Podcasts about slowing

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Magnitude of velocity

  • 1,297PODCASTS
  • 1,557EPISODES
  • 34mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Oct 27, 2021LATEST
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Best podcasts about slowing

Latest podcast episodes about slowing

Keyword News
Keyword News 10/27/2021

Keyword News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 11:42


Coverage of major news stories 1. Roh Tae-woo dies 2. Helping ASEAN 3. N. Korea-China relations 4. Slowing growth 5. Trade volume surges 6. Hydrogen power plant

Conservation Queens
Slowing it Down with Sloths~

Conservation Queens

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 54:41


We're celebrating international sloth day! Join us as we talk about these evolutionary weirdos who took it to one very extreme side of the adaptation scale. Queens Catie and Kenzie take us through this episode to teach you everything you've ever wanted to know about sloths.

The Daily Still Podcast - Guided Christian Meditations and Devotions

This meditation focuses on practicing unrushed rhythms.   Slowing down the pace of life, as well as the information we take in, promotes a quiet soul. Studies show, calm, quiet moments are a trigger to our brain — minimizing the body's physical response to stress, lowering blood pressure, heart rate and stress hormones. This produces better concentration and overall emotional health.   Our souls need space to Breathe!   Ralph Waldo Emerson reminds us: Life is a journey, not a destination.    This is true of the spiritual life as well.   So what will we discover on that journey? The answer may just be found in the pace of life that we keep.   Scripture: Jeremiah 2:25 MSG Psalm 46:10 MSG   Meditations written and copyright by Cindy L. Helton Produced by Jess Olekshy Music by Michael Olekshy

SportsBeat KC
Better chance of Titans limiting Mahomes, or Chiefs slowing Henry?

SportsBeat KC

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 38:26


Derrick Henry is going to get his yards, there's no doubting that. But can the Chiefs slow the NFL's leading rusher enough to get by in Tennessee? On this episode of The Star's daily podcast, SportsBeat KC, beat writers Herbie Teope and Sam McDowell and columnist Sam Mellinger break down Sunday's Chiefs-Titans game. It promises to be a high-scoring affair with Henry and Patrick Mahomes, who leads the NFL in passing touchdowns (despite the fact that the Chiefs top the league in turnovers). Also, how might injuries, especially in the Titans' secondary and to Chiefs linebacker Anthony Hitchens, affect the outcome? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Arrowhead Pride: for Kansas City Chiefs fans
AP Interview Series - Jason Martin on slowing Derrick Henry

Arrowhead Pride: for Kansas City Chiefs fans

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 22:04


Host of JMart and Ramon, on 104.5 The Zone in Nashville, Jason Martin joins Pete Sweeney to discuss the Chiefs match-up with the Tennessee Titans on Sunday. Jason sees similarities between the up and down performances of both of these teams-- and has an idea how the Chiefs can attempt to slow Titan's star running back Derrick Henry. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Caregiver Connection Podcast
Finding Your Caregiving Self-care Style: Part One

Caregiver Connection Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 18:02


I bet your idea of self-care is flawed.  Listen to Episode 82 “Finding Your Caregiving Self Care Style: Part One” to find out if it is and learn two ways you can bring self-care into your day. Show Notes If you have listened to any of my episodes that focus on self-care you know that I believe it is required of all caregivers to care for themselves. When I asked caregivers what they needed the most, the answer I got was - learn how to care for themselves. So for the next few episodes, we are going to do just that.  Let's talk about ways caregivers can support themselves. I get it.. you might be skeptical right now but give me just 10 minutes of your time. Don't worry about writing anything down if you are driving or on a walk. All of this information is on the website so you can always reference that to find everything I talk about on this episode today. Self Care is Essential Self-care is essential for caregivers. If you listened to episodes 13   and episode 43  you know that I feel it is a requirement. Not only is it essential for your own health it also allows you to be the best caregiver you can be. It allows you to release the stress that builds up every day, allows you to become resilient so you find yourself feeling overwhelmed less often and it allows you to love your life while caregiving. There is scientific data that proves chronic stress is linked to Cardiovascular disease, depression and anxiety, and a weakened immune system. Doing things that keep you from chronic stress is essential for keeping you healthy.  What is self-care? There are three problems that caregivers have when addressing self-care.  1. They don't feel that self-care is for people like them. 2. They don't have any time to do anything for themselves. 3. They don't know what they would do even if they wanted to. My answer to those objections are  We need to work on your definition of self-care  The problem isn't not having the time it's in how you prioritize your day.  Self-care doesn't have to be complicated. Definition of self-care Let's start with the actual definition of self-care. According to the dictionary self-care is: The practice of taking action to preserve or improve one's own health. and  The practice of taking an active role in protecting one's own well-being and happiness, in particular during periods of stress. Nowhere in this definition do I see any specific events or activities listed. If we use this definition of self-care then it is open to interpretation. It is anything that you could do to protect your own well-being and happiness.  The problem is that companies have decided to tell you what self-care should look like. Social media accounts promote what they want you to think self-care is. It can feel like the world is trying to tell you that you need self-care and the thing they are selling or the place they are promoting is the answer and almost always the person they use for their messaging is a young, healthy person wearing beautiful expensive clothing or hardly anything at all.  You don't see yourself in that messaging. That is why I meet so many caregivers that tell me self-care isn't for them. I get that. If you think self-care is what you buy for yourself or what you go to do it's going to feel out of reach for you.  Now, I'm not saying that taking a trip, getting a massage, or buying that expensive cream aren't good ways to release caregiver stress but most of those things are not daily forms of self-care. I'd consider them the extra things you do if you can. The problem is, you can't sell the act of doing nothing. It isn't glamorous but for some people taking a moment to sit and do absolutely nothing is their form of self-care.  The other problem is, no one reaches out to help you learn what self-care means for you. You know you should be caring for yourself because people are always telling you that you should do it… usually when you are at a breaking point. Which is extremely unhelpful. Everyone telling you to take care of yourself but no one to give you ideas of what to do! Keep listening because we are going to get to that.  You are the only person that can determine what self-care is for you. No matter what it is, the focus of it should be protecting your own well-being and happiness. Protecting your well-being means protecting your health. For caregivers, one of the most important things that need to be done is to find ways to deal with the stress of caregiving. I am going to give you options over the next three episodes for you to consider so you can find one thing that can be brought into your life consistently. Time for self-care Self-care needs to be a part of your daily life. It needs to become what you do every day, like going to the bathroom or brushing your teeth. It has to be non-negotiable. That means it has to be something you will actually do. I can spend hours talking to you about the benefits of meditation but if you don't believe you'd find that enjoyable it'll never work for you.  You have to believe in yourself care and it needs to be as big or as small and you think it should be. However, if you tell me there is absolutely no time for you to do anything for yourself what I hear is you don't think you are worthy of being a priority. Some of the things that I am going to suggest you consider taking less than 5 minutes. You have that much time. It can take more than 5 minutes to find something to watch on Netflix and you probably spend more than 5 minutes a day on social media.  Self-care is what you actively do to protect your own well-being and happiness and it can take as much or as little time out of your day but it needs to happen daily. I am positive you can do this. Let's look at two self-care options and see if any of them are things you would consider doing.  Finding your self-care tool Self-care tool #1 - Stop It's as simple as that… just stop and do absolutely nothing. Stop for a couple of minutes, no phone, no book, don't add to your to-do list. Just stop. Stop doing, stop talking, stop trying to fix things. Stop and sit or simply lie down on the floor. Get to that place you are driving to, park, and stop. Turn off the radio and lean that seat back for a minute.  We spend so much of our time doing. Take a minute to not do that. Just stop. Don't get ready to stop. Don't cue up something on the radio so you can stop. JUST STOP. Turn everything off. Just don't do anything.  Just be. Let your thoughts float by. Don't try to change them or fix them. Don't try to stuff the ones down that see this as an opportunity to come up. There's nothing to analyze right now. Just stop and do nothing.  I know I'm repeating myself because this is by far, the easiest thing for you to do, and most of you will not end up even trying it!  You don't have any time for yourself? Just stop. Take a seat. Just a minute. You have a minute. Self-care isn't for you? Just lie down on the floor or sit in your car and recline the seat when you get to the grocery store. Everyone can take a break for a minute. Just a minute of doing nothing. No special breathing (although this would be a great time for that). No meditation. No assessing your emotions. Just stop doing!  Give your brain a chance to catch up with you. Let your nervous system have a moment when it doesn't feel like it's under attack. Just stop! Self-care tool #2 - Walk/Get outside The next tool I would suggest trying is having a specific time of the day when you get out of the house. I know some of you are already thinking you don't have time for that or you can't do that because of the person you care for needs you around all the time. Even more of a reason to really listen to this one if that is the case. Oftentimes a caregiver's house can feel oppressive. Have you ever felt claustrophobic in your house because you've been in it for too long? Maybe you aren't confined to the house by your responsibilities but when you do leave it, is to do something specific and not to do something for yourself.  Getting out of your house is a very good self-care tool. It shifts your focus to something other than what you were probably hyper-focused on at home. If there is a lot of stress in your life, getting out of the house can give you a break from that. It can be the distraction you need before making a big decision or having that conversation you don't really want to have.  Getting out of the house can be a reset for you. It can remind you that you are part of a community. You have a chance to see other human beings and notice birds, the smell of the air, and the sounds of the world you live in. Have you ever left your house and noticed how everything feels different? All the things your mind was trying to fix, figure out and formulate move off to the side and you might feel a little bit more clear-headed. Or maybe you're just tired of hearing the same show on tv with the volume up 100% higher than it needs to. Before you pick up that bat and destroy the tv simply get out of the house. That's the why, here's the how.  5 min version  Let's say you feel you can't really leave. If you really think this is something you'd like to do I would suggest seeing if there aren't 5 minutes in your day where things would be ok if you weren't there. If not, ask yourself if it is because your loved one needs you or you are scared to leave? Not in an effort to judge but to understand why you feel you can't leave. If you do find 5 minutes you might not be needed then try being out of the house for two minutes. Just step out the door and walk in one direction for one minute and then turn around. As you feel more comfortable you can try going out for longer. If you can't get away for that long the option for you would be to open the front door of your house and focus on what is outside. Stand there. Maybe you do this when you grab your coffee in the morning, or while you are waiting for lunch or dinner to finish. Find a time you would be by the door every day and see if you can take a minute to stand there and notice what is right outside. You can always do this with a window instead.  10 min version  Get out and take a walk. It doesn't need to be fast. You don't have to wear workout clothes to do it. Just get out and walk away from the house for 5 minutes and then turn around. Can the walk be longer or shorter? Of course. Also, take into mind the safety of your surroundings, the weather, and please don't wear all black if you're going out in the dark. Ask yourself after the first time if you enjoyed it and could you do it every day? Be honest with yourself. If not every day then maybe a couple of times a week or a month but that would mean this isn't the thing you do daily for yourself.  Maybe you find out you feel free when you go out for a short walk. Maybe this is the time you get to think through things. A time for you to be alone. Maybe even a time to listen to a short podcast or music. This short break could end up being something you get excited about every day but you won't know if you don't try it.  30 min version This might be something you don't do every day but it's worth mentioning because I know it feels good to do. Take a drive or take a long walk somewhere. Maybe you drive to a park or a place that has a scenic view and you just sit there for a couple of minutes. My favorite is to drive to grab some coffee. I turn my favorite music up loud in the car and I sing as loudly as I want. Or if classical music is your jam I'm with ya. Make this all about you and not about any chores or errands you need to do.  Longer Of course you can do any of these things for longer periods of time. What we're focussing on here is a daily activity you can integrate into your day. Keep that in mind. If there are things you would love to try but you know you wouldn't do every day by all means make a note of it and do it when you can. We are just working on slowing down with the options I am giving you today. Both of these forms of self-care are free. You don't need anything to do them. In fact, the first one is about doing absolutely nothing. While doing nothing for a couple of minutes or sticking your head out of the door may seem inconsequential I challenge you to try them.  For those of us who feel like we always need to be doing something to prove our worth, stopping is the best thing to do. It helps you catch up with how you are feeling and gives you the opportunity to see if there are things that you need to do for yourself that you've been too busy to notice. Slowing down allows your nervous system to take a break. Feeling that constant underlying stress and anxiety is not sustainable long term but you probably already know that.  I know it's difficult to do things for yourself. Even thinking about taking some time for your own self-care can be uncomfortable. Next week I am going to share two more ways you can bring self-care into your day and why your self-care is important for the person you care for.  For now, take a moment to think through how this isn't about you being selfish. Caring for yourself is about keeping you healthy, mentally and physically. It doesn't require you to buy or go anywhere if you don't want to. You just have to find the thing that will work for you and that you will do every day. Try just stopping. Maybe after listening to this you turn it off and sit in silence for a moment or maybe you go for a walk or stand outside for a bit.  Experience these two things and see if it is possible for you to do and if it is something you'd actually do. Then next week there will be a new set of two things to try.  If you want any feedback or have questions feel free to send me an email or ask in the FB group. These links are in the show notes at www.loveyourcaregivinglife.com

Scotland Outdoors
Slowing Your Roll with Travel Blogger and Podcaster Kathi Kamleitner

Scotland Outdoors

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 28:17


Helen Needham goes for a walk with Kathi Kamleitner of the Watch Me See Travel Blog.

What’s Next with Lisa Scott
Personal Growth

What’s Next with Lisa Scott

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 45:37


In this episode, Lisa walks you through how to reframe your thoughts and achieve personal growth. Slowing things down and celebrating yourself is ok and a pre requisite of personal growth! email your questions or show topic ideas to whatsnextwithlisa@gmail.com or check Lisa out on instagram @whatsnextwithlisa or twitter @whatsnxtlisaSupport the show (http://paypal.me/tworiverscounsel)

The Innovative Mindset
How Slowing Down Can Help You Go Faster

The Innovative Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 19:03


In this week's show, I explore how slowing down can help you get more productive and creative. It's counterintuitive, I know. We tend to think that to achieve more, we have to do more. But oh my stars, that isn't always true. Do you have to do something? Sure. Do you have to do everything? Nope. Here's how you can get more attention so you can give more attention. First, try the one-minute breathwork assessment. Try it for a week. Note how you feel before you do this 53-second exercise and then note how you feel afterward. You can find the video on the Back To Basics Meditation page. You'll also find a link to an easy little assessment you can do for yourself. You'll see the proof with your own eyes. It's super easy. Click the link to the document. Make a copy of it for your own use (Go to File and select Make a Copy) Enter how you feel (the date and time will appear automatically right next to your feeling). Do the super short activity video. Enter how you feel (the date and time you do it will appear again) After a week or two, evaluate the difference. I'm betting you'll see one. Here's what the document looks like. Get in touch and let me know what differences you notice in how you feel before and after. I'd love to hear from you. Connect with me https://www.instagram.com/izoldat/ https://www.instagram.com/innovativemindsetpodcast/ https://twitter.com/IzoldaT https://www.linkedin.com/in/izoldat/ https://IzoldaT.com https://podcast.izoldat.com Episode Transcript [00:00:00] That's one of the best reasons to slow down. You begin to notice things again, instead of letting them streak by you. You actually have enough attention to pay attention. [00:00:16] Hello, and welcome to the innovative mindset podcast. Izolda Trakhtenberg on the show. I interview peak performing innovators in the creative social impact and earth conservation spaces or working to change the world. This episode is brought to you by brain FM, brain FM combines the best of music and neuroscience to help you relax, focus, meditate, and even sleep. [00:00:36] I love it and have been using it to write, create and do. Deepest work because you're a listener of the show. You can get a free trial head over to brain.fm/innovative mindset. To check it out. If you decide to subscribe, you can get 20% off with the coupon code, innovative mindset, all one word. And now let's get to the show.[00:01:00] [00:01:01] Hey there and welcome to the innovative mindset podcast. My name is Izolda Trakhtenberg, I'm super thrilled that you're here and I'm excited to talk to you about this week's topic. It's about a surprising thing that you can do to increase your overall productivity, creativity, and sense of wellbeing. And here's the surprising thing it's slowing down. [00:01:25] I believe that we're so busy with what we should be doing, that we don't really think about what we want to be doing. And I'm recording this episode the day after the big Facebook, WhatsApp, Instagram crash, or whatever it is that happened. And it was amazing to me how often mindlessly, I was going to Facebook and to Instagram to check in, even though I knew. [00:01:50] But there was nothing going on there that there was nobody that the sites were down, but it didn't seem to matter. There was a mindless sort of, oh, let me see what's going on. [00:02:00] And so when I slowed down a little bit and started thinking about it, it changed a lot. For me, it changed how I was looking at. [00:02:10] Downtime, slowing down time. And, and the question to ask is what if you took that time, how would it be? What might you do if you were slowing down? Would it be okay? Does it work. Are you feeling pressured and pushed into directions? You don't want to go and therefore don't really take the time. Right. So, so let me ask you, what did you do with the time that you couldn't be on those platforms yesterday? [00:02:38] I mean, I spent more time on Twitter, but I also spent more time looking at the cool art on the walls of the study room at the New York public library, which is where I spent the day where. And I see, I find a need, a change of venue to create as well as my trusted brain FM app. I have to admit that, but yeah, I take the time to [00:03:00] go take the subway and go to the library and I go outside of my home. [00:03:06] So I use the subway ride to chill out and I used to try to listen to podcasts or send emails or read emails, but I've stopped doing that because I can't hear much because of how loud it is. And it's hard to write. So nowadays, when I ride on the subway, I daydream, I imagine I come up with new ideas or even. [00:03:24] I meditate. And how hilarious is it to spend 20 minutes in deep meditation and forget where you are to open your eyes and see a guy speaking with deep love to his cup of coffee, surrounded by people in various stages of napping or yapping, but it lets me be here now. And that's a cool place to be. The other day, I noticed the core graffiti, some enterprising artist has painted in the dark tunnels in the space between stops. [00:03:49] There are miles of darkness and there are sometimes small lights that punctuate the darkness to sort of illuminate the space maybe for workers or something like that. And someone or [00:04:00] a number of someone's painted cool art right below the lights on one of the lines. You see a sort of movie unfold as you look at the lid spots. [00:04:07] Two people meet, try to be romantic decide they can't be, and instead become friends. And I'm not sure if it's there still, because since periodically someone from the subway comes along and paints over the art to base it black, but it's super cool when you notice it. And if I didn't take the time to slow down, I would have never noticed it. [00:04:26] And that's one of the best reasons to slow down. You begin to notice things again, instead of letting them streak by you, you actually have enough attention to pay attention. And I wouldn't see any of that if I didn't slow down and I love art where you find it, right, art, illuminates life for us, it highlights the bizarre, the fun, the tragic, the on inspiring the human condition. [00:04:52] And so when you take the time to slow down even a little bit, you get to take in. All of this other amazing and cool [00:05:00] stuff. And it also gives you time to imagine, to get new ideas, new thoughts, new insights. So I wanted to talk to you a little bit about different ways to slow down. My favorite of course is meditation, but you don't have to do that unless you want to. [00:05:15] And I'm going to talk to you a little bit more about that in a sec. You can doodle, you can daydream, you can take time off social, right. And taking time off social does something very interesting. It helps you stop consuming content. So your brain is more free to create it. And I don't mean create content for necessarily posting on social media or whatever, but creating new ideas, new creative ways of doing something. [00:05:41] Thinking about something of what you're going to cook for dinner. It doesn't matter what, what the creation is. It lets you be creative. Instead of watching other people be creative or listening to other people be creative. And it also helps you stop the comparison game, right? It gives your eyes and your ears arrest. [00:05:57] It helps you stop comparing your life to. [00:06:00] Because you're the only person living your life. You're the only person telling your story. So giving yourself permission to do that is an incredible thing. And one of the ways to do that is to take a little time to slow down and not consume content as much as so many of us do myself included. [00:06:16] Right. It also resets your mind, right? So going for a slow walk, it gives you time to sort of breathe and be and chill out and you can also do. One minute slow down to breathe, right? It's a way of filling the, well, it gives you the opportunity to do that. Very thing to just sort of go, okay, that's it. [00:06:36] I'm going to slow down and. I'm going to give you a mission, right? If you meditate, keep doing that. If you don't consider starting, and I'm going to talk to you about that right now. So how do you start? If you, if you don't meditate, how do you start doing it? How do you get into that space? Well, I've created a start where you are a meditation and that's great. [00:06:58] If you're already set, if you [00:07:00] already know where you are, that's terrific. But if you don't, if you're a little bit lost, then it becomes tougher to figure out exactly what to do and how to do it. And this is where I come in. So meditation, why, why do people meditate? We've sort of talked a little bit just about that earlier. [00:07:17] Right? Slowing down is beautiful, but it also, there are lots of reasons, right? If you're a monkey, you might do it because it's a way of getting closer to God or closer to whatever you hold sacred. If you're a lay person, you might want to do it because you want a greater sense of peace in your life. A greater sense of patience, a little bit more stability, that kind of thing. [00:07:33] And that's the whole point, since we're talking about how you can be more productive and creative. Yeah. Slow down. Meditation helps with that because it gives you space in your mind and your body and your heart and your soul to have that well, be filled with something that's positive and creative and maybe even productive, but at the very least positive and creative. [00:07:54] So there are lots of different reasons. There are people, like I said, who use meditation for [00:08:00] opening up their creative channels. Some people use it for developing better relationships, you know, with yourself as well as with other people in your life. For me, meditation has been about being creative without meditation. [00:08:11] I wouldn't have read it written seven books, but it's also about learning about yourself, you know? What the lessons are that you need to learn to know yourself better and to also be connected to something greater than yourself. If you, if you take that time, in my case, if you knowing myself better, that's about the earth and all the critters on the earth. [00:08:33] Right. But it could be whatever it is that makes you feel like you're connected. It's also way first and foremost, for me to get back into myself, finding that space within me, that helps me reset. And especially if I'm. I use a lot of breathing techniques to help with that, to help with being stressed, to help with releasing some of that Trent stress or anxiety. [00:08:56] I feel with my history, I have a lot of reasons [00:09:00] to be anxious. And I work through that often because as a, as a survivor of child abuse, as an immigrant, as someone who lived in a war zone, as someone who overcame a huge public speaking phobia, there are lots of reasons for me to be. And sometimes that anxiety rears its ugly head. [00:09:19] And I need to have tools in my toolbox to figure out how to deal with it and how to release the anxiety and as much as possible, the stress, right? That's the whole point of that. But again, it depends on who you are and what you want out of it, but a lot of it is going to end up, use it for what works for you. [00:09:39] If meditation is something that works for you, it's going to work for you. If it doesn't. Then my suggestion is. Keep trying until it does, but you're going to have to make your own way. Whatever meditation means to be. There are some tried and true techniques that work, there are some tried and true techniques that you start with. [00:09:55] And in the show notes, I'll, I'll give you a link to a meditation. That's [00:10:00] all about. The really simple breathing exercise and your mission to begin a very easy practice. It does not have to be a huge, I'm going to sit for half an hour, a day kind of thing. It just doesn't to begin with. You can do something very simple and very easy, and there are lots of different ways to meditate. [00:10:20] And we're going to talk about that in the weeks to come, but at its root, most of the time meditation is going to have some sort of breath work. When we do that, right? It's going to be with just simple breath work and, and meditation exercise. And as you develop your practice, you're going to have to see what works for you, because what I'm doing might not work. [00:10:44] There are apps you can use. There's calm and Headspace and balance. And my current favorite brain FM, there's listening to music. Vegging out as long as you've edge out without falling asleep, that's kind of meditative. And in fact, I dare say that there are gurus out there, [00:11:00] meditation teachers out there who would say that if you do anything mindfully that washing dishes can become a meditation, Allah tech, not Hahn, certainly something like Tai Chi is a moving meditation. [00:11:10] Things like that. There are lots and lots of different ways to meditate and that I'm developing and I'm going to be releasing meditation packs of different sorts of meditation in the coming weeks. But for today, we're just going to do a very back to basics kind of thing. Right. We're going to just breathe and that's your mission, right? [00:11:30] So here's, here's what I'm going to ask you to do in the show notes. There's a link to a little YouTube meditation that I developed. That's all about breathing. Very purposefully if you will, for even less than a minute. And here's the mission, the mission is that I'm going to ask you to go to the Google doc that I have. [00:11:55] There are two things to do here. I know more than one is, can be confusing, but the reason I'm [00:12:00] doing this, because there are two different things for you to do here, right? Developing an assessment or evaluating for yourself, how you feel before you meditate and how you feel after you meditate. And since breathwork is the root of meditation, we are going to do a very simple breathing meditation that takes less than a minute, but here's the thing. [00:12:24] If you go to the Google doc and you can see the image of what the Google doc looks like in the show notes, if you go to the Google doc, there's a little thing that says, how do I. And you're going to make a copy of that Google doc. So you can do this for yourself and you're going to write out how you feel. [00:12:42] Do you feel stressed? Do you feel anxious? Do you feel good? Do you feel hungry? How do you feel? And then. Once you do that a little date and timestamps is going to show up. And once that date and timestamp shows up, that's the before, right. And then do the breathing exercise in that little YouTube video. [00:12:59] So click [00:13:00] on that link and you're going to see that that actually gives you another sort of minute of that breath work that we were just talking about. And after you've done with that, go back to that Google doc and then. Type in how you feel now. So you're going to have a, before I do the breath work and after I do the breath work kind of thing happening, and the link to the YouTube video that does this little 53 seconds of meditation is right there in the Google docs. [00:13:31] So all you need to do is go to the Google doc, go to. Got to make a copy, make a copy. Cause you can't add anything into the, into that file so that lots of people can use it, but then you'll get a way of assessing for yourself. Does it make a difference? Right. I'm very practical when it comes to this stuff. [00:13:47] I love having the notion of does it make a difference and can I measure it? So that is what we're going to do. Right. [00:14:00] And w the way to look at meditation to begin with is that right? You, you have to give yourself permission to stop the rush every once in a while, take a minute and breathe. And so that's what this, this sort of test for yourself is going to be right. [00:14:17] You're going to write down how you feel beforehand, and then you're going to write down how you feel afterward, just so that you can have this notion of. Breathing and meditating and see if it makes any kind of difference for you. Try it for a week and note any differences for yourself. And I'm going to bet that you can just see some and you'll notice how much even a minute of sewing down will help you feel better and think better. [00:14:43] And if you decide that you want to go even further, then I'm going to invite you to go to yet a third thing to do. I can't believe I'm putting so many things in the show notes here. But there's a, there's a back-to-basics meditation that you can grab for yourself. And it's just just an MP3 file of me [00:15:00] talking you through this back to basics meditation. [00:15:03] What does it take to get to very, very beginning of breath work and you can feel free to grab it. It's yours for the keeping it's right there on that page. You can just grab it. And in fact, what I think I'm going to do now that I think about it is I'm going to put the link to that Google doc and the link to that YouTube meditation right there, so that you can have all three in one place. [00:15:26] And you'll notice that one of the things that happens when you do this before and after. Breathing assessment. You're going to notice changes in how you view everything. And once you notice those changes, you're also going to notice that you have more awareness to some of that, that stuff that let's use slow down, and some of the stuff that's going on around you, that you've been too busy and too stressed to notice. [00:15:48] That's really cool and really beautiful. So I'm going to invite you to do that and see. What it does for your productivity, because if you approach this stuff from that place of, I feel [00:16:00] peaceful and I don't feel stressed and rushed, you won't forget things as much. You'll have an easier time completing things. [00:16:06] You'll have an easier time of conceptualizing things, which means you're going to be able to see the whole picture, which is a beautiful thing when you're trying. Productivity to be part of your life. And you'll also see inspiration. And that's where that creativity thing, that creativity piece for me happens most when I slowed down enough to see it, to pay attention to it when it happens. [00:16:28] So if I, if I believe, and I do that, that innovation happens when. Someone who's creative sees a problem that they can solve and comes up with this really cool creative way of doing it. That's innovation. Well, if you want to innovate, if you want to create something, no one's ever created before first, you have to have the mental and sort of heart emotional space. [00:16:52] To be open to the inspiration, which is what a really easy, simple meditation practice will allow you to do. I hope that [00:17:00] you've enjoyed today's episode. I know that it's a lot of stuff to think about. Please head over to the back to basics meditation page it's is old, a t.com/back to basics. Made it back to basics meditation. [00:17:12] Oops. I said the wrong URL is older t.com/back to basics meditation. There, you will be able to find a Google doc that lets you do that. Evaluation the link to the YouTube video. That is the less than a minute of breathing. That's the thing to do when you're doing the before and after, and also the back-to-basics meditation, the exact, how the heck do you start a meditation that will help you? [00:17:38] Into that space of breath, breath, work, and breathing. I hope you've enjoyed the episode. I'd love for you to let me know what you think. If you're doing this for a week or even a few days, and you notice a difference, please let me know. Drop me a line is older@hisoldat.com. And if you're enjoying the episodes themselves, please rate and review the show, tell a friend [00:18:00] about the work that we're doing here and the cool stuff that we're exploring until next time I remind you to listen, learn, laugh, and. [00:18:07] A whole lot. [00:18:13] Thanks so much for joining me today. I really appreciate you being here. Please subscribe to the podcast if you're new and if you like what you're hearing, please review it and rate it and let other people know. And if you'd like to be a sponsor of the show, I'd love to meet you on patrion.com/innovative mindset. [00:18:31] I also have lots of exclusive goodies to share just with the show supporters. Today's episode was produced by Izolda Trakhtenberg and his copyright 2021 as always. Please remember, this is for educational and entertainment purposes. Only past performance does not guarantee future results, although we can always hope until next time, keep living in your innovative mindset.[00:19:00]  

The Permaculture Podcast
Shantree Kacera – The Living Centre

The Permaculture Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021


We can expect change to occur continuously throughout our lives. We're likely to call several places home. Friends will come and go. We'll move between jobs multiple times and likely even switch career paths. As permaculture practitioners, in the landscape, we play with change. Slowing succession in some places of our design, advancing it in […] The post Shantree Kacera – The Living Centre appeared first on The Permaculture Podcast.

Elevating Motherhood
128. Going Grey: The Ups & Downs of Growing Out My Natural Hair at 40

Elevating Motherhood

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 38:42


My hair may be changing, but so am I. Growing out my grey is about soooooooo much more than hair. A year in, I'm more genuinely confident –that doesn't mean I love every day, but my gosh, I see the growth literally and figuratively. I see the beauty and the potential. Maybe it's because I'm a mom, but I know how quickly this transition will fly by, even if it takes years. In this episode I talk about: · Why I'm growing out my grey · Shout out to my hairdresser Tiana · How it all started · How it's going · Vanity · Non-toxic shift · Primally Pure · The ups & downs of growing out my grey · Reflection · Self acceptance · Slowing down · The slow process of growing out my grey · Detachment · Understanding my whys behind my choice · Other people's reactions to my decision · Feeling “old” or looking “old” with grey hair · The disbelief of others that I'm actually doing it · Obvious disapproval of others · Insults—intentional or not · The people who love it · Authenticity · How others have inspired me · How I've kept that ripple of inspiration going · Deep, instant connections · “You know you could just dye it” reactions · Why others choose to grow their grey · Months of unfolding · Endless support of Silver Sisters · #silversisters · #grombre · #growingoutmygrey · #greyhair · #grayhair · #silverhair · #greyhairmovement · Two funny stories about growing out my grey · Brad Paisley's song “Then” · Fertility = youth · Different perspectives on aging

Flatirons Syndicate Motorsports Podcast
Episode 049: Are Your Brakes Just Slowing You Down?

Flatirons Syndicate Motorsports Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 58:54


Jon, Ryan and Scotty sit down to talk about how the last NASA Rocky Mountain event went at High Plains Raceway. When you are building a car to compete in a specific class, it is natural that your focus would be the cars and drivers that you are competing against. What Scotty and Ryan discovered was that sometimes taking a look at what is going on in other similar classes can be enlightening, too. That change of perspective can give you some ideas of new things to try as well as new benchmarks for how competitive your car actually is. Scotty and Ryan are usually focused on the NASA Time Trials classes, but the classes that got their attention this weekend were GTS2 (German Touring Sedan) and GTS3. These are typically BMWs that have lower power-to-weight limits in their class (14:1 in GTS2, 10:1 in TT3) and these cars race wheel-to-wheel. There is no guarantee that they will even get a clean lap. But with all that, those cars would dominate the class they would fit in for Time Trials. This led to two important realizations: First, that it can really help to run a car in a class where there is a clearly tried and tested upgrade path, with parts that are known to be effective, and second, that sometimes your brakes are just slowing you down. Thanks for listening! And thank you for your support. We hope you enjoy this episode, and #staytuned.

Dogs Are Smarter Than People: Writing Life, Marriage and Motivation
Invisible Disability Requires A Different Kind of Bravery for One Author

Dogs Are Smarter Than People: Writing Life, Marriage and Motivation

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 7:28


IT'S BE BRAVE FRIDAY WHERE SHAUN OR I (FROM DOGS ARE SMARTER THAN PEOPLE AND LOVING THE STRANGE AND JUST BEING AN AUTHOR IN MAINE) SHARE PEOPLE'S UNEDITED, UNFILTERED STORIES, SO WE CAN ALL CELEBRATE THE BIG AND LITTLE BRAVE THINGS WE DO ALL THE TIME. SOMETIMES WE DON'T EVEN REALIZE WE'RE BEING BRAVE. This Be Brave Friday story is from the wonderful and brave and cool and talented Lenka Vodicka who writes the Forest Fairy Craft books, which you should check out! Here's Lenka's story. I was a mellow baby that slept a lot. Then I was a clumsy child that fell a lot. Then I was diagnosed with a genetic disease called Charcot (pronounced shar-co) Marie Tooth (CMT) which has nothing to do with teeth. It's named after the three doctors that discovered it. CMT is also called hereditary neuropathy. CMT is a glitch in the genetic code that causes nerve damage, muscle weakness, balance issues, and fatigue. It's degenerative, meaning it worsens over time. There is no treatment, other than bracing and corrective surgery that may or may not work. And there is no cure. I have CMT for life. CMT symptoms can vary widely, even within a family. Some people have mild symptoms that are barely noticeable into their 80s, while others have multiple surgeries and use wheelchairs as children. My case was in the mild category for a long time. I couldn't wear flip-flops, or scramble up rock climbing walls, but most people had no idea that I dealt with any disease at all. I could be normal. My challenges were usually invisible. Situations like mine, where challenges are not easily seen, may be called invisible disabilities. Then, one day, that changed too. My feet hurt. Every day. Every hour of the day. Every minute of the hour. They ached like someone dropped a book on them. And they didn't stop hurting. Fingers went numb. I never considered myself disabled before. The word was serious and full of baggage from sad movies. Facing the reality of my situation required a leap of bravery in itself. I wanted to run towards “normal” as fast as possible. Slowing down, facing my limits, and then asking, “How can I help myself? How can I make my life easier in this moment?” was big work. I changed jobs and got a disabled placard for my car. Then the real bravery began. Because having an invisible disability means that every single time I ask for accommodations, I have to call on my inner brave self. Because my bravery is the opposite of heroes that step up to a moment of decisive action. It's the opposite of heroines volunteering for a mighty quest. It's the opposite of saying, “I think I can, I think I can. I believe in myself.” My bravery is “No.” My bravery is approaching random staff person at a concert or event to ask if there is an alternative line or somewhere to sit that doesn't involve steep stairs. Sometimes the information is online, but that doesn't always translate to the location. And I've even had staff say, “I don't know why the website says that.” And because my disability is invisible, not apparent on first glance, I never know how they will react. Some staff say they have no idea. They need to radio another person that's not answering the walkie-talkie. Or I give a museum feedback that more benches would be great, to hear, “Well, we want people to keep moving.” Trust me, I'd love to keep moving. I've heard many times that, “if we accommodate you, then everyone would want that too.” Again, trust me, they don't want CMT. I've had a few meltdowns when a staff member insists that everyone must follow the same rules. I've missed events and left venues because the walk or the line wasn't worth the pain that I would manage for days afterwards. So why be brave? Why bother standing up to the hassle of disrupting the day for my friends, and the potentially embarrassing conversation, for nothing? Because, other times, bravery makes all the difference. Amusement parks became fun again. My niece said, “We need to come with auntie every time,” because we could stand to the side and enter though the exit instead of standing in winding lines for hours. I got to sit at concerts on a balcony where I could actually see the show instead of sitting in a sea of dancers. I've been able to drive to locations accessible only by trail unless you required disabled access. We avoid crowds and steep stairs. We park closer to the entrances or exits. Asking for support makes adventures attainable again. Bravery can be saying, “not today, thank you.” Bravery can be found in little moments. In the decision to tell your friends that the hike is too steep. In researching accessibility options before booking a room or campsite. In holding your deep truth. And asking for what you need. Bravery is accepting your limits, then finding ways to help yourself thrive. Now, I am a unique mom that loves adventures. And I look forward to many, many more. BE A PART OF OUR MISSION! Hey! We're all about inspiring each other to be weird, to be ourselves and to be brave and we're starting to collect stories about each other's bravery. Those brave moments can be HUGE or small, but we want you to share them with us so we can share them with the world. You can be anonymous if you aren't brave enough to use your name. It's totally chill. Want to be part of the team? Send us a quick (or long) email and we'll read it here and on our YouTube channel. LET'S HANG OUT! HEY! DO YOU WANT TO SPEND MORE TIME TOGETHER? MAYBE TAKE A COURSE, CHILL ON SOCIAL MEDIA, BUY ART OR A BOOK, OR LISTEN TO OUR PODCAST? Email us at carriejonesbooks@gmail.com HELP US AND DO AN AWESOME GOOD DEED Thanks to all of you who keep listening to our weirdness on the DOGS ARE SMARTER THAN PEOPLE podcast and our new LOVING THE STRANGE podcast. We're sorry we laugh so much… sort of. Please share it and subscribe if you can. Please rate and like us if you are feeling kind, because it matters somehow. There's a new episode every Tuesday! Thanks so much for being one of the 263,000 downloads if you've given us a listen! One of our newest LOVING THE STRANGE podcasts is about the strange and adorably weird things people say? And one of our newest DOGS ARE SMARTER THAN PEOPLE episode is about fear setting and how being swallowed by a whale is bad ass. And Carrie has new books out! Yay! You can order now! It's an adult mystery/thriller that takes place in Bar Harbor, Maine. Read an excerpt here! The people who kill It's my book! It came out June 1! Boo-yah! Another one comes out July 1. And that one is called  THOSE WHO SURVIVED, which is the first book in the the DUDE GOODFEATHER series.  I hope you'll read it, like it, and buy it! The Dude Goodfeather Series - YA mystery by NYT bestseller Carrie Jones TO TELL US YOUR BRAVE STORY JUST EMAIL BELOW. Submit a form.

She Gathers Beauty | Living Your Wildly Naked Truth
Don't Be So Careful: What if that was your last kiss?

She Gathers Beauty | Living Your Wildly Naked Truth

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 23:25


What are you growing into?  What do you long to embody? What if something you experienced was the last time you'd experience it? What if the last kiss you had was the last one? And what if it wasn't but you let yourself remember that everything will change—how would you bring your whole self into the next kiss? Into grief and sadness? Into this moment? Into whatever you love? Appreciating being here. What can you find home in right now? Being rearranged, knowing the sacredness of it, even when it doesn't feel that way. Inviting the breath in, letting it show you the way with its elegant rhythm, moving in and out.  If you pick one thing to wear today that would represent how you want to live into this moment like it's the last moment, what would it be? Your favorite shirt? A piece of jewelry? An essential oil? Choose comfort and ceremony. How will you wear your love? Slowing down and growing into the journey of this life. Letting longing be birthed as a spark from within.  Getting acquainted with the fire of our soul.  The practice of living your wildly naked truth. Remembering to trust. And the trust in remembering. I share the poem Deep Violets, Wild Pines. Where can you let go of being so careful and live your you-ness now. Seek it out. What would living more wildly look like? Begin a new alchemy. “Wear your love like perfume.” Saturday, October 23rd, join me for Permission, a luscious and sacred virtual retreat. https://www.shegathersbeauty.com/booking/three-divine-doors If you'd like to receive invitations to special offerings and love notes from me, visit www.shegathersbeauty.com to sign up for my weekly newsletter. As soon as you land on the home page, a little note will pop up and you can sign up there.  

Everyday Strong Radio
093 Slowing Down to Speed Up

Everyday Strong Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 23:53


Has anyone else been having issue after issue come up the last few weeks? Astrologists say Mercury in retrograde can be a time of tension, miscommunication, and mishaps. Whether it's Mercury in retrograde or just a week that will not give you a break, we all need tools to help us get through the tough times. Slowing down to speed up is a way to step back from the problem long enough to detach ourselves from the thoughts that are holding us back or keeping us frantic. Join me on this week's episode to figure out how to put Slowing Down to Speed Up into practice in your life.

Entrepreneur Hour with Chris Michael Harris
EP 336: Is FATIGUE Slowing You Down in Your Business? DO THIS! w/Chase Chewning

Entrepreneur Hour with Chris Michael Harris

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 53:39


Chase Chewning is a renowned Health and Wellness Coach. Connect with Chase: https://chasechewning.com/   **If you have enjoyed listening to today's episode, please don't forget to subscribe, rate, and leave us feedback!   Connect with me on facebook.com/HeyCMH/ youtube.com/c/StartupU @HeyCMH  

Off the Rails with James & Jess
Slowing it Down: Talking Domestic Violence Month

Off the Rails with James & Jess

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 80:09


We liked to talk a bit on the fast side, but others are not fans. We are all about the people so we work on slowing things down. Today we talk Domestic Violence month. But it cant all be gloom and sadness, so we end the day with a little "Would you rather?" Follow us on Socials James Twitter @themrjamesking Instagram @jjhking82 Jess: Instagram @theprincesssjess Twitter @jessthescore

The Accountability Coach: Business Acceleration|Productivity
5 Time Management Skills To Master Right Now

The Accountability Coach: Business Acceleration|Productivity

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 10:23


Developing time management skills enables you to accomplish high-level goals that accelerate your business success. Time remains our most valuable resource. The most successful professionals master their time utilization, so their "hours worked" align with meaningful objectives. These time management skills guide seasoned professionals in their craft. So, the five time management skills you want to master are: 1. Schedule Calls Within Time Blocks Business professionals love to hear the phone ringing. A prospect, partner, or client resides on the other line, waiting for you to pick up the phone. However, fielding calls throughout the day can present a problem. If you spend too much time fielding all your calls, you will not have enough time for outreach and building your brand. Hiring someone on your team to field calls for you greatly alleviates this issue, if you don't already have someone in place. The person answering the phone can schedule a time for you to call back the prospect or handle the entire call themselves, so you don't have to. Connecting with colleagues and people in your local area on Linked-in and asking for introductions to potential clients expands your pipeline. Taking calls throughout the day limits your ability to perform these activities. Scattering your calls throughout the day will give you little time to embrace deep work for your other objectives. Scheduling your calls within a time block gives you set hours to get into the flow with other activities. Setting a time block is one of the best time management skills to master. This practice cultivates deep work, which is an essential element of highly successful professionals. Some of the most productive people in the world swear by time blocking. Ever heard of Elon Musk, Bill Gates, Michael Hyatt, or Cal Newport? Yep – all time-blockers. They're squeezing every drop of productivity from their days, and you can do the same. 2. Identify and Prioritize Your KPIs (Key Performance Indicators) Time blocking gives you a scheduling framework to input activities. We all know specific tasks deserve more attention than others, but which tasks deserve the most attention for your business? Rather than take a guess, let your KPIs guide you. Decide the vital KPIs for your business and prioritize work that matches up with your KPIs. Revenue growth and profitability are two common KPIs. Professionals focusing on these KPIs would focus on activities that bring in revenue and increase profit margins. Digging deeper into general KPIs such as revenue growth and profitability gives you further clarity on your priorities. If you make the bulk of your revenue through specific products or services, prioritize activities that effectively fill up your pipeline with the greatest opportunities. If connecting with people on Linked-in more effectively fills up your pipeline than writing industry articles, then you should obviously prioritize Linked-in over articles. 3. Put Less Work On Your Plate When you identify KPIs, it gets easier to implement other time management skills. One of those skills is putting less work on your plate. Many professionals make the mistake of seeing a busy calendar as a successful one. Rather than focus on how many hours they work, successful professionals fill their calendars with impactful activities that are the highest payoff. Pursuing fewer tasks gives them more time to focus on what most contributes to the bottom line. Review all of the work you perform in a given day, week, and month. How many activities produce negligible results? How many activities lead to incredible results? According to Pareto's Principle, 80% of our results come from 20% of our work. Discover the few activities that yield most of your results. Then, phase out the many activities that only lead to 20% of your results. 4. Slow Down To Speed Up Slowing down to speed up is one of the most underrated time management skills. If you speed up and always keep yourself busy, you will eventually hit a productivity roadblock. Slowing down your workday with mini breaks allows you to recharge. A quick walk, exercise routine, or meal away from the screen goes a long way in refueling your mental state. Before important races, runners slow down their mileage and workout paces. They don't burn themselves out leading up to a race. This level of preparation gives runners plenty of additional energy to thrive on race day. There is a time and place to work extra hours. However, there is also a time to slow down. Mini-breaks and vacations help you with slowing down. Not only do professionals temporarily slow down via mini breaks but also by reviewing their businesses. Most professionals make the mistake of staying busy without asking themselves if they're taking an optimized approach. Taking a step back from your business to review operations will help you understand if you're moving in the right direction. This review will help with prioritizing your time and addressing essential items. 5. Track Your Time Even if you apply the other time management skills, you can't improve in areas you don't actively track. Tracking your time allows you to spot opportunities for improvement. You can use a time management app like Toggl, for one example, to document the time you spend on each activity. Tracking your time allows you to see if your time management strategies are working rather than guessing. Professionals strive to remove as much guessing as possible from their success. In a survey of business professionals, when asked, they consistently feel they waste approximately 2 hours a day, which translates to 10 hours a week, etc. Let's not focus on how much time is actually wasted as the focus needs to be on what you can do with the wasted time to generate even more money, work less, or do other things you really want to do. Use a time log to help you know where you are actually spending your time during the day. Periodically use this time log for a 2-week period of time to help you continue to be time efficient. This tool can be utilized by everyone on your team at the same time. Talk about what you realized at the end of the 2 weeks and how you can get even better with managing time. Think about it for a minute. When you track what you eat, you watch more of what you put in your mouth as it has to go on a food log that someone else will be reviewing and helping you be better at nutrition. The same works when you apply it to your valuable time. You think twice about doing activities that aren't moving you forward because you have to write them down. To download my complimentary Time Log Exercise and help you and your team members be even more time efficient, so you are in a higher probability position to achieve your goals, go to: https://www.accountabilitycoach.com/time-log/. Simple instructions come with the exercise to help you know how to complete the time log. Time management is vital for any business professional's success. Make sure you prioritize these time management skills to master your time utilization, so you can accelerate your business results and enjoy having your ideal business and your ideal life. If you are getting value from any of Podcasts, please take a minute to leave me a short rating and review. I would really appreciate it, and love to hear from you. Aim for what you want each and every day! Anne Bachrach The Accountability Coach™ The Results Accelerator™ To help you stay focused and on track to achieving your goals, check out these other high-value resources. - Subscribe to my high-value business success tips and resources Blog https://www.accountabilitycoach.com/blog/) - Subscribe to my YouTube channel with business success principles (https://www.youtube.com/annebachrach) - Connect with me on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/TheAccountabilityCoach) - Connect with me on Linked-in (https://www.linkedin.com/in/annebachrach) - Connect with me on Pinterest (https://pinterest.com/resultsrule/) - Connect with me on Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/annebachrach/) Take advantage of all the complimentary business tips and tools by joining the Free Silver Membership on https://www.accountabilitycoach.com/coaching-store/inner-circle-store/. Go to https://www.accountabilitycoach.com to check out for yourself how I, as your Accountability Coach™, can help you get and stay focused on you highest payoff activities that put you in the highest probability position to achieve your professional and personal goals, so you can enjoy the kind of business and life you truly want and deserve. As an experienced accountability coach and author of 5 books, I help business professionals make more money, work less, and enjoy even better work life balance. Check out my proven business accelerator resources by going to https://www.accountabilitycoach.com/coaching-store/. Get your daily Accountability Minute shot of a single, simple, doable idea, so you can start your day off on the "right foot". You can find The Accountability Minute on https://www.accountabilitycoach.com/my-podcast/ as well as on most podcast platforms and in most English-speaking countries. Author of Excuses Don't Count; Results Rule, Live Life with No Regrets, No Excuses, and the Work Life Balance Emergency Kit, The Roadmap To Success with Stephen Covey and Ken Blanchard, and more.

Goal Setting & Achievement Podcast: Business|Productivity
5 Time Management Skills To Master Right Now

Goal Setting & Achievement Podcast: Business|Productivity

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 10:23


Developing time management skills enables you to accomplish high-level goals that accelerate your business success. Time remains our most valuable resource. The most successful professionals master their time utilization, so their "hours worked" align with meaningful objectives. These time management skills guide seasoned professionals in their craft. So, the five time management skills you want to master are: 1. Schedule Calls Within Time Blocks Business professionals love to hear the phone ringing. A prospect, partner, or client resides on the other line, waiting for you to pick up the phone. However, fielding calls throughout the day can present a problem. If you spend too much time fielding all your calls, you will not have enough time for outreach and building your brand. Hiring someone on your team to field calls for you greatly alleviates this issue, if you don't already have someone in place. The person answering the phone can schedule a time for you to call back the prospect or handle the entire call themselves, so you don't have to. Connecting with colleagues and people in your local area on Linked-in and asking for introductions to potential clients expands your pipeline. Taking calls throughout the day limits your ability to perform these activities. Scattering your calls throughout the day will give you little time to embrace deep work for your other objectives. Scheduling your calls within a time block gives you set hours to get into the flow with other activities. Setting a time block is one of the best time management skills to master. This practice cultivates deep work, which is an essential element of highly successful professionals. Some of the most productive people in the world swear by time blocking. Ever heard of Elon Musk, Bill Gates, Michael Hyatt, or Cal Newport? Yep – all time-blockers. They're squeezing every drop of productivity from their days, and you can do the same. 2. Identify and Prioritize Your KPIs (Key Performance Indicators) Time blocking gives you a scheduling framework to input activities. We all know specific tasks deserve more attention than others, but which tasks deserve the most attention for your business? Rather than take a guess, let your KPIs guide you. Decide the vital KPIs for your business and prioritize work that matches up with your KPIs. Revenue growth and profitability are two common KPIs. Professionals focusing on these KPIs would focus on activities that bring in revenue and increase profit margins. Digging deeper into general KPIs such as revenue growth and profitability gives you further clarity on your priorities. If you make the bulk of your revenue through specific products or services, prioritize activities that effectively fill up your pipeline with the greatest opportunities. If connecting with people on Linked-in more effectively fills up your pipeline than writing industry articles, then you should obviously prioritize Linked-in over articles. 3. Put Less Work On Your Plate When you identify KPIs, it gets easier to implement other time management skills. One of those skills is putting less work on your plate. Many professionals make the mistake of seeing a busy calendar as a successful one. Rather than focus on how many hours they work, successful professionals fill their calendars with impactful activities that are the highest payoff. Pursuing fewer tasks gives them more time to focus on what most contributes to the bottom line. Review all of the work you perform in a given day, week, and month. How many activities produce negligible results? How many activities lead to incredible results? According to Pareto's Principle, 80% of our results come from 20% of our work. Discover the few activities that yield most of your results. Then, phase out the many activities that only lead to 20% of your results. 4. Slow Down To Speed Up Slowing down to speed up is one of the most underrated time management skills. If you speed up and always keep yourself busy, you will eventually hit a productivity roadblock. Slowing down your workday with mini breaks allows you to recharge. A quick walk, exercise routine, or meal away from the screen goes a long way in refueling your mental state. Before important races, runners slow down their mileage and workout paces. They don't burn themselves out leading up to a race. This level of preparation gives runners plenty of additional energy to thrive on race day. There is a time and place to work extra hours. However, there is also a time to slow down. Mini-breaks and vacations help you with slowing down. Not only do professionals temporarily slow down via mini breaks but also by reviewing their businesses. Most professionals make the mistake of staying busy without asking themselves if they're taking an optimized approach. Taking a step back from your business to review operations will help you understand if you're moving in the right direction. This review will help with prioritizing your time and addressing essential items. 5. Track Your Time Even if you apply the other time management skills, you can't improve in areas you don't actively track. Tracking your time allows you to spot opportunities for improvement. You can use a time management app like Toggl, for one example, to document the time you spend on each activity. Tracking your time allows you to see if your time management strategies are working rather than guessing. Professionals strive to remove as much guessing as possible from their success. In a survey of business professionals, when asked, they consistently feel they waste approximately 2 hours a day, which translates to 10 hours a week, etc. Let's not focus on how much time is actually wasted as the focus needs to be on what you can do with the wasted time to generate even more money, work less, or do other things you really want to do. Use a time log to help you know where you are actually spending your time during the day. Periodically use this time log for a 2-week period of time to help you continue to be time efficient. This tool can be utilized by everyone on your team at the same time. Talk about what you realized at the end of the 2 weeks and how you can get even better with managing time. Think about it for a minute. When you track what you eat, you watch more of what you put in your mouth as it has to go on a food log that someone else will be reviewing and helping you be better at nutrition. The same works when you apply it to your valuable time. You think twice about doing activities that aren't moving you forward because you have to write them down. To download my complimentary Time Log Exercise and help you and your team members be even more time efficient, so you are in a higher probability position to achieve your goals, go to: https://www.accountabilitycoach.com/time-log/. Simple instructions come with the exercise to help you know how to complete the time log. Time management is vital for any business professional's success. Make sure you prioritize these time management skills to master your time utilization, so you can accelerate your business results and enjoy having your ideal business and your ideal life. If you are getting value from any of Podcasts, please take a minute to leave me a short rating and review. I would really appreciate it, and love to hear from you. Aim for what you want each and every day! Anne Bachrach The Accountability Coach™ The Results Accelerator™ To help you stay focused and on track to achieving your goals, check out these other high-value resources. - Subscribe to my high-value business success tips and resources Blog https://www.accountabilitycoach.com/blog/) - Subscribe to my YouTube channel with business success principles (https://www.youtube.com/annebachrach) - Connect with me on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/TheAccountabilityCoach) - Connect with me on Linked-in (https://www.linkedin.com/in/annebachrach) - Connect with me on Pinterest (https://pinterest.com/resultsrule/) - Connect with me on Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/annebachrach/) Take advantage of all the complimentary business tips and tools by joining the Free Silver Membership on https://www.accountabilitycoach.com/coaching-store/inner-circle-store/. Go to https://www.accountabilitycoach.com to check out for yourself how I, as your Accountability Coach™, can help you get and stay focused on you highest payoff activities that put you in the highest probability position to achieve your professional and personal goals, so you can enjoy the kind of business and life you truly want and deserve. As an experienced accountability coach and author of 5 books, I help business professionals make more money, work less, and enjoy even better work life balance. Check out my proven business accelerator resources by going to https://www.accountabilitycoach.com/coaching-store/. Get your daily Accountability Minute shot of a single, simple, doable idea, so you can start your day off on the "right foot". You can find The Accountability Minute on https://www.accountabilitycoach.com/my-podcast/ as well as on most podcast platforms and in most English-speaking countries. Author of Excuses Don't Count; Results Rule, Live Life with No Regrets, No Excuses, and the Work Life Balance Emergency Kit, The Roadmap To Success with Stephen Covey and Ken Blanchard, and more.

Family Brand: Take Back Your Family
47. Lessons From Northshore: The Pursuit Of Less

Family Brand: Take Back Your Family

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 17:54


Hey guys! Chris and Melissa here, As we approach our year mark of moving from Arizona to Hawaii, we've been thinking about the ways that we have grown and changed over the course of the last 12 months. If you pay attention, where you live can teach you a lot of lessons, and our experience has been no different.  Listen in as we share the unexpected lesson of finding fulfillment with fewer things. While materialism is a big issue, we want to emphasize that wanting a bigger house,  a better car, and more things is not inherently bad or even frowned upon. But we've gained a keen sense of awareness of the big difference between our simple life in North Shore and the frantic pace of living on the mainland. You'll hear our thoughts on how it's changed not only our physical space but also our mental and spiritual space as well.  Join us as we talk about how we quickly realized that even the small amount of things we brought are almost too much for where we are now. It's easy to get wrapped up in feeling like we don't have enough, which can put a strain on our wallets and our minds. We talk about the risk of comparing yourself to others and how that can lead to less satisfaction and more stress in your life. You'll hear our experience of making time to figure out where our values truly lie, and how that has given us more confidence, joy, and freedom as a family. If you've felt overwhelmed lately it may be time to slow down and take stock of what is taking up space in your life.  To follow our journey on Instagram, check out the links below!    More Of What's Inside: Looking at the lessons we've learned in Hawaii Moving away from materialism Pursuing experiences not things Being really clear on what you need  The risk of getting caught up in comparison Focusing on what you do have instead of what you don't Questions you can ask yourself to be more aware Slowing down and enjoying your life Finding your internal motivation Taking a second look at what you value And much more! Website:   familybrand.com    Social:   Facebook: www.facebook.com/FamilyBrandOfficial Instagram: www.instagram.com/ourfamilybrand YouTube: www.youtube.com/channel/UCGu-7odB6gkPbyXpUIQLkrg Twitter: https://twitter.com/OurFamilyBrand   Free course:   familybrand.com/10steps     Episode Minute By Minute: 0:02 - What we cover today 0:42 - Looking back at our time in Hawaii 5:37 - Finding freedom in less 10:32 - The risk of materialism 14:55 - Closing thoughts

The Agenda with Steve Paikin (Audio)
Climate Technologies To The Rescue

The Agenda with Steve Paikin (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 34:13


Slowing down emissions of CO2 will not be sufficient to contend with climate warming and its impacts. New technological interventions are needed quickly. They are expensive, controversial, and necessary. We get some insight from David Keith of Harvard University; Holly Buck of the University of Buffalo, and the University of Toronto's Marcius Extavour. If you love getting your in-depth current affairs analysis through The Agenda podcast, consider making a donation to support TVO's unique model of local journalism at www.tvo.org/supportpods. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Empowered Nutrition
The Gut Health Blueprint with Claire Carlton, MS, RD

Empowered Nutrition

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 45:06


Want a diet protocol that also addresses the gut microbiome AND mindfulness? On this week's podcast we discuss The Gut Health Blueprint framework with Claire Carlton, MS, RD! In this episode, we have a great discussion with Claire Carlton, MS, RD, a Registered Dietitian specializing in nutrition for digestive disorders. She works with women 1:1 in her virtual private practice, Nourish with Claire. As a specialist in nutrition for gastrointestinal health, she guides clients through her signature Gut Health Blueprint framework to unearth the root of chronic symptoms and help them discover lasting wellness.  With a Master's degree in Nutrition combined with additional training in the areas of integrative & Functional Medicine Nutrition and Intuitive Eating, Claire has created a holistic approach that focuses on one's relationship with food while integrating nutrition and lifestyle strategies that address the root cause of their health concerns. This method allows clients to step away from diet culture while they create mindful and sustainable habits to support their health and wellness goals. In this episode: What got Claire into nutrition: she was exposed to diabetes and healthcare from a young age and in grad school had digestive problems  Claire's Functional Nutrition training, IFNA – intro to field of functional nutrition  Her “Gut Health Blueprint” Framework (nutrition, microbiome, mindfulness) How nutrition impacts the microbiome by increasing microbe diversity The microbiome and mindfulness connection: how the Gut Brain connection (enteric nervous system) can be disrupted with TBI, stress, etc.  How mindfulness and nutrition intersect: leveraging intuitive eating and body trust The 3 pillars that must align in order to achieve digestive harmony The potential downfalls of elimination diets Not appropriate (ED, malnutrition) Lack of reintroduction plan w/ elimination diets  Microbiome diversity Nutritional inadequacy Added stress How to ID food triggers of GI dysfunction  How to maintain a healthy relationship with food during gut healing diet – use a hunger/fullness scale Mindfulness practices to aid digestion Slowing down, deep breathing Flavor features, try to identify cravings (ex: cool, crisp, crunchy) Using new or different herbs and spices Look at food before eating How Claire approaches the combination of anxiety and digestive problems Routine, Vagal nerve activation (gargling)  How to get started with mindfulness while being busy or overwhelmed Bowl or ‘Wardrobe' meals Sauces, Claire recommends this Dill Cream Sauce (Credit to Selva @happybellnutrition) Find Claire on Instagram @mindful.gut.nutritionist To learn more about Claire's practice visit her website: https://nourishwithclaire.com/ Freebie: 5 Pitfalls that actually worsen gut health and what to do instead  Check out the full episode at: https://erinskinner.com/empowerednutrition/guthealthblueprint Please review the Empowered Nutrition Podcast on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen! Then, send me a screenshot of your positive review to erin@erinskinner.com as a DM on Instagram (erinskinner_rd) .  Include a brief description of what you're working on with your health and/or nutrition and I'll send you a free custom meal plan!  Also, I'm accepting new clients for functional nutrition!  Book a free chemistry call to discuss your story and see if we're a good fit HERE. Follow me on Facebook | Instagram | Pinterest

The Ultramarathon Mindset: Trail Talk
Trail Talk: Slow Down to Get Faster - Joe Sanok

The Ultramarathon Mindset: Trail Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 25:07


My guest this week is Joe Sanok who is a Licensed Therapist, Podcast Host, Author, 4-Day Workweek Specialist, TEDx, and Lead Speaker Consultant. His new book, Thursday is the New Friday: How to Work Fewer Hours, Make More Money, and Spend Time Doing What You Want, has just been released, and he tells how he came to be a champion for a 4-day workweek.For some of us runners, we've had coaches tell us the same. Running most of your miles at an aerobic pace will make you faster on race day. Yes, we need intensity too. But in smaller amounts than most of us practice.Joe gives us his opinion on what is the mindset we should have to live healthier, both mentally and physically. Slowing down in life allows us to do everything in our lives in a smarter and more productive way.

The Road to Self Love
The Difference Between the Masculine and Feminine with Madelyn Moon

The Road to Self Love

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 47:34


Oh hey, Self Lovers! Today we're joined by Madelyn Moon! She is a walking permission slip, a soul igniter and helps humans turn their “drama” into “dharma” so they can have deep love and intimacy.  This episode is for you if you struggle with- Slowing down in life Giving yourself the permission to evolve.  Making yourself wrong for having emotions. EPISODE HIGHLIGHTS! (4:10) - Madelyn's back story and how to navigate through negative things in life (12:41) - What is masculine & feminine energy? (22:19) - How to notice if you are in balance with your masculine & feminine (27:09) - Road trip game #1 (35:23) - How to give yourself permission to evolve (39:58) - What does self love mean to you? If you are just casually obsessed with Madelyn, you can find her at- Instagram: @madelynmoon Website: https://maddymoon.com/ I want you to know that you are not a burden at all and I would love to help you with your self-love journey so DM me on Instagram: @PaulFishman Youtube: Paul Fishman TikTok: @Paul.Fishman Website: PaulFishman.Love Text: 619-202-8353 Apply for The Self Love Diet today 

Entrepreneurs on Fire
Thursday is the New Friday with Joe Sanok

Entrepreneurs on Fire

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 26:24


Joe Sanok is the author of Thursday is the New Friday: How a four-day week boosts productivity and creativity. He's a mental health counselor, keynote speaker, and podcaster. Top 3 Value Bombs: 1. Doing work in the pacing that you need in your life produces more joy, happiness, and more impact in the world. Be able to genuinely enter into the business world and have it be good for your clients and to you. 2. Slowing down a bit and then doing the best work after that is where we see the biggest success. 3. The best connections within the brain is when different parts of the brain can speak to one another in a way that's different from when we're stressed out. If you want to connect with Thursday is the New Friday - Go to ThursdayIsTheNewFriday.com Sponsors: Thinkific: It's time to stop trading time for money and start reaching more clients and making a bigger impact - with online courses! Try Thinkific for free today at Thinkific.com/eof. ZipRecruiter: When you post a job on ZipRecruiter, their matching technology finds qualified candidates and invites them to apply! Try it for free at ZipRecruiter.com/fire.

Alexa Entrepreneurs On Fire
Thursday is the New Friday with Joe Sanok

Alexa Entrepreneurs On Fire

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 26:24


Joe Sanok is the author of Thursday is the New Friday: How a four-day week boosts productivity and creativity. He's a mental health counselor, keynote speaker, and podcaster. Top 3 Value Bombs: 1. Doing work in the pacing that you need in your life produces more joy, happiness, and more impact in the world. Be able to genuinely enter into the business world and have it be good for your clients and to you. 2. Slowing down a bit and then doing the best work after that is where we see the biggest success. 3. The best connections within the brain is when different parts of the brain can speak to one another in a way that's different from when we're stressed out. If you want to connect with Thursday is the New Friday - Go to ThursdayIsTheNewFriday.com Sponsors: Thinkific: It's time to stop trading time for money and start reaching more clients and making a bigger impact - with online courses! Try Thinkific for free today at Thinkific.com/eof. ZipRecruiter: When you post a job on ZipRecruiter, their matching technology finds qualified candidates and invites them to apply! Try it for free at ZipRecruiter.com/fire.

Dreamvisions 7 Radio Network
11:11 Talk Radio with Simran Singh

Dreamvisions 7 Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 51:25


The Art of Stopping: David Kundtz Stopping is not slowing down. There are many books on slowing down the frantic pace of life. This is not one of them, even though an important aspect of Stopping, even one of the reasons for Stopping is, in fact, to slow down. The process of Stopping is very different from the process of slowing down. Trying to slow down does not slow you down. We have been trying to do that for many years now; it generally doesn't work. It's like trying to cut down on smoking: in a short time you end up where you started, except more frustrated. Slowing down doesn't work because everything around us is going so fast. We get revved-up even if we don't want to be. In his book Timeshifting, Stephan Rechtschaffen, MD, writes about entrainment, which he describes as an unconscious “process that governs how various rhythms fall into sync with one another.” For example, if you were to place two out-of-sync pendulum clocks next to one another, in a short time they would be exactly in sync. “The same principle works,” says Rechtschaffen, “with atomic particles, the tides and human beings.” With human beings? That's quite a remarkable idea. We pick up each other's rhythms and the accumulated rhythms of the world around us. If most of the rhythms around us are fast, so are ours, automatically. That's entrainment. The word can also mean “getting on a train.” Stopping can bring us both an answer and a solution. David Kundtz, SThD, MFT, has enjoyed several careers, including nineteen years as a Catholic priest, twenty years in the practice of psychotherapy, and over two decades teaching courses on managing stress and emotional health, and writing. He has graduate degrees in psychology and theology, and a doctorate in pastoral psychology. Among the seven books David has authored are Quiet Mind, Moments in Between, Awakened Mind and his most recent, The Art of Stopping: How to Be Still When You Have to Keep Going. www.DavidKundtz.com  www.stopping.com Learn more about Simran here: www.iamsimran.com www.1111mag.com/

Going Pro Yoga (Formerly the Yoga Teacher Evolution Podcast)
Episode #54: Why Emotions Come Up in Yoga

Going Pro Yoga (Formerly the Yoga Teacher Evolution Podcast)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 18:48


In this podcast episode we are discussing the very intense and powerful topic of emotional release in yoga classes. If you have experienced a huge emotional release in a yoga class as either a teacher or student, or if you're interested to experience one then make sure to listen to the full episode. We cover how emotions are stored in the body, and the various ways they can be released through yoga practices. Plus importantly we discuss how as a yoga teacher, the way you conduct your classes can lead to these emotional releases or not… Byron also shares his own experience and perspective as both a student and teacher. And also the intellectual and emotional perspectives on why you might experience emotions in your yoga classes. Join us for this dive into a very interesting and stimulating topic! (01:41) Introduction and how emotions and the physical body are linked… (03:25) Yoga is one method of releasing stored trauma (04:56) Acceptance and being seen (06:50) Yoga teachers inadvertently learn to hold space (07:23) Students may perceive you as a teacher in a certain emotional way (08:02) With great power comes great responsibility… (10:35) You don't always need to be on fire, and you don't always need to hold space (11:53) Byron's perspective as a yoga student on emotional release (12:52) The intellectual or emotional perspective (14:51) Slowing down or pushing through, what would you respond to? (16:53) This was just the tip of the iceberg, and we will go deeper in the future --- SPECIAL OFFER: Become a founding member of the much anticipated Going Pro Yoga Platform! A sneak peak of what's inside: The first EVER Priority Cueing System for over 120 yoga poses, with over 300 variations and modifications, to refine your teaching The first EVER Sequencing Vault with over 70 videos to plug-in-play and create your own sequences in minutes. The first EVER Injury Management and Injury Prevention Program for Yoga Teachers from yours truly And so much more.. When you become a founding member, you'll NEVER have to pay a monthly subscription, you'll get access for life, and you'll receive all updates and addons. The perks of being the first ones in the door! Add your name and email to the waitlist and be the first one in the door! I want to Join the waitlist and become a founding member! --- PODCAST DETAILS: This podcast is dedicated to aspiring yoga teachers who want to develop their craft with integrity and authenticity. Co-hosted by Michael Henri, Paul Teodo and Byron de Marsé Send us an email Send us a voice-note comment/question

Idaho Matters
Examining The Role Of Religion As Idaho's COVID-19 Cases Show No Signs Of Slowing

Idaho Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 31:02


For some, the decision to not get vaccinated comes down to politics. But how does religion contribute to this decision? According to the Pew Research Center, the two largest religious groups in Idaho are Evangelical Protestants (21%) and Mormons (19%). Idaho Matters talks with two people to get a better idea of the ways religion could be influencing vaccine acceptance in Idaho.

Wealthion
Contagion! Evergrande, Inflation, Shortages and Fed Taper To Worsen Slowing Economy | Jim Bianco (PT1)

Wealthion

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 32:57


The world has become a lot more volatile over the past few weeks. Markets are lurching up and down as investors have become suddenly concerned about contagion -- and not just from the new COVID variants, but contagion from the failure of big players in China, like Evergrande, and contagion from rising input costs caused by both stimulus and snarled global supply chains. A mind-boggling amount of money -- tens of trillions of dollars worth of monetary and fiscal stimulus -- has been issued around the world since the pandemic broke out last year. But the global economy is slowing fast, led by Asia -- and China in particular. How can the boost to the economy from such a massive flood of money already be over? How worried should we be? And what are the likely implications? To tackle these important questions, I'm thrilled to welcome Jim Bianco back onto the program. See the YouTube Video for the charts and graphics: https://youtu.be/HHKKM8Bb4ME

Radically Loved with Rosie Acosta
Episode 386. Building Resilience To Find Peace From Anxiety With Hala Khouri

Radically Loved with Rosie Acosta

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 38:31


Building Resilience To Find Peace From Anxiety With Hala Khouri We live in a time when our lives can be overwhelmed by stress and anxiety. Being in this constant state can perpetuate a feeling of helplessness. But at one point, we have to face all these negative feelings inside us to free ourselves from them by building resilience . Acknowledging that both positive and negative things can co-exist is the only way we can feel more at peace. In this episode, Hala Khouri joins us to share the essential tools in her book, Peace from Anxiety. She talks about developing the concept of “tend and befriend” as a stress response and interoception as a self-regulation technique. Hala also discusses why she chose the theme of building resilience. Tune in to the episode to learn how you can find peace from anxiety and transform your life. Here are three reasons why you should listen to the full episode: Learn about the three different aspects that might be keeping you from finding peace. Find out helpful tips on what to do when you're unable to regulate your nervous system during high-stress states. Discover the concepts of self-regulation, interoception, and building resilience in transforming yourself. Resources Connect with Hala: Website | Facebook | Instagram Off the Mat, Into the World Peace from Anxiety by Hala Khouri Shambhala Publications Create a daily meditation ritual in just seven days! Download BUILD YOUR DAILY MEDITATION RITUAL and other freebies on the Radically Loved website! FREE Action Guide! Apply the lessons you learn from this episode as you listen! Sign up at com, and I'll send it right away! Episode Highlights Writing Peace from Anxiety Hala always knew the book was inside her. Many of her students and clients were requesting for the information to be more widely available. The book-writing process was a seamless experience for Hala. She was ready and merely wrote every smart thing she has said. The book is divided into three different parts. What will impact readers most depends on what's missing in their lives. The First Part: Physiological Aspects This part is about grounding techniques, self-regulation, and understanding our nervous system. It's often the easiest for people to grasp and has the most immediate impact. These tools are the things people remember, implement, and do all the time. The Second Part: Relationships We can't be well alone. While we can have all the tools for our bodies to run smoothly, we still need to build relationships. This part is not something you can do right away. It involves working on prioritizing relationships, asking for help, and letting yourself need other people. The Third Part: The Global Heart It's about feeling like we're contributing towards a better world. For some people, the missing piece is the sense of making meaning and taking accountability. We all need to have a larger feeling of purpose and meaning. Relationship Divisions on Social Media Our thinking is very binary when we're in a high-stress state. Separation can be a stress reaction. The disembodied relationships and biased algorithms of social media make it worse. Social media is the perfect storm to our massive division and intolerance for difference. Before judging other people in a black-and-white manner, remember that we all have different levels of access to information and education. On Unhappiness, Forgiveness, and Giving Care Unhappy people tend to focus on their unhappiness because of the hypervigilance of figuring out how to be happy. Hala has worked with people with anxiety and depression. The “cure” they found was extending their care beyond themselves. We need to transform our stress response from “fight or flight” to “tend and befriend.” Tend and befriend is about seeing that our well-being is bound and extending ourselves to care for others when we're stressed. With the coronavirus, nobody can be well until everybody is well. Getting vaccinated is more of thinking about the sake of other people than yourself. What to Do When You're Unable to Regulate Your Nervous System Sometimes, we need somebody or something else to hold us. It can be another person or a spiritual belief that is bigger than us. Connecting to the suffering of others intentionally makes us feel less alone in our suffering. If you have COVID-19, think about all the other millions of people who also have COVID-19 at the exact moment. Allow your heart to open and feel that you're not alone in your suffering. Tune in to the full episode to hear about Rosie's experience on contracting COVID-19! Launching a Book Hala still feels surreal that her book is out. She hopes the book becomes a tool to support and impact people, especially at this high-anxiety time. One of her critiques about self-help books is their overly individualistic paradigm. Her book encourages people to need each other and allows them not to do everything right by themselves. Parenting at the Time of COVID-19 Her children understand how lucky they are to not be affected as badly as others. The issues her children experience are around missing milestones that allow them to feel themselves growing. Sometimes parents want to make their children's bad feelings go away. Doing that is a disservice to your child. Instead, Hala teaches her children how to face difficult feelings while also acknowledging what is positive. Self-Regulating When You're Hyperfocused on Negative Feelings We tend to hyperfocus on negative feelings when we're anxious, depressed, or scared. Numbing or denying the negative feelings don't work. Allow yourself to notice what else is in your body that feels good. Build the capacity in your brain to hold something that feels pleasant along with what's uncomfortable. The goal is not to get overwhelmed by anxiety or depression. Then, they can become just a part of who we are while we're still able to focus on the good. Interoception and Trauma Interoception is our capacity to sense what's happening inside us. Since we live in a disembodied culture, most of us have to learn it. This process is even harder for people who have had a lot of trauma in their formative years. You have to understand that you can't just stop being anxious instantly. But you can work on being more grounded. It would be helpful to have support, such as being in a yoga class or working with a therapist. You have to go slow. Otherwise, you will keep yourself in a high anxiety cycle. Slowing Down We get used to moving at a particular pace that's comfortably uncomfortable. Slowing down is scary, but it is okay. Hala decided not to go for her doctorate. It was a tough decision, but she realized she doesn't have to do that right now. We don't always have to strive to be amazing; mediocrity can be satisfying as well. Building Resilience in the Book Hala focused on building resilience because it doesn't pathologize. Her favorite definition of resilience is allowing difficulties to transform us. It's having this feeling that we can handle life. Resilience is a word that is more nuanced than some other positive words. It's about our capacity to imagine things being better than they were. We're all living in an imagined future. Trauma is a loss of imagination; reclaiming that capacity gives us hope. How Hala Feels Radically Loved Hala feels radically loved in every moment by being surrounded by blessings, opportunities, and supportive relationships. 5 Powerful Quotes [11:11] “The thing that ‘cured' [people with anxiety and depression] was actually extending their care beyond themselves, making it about something bigger than themselves.”   [11:23] “I think what our planet needs is for us to transform our stress response from a fight or flight to a tend and befriend.”   [11:51] “Until everybody is well, nobody can be well.”   [23:33] “Maybe the goal is to not be overwhelmed by our anxiety or to feel like we're bigger than our depression so that those things become just a part of who we are.”   [33:31] “Trauma is a loss of imagination. And when we reclaim our capacity to imagine, then that gives us hope.”   About Hala Hala Khouri is the co-founder of Off the Mat Into the World, an organization dedicated to bridging yoga and activism. She is a yoga and movement teacher with over 25 years of experience and training in Somatic Experiencing. Hala is also a well-recognized speaker and trainer on yoga, social justice, and trauma. She has been doing clinical work and training for more than 15 years. The focus of her work is leading trauma-informed yoga training for individuals and groups. She trains educators and service providers on how to be trauma-informed and culturally responsive. If you want to connect with Hala, you may visit her website, Facebook, and Instagram. Enjoy the Podcast? If you felt radically loved from listening to this podcast, subscribe and share it with the people you love! Love to give us 5 stars? If you do, we'd love a review from you. Help us reach more people and make them feel loved. Do you want to help people in building resilience? Do you want to know how to find peace from anxiety? A simple way is to share what you've learned today on social media. Don't forget to follow and message us on these platforms! Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/rosieacosta/ Twitter: https::twitter.com/rosieacosta Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/radicallylovedrosie TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@itsrosieacosta To feeling radically loved, Rosie

SISTERHOOD OF SWEAT - Motivation, Inspiration, Health, Wealth, Fitness, Authenticity, Confidence and Empowerment

Are you interested in building your business?  Have you been struggling to be productive?  Today, we're getting outside the box and discussing productivity hacks. In this episode, I talk to Joe Sanok. He is the author of Thursday is the New Friday: How to work fewer hours, make more money, and spend time doing what you want. It examines how the four-day workweek boosts creativity and productivity. Joe has been featured on Forbes, GOOD Magazine, and The Smart Passive Income Podcast. He is the host of the popular The Practice of the Practice Podcast, which is recognized as one of the Top 50 Podcasts worldwide with over 100,000 downloads each month. We are deep diving into productivity in this podcast, so business owners, entrepreneurs, and side hustlers, this one is for you. Questions I asked: Does 4 Day work week make people more productive? How does shorter work weeks make you more creative? Do you have any studies behind the shorter workweek? How does slowing down boost productivity? How do we figure out our sprint type? How does delegating come into play? What are the 3 internal inclinations? How did you get the idea for your book, Thursday is the New Friday? Can you tell us how you've gotten the word out about the 4 day work week? What is one tip for everyone to create their 4 day work week?   Topics Discussed: Keynote speaking. Productivity hacks. Building a business. Thursday is the new Friday. Batch working. Slowing down to speed up. Taking breaks. Knowing your batch type. Getting an outside perspective. Quotes from the show: “Instead of limping through the week, people realize every minute you're not productive is time you're stealing from your family.” @JoeSanok @SisterhoodSweat “If I just got things done quicker, I could have a day or more to myself.” @JoeSanok @SisterhoodSweat “We know we need to get up and get the cobwebs out.” @JoeSanok @SisterhoodSweat “We know that we can sprint, but we don't know our sprint types.” @JoeSanok @SisterhoodSweat “We have outgrown the 40-hour work week.” @JoeSanok @SisterhoodSweat How you can stay in touch with Joe: Website Book Website Amazon the Book Instagram LinkedIn Twitter Thursday is The New Friday Podcast Practice of The Practice Podcast How you can stay in touch with Linda: Website Facebook Twitter Instagram Pinterest YouTube SoundCloud "Proud Sponsors of the Sisterhood of S.W.E.A.T" Essential Formulas Organifi.com/SWEAT  - use code SWEAT for 20% off   My daily energy stems from mushrooms... mushroom coffee that is! Have you checked out Four Sigmatic yet? If you want a coffee that contains superfoods and adaptogens like rhodiola, eleuthero, and schisandra to help you live a healthier, more enhanced life, then you need Four Sigmatic mushroom coffee in your daily routine! Check out their products here and be sure to let me know what you think of it!

Shit We Don't Talk About
EP 042 - Lizard Brain Top Tips

Shit We Don't Talk About

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 34:08


On this episode of Sh!t We Don't Talk About, Mia is joined by three-time Amazon bestselling author Drew Linsalata to discuss why teaching the fear center in your brain - that pesky lizard brain - to slow down is a good idea. Slowing down, even when stress and anxiety are demanding that you speed up, can go a long way toward achieving a calmer, less frantic life. Drew's latest book, Seven Percent Slower - A Simple Trick For Moving Past Anxiety And Stress, is available now at sevenpercentslower.com. ------- For full show notes on this episode visit https://miavoss.live/42 Find Mia online here or here. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/miavosslive/support

CHECK YOUR HEAD: Mental Help for Musicians
Chase Bryant: Living w/Anxiety, Depression & Imposter Syndrome Recovery w/Aric Steinberg (Sweet Relief Musicians Fund)

CHECK YOUR HEAD: Mental Help for Musicians

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 48:11


Mari Fong interviews country singer-songwriter Chase Bryant and Sweet Relief Musicians Fund Executive Vice President of Development & Artist Relations, Aric Steinberg. Chase Bryant shares his solutions for anxiety, depression and imposter syndrome recovery. After skyrocketing to fame, Chase Bryant found himself quickly playing with country superstars like Tim McGraw where the stress of fame took his toll and led him to a suicide attempt. Slowing his life down, being true to himself, and therapy have soothed his soul and helped calm his mood disorders. Next, Aric Steinberg of Sweet Relief Musicians Fund talks about how this 501(c)3 nonprofit can help musicians and others working in the music industry with financial assistance, especially during this pandemic. Sweet Relief and the CHECK YOUR HEAD Podcast partner for the Add-A-Buck Program where artists donate $1 for each ticket sold to benefit musicians and their mental health. Aric shares how easy it is to apply for Sweet Relief assistance.“Be brave, ask for help, and be persistent in finding the mental help that you need.” For free and affordable solutions for mental health and addiction recovery, visit: http://checkyourheadpodcast.com/* Donate to our mission at checkyourheadpodcast.com or on our patreon.com page. Every dollar is appreciated, every listener is appreciated.THANK YOU for following us on social media @checkyourheadpodcastWatch and subscribe to our YouTube Channel:  checkyourheadpodcast.youtubeSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/checkyourheadpodcast)

Somewhat Frank
#0026 - Entrepreneurs Tackle Civilian Space Exploration, Cloning Dinosaurs, and Slowing Hurricanes

Somewhat Frank

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 33:21


On this episode of the Somewhat Frank Podcast, Frank Gruber (@FrankGruber) and John Guidos (@JohnGuidos) talk about late-summer activities, entrepreneurs tackling civilian space exploration, cloning dinosaurs, and slowing hurricanes, and more. Frank and John also celebrate the following people from their networks: Charlie O'Donnell has raised a third fund for Brooklyn Bridge Ventures - https://www.brooklynbridge.vc/bbv-raises-third-fund Jewel Burks Solomon and Collab Capital has raised its first fund to invest in black innovators - https://medium.com/capital-innovation/collab-capital-closes-50m-first-fund-to-invest-in-black-innovators-22896db11ae8 Michael D Smith nominated for AmeriCorps - https://amp-cnn-com.cdn.ampproject.org/c/s/amp.cnn.com/cnn/2021/06/15/politics/biden-michael-smith-americorps/index.html Katie Stanton raised her second fund - https://www.forbes.com/sites/alexkonrad/2021/07/19/moxxie-ventures-85-million-fund-katie-stanton-alex-roetter/ Max Crowley has had his coffee delivery startup Bandit acquired by Gopuff - https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/bandit-now-part-gopuff-max-crowley Matt Galligan on the launch of his new company XMTP and securing $20M in funding - https://blog.xmtp.com/series-a/ Frank and John also also invite listeners to apply for the following upcoming events: Startup of the Year Awards Summit - If you're interested in an opportunity to be a part of those awards and for a shot at potential investment and bragging rights, if you're named Startup of the Year then join our community before Sept 30th and if you're one of the 100 startups selected you could be in the running. More info at http://soty.link/apply NASA iTech Cycle II Forum startup competition - NASA is searching for non-government funded technologies that are addressing the following focus areas: Enabling Technologies for Commercialization of Low-Earth Orbit Hybrid Electric Aircraft Technologies and Alternative Fuels Physics-Based Machine Learning for Artificial Intelligence Technologies Using NASA Data to Foster Climate Resilience X-Factor Innovations (anything so cool, NASA should know about it). Apply here: http://est.us/NIT (the deadline is Friday, October 15th at 11:59 AM PDT) The guys talk about these new books/articles: Civilians in Space! --https://www.space.com/spacex-inspiration4-returns-to-earth?utm_source=join1440&utm_medium=email  Real-Life Jurassic Park? - Colossal, this startup just raised $15M with the goal of bringing the woolly mammoth back from extinction by 2027 using CRISPR, a revolutionary gene-editing technology. --https://www.cnet.com/news/woolly-mammoths-could-walk-the-earth-again-by-2027-if-crispr-startup-succeeds/ Hurricane Killing Startup? --https://futurism.com/the-byte/startup-tech-kill-hurricanes Zoom brain is a thing. --https://techcrunch.com/2021/04/21/this-is-your-brain-on-zoom/amp/#click=https://t.co/1q2GPOILzx Chickens for rent -- Rent-a-chicken trend spikes during pandemic -- https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/article/chicken-rentals-spike-during-pandemic Sears is closing last store in home state of Illinois --https://www.cnbc.com/2021/09/16/sears-is-shutting-its-last-store-in-illinois-its-home-state.html Let's talk beef, Wagnu beef to be more specific… of the 3D variety… -- https://interestingengineering.com/scientists-reveal-worlds-first-3d-printed-marbled-wagyu-beef The guys are also watching the following shows/movies: Ted Lasso - Season 2 (Apple TV) The Morning Show - Season 2 (Apple TV) Only Murders In The Building (HULU) Lastly, the Frank and John chat about testing out some new gear: ITIWIT Inflatable Kayak - https://www.decathlon.com/collections/kayaks/products/kayak-touring-inflatable-high-pressure-dropstitch-floor-3-seat-x100-177376?variant=39473127751742 DJI Mini 2 Drone - https://www.dji.com/mini-2 As always, thank you for listening and feel free to reach out and let us know what you think at: somewhatfrank@est.us Get updates like this in your inbox before they hit the web by subscribing to the newsletter here: https://frankgruber.me/newsletter/  

Practicing Polyamory Podcast
E.102 - Developing Self Consent with Sophia Graham

Practicing Polyamory Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 38:20


How many of us have even considered what Self-Consent means? In this episode, educator and therapist Sophia Graham walks us through her journey to discovering how important self-consent became to her, and how it can help each and every one of us! Sophia challenges us to ask, "Who am I?" and refuse to leave that question answered only at the surface. She encourages us to explore ourselves more deeply than ever, bringing all of our various identities to light and finding out whether our identities are chosen or accepted by default. She shares her experience in consent workshops, including the tea metaphor that's often taught, and how the idea of consent goes beyond our interactions with others and includes our inner dialogue as well. Slowing down and centering consent with ourselves, asking more questions about each circumstance, and trusting our emotions to guide our decisions are just a few tips Sophia offers to help us learn the art of self-consent, and that is just the beginning! Tune in to hear what she has to say about contradicting desires, overcoming social anxiety, and recalibrating the hustle mentality to allow for a more fulfilled life. Learn more about Sophia at www.loveuncommon.com and follow her on Twitter @LoveUncommon ! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/practicingpolya/support

Common Thread Church Weekly Messages
Weekly Meditation: Slowing Life Down

Common Thread Church Weekly Messages

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 9:16


The post Weekly Meditation: Slowing Life Down appeared first on Common Thread Church.

Your Anxiety Toolkit
Ep. 202 The Importance of Slowing Down (with Drew Linsalata)

Your Anxiety Toolkit

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 42:34


This week we interview Drew Linsalata, an amazing friend who has written an amazing book called, “Seven Percent Slower”  Click the link below to hear more about his book! https://theanxioustruth.com/seven-percent-slower/ Kimberley: Welcome, everybody. This episode is for you, the listener, but it's actually for me, the podcaster, more than anything. Today, we have the amazing Drew Linsalata. I've talked about Drew before. We've done giveaways. We've done a bunch of stuff together on social media. I am a massive Drew fan. So, thank you, Drew, for being here today. Drew: Oh, you're so sweet. Thank you, Kim. It's my pleasure to be here. Kimberley: Okay. So, you, you are amazing, and I would love if you would share in a minute to people a little bit about your lived experience with anxiety. Drew is just the coolest human being on the planet. So, I'm so excited to share with everybody you, because I think everybody needs Drew in their life. Drew: Wow. Kimberley: But in addition to that, we are today going to talk about something. I'm actually going to try and drop down into my own vulnerability, and not just be the host, but also be the listener today because you are talking about one particular topic that I need to work on. So, first of all, tell me a little bit about your background, your story, and we'll go from there. Drew: Sure. So, unfortunately, I lived in experience with panic disorder, agoraphobia, and intrusive thoughts and things of that nature, clinical depression, on and off, from the time I was 19 years old – 1986 all the way to around 2008, in varying degrees. So, it was a very long time. I was in and out of those problems. They came, they went. I did all the wrong things for a lot of time, trying to fix those problems, even though I knew what the right things were, because I've always been a bit of a behaviorism and cognition geek. And it took me a long time to come around to actually solving those problems. I did the medication thing that didn't work out for me. And then I really just took the time to learn what I needed to do behaviorally, cognitively, using those evidence-based things that I know you talk about all the time. And I just used them on myself and I learned as much as I could from very smart people like you. And I went and did the work and managed to get myself through the recovery from panic disorder and agoraphobia and depression and all of those things. And along the way, the things that I learned, I just started sharing with other people, which is nothing that I invented. I never claimed that I invented any of this stuff. I just became a really good messenger, I guess, in terms of explaining. Well, I learned this and then I used it this way. And that led to just helping people online back in 2008, 2009 as I was going through it. And that led to continuing to do it. And that led to starting my own podcast back in 2014, like talking to nobody with a $4 app on my phone. But it just seemed like the right thing to do to try and pay the help forward, because I had a lot of supportive people who rallied around me. And that just one thing led to another. And here we are, and the podcast is just kept going and it has led to writing two books about this stuff. One is my story, and one is the recovery guide that I wrote. And here I am, still educating about this topic and advocating and supporting where I can and just trying to contribute to the community because I felt like the community, in its form that it was in 10, 15 years ago, was so helpful to me. And I just feel like I want to give as much of that back as I can. So, yeah. Kimberley: So you've written-- I'm giggling. So, for everyone listening, if you hear me giggling, it's not because it's particularly funny. It's just so ironic to me. You wrote a book called Seven Percent Slower. Drew: Yes. Kimberley: Now I probably tell my clients every single day they need to slow down. I have done a podcast on slowing down, but it is probably the safety behavior I fall into the most. And I don't do a ton of safety behaviors anymore that this one is just so ingrained in me. So, I read your book. Thank you so much. Not only is it an amazing read, but you're hilarious. I was texting Drew yesterday, just cracking out at some of the things that he says because it's my type of humor. I just love it. So, can you share with me why this one topic? Of all the things you could have written, why is this one topic? Why was it so important to you and why is it so important? Drew: It's a good question. Up until three, four months ago. I would have not thought that I would write this book. There was no plan to write a book about learning to slow down. But what I discovered was, Seven Percent Slower is the thing that I just came up with as a little silly mental device for me when I was struggling in a big way. I knew that part of what would happen when I would get really anxious and I would begin to panic, and I would just associate that with all those nasty things, I would start just really speed up. I would rush around like crazy. And I knew I was doing that, and I knew that wasn't helping me, but I was having a hard time catching it. And one of the things that my therapist at the time, she was like, “Really, you got to start to learn to slow down.” So she gave me that good advice. Again, I didn't invent any of this. And I used to have to remind myself, I would literally walk around trying to remind myself like, “Slow down, moron. Slow down.” I would be talking to myself. The no self-compassion there, like, “Slow down.” And I was trying and trying and trying. And then for some reason, because I'm a fan of the absurd, the idea of trying to go 7% slower was born in like 2007 in my stupid brain. And it was just easy to remember, “Oh yeah, just go 7% slower. And it was just a little mental trick not to actually go 7% slower. Just remind me again to slow down. And it proved to be really helpful to me like that stuck in my head because it's silly. It's just a silly, arbitrary number. And I forgot all about it. I use it. I still use it to this day, but not really thinking of it consciously. And I have to tell so many people in the community surrounding my podcasts and my books that slow down. One of the things to do slow down – I started telling people, “Well, just try going 7% slower.” It came back to the surface again. And the response that I got from it was astounding, like, “Oh, that's so great. Yes, I'm using it. I'm doing the 7% slower thing and it's really helping me.” And I'm like, “Oh, there's a book. I need to write this.” And that's how I dragged it back up from 10, 15 years ago. And I said, “I should probably write about this and tell people what it is.” Kimberley: So, tell me how you implemented it in-- you've talked and I've heard you talk about exposures and some of the experiences you did. Can you just give me upfront for people who, first of all, want to hear about your story, what were some of the exposures you engaged in and how did slowing down impact it, both for how did it make it easier and how did it also make it more difficult? What was your experience? Drew: So I'll give you a typical morning for me. My biggest issue was-- again, my official diagnosis would have been panic disorder with agoraphobia, right? So I had a real problem leaving the house or being alone by myself or going any appreciable distance from the house. And so, a typical exposure for me, a typical morning for me when I decided I really have to fix this as I would get up, the minute I open my eyes, I put my feet on the floor, I would already be in a state of very heightened state of arousal and anxiety at that point because I knew it was coming. I was going to get dressed. I was going to get ready. I was going to hurl my butt out the door and start driving, which is the thing I was terrified to do. So, I did that every day, every single day. And right away, I learned within the first week or so like, okay, I get the principle of this, but I'm walking out the door in a blind panic. So I need to dial it back and start to work on just preparing to walk out the door first. So, I need to really acclimate to this first. And that's when I really started using the “Slow down, slow down, slow down.” So, I would get up and I would be trying to get ready and rush around and drink water and do everything I had to do to get out the door like I was on fire and it was crazy. And I started to slow down that way. And it really was a huge help, but you're right, it also made it worse because-- and this is so funny because it came up in a live I did the other day on Instagram with Jen Wolkin. She talks about mindful toothbrushing. And that is really-- the act of brushing my teeth in the morning is where Seven Percent Slower really began to shine. I wrote about it in my first book. The first thing I did before I learned to drive again was to learn to brush my teeth slowly and mindfully while I was in a complete state of panic. Yes. And just the act of slowing everything down, all I have to do is take the cap off the toothpaste. All I have to do is put the paste on the brush. All I have to do is put the cap back on. All I have to do is pick up the toothbrush. I literally would have to break down my getting-ready routine into the tiniest, little tasks and just focus on each one of those and literally act as if I was in slow motion. So, I wrote in Seven Percent Slower that one of the ways I learned to actually do that was to exaggerate it in a huge way. To me, it felt like it was brushing my teeth in slow motion. I probably was, but it really helped because it was the opposite action. So, my amygdala is screaming, “Go fast, go fast, go fast.” And I'm like, “No, no, no, I'm going to go slower and slower and slower.” And it did change my state over time. And I was able to go out and start my drive and my exposure and panic all over again. But at least I was leaving the house at a level 5 instead of a level 8. But it did make it harder because when I slowed down, I would just feel all of the things. I just have to let them come and let them come. You know the deal, and your listeners, I'm sure, know the deal. So, it was tough, but it was also tremendously helpful to me. Slowing down was one of the biggest things that changed my situation, for sure. Kimberley: Yeah. And the reason I think this is so important, this one thing and I love that you're just looking at this one thing, is I think in that moment, for the listeners, we're constantly talking about how to reduce mental compulsion. And I think the slowing down helps with that too, right? I think about there's exposure, but there's also the time before the exposure and after the exposure where you have to practice not doing the compulsion. And if you're rushing, your brain's rushing and everything. And so, I love that you're even talking about before doing the exposure, you had to slow down. Drew: Yeah. I mean really, before the exposure was exposure itself, there's no doubt about that. And I had to come to the realization that like, well, the exposure right now isn't the driving. The exposure is literally putting my shoes on right now while I panic, putting on my coat while I panic, brushing my teeth while I panic. And in Seven Percent Slower, I wrote about accidental emergency multitasking, which that's the thing that I forgot. We were talking before we went in there. I forgot I wrote that. And I'm going through my editor's notes, and I'm like, “I wrote that, how about that?” But that's true because when you-- Kimberley: Good for me. Drew: Yeah, right. Good for me. go through. So, I remember really thinking that, like when you're in that crazy terrified state, I was trying to solve every problem at once. So, there was a lot of mental compulsion in there. I was trying to go through the drive in my head. I was trying to anticipate each turn. I was trying to beat back the panic before it even happened in my head. I was thinking about yesterday's drive and how difficult that was. And slowing down, meaning it put things-- it made me focus on what was going on right now. So, it was also accidental or backdoor water down sort of ghetto mindfulness practice. I'll take it though because it worked. It put me in the present moment and it took me out of emergency accidental multitasking mentally and physically. Kimberley: I think it's pure mindfulness, right? Drew: Oh, it definitely was. And there was no-- I mean, I wrote about this in the book too. I'm not trying to read the whole book to you guys, but yes, it is part of it. There's a whole chapter called Is This Mindfulness: Do I Need to Meditate to Slow Down. It's literally one of the chapters. And well, it kind of is. If you start to learn to go slower, you will accidentally become more mindful without having to go through all the overwhelming things that sometimes people feel mindfulness is. “I have to become grateful and of the present moment, and I have to learn to appreciate the now.” No, you just have to slow down, and you'll automatically mechanically become more mindful. The rest of the stuff is window dressing. It doesn't matter. I wasn't grateful for brushing my teeth at all, but I was mindful of it, and it got me out of those compulsions in that crazy, anticipatory anxiety cycle. Let me do the exposures more effectively. Kimberley: Yeah. So, one of the things I love that you did-- and I actually did the homework. You'll be so proud of me. Drew: You did the homework. Did you use index cards? Kimberley: Huh? Drew: Did you actually use index cards, like I wrote about? I'm so old. Kimberley: I did. Usually, when I read a book, I do not follow their instructions because I don't like to follow instructions. It's not my style. Drew: I feel you. Kimberley: My husband always cringes when I go to make an IKEA piece of furniture because I am bringing out those instructions. Drew: It's going to be an extra draw leftover. We just know it. Kimberley: Oh, I could show you some photos. You would love, I tell you. But I did your homework. And this is what I thought was really interesting. So, I want to walk through. I'm going to try to be vulnerable here. I have noticed in the last week, since returning back from vacation, that my hyper-vigilance is going up a lot. I was noticing my anxiety wasn't so high, but I was engaging in a hyper-vigilant behavior. I think mostly because I'm now thinking about COVID, how to protect my children, and all the things. When we were away, we were far, far away from anybody. We didn't see anybody. So, I sat down, and I wrote the things that I do that I need to slow down at, right? And I'm just sharing it because I do the homework. I'm so proud of myself. Drew: I'm proud of you too. Kimberley: So number one is in the morning, I wake up and I sit up and I just go. I don't ease into the day. And then you talk in the book about how speed is like an escape response, right? You don't want to be in your discomfort. So, I thought that was interesting. These are ways that I've caught myself, right? So I jumped out fast. Like how can I not feel my discomfort about the day? Another one is I rushed during emails. And the big one, which I'm not happy about, is I multitask. Now I want to get your opinion on this as my dear friend, excuse me. Most people are probably multitasking, but why would multitasking be bad for anxiety? Drew: Okay. So, I will preface this by saying, I used to think that my ability-- and I will multitask like a mofo. I'm good at it. I know that cognitive scientists will tell me that I'm not because there's no such thing. We're literally tearing down our cognitive models and building new ones every time we switch from test to test. I understand all of that. But I will tell you that I'm good at it anyway. I'm going to stick with my guns, right? So, I wore it like a badge of honor. And when I have to, I can still do it. However, it absolutely fueled my anxiety state. There's no doubt about that because there's a sense of urgency that comes with multitasking. There really is. You are not present in anything when you're trying to do everything. So, that really in the end is that. And multitasking is not just physical. It's also mental. So, I'm answering an email while I'm thinking about the next email. I see your face. You know what I'm talking about. You've been there, right? You were probably there today. Kimberley: Like I said to you, I'm so grateful that you wrote this because it's so important. It's so important for the quality of our life. Last week I was exhausted at the end of the week and it's because I was rushing. I just know that's why. That's why I'm such a huge fan of what you're writing. Drew: As I was writing, things came out because I'll be honest with you, when I thought of this as my own little mental device many, many years ago, I didn't flesh it out. I just did it. You know how it goes. I didn't invent a thing. But as I was writing about it, I had to think. And this speed to me looks like both an escape-- it's both a fear response, sort of involuntary, and a safety behavior at the same time, like it keeps us from feeling the feels, right? So, yes. And I think the other thing that multitasking does is it makes us sort of-- we can put our attention to the places that we want it to be at because they're the easier things, even practically, like, I don't really want to answer this email because this is a hard email. So, I'll skip that one, mark it unread, and then go back to this one and I'll just keep marking that. You know what I mean? So, it keeps-- Kimberley: You just described my whole week last week. Drew: I hear you. The day I got to inbox 0, which was years ago – by the way, I'm not there anymore. Not even close – I was on top of the world. I was convinced like I'm now qualified to basically run the UN if I need to, because I'm at inbox 0. But I'm very guilty of that stuff where I was for a long time. I still fall into the habit. There's no doubt about that. But yes, when I find my-- sometimes I do it intentionally because I need to, and there's a time and a place for it. But when I find that I'm feeling extra stress, because one thing that I noticed about this book is that it doesn't just apply to anxiety and anxiety disorders, but it applies to stress management in general, because I still use seven percent slower, I just didn't remember that I was. And when I find that I'm feeling the effects of the stress, much of which I create myself by taking on so much, slowing down and stopping the multitasking, like close all the apps, run one app at a time, do one thing at a time, it really brings that down. It doesn't solve all my problems, but it keeps me from being overwhelmed by the physical responses that come with stress. Why am I holding my breath? Why does my neck hurt? Well, I know why. Because I'm stressed, and I got to back off. It helps. It really does help to slow down. Kimberley: It does. The final one that I listed, and I really want you to talk more on, is just a general sense of worrying, right? I mean, I think you can actually give me your opinion on this, but sometimes we do have to solve problems, right? We have to make decisions. This was a big one for us last week, is deciding whether we wanted to put our kids back in school or homeschool them, back and forth. Sometimes you do have to make those decisions, but there is a degree of just general worrying that happens. And then you can start to worry on speed at the highest speed ever. So, did you have to apply this to the speed in which you worried or try to solve problems? You're talking about physically slowing down, but did you also apply it to mentally slowing down, or they go hand in hand? Drew: That's a really good question actually. And if I think about it, the way it worked for me personally, my personal experience with this particular method or whatever you want to call it, is that it was first the physical slowing down. But then I discovered that that started to spill over. So, when I was physically going slower and being more mindful and deliberate in my behavior, it became a little easier for me to recognize that I am literally thinking about 17 problems at one time right now. I can't solve them all at one time. Some of them I can't solve at all. Kimberley: We could probably resolve or solve them already. Drew: Exactly. And it really helped me clarify that habit that I have. I'm just going to think, think, think, think, think. I'm thinking all the time. I think anyway, but I was thinking very maladaptively in those days in a big way. I was a prisoner to my thoughts and the thinking process. And it really helped me break that cycle. It's always important to me to say, slowing down and going 7% slower is not a cure for all of this or anything like that. It's not magic. It was just one part of the puzzle. It turned out to be a big part of the puzzle for me because it unlocked a lot of things, but yeah, it did slow down my mental behavior too, my ruminating, my worry, my thinking. Kimberley: Right. Yeah. I keep saying, I'm such a fan of these. And I think for me, I mean, you guys know I'm very well recovered, right? I'm mostly very healthy, mentally healthy. You might question me now that I've totally got that upside down. But I consider myself to be pretty level. What was interesting for me is, that for me is usually the first sign that you're starting to go into relapse, right? When you start to speed up. So, that's why I thought last week, I was like, the gods have all the stars aligned because I've come out of this very beautiful, long vacation where I'm managing my stress and everything. And the first thing my brain did when it got home was speed up. And if I hadn't caught it being hypervigilant, I think I would have gotten snowballed, right? And I think it's a great way, a tool to keep an eye out for your relapse as well. Drew: Yeah. I mean, actually, these are hard things to catch, don't get me wrong, because so much of it is automatic or it's a little bit beyond. The initial speeding up is beyond our control. My assertion in the book is initially, you will probably automatically speed up, but you can catch that and then change it. It takes work. And I really talked about like-- in fact, today's Instagram post is all about that really. Not that anybody has seen it because it's a podcast for the future, but it was about that. Like, “Hey, look at these. Here's 10 signs.” I did a 10 things posts. Now I'm disgusted with myself now that I think about it, but I have a list with 10 things like here is-- I think there's actually 11, to be honest with you. But here's a thing, if you find yourself doing this, if you're stumbling over your words, if you're shaking, if you're dropping things, when you're walking, if your stride length has shortened, because that's what I would do. I have reasonably long legs, but I'd be taking these little tiny penguin steps because I was rushing like crazy, like running. So, there's a bunch of practical things that you can really look at. This is what my rushing habit looks like. So I can be aware of those things and catch them and then start to slow down. Kimberley: Right. And that was what you said in the book. Write them down, identify the behaviors in which you're doing, which I thought was brilliant. Drew: Thank you. Kimberley: Yeah. Okay. I wanted to touch on, because I loved how you really talked about that, the side effect of slowing down is that you have to feel uncomfortable. Bummer, you totally ruined it. Drew: I did. What a buzzkill. Kimberley: We're going so good. Drew: Yeah. It's true. I think that was one of the chapters. I specifically wrote an entire chapter about why you probably don't want to slow down, right? Kimberley: Exactly. Drew: One of the reasons is that we view rushing around as some sort of badge of honor and achievement. If you run around like a speed demon, it must mean that you're busy and achieving things, which is not true. But also, if you slow down, you feel all the feels, and we hate that. And I'll use the word “we.” Humans are not really-- we're designed to be creatures of comfort. We don't want to feel crappy stuff. But you know that. I'm not telling anybody anything they already know. If they're listening to Your Anxiety Toolkit, you already know this, but you have to move through the crappy stuff to get past the crappy stuff. And slowing down is a good way to allow yourself to do that. Kimberley: Yeah, I agree. Drew: Yeah. Accidental happy side effect. Kimberley: I love that you brought this up. So, let's go through like, okay, slowing down. You can even maybe share your own experience. Slowing down, for me, I think it's not that I have to feel physically uncomfortable as much as I have to have a lot of uncertainty, right? I have to be uncertain, which is typically, at the end of the day, still just sensation and experience. For you in that, when you were practicing this during your exposures, what did you have to feel when you slowed down? Drew: So for me, when I would slow down, I would feel the physical sensations of panic. The one sensation that never leaves me – it's the memory of a sensation. It's not that I feel it. I rarely feel it anymore – was the feeling of my heart thudding in my back. You feel like all my chest was pounding, but it would feel like it was beating so heavily when I was in a panic that I could feel it almost beating along my spine. It was a really uncomfortable sensation. And traditionally, when I would feel that, I would do everything I could to try to not feel that – wiggle around, change position, lay down, stand up – try anything that I could to not feel that. One of the key things-- and I felt all the physical sensations, but that one sticks in my memory was when I started to slow down, I had no choice but to let my heart pound lead against my spine, and it was so uncomfortable. And I remember really just having to reason with myself as best I could like, “Just get through it for another 10 seconds. Just give it another 10 seconds. Just give it another 30 seconds.” And then it was just, “Just give it another minute.” And then it was like, “Oh, this isn't so bad.” So, it was a gradual habituation to that where I stopped being afraid of it. And slowing down meant I had to feel that. There was no more shield against feeling it. If I'm going to stand in the bathroom and slowly brush my teeth, I'm going to feel that. But I also heard the thoughts very loudly when I slowed down. And the thoughts would be panic-type thoughts, like, oh my God, what if it's not anxiety this time? What if I'm having a heart attack? What if this is a stroke? It does happen to people. Even though I'm only 30 years old or whatever it was at the time, this can happen. What if, what if, what if? Those thoughts were already loud. And when I slowed down, I essentially turned down all the other sounds. So those thoughts were really, really, really loud. And I would literally have to practice. It forced me to practice like that could be, but it's not likely. I would have to say that all the time. “That could be, but it's not likely. It could be, but it's not likely.” Yeah. And it just forced me to practice. So, I would feel the physical sensations and hear my thoughts so much louder. Hated it. Kimberley: Right. Yeah. I'm so glad that you mentioned that. I mean, I can only imagine too. When we have those symptoms that aren't textbook, like you feel your heart in your back, it's hard to just let that be there, right? You and I have joked a lot, the old Instagram posts about like, these are the 12 ways to feel a panic attack. But when you don't have something on that list and when you have something additional, that's scary, right? “Oh, crap. I've got six things that aren't even on that list. What does that mean?” Drew: Here's an interesting thing that you just made me think of now. The other thing that slowing down accomplished, and this was a happy accident also, is I like to look at it as imagine anxiety as a room. So, when your lizard brain, when your amygdala is in charge, it fills the entire room, so prefrontal cortex stuff has no room. It's pressed against the walls. It's being pushed out the door. There's no reasoning at all. When I slowed down, I actually made a little bit of room for prefrontal cortex to chime in. Winston and Seif, they will talk about wise mind in their writing. Wise mind had a chance to chime in where I was able to say, “Okay, Drew, yes, this isn't on the list of the usual stuff, but you have felt things like this 10,000 times. And all indicators are: you're healthy as a horse, you're in great shape. It's okay.” And it allowed me to tolerate that uncertainty a lot more because I was able to reason a little bit more. I was unable to talk myself off the ledge, but I was able to insert just enough reasoning because it gave me a little bit of room to work in. That helped also. I was able to actually do that, whereas before I was just frantic. That was like, “You're okay. You're okay. It's okay. It's nothing, it's nothing.” But your amygdala doesn't care. It doesn't believe you. But in that case, I was able to actually say, “Okay, hang on. I felt this zillion times before. This is likely nothing. Okay, I can go with that. I'm going to roll the dice on that. I'm good with it.” Kimberley: Right. You can see the trends that have been playing instead of thinking like it's the first time it's ever happened, even though it's happened a million times. Drew: Yeah. So, practicing slowing down gave me a little bit of space for that stuff to get a little foothold, a little handhold, and then it grew. Kimberley: Yeah. So it's interesting because I'll share with you, a big part of my recovery has been considered what I have been calling a walking meditation. So, I did a lot of meditation training in the latter stage of my recovery. And I don't love to sit and meditate because it's uncomfortable, right? But what I love to do is this end practice of walking meditation. And so, I've often called friends and said to them, this is an accountability call. I have to do a walking meditation all day. And then when you're writing this, I'm like, “That's what I was doing. I was slowing down.” And I've been just calling it something different. So, I thought that that was really fascinating because in the Zen practice, you do a lot of walking meditation, right? Being aware slowly as you engage in the day. Drew: Which is something that I think a lot of people have a hard time putting their brain around. In the beginning, I think it's hard to do that – being mindful in motion. So, to me, meditation, I always say mindfulness to me is like meditation in motion. I don't know if that makes any sense, but that's-- Kimberley: It is what it is. Drew: Okay. So, that's the way I've always thought of it for myself. Well, firstly, I learned to meditate and then I put it in motion so that I can be meditative even in a meeting or on a phone call or driving my car. That's possible, but that's the thing you have to learn. But that's part of slowing down also. When you do your walking meditation, you're intentionally slowing down. Kimberley: Yeah. I would even invite the listeners to think about when are you the most calm or coping the best is when you're actually slowed down. For me, it's when I'm with a client. When I'm with a client, I can't multitask. I am so with them, and it's their pace, which is not my pace. I can't speak at a rapid, two times speed formula in session. And that's where I feel the most connected. And that's where I feel just wonderful. And there it is right there. It's forcing me to slow down. So, I think it's helpful also to look at where are you actually being slipped, where are you forced to slow down, and how are you coping in those situations. Drew: Yeah. When you have no choice, you can actually try and remember, well, what does it look like for you? It'd be like, what does it look like when I'm in session? I just have to do that. When you're not sure, well, let me just go to what that feeling is. And those things to me also-- the last chapter of the book is called Beyond Seven Percent Slower because to me, that skill that I developed accidentally years ago serves me well now. So, one of the things in business that I get told all the time and people always say, the building could be on fire, and you're just-- I mean, I was a dude that couldn't leave his bathroom. I was so panicked and so agoraphobic, and they're like, “No problem. You do this, you get a bucket, we'll put it out. Everything's going to be cool.” That's the slowing down. And when you learn to do that, and you cultivate that skill, not only can it help you in your recovery journey, but it stays with you for a long time and it brings out the superpowers. We sometimes think that rushing and multitasking is the superpower – not really. Slowing down and letting each of your individual strengths and skills shine through because they can because you've given them space, that's where your real superpowers come out. That's probably where you are the most effective as a clinician is when you slow down and you're in that session. Kimberley: Or as a parent or as a wife or as a human, everything, right? Drew: Yeah. So, not to get all preachy about it, but I think it goes well beyond just the anxiety and stress thing. It's a good life skill in general. Kimberley: 100%. Okay. I have one more question. Drew: Sure. Kimberley: I've purposely not tried to go down the tips and tools because I just want people to actually buy the book and just go through it, like I did writing it down and really addressing it. But you talk about one thing that I wanted to talk about, which is the 92-second timer. Drew: Okay. I have to search through my Ulysses app, where did I write about 90 seconds. Kimberley: See, we just did this today. Let me tell you what I found was so helpful, is you said you set a reminder every 90 seconds to slow down. Drew: Yes. Kimberley: So, tell me, how important is that? Does it have to be 90 seconds? Was that a big piece of you retraining your brain? What did that look like? Drew: Again, that was my own-- yeah, that's right. I did do that, and I did write about it. So, I know we talked about it a little bit. That's fine. What I did was, I had an original iPhone, like OG iPhone, and I had this stupid timer. And I had this timer in there for 90 seconds. I use 90 seconds. I don't care what you use. I don't think the number is magical in any way. But when I was getting into that panic state and when I started doing my morning routine to prepare to do my driving exposures, I would just set the timer and it would repeat every 90 seconds. And that silly little timer would bring me back to slow down, slow down, slow down. It was just a cue. That's all. It was a silly little mental thing. Do I think it's critical for people? Some people might not need it. But if you do need it, I don't see that there's any crime in using it. And you could do it every 30 seconds, 60 seconds, every two minutes. It doesn't matter. It was nothing more than an auditory cue to remind me to slow down, slow down, slow down, slow down. Kimberley: The reason I bring it up is that has been crucial for me in all of my recovery, no matter what it is, is reminders. I think that it's easy to go on into autopilot. And I love that you mentioned that because I am a sticky note fan. I talk about it in my book. I love reminders. That's a crucial part of my existence. So, I just love that you brought that up because I think that we always have sticky notes like don't forget to get eggs and you've got to make a phone call. And this is the opposite of that, which is like, “Slowing down, hun. Bring it down a notch.” Drew: Kind of, because our reminders are usually to remind us to do things faster, now, don't forget them, get them done. Whereas-- Kimberley: Urgent, urgent. Drew: Yes, urgent, urgent. One of the funny things about this, the thing was, I don't have my phone with me here, but the sound was that stupid submarine alarm, like errr, errr, errr, which you would think I would have made a silly little, I don't know, like chimey, gentle thing. But I intentionally did the errr, errr because it was jarring. I needed it to jar me. And so, yeah, it was weird. I did not have to use the 90-second timer for months and months on end. It was in the beginning. It became very helpful to me. And then I spread the timer out to two minutes and then five minutes, and then we just didn't have to use the timer anymore. So, it was adaptive. I don't want anybody to think like I live my life based on this silly timer going off all the time. That's not the way it works. Kimberley: And I get that. I think that that's the cool piece here to the story you're sharing. And I would make this a big piece of what I want everyone to take away, which is, like anything, this sucks to start. It sounds like for you and it has been for me, although, like I'm saying, I'm owning up to falling off the wagon here a little, which I'm fine with. It can be a 90-second timer to start. But then that's where that muscle gets strong. It sounds like that for you, it's pretty strong now. Drew: Oh, it's really strong. It's automatic now. Yeah. It's almost automatic, but again, that's a lot of practice and repetition and really taking this to heart. It's not an overnight thing. And I still make mistakes. I just catch them faster now. Now, there's zillion things to do to get ready to launch this book. Yesterday, I fell absolutely into the trap. Totally did. Around three o'clock yesterday, I felt terrible. I was just agitated and all the stress stuff and anxiety stuff was like, oh, wait a minute here. So, I can see at least that that's the benefit of it. It's taught me to see what I'm doing and then correct it when I need to. Kimberley: Yeah. And it's great to have that. You're modeling that beautifully, right? That it's not going to always be the hardest thing. It's like something that you can learn to strengthen, which I really appreciate. Okay, tell us about where we can get this amazing book. Drew: Well, I think I made it pretty easy being a techie guy that I am. You could just go to sevenpercentslower.com, which you can either spell it seven or use the number 7, sevenpercentslower.com. We'll get you right to the page on my website that tells you about the book, which should come out plus or minus September 15th. So, I don't know when this podcast is going to air, but it's either out or not. If it's not, just get on my mailing list and I'll tell you when it is out. And yeah, that's how you got it. It's nice, friendly, short. You read it pretty quickly, I'm sure. It's not a giant 400-page monster like The Anxious Truth. It's friendly, easy, I like to think funny, easy to remember. Kimberley: It's so great. I'm actually so in love since the summer. I read all these amazing, just like short, really goes straight to the point. I cannot stand books that tell you something they could have told you in 100 pages. So I love that. I think it was exactly what I needed to hear. So I'm so grateful. Drew: Oh, I'm glad that you find it helpful, and thank you so much for giving me this little spotlight to talk about it and appreciate you. Kimberley: Of course. I probably a hundred episodes got on and went on a big lecture about how everyone has to slow down. And this is perfect timing. I think we all need it right now. Drew: Very good. Well, go get it. Sevenpercentslower.com. Hope it's helpful for everybody. Kimberley: Thank you, Drew. Drew: Thanks, Kim. Anytime. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B09G227B1Z/ref=sr_1_9?dchild=1&keywords=coping+skills+for+anxiety&qid=1631488551&s=digital-text&sr=1-9

Heino's Home Show
Ep 50: Condo Sales Slowing, DOJ Sues Realtors and Things That Will Lower Your Sales Price

Heino's Home Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 46:48


How the Florida condo tragedy has affected condo sales, why the DOJ has sued the National Association of Realtors and the long list of things that can greatly reduce your home’s sale price.

Optimal Health Daily
1483: 3 Ways Dieting Could Be Slowing Your Metabolism by Matthew Benetti with Ideal Nutrition on Trouble Losing Weight

Optimal Health Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 10:38


Matthew Benetti of Ideal Nutrition shares 3 ways that dieting could be slowing your metabolism Episode 1483: 3 Ways Dieting Could Be Slowing Your Metabolism by Matthew Benetti with Ideal Nutrition on Trouble Losing Weight Ideal Nutrition is an in-person and online dietitian service based in Brisbane. Their biggest specialty is body composition improvement, with a focus on helping people gain muscle or lose fat. This has developed through their own interest in sports and strength training, with a particular focus on powerlifting, in combination with the experience gained working with clients.  The original post is located here: https://idealnutrition.com.au/3-ways-dieting-could-be-slowing-your-metabolism/  Apple Vacations packages include roundtrip airfare, hotel accommodations, meals, drinks, entertainment, and tips. For a limited time, you can use promo code SAND75 and take $75 off your stay at Live Aqua in Cancun or Punta Cana. Go to AppleVacations.com/optimal-health-daily to get this deal to your favorite Live Aqua resort. Please Rate & Review the Show! Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com and in The O.L.D. Facebook Group  Join the Ol' Family to get your Free Gifts Interested in advertising on the show? Visit https://www.advertisecast.com/OptimalHealthDailyDietNutritionFitness

Optimal Relationships Daily
1087: Are People Slowing You Down by Steve Pavlina on Surrounding Yourself With the Right People For Your Goals

Optimal Relationships Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 9:46


Steve Pavlina asks you to reflect on whether or not people are slowing you down Episode 1087: Are People Slowing You Down by Steve Pavlina on Surrounding Yourself With the Right People For Your Goals Steve Pavlina is widely recognized as one of the most successful personal development bloggers on the Internet, with his work attracting more than 100 million visits to his website, StevePavlina.com. He has written more than 1300 articles and recorded many audio programs on a broad range of self-help topics, including productivity, relationships, and spirituality. Steve has been quoted as an expert by the New York Times, USA Today, U.S. News & World Report, the Los Angeles Daily News, Self Magazine, The Guardian, and countless other publications. He's also a frequent guest on popular podcasts and radio shows. The original post is located here: https://stevepavlina.com/blog/2020/04/are-people-slowing-you-down/ Upstart considers your income and current employment to find you a smarter rate for your loan. Find out how they can lower your monthly payments today when you go to Upstart.com/ORD Please Rate & Review the Show! Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com and in The O.L.D. Facebook Group Join the Ol' Family to get your Free Gifts Interested in advertising on the show? Visit https://www.advertisecast.com/OptimalRelationshipsDailyMarriageParenting

Optimal Relationships Daily
1087: Are People Slowing You Down by Steve Pavlina on Surrounding Yourself With the Right People For Your Goals

Optimal Relationships Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 10:31


Steve Pavlina asks you to reflect on whether or not people are slowing you down Episode 1087: Are People Slowing You Down by Steve Pavlina on Surrounding Yourself With the Right People For Your Goals Steve Pavlina is widely recognized as one of the most successful personal development bloggers on the Internet, with his work attracting more than 100 million visits to his website, StevePavlina.com. He has written more than 1300 articles and recorded many audio programs on a broad range of self-help topics, including productivity, relationships, and spirituality. Steve has been quoted as an expert by the New York Times, USA Today, U.S. News & World Report, the Los Angeles Daily News, Self Magazine, The Guardian, and countless other publications. He's also a frequent guest on popular podcasts and radio shows. The original post is located here: https://stevepavlina.com/blog/2020/04/are-people-slowing-you-down/  Upstart considers your income and current employment to find you a smarter rate for your loan. Find out how they can lower your monthly payments today when you go to Upstart.com/ORD Please Rate & Review the Show!  Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com and in The O.L.D. Facebook Group  Join the Ol' Family to get your Free Gifts Interested in advertising on the show? Visit https://www.advertisecast.com/OptimalRelationshipsDailyMarriageParenting Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Casper Dog Training
Slow down! Why rushing your dog is bad for obedience

Casper Dog Training

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 27:16


Slow down! Why rushing your dog is bad. Take your time! Sometimes we teach our dogs a little too well. When you ask your dog to do something, Do they skip a command because you have been consistently asking for a predictable pattern? Example: You always ask for Sit then down. So the dog just lays down when you ask for sit. Slowing down, capturing the behavior you want and getting the dog to focus, when its not a rush, will lead your dog into focus whether the dog is excited or relaxed. https://www.buymeacoffee.com/adamcasperhttps://www.buzzsprout.com/?referrer_id=1825873Check out www.rytecbd.com for high quality CBD products for you and your pet today!Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/adamcasper)

Behind the Movement
#67 - Traci Bennett

Behind the Movement

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2021 80:38


Traci has been a competitive life-long athlete. She has dabbled in soccer, basketball, baseball, softball, and Crossfit. She has experienced both sides of the coin: being an athlete and being a coach. After several crippling back injuries, she transitioned from a competitive athlete to a Coach, and focused more on the quality of movement rather than the intensity. Slowing down to coach helped her realize her passion, she has a deep drive for helping others move and feel better. Her chronic injuries eventually led her to find Functional Range Conditioning (FRC) and Kinstretch. These systems gave her the thought processes to assess her current state, and how to improve upon her limitations and train her injuries safely back to health. She wants to help people move and FEEL better, setting them up for success with knowledge and tools to empower them to full body freedom!

Marietta Daily Journal Podcast
City Council Approves Traffic Slowing Measures; North Georgia United Methodist Conference Sues Mount Bethel; North Georgia Students Compete in International Competition

Marietta Daily Journal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2021 18:10


The Marietta City Council has approved measures to slow down speeding drivers; The North Georgia UMC is going to sue Mt. Bethel UMC; UNG students compete to represent America in a cybersecurity competition. #UNG #NorthGeorgia #UMC #UnitedMethodist  #CobbCounty #Georgia #LocalNews      -            -            -            -            -            The Marietta Daily Journal Podcast is local news for Marietta, Kennesaw, Smyrna, and all of Cobb County.              Subscribe today, so you don't miss an episode! MDJOnline             Register Here for your essential digital news.             Find additional episodes of the MDJ Podcast here.              This Podcast was produced and published for the Marietta Daily Journal and MDJ Online by BG Ad Group on 9-10-2021.           For advertising inquiries, please email j.southerland@bgadgroup.com See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Wise Investor Group - Baird
Bullish On A Slowing Economy

The Wise Investor Group - Baird

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 15:26


Today we examine the numerous disappointing economic indicators coming out of August and what it may mean for the rest of the year. Also though, why it's a positive for the stock market and why we're still bullish.

The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer
Surgeon General Talks About Slowing Vaccinations, Surging Variant

The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 38:40


President Joe Biden meets with covid-19 response team ahead of major speech on the pandemic. Biden's covid-19 speech will include announcements on mandates, testing and a six-pronged strategy to fight the delta variant.  The United States surgeon general speaks about the rising covid cases among children. The United States surgeon general talks about slowing vaccinations and a surging variant and how vaccinated people are overestimating their risk. According to the CDC, the pace of covid-19 vaccinations is ticking down again. According to a study, severe breakthrough cases tend to be in older and sicker people. Kentucky sees a record number of new covid cases in one week. Covid hospitalizations in the United States are holdings at around 100,000.  13 Miami-Dade school staffers die of covid over the past few weeks. The United States is averaging nearly 1,5000 covid-19 deaths a day. A Florida judge allows for mask mandates to continue in schools, ruling against an appeal by GOP Gov. Desantis.  New video of the suspect who plants the pipe bombs ahead of the Jan 6 riot. A Capitol police memo warns of growing online talk of violence surrounding the September 18 rally supporting insurrectionists.  More than 12 million are under a flood watch in the storm-battered Northeast.  To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

40 for Tea
GREEN LIGHT - Season 3 Launch - Journey not Destination with Rach Allan

40 for Tea

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 2:50


In this short intro - Rach talks being messy & what is coming in the next 10 conversations over tea; Powerhouse Women, Alternative perspectives, and  Slowing down to Soul Sessions.

SuperFeast Podcast
#132 Mindful Travel with Nina Karnikowski

SuperFeast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 72:30


Travel writer and author Nina Karnikowski is putting a new lens on the way we view travel. In her recent sustainable travel handbook, Go Lightly- How to travel without hurting the planet, Karnikowski urges the reader to forget the bucket list and replace it with an itinerary that's more about connection. Connection to the lands we visit and the cultures native to them. Connection to the impact that our travel is having on local economies; 95% of travel dollars get funneled out of the destinations we visit (a term called 'leakage' in the travel industry). Connection to the languages spoken by the artisans that whittle and weave crafts to feed their families. And more connection to the idea of sustainable travel, which means doing a lot less and making our actions count in every possible.   For many of us, venturing overseas to explore far-off corners of the globe is something of a right of passage into early adulthood, and for some, a way of life. But as Karnikowski states, 'the staggering reality is, that only 6% of the world's population have ever even set foot on a plane'. This statistic really puts the idea of privilege into perspective, and as the adage goes, 'with great privilege comes great responsibility. Working as a travel writer for over a decade, traveling to some of the world's most remote destinations, Karnikowski has seen firsthand the destructive side of global travel. In this chat with Tahnee, Nina offers soulful insights and practical notions of how we can not only leave a lighter footprint but maybe even leave a place better than we found it through regeneration and mindful reciprocity. This conversation will have you yearning for connection, inspire you to do better, and make you incredibly nostalgic for travel. Mostly, it will open your eyes to the many little things we can be doing to make a positive impact on the places we choose to travel and the type of memories we create.   "And of course, during that time, I think a week after one of my editors writes to me and she says, 'Can I tempt you with this three-week private jet trip around Africa and you will be going to see the gorillas in Rwanda, and you'll be seeing the rock churches in Lalibela in Ethiopia'. And just this incredibly enticing trip. And I just had to say no. And of course, all these invitations kept coming. It was the greatest test of all but I thought, 'No, I've got to draw a line in the sand here'. Two years later, and I feel very strongly that the overarching message is unfortunately we have to just do a lot less of it".     Tahnee and Nina discuss: The power of conversations. How to travel more sustainably.   Leakage in the travel industry.  How to support local artisans. The art to a good travel wardrobe. The potency of a daily writing practise. Over tourism; Thinking twice about geo-tagging.  Being more mindful of how we spend our travel dollars. The negative impacts of tourism on local accommodation. Slowing down and spending more time connecting to people and nature.     Who is Nina Karnikowski? Having worked as a travel writer for the past decade, Nina Karnikowski is now on her greatest adventure yet: making her and her readers' travels more conscious, and less harmful for the planet. The author of Go Lightly, How to Travel Without Hurting the Planet and Make a Living Living, Be Successful Doing What You Love, Nina is dedicated to helping people find less impactful ways of travelling and living. She also runs regular writing workshops focused on connecting more deeply to self and the earth.    CLICK HERE TO LISTEN ON APPLE PODCAST    Resources: Nina's website Nina's Instagram Go Lightly Make A Living Living, Be Successful Doing What You Love   Q: How Can I Support The SuperFeast Podcast? A: Tell all your friends and family and share online! We'd also love it if you could subscribe and review this podcast on iTunes. Or  check us out on Stitcher :)! Plus  we're on Spotify!   Check Out The Transcript Here:   Tahnee: (00:00) Hi everybody and welcome to the SuperFeast podcast. I'm really excited today to be speaking to Nina Karnikowski, I think I got that. She's a beautiful Polish lady who is also Australian and an incredible travel writer and author who I'm actually lucky to share a neighbourhood with, just around the corner from us. Nina's worked as a travel writer for the past decade, which is a long time. And she's now getting to be a published author and she's written a really excellent book called Go Lightly, which is about making your travel more conscious and less harmful to the planet.   Tahnee: (00:37) It has some really beautiful reflections on how we can continue to enjoy exploring our planet with as much impact as we've been having in the last few decades. So Nina, I'm really stoked to have you here because I'm really passionate about this topic and I kind of didn't realise until I read your book how much of what you were saying is how I've always intuitively travelled. I hate the popular places and I hate the places where there's all the tourists.   Tahnee: (01:06) I've been really sad to return to places and see how tourism has damaged them. But I'm also, like you I think hopeful that tourism can be a force for good in the world as well. So, I feel like this could be a really juicy and fun chat. So, thank you so much for joining us today.   Nina Karnikowski: (01:23) Thank you so much for having me. I am excited to dive in.   Tahnee: (01:26) Yeah. Like at SuperFeast, Mason and I, the first thing we did when we got together was jump on a plane and went to Costa Rica and we spent a month there and then some time in the States. And then, I went off to Thailand and I was thinking about how much we have just always had travel as a part of our life style. And then obviously, Corona has come in and it's just been complete stillness for the last couple of years.   Tahnee: (01:54) And for me, it's been really beautiful. I was wondering about you as a traveller. Like you've been travelling for at least a decade nonstop, possibly longer. So, are you finding this kind of time is actually really restorative for you or are you feeling a little bit restless? How are you going in lockdown?   Nina Karnikowski: (02:12) Wow. It is a very big journey in itself, experiencing this lockdown. I think I have been through many waves, as I'm sure everybody feels. There are periods in which I am completely at peace and feeling very restored, feeling connected to the community, feeling connected to myself, feeling the wonder and beauty of everything that is around us all of the time. And actually probably connecting to that the first time in a really, really long time.   Nina Karnikowski: (02:46) And then, there are other weeks when I just feel ... I mentioned this word to you before we started talking, but I feel the [fernway 00:02:54] very acutely, which is this German word that expresses the opposite of homesickness. So, this desperate desire to just get out and see the world. I ache for the world, I ache for faraway places, I ache for the inspiration of that. And really what I have come to realise is that that cannot be replaced.   Nina Karnikowski: (03:17) I thought that it might be for awhile, but there is actually nothing that replaces that. But it is really something to be ... It's a period in which I've realised that travel is something to really be revered and to treasure. And I have come to really treasure my travel memories during this time. And also like I say, I've fallen in love with Australia again and the places close to us, which is really important when we're talking about the state of travel.   Tahnee: (03:54) Yeah. Something I really got out of your book was those kind of micro adventures, like getting in a car and going not so far and experiencing things close to us. And I want to stay on this idea of wanderlust a little bit because I'm super interested in ... I've been talking to a lot of people during lockdown about this and people are like, "You know, it's this right of passage. Every Australian gets to travel." And thinking about these 18 year olds that are stuck here and a part of me is like, "Well, it's actually a privilege that we get to do that, it's not a right."   Tahnee: (04:26) It's this incredible privilege to be able to jump on a plane and go anywhere in the world. And this idea that we could spend a year living in Europe or a year overseas somewhere, completely agree, invaluable life experience. But it's this sort of real privilege as well to have that. And I guess I think a lot about what is it in us that craves something new, what is it that needs to go and experience these other cultures? There's lots there for me because I think about Australia being in some ways quite cultureless, and we can talk about that.   Tahnee: (05:02) And I also think about how humbling and how beautiful it is to expose yourself to another culture and have to adapt your way of thinking to their way of being. So, they're the two things that have really come up for me is like experiencing something so different and so unreal. And obviously, the nature piece. Have you done any reflections on what are those motivations for you or where did that wanderlust arise from in you?   Nina Karnikowski: (05:31) It's a really important question. I think that we've all had a lot of time to try at least to get to the bottom of. Because I think it's so multifaceted. And just on the privilege thing, I'll share with you a really interesting statistic that I came across while looking to create Go Lightly. It's that 6% of the world's population have set foot on a plane.   Tahnee: (05:56) Wow.   Nina Karnikowski: (05:56) 6%, isn't that just staggering? And when you think about that and you think of how low that is compared to what we think it is, you really start to realise what a huge privilege the idea of travel really is. And that has really reframed things for me. But just about what that desire to travel is and where does that come from, I mean I think you're right in that it is this desire to experience difference and to really frame our own experience within that idea of the other, the other place, the other culture.   Nina Karnikowski: (06:45) Really I think we find a way to understand ourselves better through that. And there's just definitely that hunger in me. I mean, my whole lens as a travel writer was to go to the most far flung corners of the world. I loved places like Mongolia and Papua New Guinea and Ethiopia and Namibia. These places that a lot of other travel writers actually didn't really want to go to that much because they were kind of lesser known and more mysterious I guess.   Nina Karnikowski: (07:22) And often places that weren't really that heavily populated. And what really drew me to them was how do people live in those sorts of places. And often, the people that were living there were ... There were ancient cultures there that were living in ways that had largely been untouched by modernity. Spending time with nomads on the Mongolian Step and seeing how do these people survive in this environment where they're picking up all of their belongings, they're moving seasonally.   Nina Karnikowski: (07:57) And they have this tiny community that is so small but so deeply connected. And similar idea with the [Himba 00:08:05] tribe in Namibia and with the [Omo 00:08:08] Valley tribes in Ethiopia. I'm just fascinated to see these ancient ways of living and ways in which are so much ... When we're talking about going lightly, that is the ultimate going lightly, is just living in those ancient ways and really understanding how overcomplicated we often make our lives back home.   Nina Karnikowski: (08:36) So for me, it was often about that. Just kind of reframing my own experience and telling stories that helped the reader reframe that for themselves and to really ask the questions of is this the best way to be living. Is the way that we're living really bringing us happiness or is it just a conditioned response? That was always the big fascination, at least for me.   Tahnee: (09:01) So, how did you find yourself with these opportunities to travel to these places? You studied journalism? Or you were doing some kind of journalism? What was your background?   Nina Karnikowski: (09:12) Yeah, yeah. Well, I went to university in Sydney, UTS, University of Technology. And I studied journalism with international studies. And so, a year of that I spent studying in France because I spoke French. I still speak French, rusty now. And I really was just so fascinated in the idea of using writing to explore the world and explore other cultures. And then, once I'd finished that degree, I did what most people coming out of university in Australia with a communications degree do and desperately scrounged around for any job that I could get.   Nina Karnikowski: (09:59) Because the amount of degrees that are coming out are very disproportionate to the opportunities that are available. So, I did a lot of free work experience and things like that and basically begged a big publishing company here called [Fairfax 00:10:14] Media. I begged for a job until they decided they could handle me doing that anymore and they created a position for me, which was a junior writer role. So, I basically started out doing all the things that the senior journalists didn't want to do.   Nina Karnikowski: (10:32) And I started on a magazine called Good Weekend that I had studied a lot at university. And a lot of award winning journalists and things. Of course, I was just there transcribing their tapes and writing the parts of the stories that they didn't want to do or didn't have time to do. I learnt so much from them. So, I kind of revolved around the magazines there and wrote things about food and fashion and profiles of people and a bit of travel.   Nina Karnikowski: (11:01) But then, after doing that for about five years, a job came up on the travel team and I lept at that. And was lucky enough to get that job. And so yeah, I became an in house travel writer, which meant that I was sent on assignments every other week to ... At the beginning it was really wherever anyone else didn't want to go because all of the other travel writers had been there for quite some time. And then, I actually ended up moving to India for a year, which is another story. But I continued doing that job for a year there.   Nina Karnikowski: (11:40) And when I came back, they restructured the whole team just a few months after that. And they decided why on Earth are we paying in house travel writers when we could be not paying that person's salary and just using contributors. So, I put my hand up for voluntary redundancy at that point and became freelance travel writer. Which was actually ... It was a great move because it meant that I could write for a whole variety of publications and I had that really great foothold already in the industry. So, that's when I really started moving into the more remote parts of the world. And I did it every since.   Tahnee: (12:22) That's very brave. I mean, I think I remember that restructure. Was that when they were restructuring all the Fairfax and News Limited in Australia?   Nina Karnikowski: (12:31) One of them, yes.   Tahnee: (12:34) One of those, okay. So, that was a really big one. I was graduating, yeah, it was a big change. And I guess from moving into freelance, are you then able to ... You're pitching your story and you're kind of picking the places you want to go and you're interested in exploring and that's providing you with the opportunity to go and do that. That's kind of how your life's been the last 10 years?   Nina Karnikowski: (12:56) Well, yeah. I mean, it's interesting how it works. A lot of people are confused as to how somebody could make a living out of doing this thing. So basically, a company will usually approach you as a freelancer if you already are writing travel stories for publication with a big readership. And they will say, "Okay, we've got a new itinerary in Zambia and we would like a writer to come and experience it and write stories about it. So, would you like to come?"   Nina Karnikowski: (13:29) And in exchange for that, for being taken on this trip and having your expenses covered, you write a series of stories about your experiences and you sell them to different publications. And so, I was lucky writing primarily for newspapers in that there was enough volume of work to make that a reality because the magazines, you might only get three stories in a magazine a year. But for a newspaper, I was filing sometimes four stories a week. And you'd go on a trip and you'd come back and you would take one two week experience and you would write eight stories about it. So, that's how that sort of became a reality.   Tahnee: (14:16) Mm-hmm (affirmative), yeah, cool. And that was quite a long part of your career. So, I noticed your first book was really more around people's passion and soul. So, I'm interested in how that sort of came about because you've been working, travel writing and then you sort of made this segway into being a published author, which is really exciting. And I want to congratulate you on that because I know how hard that is. I worked in publishing for awhile. So, what was your motivation in putting together your first book? Was that just coming from your own passion?   Nina Karnikowski: (14:49) Yeah. Well, I was actually approached by somebody at the publishing house who said, "You've got this really interesting career. Do you think you might create a book around it?" And I didn't really like that idea of having my story at the centre of it, but I loved the idea that they were curious about how that had become my life. Because I always thought that about other people, you know? I would see these fabulous lives on Instagram and I'd be like, "Wow, how did that person become a wood carver? How did that person become a medicinal mushroom [crosstalk 00:15:28]."   Nina Karnikowski: (15:31) And I would look at these people and think, "Wow, I'm so curious about that. I wonder what kind of sacrifices they made to get there. I wonder how much money they started with." All the questions that people had asked me, like how do you actually make money as a travel writer? How do you become one? What are the downsides of that? All these kind of questions that I wanted to ask other people. So, the book ended up being my story just as the intro and then 26 stories from people from around the world who had made a living doing what they love.   Nina Karnikowski: (16:03) So, there's a Japanese tiny home builder and an Armenian visual artists and a Tanzanian photographer and a weaver in the US. All these different kinds of people. But really looking at the realities of what it takes to do those things because I think social media has a lot to answer for in making things sometimes look a whole lot easier than they really are. But also, encouraging the reader to take actions themselves. So, somebody who might be stuck in a nine to five job that they feel incredibly dispassionate about and how do they start implementing more creativity into their life.   Nina Karnikowski: (16:43) I have exercises in there to help them do that, lots of advice from the people that I featured to really empower people to take control. I mean, we spend such a huge part of our lives working. And I just think it's a tragedy if we are not enjoying what we're doing and feeling creatively fulfilled. And also, redefining what success is because let me tell you, as a freelance travel writer, I was not making heaps of money.   Nina Karnikowski: (17:15) But I was having an incredible time, I was telling great stories, I was seeing the world. And I had to really look at my definition of success and go, "Okay, well if my bank account is not heaving, then am I feeling fulfilled? And how do I help people see a different version of success that might empower them to take a few different chances in their life?"   Tahnee: (17:43) I think that piece around like when you aren't really passionate about something and it feeds you, you often make a lot of sacrifices, which often is financial as well as other things. I don't think we discussed that compromise enough as a culture around ... You do see ... I know people have said it about us. They're like, "You guys are so passionate and motivated." I'm like, "Yeah, but those things that we all come from is because of this." And not everyone is willing to make that sacrifice. I haven't had a chance to read that one yet but I'm really excited and I think [Mika 00:18:13] and Jesse are in there too. So, I'll have to-   Nina Karnikowski: (18:15) Yes, exactly. Who are Byron based chocolatiers. They make the most delicious chocolate. And she's an example of somebody who you'd be like, "Wow, a chocolatier?" You think of movies like [Chocolat 00:18:34] and you're just ... It seems so romanticised and I loved that she was so honest and she's like, "There were so many naysayers." And actually, the reality, there's a lot of ... So much hard work. She just works all the time.   Tahnee: (18:48) All the time, yeah.   Nina Karnikowski: (18:49) Yeah. But she loves what she's creating and she's very passionate about it and has a different view on what she wants to be spending her time doing than other people might. So, I think all of that is really important to convey because if you're someone who ... A lot of people really love the nine to five model and that's also really great because if you want to be able to properly switch off before and after work as well, then maybe being an entrepreneur or a creative is not for you. So, I think it's just important to show the realities of it so people don't go into this and then get a shock at how much work might be involved.   Tahnee: (19:34) Because I think about travel writing as one of those industries that people think is very glamorous but I'm sure you would be the first to tell us that it's not. And I mean, I wonder for you, is that something you see yourself doing forever? I mean obviously none of us know the future but what's that sort of looking like for you? Would you continue to take those assignments and then is there more books in your future? Or what are you looking toward?   Nina Karnikowski: (20:00) The great mystery.   Tahnee: (20:01) Yeah. Just throw that one in there.   Nina Karnikowski: (20:04) Well, yeah. First of all, I would say you're so right. It's absolutely not as glamorous as people might think. There's a lot of illness, I'll say first of all. A lot of illnesses I experienced because of that. And it's very fast paced. It's very you hit the ground running. You are working from the first moment you open your eyes until your head slams down on the pillow at the end of the day because the whole time you are just meeting people, gathering notes, taking photographs, making sure you've got everything to tell these stories the right way.   Nina Karnikowski: (20:46) And you've also got to be up all the time because people are hosting you and you want to be enthusiastic and you want to stay curious and you want to keep your eyes open wherever you are. So, that's not for everyone. And I certainly met various travel writers throughout my time who weren't really suited to it. And they would turn up and say, "I don't really want to do what we're doing today." And it's like well, you have to kind of do what is organised because people are expecting you to do that.   Nina Karnikowski: (21:14) So, that was definitely something. And also, you miss out on ... I was away a third of every year. I have a marriage to maintain and a life and family relationships and things. It's really difficult when you miss out on a lot of things. Okay. And then, as for what is ahead, well I mean, I've had such a huge shift in my thinking about what I'm doing and why over the past two years and even a bit before that. Which I'm sure we'll talk a bit about coming up.   Nina Karnikowski: (21:58) But I'm definitely going to change the way that I do what I do. So, it will be much less travel. It will probably be instead of 12 trips overseas a year it would be more like one or two longer trips so that I can tell more stories in one place but then come back and have that time at home. And definitely more books. I love creating books and I love actually almost as much as that the conversations that they start, like this. And being able to talk about these ideas with people and express them in other ways.   Nina Karnikowski: (22:36) I've started running workshops and things, which I find really deeply fulfilling because I think just conversations are so powerful. And I think for a long time I forgot that. I was in my storytelling, writing mode and I didn't even think about other forms of communication for a long time. I didn't have the space to. So, that's been a real gift in this time. And kind of just following my curiosity as well. I'm working on something with my publisher at the moment which is actually a totally different modality that I'm excited about and more in the writing craft realm. And I think as creatives we stagnate if we don't keep evolving. So, I'm looking forward to seeing how that mystery unfolds.   Tahnee: (23:28) Yeah. I want to make a little note on the sustainable travel tips you just gave us around less trips and longer times, I'll come back to that. But the last piece I wanted to talk to you about was a little bit off the book, was it's actually about your craft. Because one thing I noticed in reading, I've looked through your social media and read your book obviously. And you write from this really heartfelt, reflective and very self aware place, which I think is quite for me, anyway in my experience with travel writing, very unusual.   Tahnee: (23:59) And also, even on social media there seems to be this real sense of reflection and a lot of heart in your writing. So, I wondered if that's something that's come with time for you or is there a practise? Or is it your life style? I think I saw that you meditate. Those are things that kind of build your craft? Or is it just something that you think you've honed over time? Do you have any advice for writers in terms of how you've come to find your voice?   Nina Karnikowski: (24:25) Well, that's a beautiful question and thank you for saying that. Outside of my professional writing, I am a big journaler. And I am very self reflective, probably to my detriment at times. But I really love the practise of writing every single morning without fail, emptying the brain onto the page. I have done that since I was a teenager. I experienced quite severe anxiety in my late teens and I started to do it then. And it wasn't probably until a few years after that that I really solidified the practise after reading Julia Cameron's The Artist's Way.   Nina Karnikowski: (25:11) Where she advocates 20 minutes every morning. And I just find it such a powerful way of unburdening yourself every day. But also staying connected to your essence, to your purpose, to motivation, all those sorts of things. And also, just venting in a way that doesn't impact other people. So, you don't really have to do it to other people, you can just do it to the page every day. So, I think that's probably where a lot of that comes from. And then, bleeds through.   Nina Karnikowski: (25:41) I love social media for that, as a way of really connecting to a deeper truth that often in travel writing you're not that involved. The writer is not that involved in the story. Places taking centre stage. So, it's nice to share some more personal things on there. And I think for anybody who wants to write or even just evolve as a human, I think a daily writing practise is just so potent. And it's free, and it is just available to use at any time. I always say I've saved so many thousands of dollars on therapy by just self administering this therapy to me.   Nina Karnikowski: (26:22) It's often just what it feels like when you write down that thing that you would think, "Oh my God, I would never say that to anybody." And once you've actually written it down, and if you need to tear it up afterwards, by all means do that. But it's gone for you, it's gone. And you can really alleviate a lot of your own suffering that way. So, that's a big part of it.   Tahnee: (26:46) Yeah, the cathartic process, shedding those layers.   Nina Karnikowski: (26:52) Yeah.   Tahnee: (26:52) I dated a guy who gave me that book, I don't know when it was, it was a long time ago. But it similarly was one of the few things from her book that stuck, the morning pages. And to a less extent since my daughter was born, I'm the same. Still in there. It's more like afternoon or night pages these days.   Nina Karnikowski: (27:13) Yeah, also okay.   Tahnee: (27:15) Any time pages.   Nina Karnikowski: (27:16) Yes.   Tahnee: (27:17) But yeah, I think piece around getting ... I think that's what I see a lot with people is that subconscious, unexpressed I guess shadow aspects of ourselves, which don't necessarily have to be negative. But just those things that we haven't digested or processed, you know? Pulling that out. And I felt that in your book. Like in Go Lightly, that you were ...   Tahnee: (27:39) I hope this isn't a terrible thing to say, but it felt like it was almost a cathartic process for you on reflecting on your own journey as a traveller and as a travel writer and coming to this place of recognising some of the mistakes were yours as well but also the opportunities were yours. And that was kind of what I got out of reading it. Does that sound like a fair review in a way?   Nina Karnikowski: (28:04) It does. You can tell you had a background in publishing, it's a very astute observation. Yeah because that book was ... I wrote that book in a fever and it came from such a place of my eyes being opened to something that I thought I need to remedy this right now. I need to create a resource that I could not find at the time. So, the genesis of it was, I mean it was a cumulative process but really it was this trip that I took to the Arctic in 2019.   Nina Karnikowski: (28:35) It was my last big overseas assignment, which I can't believe I'm saying that. That's been two years now. Me two years ago would have just completely baulked at that idea. But i went to a town called Churchill, which is the polar bear capital of the world. 900 polar bears to 800 people. And I went there and I learnt firsthand about the plight of the polar bears, which of course I already knew. But to see these things firsthand, to learn about the melting of the ice caps and how that is impacting the breeding season of the polar bears. And how there's absolutely nothing that they can do to alleviate that situation themselves.   Nina Karnikowski: (29:15) But there is something we can all do. That really, heavily impacted me. And I came home from that trip and I calculated my carbon emissions and I thought, "Oh my God, I have got to change the way that I do this thing." That is so necessary for me as a human being. I felt it was the air that I breathed at that time I travelled. But it was the single most heavy thing that I was doing for the environment. It counts for something like 8% of the world's carbon emissions. And my carbon emissions personally were out of control because of that.   Nina Karnikowski: (29:57) And so, I really had to find a way to be more accountable and to understand how I could continue doing this thing that I loved. And it also accounts for one in 10 jobs in the world. And it does so much for our personal growth and it connects us as human beings. It does all these wonderful things so how could I continue to do it but in a way that was less impactful. And so, honestly almost immediately after that trip I wrote to my editors. I said, "Okay, I need to just take a little break. I've lost sight of why I'm doing this when I really came face to face with the impact of it. I need some time."   Nina Karnikowski: (30:42) And then, that same day I wrote to my publisher and I said, "I need to write this book. I need to figure out all the things that I've done wrong and figure out how to do it better." And to help other people figure that out too because we want to keep doing it but in a way that is less impactful. And so, I wrote that book then in the following three months. And of course, during that time, I think a week after one of my editors writes to me and she says, "Can I tempt you with this three week private jet trip around Africa and you will be going to see the gorillas in Rwanda and you'll be seeing the rock churches in Lalibela in Ethiopia.   Nina Karnikowski: (31:24) And just this incredibly enticing trip. And I just had to say no. And of course, all these invitations kept coming. It was the greatest test of all but I thought, "No, I've got to draw a line in the sand here." Two years later and I feel very strongly that the overarching message is unfortunately we have to just do a lot less of it. Which we are always hoping for a silver bullet. But aren't they going to make trains electric or run them on seaweed or something like that? But really, we just have to do less travel but make our travels count when we do them.   Nina Karnikowski: (32:05) Like everything in sustainability, do less and make our actions count. And perhaps even move towards regeneration. So, how do we give back to the places that we visit? How do we really make sure that there's reciprocity happening there? And how do we as 6% that have this ability to travel, how do we make our very potent travel dollars count in these places?   Tahnee: (32:36) Well, that statistic just dropped in for me. Like 6% of people are using 8% of the carbon emissions just in travelling. That's a really ... That's sort of mind blowing. It's interesting because I find a lot of problems with how we view these developing places and how we go there and we're rich there so we behave like divas. It's something that I've always really struggled with. And look, I've definitely done it too so I'm not saying I'm immune from this.   Tahnee: (33:10) But the reciprocity piece I thought was a really beautiful part of your book. And I think there was an African ... One of the first actual indigenous Africans to own a lodge, you interviewed him. I think his interview was really big for me because it really impacted me on how we really need to do our research and make sure that these places aren't owned by westerners who are just funnelling the money out of there or putting it toward their Range Rovers or whatever. It's actuallY going back into the villages and into the communities and supporting them in some way.   Tahnee: (33:45) And I don't know, do you have any thoughts on that kind of mindset shift that we might need to make as a population? That we're not going there to live like queens and kings. We're going there to participate in their economy and participate in their culture and in their world. I'm curious as to your thoughts on that.   Nina Karnikowski: (34:03) Yeah. I love that that came clear to you through reading it because that's really I think the most powerful thing that we could do. I mean, keeping the 6% figure in mind and then also keeping this figure in mind, which is that 95% of our travel dollars get funnelled out of the destinations that we visit. So, that's something called leakage in the travel industry. And so, we want to basically stop that from happening as much as we possibly can. So, that's looking for, like you say, companies like [African Bushcamps 00:34:39], which is in love with the first black owner of a bush camp in Africa. I can't even believe that.   Tahnee: (34:48) Yeah, that blew my mind. I was like, "Hang on a second."   Nina Karnikowski: (34:51) Right, right, exactly. So, putting our money into those sort of companies, also into locally owned hotels, into locally owned restaurants, into indigenous crafts and making sure that we understand that. And putting in the time to meet makers and really diving into the culture in a deeper way. And putting in the effort to learn the language. All these sorts of things which are helpful as well. But really, it's thinking about the travel dollar all of the time and always asking the question of who owns this and is there an alternative for me.   Nina Karnikowski: (35:38) Doing things like home stays are amazing and always so powerful as a traveller. We've all experienced going and staying in some sort of high rise Hilton and feeling like you could be anywhere in the world. And then, staying with a local family. Like I did this trip in Nepal where we stayed with families. And I spent four days family and learnt so much more about the culture and developed a really beautiful connection with the couple and their children.   Nina Karnikowski: (36:10) You get such a richer, deeper experience. And then, you develop relationships that then can carry on throughout your life, which I think is one of the most important things that we need to do as well as travellers is to create ongoing relationships with places. So that then if a tragedy occurs in that part of the world, the way we work is we'll be more inclined to act if we've visited that place, understood the people there and understood the culture. And so, that's another benefit of thinking that way as well.   Nina Karnikowski: (36:42) And just going back to [Lex 00:36:45] and what he said in that interview, he said something like the places that we travel to are nourishing for us, how do we give that nourishment back? How do we ensure that we are being nourishing too? So, that comes down to things like cultural exchange and making sure that we are offering something in return all of the time. So, if we're learning something and are we paying a fair price for things, first of all. And are we using our money in the right places?   Nina Karnikowski: (37:18) But also, just having conversations, building deeper relationships in places and making sure that in that way we're giving back as well. There's so many ways to give back as a traveller and it's not just about ... I think we had this outdated mindset of, "Okay, if we want to give back, we've got to sign up to build an orphanage in a destination."   Nina Karnikowski: (37:44) But the truth of that is that there's a lot of problems relating to that, which is often it can take away jobs from locals or build something just to tear it down once the travellers have gone because it's actually just a way of making money. All these sorts of things. So, I think that direct action, putting money in the pockets of locals and also building those more robust relationships. And just putting in the effort to really learn at that deeper level about culture.   Tahnee: (38:18) Yeah. Well the big kind of word that kept coming up for me in reading your book was slowing down. And I think I was reflecting on the most meaningful trips that I've had and they weren't probably very Instagramy in terms of I would walk around the city for four days and just sit at a café and talk to some old man about his experience living there for ... I did that in San Francisco. I spent three hours with this 70 year old gay man who had been through all of the amazing cultural shifts in San Francisco.   Tahnee: (38:47) And I learned more in those three hours than I would have learned in a museum or anywhere else. And same in Japan, I did a cultural exchange when I was 16 and lived with families there. And I still have them as a vivid memory of the grandparents every morning tending the shrine and the breakfast we were served and their gardens. But they're not particularly memorable memories in a way. Like in terms of sharing them with people or anything like that. They're just very special to me.   Tahnee: (39:17) And I think that was kind of the stuff that kept coming into my head reading your book was those experiences helped shape me. Yeah, I won't so much a picture and it was an incredible experience. I actually had a lot of resistance to going there. My husband made me go. He was like, "You will like it." I was like, "I'm not going to that place. It's too many people." He was like, "Just go." And we went at six in the morning to try and avoid the people. And yes, it was an incredibly sacred experience but we went to another temple, it was just him and I and that was for me a more sacred experience.   Tahnee: (39:47) So, I think all those notes that you made around getting off the beaten track, actually listening to locals, asking them where their favourite places to go are. Slowing down and spending more time connecting with people, I think those are the keys to really having that meaningful experience. Rather than being on those itineraries where you just go, go, go, go, go. Which we've all done those too.   Nina Karnikowski: (40:10) Yeah.   Tahnee: (40:10) Would you say that's kind of ... Is it slow? And is it mindful? Are these the kind of key words that are coming up for you in your research?   Nina Karnikowski: (40:19) Yeah, yes, absolutely. And so much of what you said is reflected in this, is thinking as a citizen rather than a consumer, right? We're so destructive in the way we travel a lot of the time. We go somewhere, we want something from it, these experiences. We don't care how we get it. But we I think need to shift and think, "Okay, but if we're acting like locals then we are more curious, we are paying more attention, we're having everyday conversations."   Nina Karnikowski: (40:57) And that way the experience actually becomes so much more delightful for you because like you say, you might not have experienced bucket list things in San Francisco, but you had a conversation with somebody that is yours, you know? And in that way it's like tailored clothes, they fit so much better. If you're tailoring your travel experience to yourself, it means you're not just going and going, "All right, I'm going to tick off that museum that I actually don't even care about that but everybody says to go. I'm going to tick off that big hat restaurant that everybody goes to."   Nina Karnikowski: (41:36) It's actually questioning what do I love, what am I deeply interested in and finding a way for that destination to help you find that. So, in that way you're growing as if you've seen. You're actually seeing things that you will be more engaged with. And it just personalises everything. I had this fantastic trip to Guatemala a couple of years ago, which was all based around weaving. And it was with this really beautiful little company called Thread Caravan.   Nina Karnikowski: (42:13) And they take groups of women to weaving villages where we met with these women. We spent the whole week with these women who had been weaving their entire lives. They're carrying on this very important cultural tradition, which is actually ... It's bringing income into these towns and it is also keeping it alive because that weaving tradition is being threatened by globalisation and by mass production and all those sorts of things.   Nina Karnikowski: (42:42) So, us going there as travellers, we're learning a skill that is just ... It just lit me up, learning how to weave on a back strap loom from these women who have been doing it their whole lives. So, you're learning something but you're also showing that community that actually hey, this cultural tradition is still worth something. And you're playing a part in keeping it alive in that sense as well. And you know, we saw how they were naturally dyeing these threads and they were telling stories about weaving.   Nina Karnikowski: (43:19) It gave me a whole new appreciation for that art as well which I'll now have for the rest of my life. Now had I simply gone and kicked off some big site, I still would have had a good time, sure, but it wouldn't have been tailored to me in that way. And it wouldn't have been something that I cherish so deeply like I do with that experience. So, I would just urge anyone who is perhaps at the moment only in the dreaming phases of their next event, but really thinking about what is it that I love. What is it that I want to learn more about?   Nina Karnikowski: (43:53) And is there a way that I can go to a place and allow that place to teach me that? And for example, I'm, as so many of us, into gardening and permaculture and things at the moment. So, I'm dreaming of going back to India and seeing if I can spend a few months on a permaculture farm and help out there because that way you're helping out but your also learning something in exchange. And developing a whole new relationship with that place via the soil. So, that's the kind of thing that I am envisaging now, the kind of journey that I'm envisioning.   Tahnee: (44:35) Yeah. I really love that idea too. It comes back to that self reflective piece, but yeah, understanding your motivations and your kind of why I guess, which I think was a big emphasis you placed in the book. Was really getting to the core of what lights you up about travel and why do you want to go. I mean you spoke about WOOFing quite a bit in the book as like an option for people. And if people aren't aware, it's a great way to give back to the community and learn some things.   Tahnee: (45:05) I've done that as well. I just think there's some really magical experiences to be had there. We were unable to go because of COVID but we were supposed to go and live on a farm in Argentina and my husband wanted to be a [guapo 00:45:20]. The cowboy. Said he wants to go and be a cowboy and I was going to cook with the women and tend the garden. Those kinds of trips are the ones that we get excited about, which aren't super fancy. But I just think for my daughter to live on a working cattle ranch, I think that's a really cool life experience. Hopefully one day we can do those.   Nina Karnikowski: (45:41) That sounds incredible. And actually, I will add as a parent how much better is that as well when you slow something down to that extent? You're actually living somewhere and you've got more space then because you're not dragging a child around from monument to monument. You're just living life in places.   Tahnee: (45:59) We've travelled with our daughter a lot and my huge learning on that was exactly what you're saying. Like rent a house, stay put, become a local. What are the great hikes in the area? Even in Bali, we just ... The best place I went was [Lovano 00:46:17], which was as far from Bali as you can get. But my daughter could play safely on the streets, she could make little friends and it was just this really ... Yeah. Like just to be very low key I think is amazing with kids. Because they get so much out of just interacting with other people.   Tahnee: (46:33) And there's no prejudice or preconceived ideas. So, they just accept things completely as it is, you know? And I love that about them. And they don't do well schlepping so there's no point trying. It's a nightmare. I did try it once. I was like, "No, never again." I don't know if you're familiar with ... There's this photography agency called Magnum, which was started in the 40s. Do you know about that? Yeah. I'm a big fan of just their story. A bunch of crazy renegades.   Tahnee: (47:06) But I kind of thought about that when I was reading your book as well because they documented a lot of places that were completely unvisited by westerners. Especially coming up through the 40s, 50s, 60s when people didn't travel as much as they do now. And they also in the interviews I've read with some of the photographers, they said 20 years later they really regretted having shared those stories because it dramatically changed the places they visited.   Tahnee: (47:37) And I wondered because you've been travelling for such a long time, have you seen that in the places you've visited? Like over tourism and what have you seen impact these cultures and these communities? And as consumers and travellers, what can we do? Obviously all the things we're talking about but are there any other tips or things that you've noticed that you think people can be more attuned to or aware of?   Nina Karnikowski: (48:01) Yeah, definitely. I think that that is a huge consideration that to be honest I didn't think too much about for a long time. I was very passionate about sharing these places with people and everybody needs to know about this place. And I never thought if I start geo tagging anything or revealing these places because I thought I want to share it with everyone. In quite a naïve way really because that is exactly how over tourism happens. And I have been to some horribly over touristed places.   Nina Karnikowski: (48:36) For example, Barcelona where we were at this [inaudible 00:48:39] and the line was something like three and a half hours long. And everyone is just going in to see the same thing. And you go in there and you can't really feel anything because how can you when you're surrounded by thousands of people and flashbulbs and cameras and things. I felt the same thing at the Taj Mahal actually because in India it's the same level of over tourism and everybody wanting to see the same thing.   Nina Karnikowski: (49:06) And to a lesser extent, there's just places, it doesn't necessarily have to be a volume thing, it's an infrastructure thing. So, there are certain towns and even rural places around the world that have become famous for a particular selfie thing made in a certain spot. And I mention a couple of these stories in the book where locals will just be completely inundated by ... And it might only be a few hundred people coming there but it's too much for their little place to bear.   Nina Karnikowski: (49:40) And there might not be enough places for people to go to the toilet and all those sorts of things. Or on the other end of that, it's like Venice where locals can no longer find accomodation because everything has been turned into tourist accommodation.   Tahnee: (49:59) Or Byron Bay?   Nina Karnikowski: (50:00) Or Byron Bay, exactly, where we are. It's the same problem. And we all know how that feels. And you see it happen in part of Paris. I remember doing an assignment there and my guide was saying that used to be a baker, that used to be a hardware store, that used to be the local cobbler. And now it's just all Airbnbs and there's actually no services for locals here now. So, in order to avoid all of those things, again it comes down to tailoring the experience.   Nina Karnikowski: (50:32) To really not rushing where everybody else is going but questioning like where do I want to go. And is there a place that's close to a place that everybody is going that might be more delightful? And asking locals where they go. And really getting clear on your own personal desires in that way. And also, another great approach is asking where needs your travel dollars. That is just becoming such a more profound question now with the variety of disasters that are happening around the world.   Nina Karnikowski: (51:10) It's a great way to approach it, to say, "Okay, is there a destination that experienced a natural disaster that might need tourist dollars? Is there a town that has experienced ..." For example, I went to Nepal for the third time just after the huge earthquake happened. And they were just desperate for tourists. People were either scared or they thought there was nothing left to see. And that place really needs your tourist dollars. So, looking at it as again, how can I use my dollars in a way that might help the local community.   Nina Karnikowski: (51:48) And also, another big thing is travelling closer to home for a lot of us. And that is something that I think obviously forced to do in some ways over the last couple of years. But have really been enjoying. So, really just thinking about what places near me are not discovered really that much. And I went to an amazing dark sky park, which was just an eight hour drive from [crosstalk 00:52:21]. Yeah, near there, yes. And it was the best star gazing.   Nina Karnikowski: (52:28) So, they call it a dark sky park because there's very little light pollution. And I saw better stars there than I did in the middle of Namibia. And did some incredible hiking and learned about the indigenous history of the area. And that area had been heavily impacted by the devastating bush fires in Australia. So, it felt good to be returning somewhere that people were perhaps a bit hesitant to go to at that time. So yeah, falling in love with the places closest to us.   Nina Karnikowski: (53:02) And I also did a road trip. This is the other thing, put nature at the centre of your journeys is a big thing to do what I'm talking about. More sustainable or regenerative travel. So, I took a road trip earlier this year from our house to the Daintree Rainforest. It was a month and it was just me and the car and I slept in the car some of the time, which is actually really fun. People are always shocked. But I was camping as well and also staying in beautiful mud brick off grid house for a while.   Nina Karnikowski: (53:41) And all a variety of different places but it was all just about hiking. It was about visiting permaculture farms. I visited a mushroom farm. I got to go and see the state of the great barrier reef for myself and understand what's happening there. The same thing in Daintree. So really, also getting curious about what ... I'm very interested in the impact of climate change on natural places at the moment. So, that was a great way for me to see that firsthand and to kind of activate myself in that way. And I think that's something we can all do as well. What issue am I interested in at the moment and is there a place that I could go to learn more about that than wait and worry to figure it out?   Tahnee: (54:29) Yeah. My mom and dad travelled Australia a lot when they were young and I think I've been Australia twice but I don't remember any of it. I've done a lot of it as an adult now as well. But yeah, I watched you travel to North Queensland which is where I grew up. And it was really ... It's something that I've found shocking living down in New South Wales that people don't know. Like I'll say I'm from Mission Beach and people go, "I've never heard of it." And I'm like, "Okay, Cannes." And they're like, "Oh, yeah, okay. Is that near [Townsland 00:55:01]?" And I'm like, "Like the great barrier reef?" And like okay.   Tahnee: (55:04) Wow, people in this country don't know. And I'm not even actually from Mission Beach, I'm from [Bingle 00:55:09] Bay but nobody even has a clue where that is, you know? And it's just like to really try and get people to see their own country. Aren't we proud? When I was a 10 year old in the 90s, we used to get ... I think there was something like, I don't know, four or five international flights a day into that Cannes airport. My parents were in tourism so you could know everyone in Cannes was Japanese. Like every single ...   Tahnee: (55:32) I used to get my photo taken because I was blonde and white haired. It was such a different place then. And people from all around the world were travelling to that place and Australians don't even know where it is on a map, you know? So, I was super excited to see you going there. And you drove your little eco car too which I was like, "Yeah." It's a really great example to set I think for people to see how much amazing nature is right on our doorsteps in this country.   Nina Karnikowski: (56:00) That's right. And also connecting more deeply to the indigenous history of this country and really thinking about what we might learn in that respect about just understanding the history of the place that we stand on. And asking yourself everywhere that you are who's land is this and am I behaving in a way that is respectful to those people. If you're asking yourself those questions when you're travelling at home, then that then translates as well when you go overseas.   Nina Karnikowski: (56:39) And you will be more inclined to think that way than ways that you might behave in the past, which is where we just kind of think, "Oh, well we're overseas, it's not our place, it doesn't matter how we behave." It always matters.   Tahnee: (56:53) It comes up to [inaudible 00:56:55].   Nina Karnikowski: (56:54) Yeah, right. So, kind of almost practising it at home as well. Practising how do we be better travellers and how do we ... Even getting used to things like camping and biking and hiking and all those sorts of things that we do at home and are comfortable doing it overseas.   Tahnee: (57:16) Yeah. I was thinking a bit about ... Well, there's two little things that really landed for me again in reading your book. So one was around ... I actually have also been to Guatemala and hung out with the weavers, not through Thread Caravan but just on my own adventures. But I remember purchasing a weaving from them, a piece of fabric and it's become such a treasure of mine because again, like you're saying, the story. She was telling me about how the different moon cycles affect the colours of the dye.   Tahnee: (57:48) So, to get a vibrant colour it goes on the full moon and the more mute colours, the new moon. All these kinds of things. It's become this possession that I'm attached to in a really ... I think in a beautiful way. Compared to things I've bought on other trips that have maybe ended up in a nut shop or not become ... It sounds terrible but it's true. I've just been like, "Eh." It's a kind of disposable piece, this thing that I've bought. So, I wondered around souvenirs and trinkets, what are your thoughts? Is it connecting with the people that are making it? Is avoiding those mass produced souvenir shops or do you have any kind of thoughts on that part of travel?   Nina Karnikowski: (58:28) It's such a good question. And I'm very passionate about that. I'm passionate about that at home as well. About really thinking about everything that we allow into our lives and thinking about where it's going to end up. And thinking about just the life cycle of every single thing that we own and about how we might treasure our possessions more and really think of them as becoming part of us. And if we really think about how is it made, where was it made, who was involved in the creation of this thing, we would develop such a more respectful relationship with the physical object in our life.   Nina Karnikowski: (59:12) So, with thinking about that, I love to collect things on my travels. And my house is definitely filled with those things. But I always thought about the life cycle of it. Instead of ... Well, not always. There was definitely in my 20s, you would buy things that would make you laugh or whatever. You bring it home and then [crosstalk 00:59:43].   Tahnee: (59:43) We've all got them.   Nina Karnikowski: (59:44) Yeah, yeah. But no, I definitely think now about where is this going to sit in my home and is this something that could be biodegradable at the end of it's lifetime. Woven baskets or wooden items or things like that, does this item really tell the story of the place that I was in? And always also asking do I have to buy five of those things or maybe I just buy one more expensive one. And always also in that respect I think it's always worth paying more for something that is made properly and by an artisan.   Nina Karnikowski: (01:00:28) As opposed to thinking, "Oh, okay, I can just buy three of those knockoff ones next door." Really coming back to who has created it, what energy has gone into creating it and bringing that reference to it. And also, the important things around questioning whether what the thing is made out of, is that ethical. So, there's all the things being made out of tortoise shell or bones or anything like that that might be an endangered species. I think that all comes into it too.   Nina Karnikowski: (01:01:05) But I really do think that that idea of reverence and buying directly from artisans is really important. And I know that the pieces that I have bought are now going to be with us forever because they do hold those memories. And I can remember each person who sold me that thing and the interaction that we've had. And some of the things it was with people who I'd been interacting with for days and then fell into relationship with so that it really has a story to it. So, I think that's also then something that does bleed out into our everyday life. And to change the way that you see them then when you're at home as well.   Tahnee: (01:01:54) Yeah. And that beautiful opportunity to reflect every time you see that piece and it's meaning to you and where it comes from.   Nina Karnikowski: (01:02:01) Right.   Tahnee: (01:02:03) Yeah. I've noticed in researching your work that fashion seems to be a topic you're passionate about as well and not consuming fast fashion. And just it's something I always find interesting with travelling, especially when you meet weavers and you look at how much work goes into producing a piece of cloth. And then, you think about I can buy a singlet for $5 from Target or something. It's such a crazy ... I know a machine's doing it, so it's a bit different. But yeah, I find that's a big schism in my brain that I can't quite reconcile.   Nina Karnikowski: (01:02:41) I have so much to say on that but I'll try to be brief. But no, it's true. And I love that you experienced that in Guatemala and you saw. I think once you see something like that, it's very hard to forget it. When you see oh my gosh, that took three months for somebody to create by hand. That's actually what it would take for a human being to create a woven piece of clothing. And when we put that lens on things, it really just shifts the whole experience.   Nina Karnikowski: (01:03:18) And it's like ... I don't know if you're familiar with [Tika Han's 01:03:23] work where he often talks about an amazing zen Buddhist teacher. And he talks a lot about when you are eating a meal, you look at the food in your bowl and really question every bit of energy that went into creating that meal. So, you give gratitude to the son and the rain and the soil that nourished the plants that then grew and then the work of the farmers who harvested that for you. And then, the people who processed it and brought it to you.   Nina Karnikowski: (01:03:58) All of those things that create a meal. And I think we can think about that with clothing too, you know? Really thinking about ... Okay, if this is a very cheap piece of clothing, what energy was put into it and how has it been possible to create it for that price? And understanding that that is reflective of something that probably isn't ethically made. And also, bringing a sense of reverence to every item that enters your world so that you're not likely to just cast it off when the fashion changes but you're really looking for something that speaks quick deeply to you that you will look after for the rest of your life.   Nina Karnikowski: (01:04:43) Or that you will pass on in a respectful way to somebody else. Because we might just think fashion is this fun folly but wow, it is really responsible for so much pollution and also mistreatment of human beings and our environment. So, it's something to love and to use to express yourself but also to really think quite deeply about the origin of all those things. That's why I'm so passionate about secondhand clothing and things like cloth swaps and things because that way you end up with pieces.   Nina Karnikowski: (01:05:26) Like I went to a clothing swap recently and I ended up with pieces from my friends that I'm like, "I've got a piece of that friend." And every time I wear it I think of them. And I'm likely to look after it more because it is attached to that person. And there's definitely a beauty to that. And also, I always think about there's a lot of companies now that say, "Our lines are sustainable, and it's made with this material," and all that sort of thing. But really, there's nothing more sustainable than buying something that is already in [crosstalk 01:06:02].   Tahnee: (01:06:01) Production, circulation.   Nina Karnikowski: (01:06:03) Has already been in circulation, exactly. So, reusing in that way.   Tahnee: (01:06:13) And so, in terms of your travel wardrobe because I loved that you touched on this a bit in the book. And I think it's always so interesting depending on where you're going and what you're going to need. And I always find when I have to go into multiple climates, it's a bit of a headache. But what's your go-to in terms of travel and packing? Are you pretty ... I'm assuming being a travel writer, you're pretty light weight. But I'm interested to hear how you approach packing and selecting clothing. Do you research the places first and try and be culturally sensitive? What's your thought process around that?   Nina Karnikowski: (01:06:51) So, yeah. I became a bit of a master packer over the years. And I think the key for me was really just packing as little as I possibly could and also packing things that could be multipurpose. I was really big on packing block colours, thing

MarketFoolery
Zoom Video Falls on Slowing Growth

MarketFoolery

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 12:24


Zoom Video's 2nd-quarter revenue topped $1 billion for the first time, but shares fell more than 15% as growth slows. Shares of Yandex rise as the Russian tech company buys out Uber's interest in several joint ventures. Maria Gallagher analyzes those stories and shares why Designer Brands' amazing 2nd-quarter report glosses over genuine challenges for the business.