” with Melissa Oatman (@MelissaOatman): https://www.goingnorthpodcast.com/ep-3795-awaken-your-inner-awesomeness-with-melissa-oatman-melissaoatman/ Ep. 371 – “The Power of Pivoting” with Monica Ortega (@monicagoesshow): https://www.goingnorthpodcast.com/ep-371-the-power-of-pivoting-with-monica-ortega-monicagoesshow/ Ep. 359 – “Think Yourself Confident & Successful” with Nathalie Plamondon-Thomas (@thinkyourselfAc): https://www.goingnorthpodcast.com/ep-359-think-yourself-confident-successful-with-nath

Developer Tea
Ambiguous Target Decisions and Noise

Developer Tea

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 13:03


In today's episode we discuss two types of decision evaluations, and a brief explanation of noise in decisionmaking.You're making judgment calls every day - are they good? How do you know?

The Call to Mastery with Jordan Raynor
Chassie Anders (Founder of Crown of Glory Beauty)

The Call to Mastery with Jordan Raynor

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 44:31


Jordan Raynor sits down with Chassie Anders, Founder of Crown of Glory Beauty, to talk about why she left “full-time missions” to do the “Kingdom work” she was best equipped to do, what Revelation says about the wedding dress we sow with our good works and 5 tips for sharing the gospel in our post-Christian context.Links Mentioned:Crown Of Glory BeautyTim KellerCalled to Create: A Biblical Invitation to Create, Innovate, and RiskThe Creator in YouThe Prodigal God

Worship Online Podcast
ELEVATION RHYTHM: How to Create & Innovate the New Worship Sound

Worship Online Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 44:40


Worship music feels like it's pretty set in its ways right now. There's nothing wrong with that, but it's time to innovate. How do we do that? Today we talk with ELEVATION RHYTHM about what they are doing to discover the new sound of worship. Our conversation is packed with insights you can apply directly to your community so you can be a part of bringing forth the new sound in worship! Mentioned in the Episode  ELEVATION RHYTHM'S New Album ---  If you like what you hear, please leave us a review! Also, feel free to shoot us an e-mail atpodcast@worshiponline.com & tell us how we can better serve you and your church through this podcast.  Don't forget to sign up for your FREE 2-week subscription to Worship Online at worshiponline.com/podcast!  The Worship Online Podcast is produced by Worship Online in Nashville, TN.  Hosted & Produced by Josh Kluge  Backing Tracks by Johnluke Lewis