Podcasts about Ukrainian

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  • 2,006PODCASTS
  • 5,125EPISODES
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  • Oct 25, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about Ukrainian

Show all podcasts related to ukrainian

Latest podcast episodes about Ukrainian

Studs Terkel Archive Podcast
Discussing Ukrainian music with Oleh Saciuk

Studs Terkel Archive Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 33:51


First broadcast on October 25, 1979. Studs Terkel discussing Ukrainian music with Oleh Saciuk. Includes instrumental music excerpts.

El Clásico Podcastico: a Barcelona and Real Madrid podcast

The boys are beside themselves with excitement for the first el clasico of the '21-22 season as both teams look to show the world who's boss in the eternal rivalry. First they dive into the form book to see how both are playing in the runup to the big game, with all the analysis of Barcelona's impressive and not-so impressive wins after the international break (10:09), and Real Madrid's avenge their two losses against Shakhtar Donetsk with a glittering performance against the Ukrainian side, and what that could mean for Barcelona (43:14). Then, they dig deep into the massive matchup itself, with Problems & Opportunities (58:11) for each of their sides, and finally get down to the dirty details with their predicted lineups, goalscorers, and final score for the game on Sunday (1:18:40). 

The Slavic Connexion
Mountains without Borders: Discovering the Carpathians with Patrice Dabrowski

The Slavic Connexion

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 39:10


In this episode, Patrice Dabrowski takes us on a historical journey through the highly understudied Carpathian Mountains of Poland, Slovakia, and Ukraine. Her brand new book details the many forces at play in the mountainous region over the years from 1860 to 1980 and shows how this area gradually went from terra incongita to tourist attraction. We hope you enjoy! ABOUT THE BOOK https://cornellpress-us.imgix.net/covers/9781501759673.jpg?auto=format&w=298&q=20&dpr=2 In The Carpathians, Patrice M. Dabrowski narrates how three highland ranges of the mountain system found in present-day Poland, Slovakia, and Ukraine were discovered for a broader regional public. This is a story of how the Tatras, Eastern Carpathians, and Bieszczady Mountains went from being terra incognita to becoming the popular tourist destinations they are today. It is a story of the encounter of Polish and Ukrainian lowlanders with the wild, sublime highlands and with the indigenous highlanders--Górale, Hutsuls, Boikos, and Lemkos--and how these peoples were incorporated into a national narrative as the territories were transformed into a native/national landscape. The set of microhistories in this book occur from about 1860 to 1980, a time in which nations and states concerned themselves with the "frontier at the edge." Discoverers not only became enthralled with what were perceived as their own highlands but also availed themselves of the mountains as places to work out answers to the burning questions of the day. Each discovery led to a surge in mountain tourism and interest in the mountains and their indigenous highlanders. Although these mountains, essentially a continuation of the Alps, are Central and Eastern Europe's most prominent physical feature, politically they are peripheral. The Carpathians is the first book to deal with the northern slopes in such a way, showing how these discoveries had a direct impact on the various nation-building, state-building, and modernization projects. Dabrowski's history incorporates a unique blend of environmental history, borderlands studies, and the history of tourism and leisure. (Publisher) ABOUT THE GUEST https://www.umass.edu/archivenewsoffice/sites/default/files/styles/article_small/public/Patrice%20Dabrowski%20copy.jpg Patrice M. Dabrowski has taught and worked at Harvard, Brown, the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, and the University of Vienna. She is currently an associate of the Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute, a member of the Board of Directors of the Polish Institute of Arts and Sciences of America (PIASA), and editor of H-Poland. Dabrowski is the author of three books: Poland: The First Thousand Years (2014), Commemorations and the Shaping of Modern Poland (2004), and The Carpathians: Discovering the Highlands of Poland and Ukraine (2021). In 2014 she was awarded the Knight's Cross of the Order of Merit of the Republic of Poland. PRODUCER'S NOTE: This episode was recorded on August 27th, 2021 via Zoom. To reach us via email, send a message to slavxradio@utexas.edu if you have questions, suggestions, or would like to be a guest on the show! CREDITS Co-Producer/Host: Lera Toropin (@earlportion) Co-Producer/Host: Cullan Bendig (@cullanwithana) Associate Producer: Zach Johnson Assistant Producer: Sergio Glajar Assistant Producer: Misha Simanovskyy Associate Producer/Administrator: Kathryn Yegorov-Crate Executive Assistant: Katherine Birch Recording, Editing, and Sound Design: Michelle Daniel Music Producer: Charlie Harper (Connect: facebook.com/charlie.harper.1485 Instagram: @charlieharpermusic) www.charlieharpermusic.com (Main Theme by Charlie Harper and additional background music by Charlie Harper, Ketsa, Scott Holmes, Kevin MacLeod, Quantum Jazz, Kai Engel, Anthem of Rain ) Executive Producer & Creator: Michelle Daniel (Connect: facebook.com/mdanielgeraci Instagram: @michelledaniel86) www.msdaniel.com DISCLAIMER: Texas Podcast Network is brought to you by The University of Texas at Austin. Podcasts are produced by faculty members and staffers at UT Austin who work with University Communications to craft content that adheres to journalistic best practices. The University of Texas at Austin offers these podcasts at no charge. Podcasts appearing on the network and this webpage represent the views of the hosts, not of The University of Texas at Austin. https://files.fireside.fm/file/fireside-uploads/images/9/9a59b135-7876-4254-b600-3839b3aa3ab1/P1EKcswq.png Special Guest: Patrice M. Dabrowski.

Economist Radio
Gas-trick distress: a visit to Ukraine

Economist Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 20:26


Russia continues to pile pressure on the country, and will soon have the power to cut off its natural gas. Our correspondent pays a visit to find how Ukrainians cope. The simplest solution to renewables' intermittency is to move electricity around—but that requires vast new international networks of seriously beefy cables. And Canada's version of American football is wasting away. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Intelligence
Gas-trick distress: a visit to Ukraine

The Intelligence

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 20:26


Russia continues to pile pressure on the country, and will soon have the power to cut off its natural gas. Our correspondent pays a visit to find how Ukrainians cope. The simplest solution to renewables' intermittency is to move electricity around—but that requires vast new international networks of seriously beefy cables. And Canada's version of American football is wasting away. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Critical Hour
Lebanon Faces Increasing Violence; RussiaGate Continues to Unravel

The Critical Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 100:34


Laith Marouf, broadcaster and journalist based in Beirut, joins us to discuss Lebanon. International security experts fear Lebanon may fall into crisis and civil war as violence on the street escalates. The announcement that a court has refused to replace a judge who is involved in the investigation of last year's deadly port blast seems to have sparked street clashes, leaving at least six dead. Our hosts come together to discuss Russia-gate. Ukrainian citizen Konstantine Kilimnick reveals that he was not interviewed by any of the US government investigators allegedly investigating Russia-gate even though he was framed as an FSB operative. Investigative journalist Matt Taibbi was shocked to find that neither Robert Mueller nor any of the other US investigators had contacted and talked to Kilimnick, even though he served as a high-level US State Department operative. Dan Lazare, investigative journalist and author of "America's Undeclared War," joins us to discuss Belarus. Belarusian President Lukashenko's administration refuses to cower to the US empire's neoliberal asset privatization plan, and has therefore landed at the top of their regime change list. This was evidenced by President Joe Biden mentioning the Eastern European nation in his UN speech on a list of nations that need US support to achieve democracy.Professor Ken Hammond, professor of East Asian and global history at New Mexico State University and activist with Pivot to Peace, joins us to discuss North Korea. North Korean leader Kim Jong Un seems to be working to create an air of legitimacy on the world stage. Their recent arms show was presented in traditional western style rather than the traditional boisterous manner to which we have become accustomed. His appearance in a suit and tie is also believed to be part of a makeover for international media consumption.Robert Fantina, journalist and Palestine activist, joins us to discuss Iran. The US Secretary of State's recent meeting with Israeli representatives has been followed by brash talk about war with Iran from both nations. Blinken has said that "time is running out" for Iran, and Israeli officials claim the right to attack the Islamic Republic at any time they decide that the threat has escalated to a point of no return. Dr. Linwood Tauheed, associate professor of economics at the University of Missouri- Kansas City, joins us to discuss Russia and China's fiscal policy. The leaders of Russia and China both have spoken out against US fiscal policy. Russian President Putin argues that the US policy of economic sanctions and profligate spending is part of the reason that inflation is rising worldwide. Also, Chinese President Xi Jinping said that the looming US debt crisis spells real trouble for the world economy.

Kyiv Future
E253 Olha Volianska: Psychology Student @ UCU

Kyiv Future

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 45:01


Olha Volianska is a Psychology Student at Ukrainian Catholic University, a journalist of the Ukrainian podcast «POLITpodcast» and a member of the UCU student organization POLITclub UCU. Olha actively volunteered as a journalist during her school years (for instance, by interviewing the head of Alliance Française based in Lviv and the current ambassador of France in Ukraine). She speaks English and French fluently while always trying to perfect them, and she participated in a lot of school language contests, taking prize places. Olha grew up in Lviv, and she is into reading the classics, preferably historical novels as well as psychological and philosophical works. She also enjoy playing the piano to unwind from daily stresses. Instagram: @ovolyanska

CSO Audio Program Notes
CSO Program Notes: Shostakovich, Schubert 3 & Prokofiev Piano Concerto No. 1

CSO Audio Program Notes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 19:03


Ukrainian-born piano powerhouse Alexander Gavrylyuk presents Prokofiev's iridescent and rhythmically animated First Piano Concerto, the work with which the composer made his CSO performance debut, in 1918, as part of its U.S. premiere. James Conlon leads this program framed by Shostakovich's steely Chamber Symphony, an adaptation of his elegiac Eighth String Quartet, and Schubert's mercurial Symphony No. 3, which shines with youthful vigor. Michael Tilson Thomas has withdrawn from these performances due to health reasons. Learn more: https://cso.org/performances/21-22/cso-classical/shostakovich-schubert-3-prokofiev-piano-concerto-no-1/

TRUNEWS with Rick Wiles
Will Dementia Help “Big Guy” Joe Biden Avoid Prison?

TRUNEWS with Rick Wiles

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 65:05


One year ago this month, many American citizens were shocked by the vulgar and obscene corruption that was revealed on Hunter Biden's computer hard drive that he abandoned at a Delaware electronics repair shop. In addition to pornographic videos of the President's son with underaged Asian girls, the hard drive contained a treasure trove of emails and files that documented the allegations that the Biden Family has been involved in corrupt international business deals for many years. A 2015 email from a corrupt Ukrainian business executive thanked Hunter Biden for introducing him to his father, the Vice President of the United States. A 2017 email about a Chinese energy company equity split proposed giving ten percent of the company to Joe Biden. Rick Wiles, Doc Burkhart, Kerry Kinsey. Airdate 11/13/21

New Books Network
John-Paul Himka, "Ukrainian Nationalists and the Holocaust: OUN and UPA's Participation in the Destruction of Ukrainian Jewry, 1941-1944" (Ibidem Press, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 60:39


One quarter of all Holocaust victims lived on the territory that now forms Ukraine, yet the Holocaust there has not received due attention. John-Paul Himka's Ukrainian Nationalists and the Holocaust: OUN and UPA's Participation in the Destruction of Ukrainian Jewry, 1941-1944 (Ibidem Press, 2021) delineates the participation of the Organization of Ukrainian Nationalists (OUN) and its armed force, the Ukrainian Insurgent Army (Ukrainska povstanska armiia--UPA), in the destruction of the Jewish population of Ukraine under German occupation in 1941-44. The extent of OUN's and UPA's culpability in the Holocaust has been a controversial issue in Ukraine and within the Ukrainian diaspora as well as in Jewish communities and Israel. Occasionally, the controversy has broken into the press of North America, the EU, and Israel. Triangulating sources from Jewish survivors, Soviet investigations, German documentation, documents produced by OUN itself, and memoirs of OUN activists, it has been possible to establish that: OUN militias were key actors in the anti-Jewish violence of summer 1941; OUN recruited for and infiltrated police formations that provided indispensable manpower for the Germans' mobile killing units; and in 1943, thousands of these policemen deserted from German service to join the OUN-led nationalist insurgency, during which UPA killed Jews who had managed to survive the major liquidations of 1942. Steven Seegel is Professor of Slavic and Eurasian Studies at The University of Texas at Austin. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in History
John-Paul Himka, "Ukrainian Nationalists and the Holocaust: OUN and UPA's Participation in the Destruction of Ukrainian Jewry, 1941-1944" (Ibidem Press, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 60:39


One quarter of all Holocaust victims lived on the territory that now forms Ukraine, yet the Holocaust there has not received due attention. John-Paul Himka's Ukrainian Nationalists and the Holocaust: OUN and UPA's Participation in the Destruction of Ukrainian Jewry, 1941-1944 (Ibidem Press, 2021) delineates the participation of the Organization of Ukrainian Nationalists (OUN) and its armed force, the Ukrainian Insurgent Army (Ukrainska povstanska armiia--UPA), in the destruction of the Jewish population of Ukraine under German occupation in 1941-44. The extent of OUN's and UPA's culpability in the Holocaust has been a controversial issue in Ukraine and within the Ukrainian diaspora as well as in Jewish communities and Israel. Occasionally, the controversy has broken into the press of North America, the EU, and Israel. Triangulating sources from Jewish survivors, Soviet investigations, German documentation, documents produced by OUN itself, and memoirs of OUN activists, it has been possible to establish that: OUN militias were key actors in the anti-Jewish violence of summer 1941; OUN recruited for and infiltrated police formations that provided indispensable manpower for the Germans' mobile killing units; and in 1943, thousands of these policemen deserted from German service to join the OUN-led nationalist insurgency, during which UPA killed Jews who had managed to survive the major liquidations of 1942. Steven Seegel is Professor of Slavic and Eurasian Studies at The University of Texas at Austin. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Jewish Studies
John-Paul Himka, "Ukrainian Nationalists and the Holocaust: OUN and UPA's Participation in the Destruction of Ukrainian Jewry, 1941-1944" (Ibidem Press, 2021)

New Books in Jewish Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 60:39


One quarter of all Holocaust victims lived on the territory that now forms Ukraine, yet the Holocaust there has not received due attention. John-Paul Himka's Ukrainian Nationalists and the Holocaust: OUN and UPA's Participation in the Destruction of Ukrainian Jewry, 1941-1944 (Ibidem Press, 2021) delineates the participation of the Organization of Ukrainian Nationalists (OUN) and its armed force, the Ukrainian Insurgent Army (Ukrainska povstanska armiia--UPA), in the destruction of the Jewish population of Ukraine under German occupation in 1941-44. The extent of OUN's and UPA's culpability in the Holocaust has been a controversial issue in Ukraine and within the Ukrainian diaspora as well as in Jewish communities and Israel. Occasionally, the controversy has broken into the press of North America, the EU, and Israel. Triangulating sources from Jewish survivors, Soviet investigations, German documentation, documents produced by OUN itself, and memoirs of OUN activists, it has been possible to establish that: OUN militias were key actors in the anti-Jewish violence of summer 1941; OUN recruited for and infiltrated police formations that provided indispensable manpower for the Germans' mobile killing units; and in 1943, thousands of these policemen deserted from German service to join the OUN-led nationalist insurgency, during which UPA killed Jews who had managed to survive the major liquidations of 1942. Steven Seegel is Professor of Slavic and Eurasian Studies at The University of Texas at Austin. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/jewish-studies

The John Batchelor Show
1756: After eight decades, honoring those murdered in the Babi Yar "Holocaust of Bullets." Malcolm Hoenlein @Conf_of_pres @mhoenlein1

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 15:55


Photo:  Notice dated 28 September 1941 in Russian, Ukrainian with German translation ordering all Kyivan Jews to assemble for supposed resettlement After eight decades, honoring those murdered in the Babi Yar "Holocaust of Bullets." Malcolm Hoenlein @Conf_of_pres @mhoenlein1 https://www.canberratimes.com.au/story/7459671/holocaust-centre-names-babi-yar-killers/

Kyiv Future
E251 Dasha Kozhura: Ukrainian Living in UAE

Kyiv Future

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 54:48


Dasha Kozhura lives and works in the United Arab Emirates. Born in Zaporizhzhia, Dasha loves dancing and has experience in Belly Dance. And she loves the Chinese language, which she is learning now as a hobby. She studied at the Zaporizhzhia National Technical University. Two of her proudest achievements is getting her driving license and buying her flat in Ukraine. Instagram: @dhdasha

CSO Audio Program Notes
Virtual Preconcert Conversation: Shostakovich, Schubert 3 & Prokofiev Piano Concerto No. 1

CSO Audio Program Notes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 37:07


Ukrainian-born piano powerhouse Alexander Gavrylyuk presents Prokofiev's iridescent and rhythmically animated First Piano Concerto, the work with which the composer made his CSO performance debut, in 1918, as part of its U.S. premiere. James Conlon leads this program framed by Shostakovich's steely Chamber Symphony, an adaptation of his elegiac Eighth String Quartet, and Schubert's mercurial Symphony No. 3, which shines with youthful vigor. Michael Tilson Thomas has withdrawn from these performances due to health reasons.

Kyiv Future
E250 Olha Burdeina: Winner of EU Eastern Partnership Scholarship

Kyiv Future

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 45:39


Olha Burdeina is the winner of the €100,000 EU Eastern Partnership Scholarship to study International Baccalaureate at the Eastern Partnership European School Tbilisi “New School” in Georgia. Born in the marvelous city of Chernivtsi, Ukraine, Olha is an active member of 5 social organizations, a volunteer, a project manager, an IB student, an actress and a great thrill-seeker. As a great fan of theatre, Olha is an actress in the Chernivtsi Trama theatre named after Olha Kobylianska. As a real thrill-seeker, Olha is fond of cycling and last summer managed to cover 100km by bike. She also enjoys mountaineering and hiking and has conquered 5 Ukrainian peaks. As a social activist, volunteer, project manager and facilitator, Olha is The Head of The Youth Council’s Committee of Education, Deputy Head of the Regional Representative Office of the public organization «Let’s Do It, Ukraine», HR-manager of the social organization «Association of Chernivtsi Cyclists», and a Member of the social organization «Foundation of Regional Initiatives». She organized and coordinated up to 10 beneficial projects, among them the most successful were “English Club”, “Student Government in Action”, “Motivate Yourself”, and “Eco in TREND” And she participated in the international youth exchange with the focus on European values in Georgia “European Summer School Camp 2020”. Instagram: @nightstar.cv

dadAWESOME
194 | Brokenness, Fatherlessness, Reconciliation & The Path Forward (Tim Olson PART 1)

dadAWESOME

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 33:26


dadAWESOME   We're on a mission to add LIFE to the dad life. We're passionate about helping dads live fully alive as they lead their kids to God's awesomeness.  | YouTube |  Instagram | Facebook | Twitter   Tim Olson   Tim Olson is an author, teacher, Principal. Pastor, and life coach with forays into audio publishing, radio hosting, and home remodeling. His understanding of father-child relationships was fostered through years of observation and application in education, coaching clients around the world, and working with the National Fathering Ministry in Minnesota and Ukraine. As a business life coach, it was through coaching family business owners that the significant connections between a father and his children (or with his own father) finally gelled into observable patterns that helped form the basis for his coaching and for his book, The Legacy of Absence. Through it all, he's found his way to helping others to discover who they are meant to be and to become that person. He and his wife, Kay, have been married for 54 years and are blessed with three children, six grandchildren, four bonus grandchildren, and four great-grandchildren. They make their home in New Hope, MN.   UPCOMING FATHERS FOR THE FATHERLESS 100 Mile Bike Rides   — NEW YORK, NY — October 16th, 2021 — PHOENIX, AZ — November 20th, 2021 Register Here: https://f4f.bike/ Make a DONATION to FATHERS FOR THE FATHERLESS   Show Notes:   Text “DAD” to 651-370-8618 to join the dadAWESOME Nudge to become an intentional dad 2:55 - Praying for his grandsons-in-law 4:55 - National Fathering Ministry - https://www.dadsfirst.org/ 6:03 - "Dr. Richard Green, a former superintendent of Minneapolis schools. And he said to us, if the kids come to us for kindergarten and do not have an involved father or an involved grandfather, they are already lost to us"  - This conversation was the purpose for working with black urban fathers of preschool children. 6:46 - Working with fathers in Ukraine - starting a fatherhood ministry that has impacted the nation 8:06 - Ukrainian college women drawing where dad sits in the family circle 9:22 - "The father for a time was even taken out of the Russian dictionary.  And and if you go back in history and I covered some of this in my book about how that worked with communism and and Marxism, ...  they did their best to eliminate the father from the family and the the government was supposed to be the ones who essentially raised the children by way of the mothers...the government was in charge." 12:26 - Malachi 4:5-6 12:46 - Gordon Dalby is a great spokesperson about fathering, and he [share that].... the brokenness in this world between children and fathers reflects the brokenness between humanity and God." 14:16 - "We have to try to find the right path or we become complicit in crimes against it." 19:28 - "One of the things that I heard them say often was, 'you know, my grandfather was like this, my dad was like this, I'm like this, and my kids will be like this, and there's nothing I can do about it. It's just the cards we were dealt.' And I would say to him, You know what? That is a lie right out of the pit of hell, yes, you can change. You may not be able to change how tall you are and the color of your skin or anything like that, but you can change your personality, you can change your character quality, you can change the things you want and don't want to pass on to your kids. You can do that." 20:56 - Story of reconciliation with his own son and not wanting to pass on generational sins 31:30 - "Christ's example shows us as leaders in our areas of strength as dads to come underneath our children and our wives to lift and encourage and to praise and to pray for and to make them who God intended them to be. But you know, the moms, their wives have their areas of strength just as strong and in their job then is in their areas of strength is to come under us as fathers and to pray for us and lift us and encourage us and support us to be the best dads we can be. And so there's this mutual coming under, this mutual submissiveness, and it's the strongest, not the weakest, that submits."    Episode Links:   https://www.dadsfirst.org/ Tim's book - The Legacy Of Absence FATHERS FOR THE FATHERLESS Make a Donation to dadAWESOME Join the dadAWESOME Prayer Team   Conversation Transcript Coming Soon!

New Books Network
Olesya Khromeychuk, "A Loss: The Story of a Dead Soldier Told by His Sister" (Ibidem, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 61:30


This book is the story of one death among many in the war in eastern Ukraine. Its author is a historian of war whose brother was killed at the frontline in 2017 while serving in the Ukrainian Armed Forces. Olesya Khromeychuk takes the point of view of a civilian and a woman, perspectives that tend to be neglected in war narratives, and focuses on the stories that play out far away from the warzone. Through a combination of personal memoir and essay, Khromeychuk attempts to help her readers understand the private experience of this still ongoing but almost forgotten war in the heart of Europe and the private experience of war as such. A Loss: The Story of a Dead Soldier Told by His Sister (Ibidem, 2021) will resonate with anyone battling with grief and the shock of the sudden loss of a loved one. Dr. Olesya Khromeychuk is a historian and writer. She received her PhD in History from University College London. She has taught the history of East-Central Europe at the University of Cambridge, University College London, the University of East Anglia, and King's College London. She is author of A Loss. The Story of a Dead Soldier Told by His Sister (Stuttgart: ibidem, forthcoming) and ‘Undetermined' Ukrainians. Post-War Narratives of the Waffen SS ‘Galicia' Division (Peter Lang, 2013). She is currently the Director of the Ukrainian Institute London. Steven Seegel is Professor of Slavic and Eurasian Studies at The University of Texas at Austin. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Kyiv Future
E249 Anna Tуmoshenko: Head of Ukrainian Students for Freedom Kyiv

Kyiv Future

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 54:26


Anna Tуmoshenko is Head of Ukrainian Students for Freedom Kyiv Department (@studfreedom), a non-profit organized around safeguarding freedom, encouraging just policy making, and spreading the principles of liberty. Anna is also a medical student at the Bogomolets National Medical University in Kyiv (NMU). Born in Sumy, Ukraine, Anna Tуmoshenko is a civil activist and a previous Head Organizer of Model United Nations conference for 150+ people, a previous member of Kyiv Leaders League, and she co-organized around 10 educational conferences for students. Instagram: @anna_timi Website: https://studfreedom.org/

Kyiv Future
E248 Mikhail Sesin: Multi-Instrumental Ukrainian Musician

Kyiv Future

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 43:52


Mikhail Sesin is a Multi-Instrumental Ukrainian Musician. Born in Lugansk, Mikhail is currently studying at School #6 of Kupyansk in Kharkiv Oblast. He is a member Youth council in his town and of Youth Truth International. Mikhail loves making and playing music, spending time with his friends, traveling, working on projects, and working out. He has tried various exchange programs such as UWC, FLEX, and UGS, and although he was rejected, he learned a lot from these experiences. Instagram: @mlsesiiin

5 Things
USA TODAY journalist Fatema Hosseini's escape from Afghanistan

5 Things

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 35:41


When Kabul fell to the Taliban, Afghan journalist Fatema Hosseini had only bad options. As a female reporter who'd worked for USA TODAY, she could stay and likely be killed or taken by the Taliban, or she could try to run. But getting out seemed impossible.The Taliban had already ransacked her parents' home. USA TODAY's international correspondent Kim Hjelmgaard swung into action to help Fatema escape. With assistance from military contacts, Kim managed to get Fatema a seat on plane bound for Ukraine. Later, she would make it to the U.S.But getting into the Kabul airport meant Fatema had to cross multiple Taliban checkpoints, duck gunfire, and avoid the whips and beatings of angry Taliban lashing out at the desperate crowds clustered at the gates. The week of Fatema's escape, at least 20 people died in the chaos.USA TODAY is bringing you the story of Fatema's heroic escape on this Sunday episode.She finally made it onto a flight from Kabul to Islamabad, from Islamabad to Kyiv. My colleague Kim Hjelmgaard met her in Ukraine.In this episode, Kim sits down with Fatema to recap her journey out of Afghanistan.Episode transcript linked here.Also available at art19.com/shows/5-Things.More about how Fatema Hosseini's escaped Kabul:Staying could mean death. The escape nearly killed her. How one woman fled Afghanistan for freedom.By Fatema Hosseini and Kim Hjelmgaard with Kelley Benham FrenchThe Backstory: How a Navy officer, a Ukrainian colonel and a USA TODAY reporter helped an Afghan journalist escape KabulBy editor-in-chief Nicole CarrollTaliban fighters tortured my journalist colleagues. They risk their lives to tell the truth.By Fatema HosseiniIn response to popular demand, here's another personal finance episode (like last Sunday's) from back in 2020:Why young people of color should be investing in the stock marketSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Saturday Live
Matt Baker and Josh Widdicombe

Saturday Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 84:28


Matt Baker joins Richard Coles and Nikki Bedi. Matt's career has taken him from Blue Peter to The One Show and Countryfile. He's recently returned to live on his family farm and feels growing up with nature helped in all aspects of his life. Listener Jo Bradshaw is an office worked turned adventurer - who leads expeditions and was attempting to summit Everest during the earthquake of 2015. Khadijah Mellah became the first British Muslim woman to win a horse race in the UK. Age 18 she won the Magnolia Cup at Goodwood Festival. Khadijah has now launched a scholarship programme to bring more people from underrepresented communities into the sport. Robin Ince shares his Inheritance Tracks: Geoffrey Burgon's Theme from Brideshead Revisited and Batyar by The Ukrainians. Josh Widdicombe is a comedian, writer and co-presenter of the award winning Last Leg. As a child in rural Dartmoor it was watching television, rather than performing, which mattered most to him. A Year on Our Farm by Matt Baker is out now. The Importance of Being Interested: Adventures in Scientific Curiosity by Robin Ince is out on the 7th October. Watching Neighbours Twice a Day...How '90s TV (Almost) Prepared Me For Life by Josh Widdicombe is out now. Producer: Claire Bartleet Editor: Richard Hooper

Inheritance Tracks
Robin Ince

Inheritance Tracks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 7:18


Geoffrey Burgon's Theme from Brideshead Revisited and Batyar by The Ukrainians.

From Our Own Correspondent Podcast
Silence Falls in Libya

From Our Own Correspondent Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 28:47


It's not easy to talk in Tripoli; Palestinian anger over Nizar Banat's death; the MH17 trial in the Netherlands; Rwandan forces in Mozambique; a number plate dispute in the Balkans In Libya, the promise of a new dawn after the overthrow of the Gaddafi regime a decade ago now seems to ring hollow. After its revolution came civil war – as militias proliferated and fought for control. For more than six years the country was split between rival administrations in the east and west. There's been a ceasefire since last year, and an internationally-brokered unity government is now installed. Elections are planned for December. Daily life for Libyans hasn't got much easier though. There are still frequent electricity blackouts, high unemployment – and regular street protests. But Tim Whewell was more struck by a sense of creeping silence. In Ramallah, a military trial has begun this for 14 members of the Palestinian security forces, charged in connection with the death of a prominent critic of the president. Nizar Banat – who was known for his outspoken Facebook posts alleging corruption among the Palestinian political elite – was badly beaten and died shortly after he was taken into custody in June. The official line was that he'd died of natural causes. But his death sparked some of the biggest protests against the Palestinian Authority in years.. Yolande Knell reports on the case - and the public anger it's triggered. Since 2017, Mozambique has been trying to stop a shadowy insurgency in its northern province, Cabo Delgado. The rebels there claim to be affiliated to the Islamic State – but little is known about the group. It started with small-scale, isolated attacks, but the conflict escalated last year, driving hundreds of thousands of people from their homes. It is estimated that 2,500 people have died in the fighting so far. This March the militants gained the world's attention when they launched attacks in the gas-rich area of Palma, forcing French petroleum giant Total to shut down its operations there. To fight back, Mozambique has called on help from military forces from Rwanda – who now say they've retaken 90% of the province in a month-long operation. The rebels have now been pushed deep into the area's forests - but Mozambique says it is not claiming victory yet. Anne Soy has been to the region with the Rwandan forces. A court in the Netherlands has been hearing emotional testimony from those whose relatives died aboard flight MH17, which was brought down over rebel-held eastern Ukraine in 2014. Dutch prosecutors have brought charges against three Russians and a Ukrainian citizen: they are all suspected of having key roles in transporting the missile system used to launch the rocket which hit the plane. None of the men have appeared in court; only one has appointed a team of lawyers. Two-thirds of MH17's passengers were Dutch citizens, and the Netherlands blames Moscow for the attack. Anna Holligan has seen and heard some of the evidence submitted by the bereaved. Armed conflict can break out for all kinds of reasons. But a row over car number plates seems one of the more unlikely flashpoints. Yet in the Balkans this summer, that's exactly what prompted Serbia to put its troops on high alert, Kosovo to deploy its special police – and NATO to step up its peacekeeping activities in the area. As Guy De Launey knows from long experience – it's always important to consider what's on your number plate before you set off on any journey in the region. Producer: Polly Hope

Kyiv Future
E247 Alina Vlasova: Student @ Ukrainian Humanitarian Lyceum

Kyiv Future

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 49:17


Alina Vlasova is a fashion model, a professional dancer, and a student at the Ukrainian Humanitarian Lyceum. Her goal is to study at the Institute of International Relations (IIR), Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv (KNU). Instagram: @eltihoney

Bavarian Football Works: For Bayern Munich fans
Bavarian Podcast Works: Weekend Warm-up Podcast Season 1, Episode 19 — Bayern Munich's rampant form; Sabitzer's lack of first team minutes; Coman's uncertain future; and MORE!

Bavarian Football Works: For Bayern Munich fans

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 38:16


Bayern Munich is looking unstoppable, and grabbed yet another lopsided victory against Ukrainian champions Dynamo Kiev in the Champions League. Nagelsmann has made all the right moves thus far, and this team looks really formidable and is certainly a treble contender. Yes, the new coach is yet to be tested by elite opposition, but the early signs are very promising. Bayern face Eintracht Frankfurt at home next, and we can safely expect a win from a team that's looking overpowered right now. And on that note, we had quite a lot to discuss on this pod, most of it being quite positive (gasp!). Here are some of the topics we covered: Niklas Süle's incredible form and the WhatsApp fiasco (again). Bayern's superb recent form. Sabitzer's lack of first team action, and what this means for him moving forward. More Bouna Sarr banter. Coman's contract situation and whether he stays or leaves. Michael Cuisance slander. Cobra Kai, Game of Thrones and other stuff. As always, thanks for your support and let us know what you think! Be sure to stay tuned to Bavarian Podcast Works for all of your up to date coverage on Bayern Munich and Germany. Follow us on Twitter @BavarianFBWorks, @jeffersonfenner, @TheBarrelBlog, @tommyadams71, @bfwinnn, and more. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Sports Gambling Podcast Network
Joshua vs Usyk Recap- Pacquiao Retires & Fight Picks! | Big Fight Weekend (Ep. 63)

Sports Gambling Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 59:58


Fresh off the upset last Saturday night in London of Unified Heavyweight champ, Anthony Joshua by Ukrainian star Oleksandr Usyk, host T.J. Rives and Marquis Johns of BigFightWeekend.com are ready to recap it and look to the future for the Heavyweights. The guys also welcome Abraham Gonzalez of NYFights.com to give his thoughts and analysis on Usyk's upset decision win on Joshua's home turf that has the boxing world buzzing. What's next for the unbeaten Ukrainian? An immediate rematch with Joshua or perhaps, an Undisputed title fight with the winner of the WBC third showdown of Tyson Fury-Deontay Wilder October 9th? They also go over the not surprising announcement that , for now, eight division world champ and future Hall of Famer Manny Pacquiao has decided to retire, as he runs for the Presidency of his native Philippines next May. Do Marquis and Abe agree that it's the end for "Pac-man" or might there be one more fight in his short future? T.J. and Marquis also go over the limited fight cards world wide this weekend and look ahead to the betting odds for Fury-Wilder next week. It's all on the "Big Fight Weekend Podcast" and make sure to follow/subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google, etc.!! Follow - Twitter | Instagram Watch - YouTube | Twitch Discuss - Slack | Reddit Read - SportsGamblingPodcast.com Download it the SGPN APP today https://sgpn.app and leave us a rating/review. Support for this episode - WynnBet | PropSwap.com code “SGP” | Pickswise.com | Oddscrowd.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

New Books in History
Patrice M. Dabrowski, "The Carpathians: Discovering the Highlands of Poland and Ukraine" (Northern Illinois UP, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 56:56


Patrice M. Dabrowski's book The Carpathians: Discovering the Highlands of Poland and Ukraine (Northern Illinois UP, 2021) tells story of how the Tatras, Eastern Carpathians, and Bieszczady Mountains went from being terra incognita to becoming the popular tourist destinations they are today. It is a story of the encounter of Polish and Ukrainian lowlanders with the wild, sublime highlands and with the indigenous highlanders--Górale, Hutsuls, Boikos, and Lemkos--and how these peoples were incorporated into a national narrative as the territories were transformed into a native/national landscape. The set of microhistories in this book occur from about 1860 to 1980, a time in which nations and states concerned themselves with the frontier at the edge. Discoverers not only became enthralled with what were perceived as their own highlands but also availed themselves of the mountains as places to work out answers to the burning questions of the day. Each discovery led to a surge in mountain tourism and interest in the mountains and their indigenous highlanders. Although these mountains, essentially a continuation of the Alps, are Central and Eastern Europe's most prominent physical feature, politically they are peripheral. The Carpathians is the first book to deal with the northern slopes in such a way, showing how these discoveries had a direct impact on the various nation-building, state-building, and modernization projects. Dabrowski's history incorporates a unique blend of environmental history, borderlands studies, and the history of tourism and leisure. Patrice M. Dabrowski has taught and worked at Harvard, Brown, the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, and the University of Vienna. She is currently an associate of the Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute, an affiliate of the Minda de Gunzburg Center for European Studies, a member of the Board of Directors of the Polish Institute of Arts and Sciences of America (PIASA), and editor of H-Poland. Dr. Dabrowski is the author of three books: Commemorations and the Shaping of Modern Poland (2004), Poland: The First Thousand Years (2014; paperback edition, 2016), and The Carpathians: Discovering the Highlands of Poland and Ukraine (release date: October 15, 2021). In 2014 she was awarded the Knight's Cross of the Order of Merit of the Republic of Poland. Steven Seegel is Professor of Slavic and Eurasian Studies at The University of Texas at Austin. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Geography
Patrice M. Dabrowski, "The Carpathians: Discovering the Highlands of Poland and Ukraine" (Northern Illinois UP, 2021)

New Books in Geography

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 56:56


Patrice M. Dabrowski's book The Carpathians: Discovering the Highlands of Poland and Ukraine (Northern Illinois UP, 2021) tells story of how the Tatras, Eastern Carpathians, and Bieszczady Mountains went from being terra incognita to becoming the popular tourist destinations they are today. It is a story of the encounter of Polish and Ukrainian lowlanders with the wild, sublime highlands and with the indigenous highlanders--Górale, Hutsuls, Boikos, and Lemkos--and how these peoples were incorporated into a national narrative as the territories were transformed into a native/national landscape. The set of microhistories in this book occur from about 1860 to 1980, a time in which nations and states concerned themselves with the frontier at the edge. Discoverers not only became enthralled with what were perceived as their own highlands but also availed themselves of the mountains as places to work out answers to the burning questions of the day. Each discovery led to a surge in mountain tourism and interest in the mountains and their indigenous highlanders. Although these mountains, essentially a continuation of the Alps, are Central and Eastern Europe's most prominent physical feature, politically they are peripheral. The Carpathians is the first book to deal with the northern slopes in such a way, showing how these discoveries had a direct impact on the various nation-building, state-building, and modernization projects. Dabrowski's history incorporates a unique blend of environmental history, borderlands studies, and the history of tourism and leisure. Patrice M. Dabrowski has taught and worked at Harvard, Brown, the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, and the University of Vienna. She is currently an associate of the Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute, an affiliate of the Minda de Gunzburg Center for European Studies, a member of the Board of Directors of the Polish Institute of Arts and Sciences of America (PIASA), and editor of H-Poland. Dr. Dabrowski is the author of three books: Commemorations and the Shaping of Modern Poland (2004), Poland: The First Thousand Years (2014; paperback edition, 2016), and The Carpathians: Discovering the Highlands of Poland and Ukraine (release date: October 15, 2021). In 2014 she was awarded the Knight's Cross of the Order of Merit of the Republic of Poland. Steven Seegel is Professor of Slavic and Eurasian Studies at The University of Texas at Austin. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/geography

New Books Network
Patrice M. Dabrowski, "The Carpathians: Discovering the Highlands of Poland and Ukraine" (Northern Illinois UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 56:56


Patrice M. Dabrowski's book The Carpathians: Discovering the Highlands of Poland and Ukraine (Northern Illinois UP, 2021) tells story of how the Tatras, Eastern Carpathians, and Bieszczady Mountains went from being terra incognita to becoming the popular tourist destinations they are today. It is a story of the encounter of Polish and Ukrainian lowlanders with the wild, sublime highlands and with the indigenous highlanders--Górale, Hutsuls, Boikos, and Lemkos--and how these peoples were incorporated into a national narrative as the territories were transformed into a native/national landscape. The set of microhistories in this book occur from about 1860 to 1980, a time in which nations and states concerned themselves with the frontier at the edge. Discoverers not only became enthralled with what were perceived as their own highlands but also availed themselves of the mountains as places to work out answers to the burning questions of the day. Each discovery led to a surge in mountain tourism and interest in the mountains and their indigenous highlanders. Although these mountains, essentially a continuation of the Alps, are Central and Eastern Europe's most prominent physical feature, politically they are peripheral. The Carpathians is the first book to deal with the northern slopes in such a way, showing how these discoveries had a direct impact on the various nation-building, state-building, and modernization projects. Dabrowski's history incorporates a unique blend of environmental history, borderlands studies, and the history of tourism and leisure. Patrice M. Dabrowski has taught and worked at Harvard, Brown, the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, and the University of Vienna. She is currently an associate of the Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute, an affiliate of the Minda de Gunzburg Center for European Studies, a member of the Board of Directors of the Polish Institute of Arts and Sciences of America (PIASA), and editor of H-Poland. Dr. Dabrowski is the author of three books: Commemorations and the Shaping of Modern Poland (2004), Poland: The First Thousand Years (2014; paperback edition, 2016), and The Carpathians: Discovering the Highlands of Poland and Ukraine (release date: October 15, 2021). In 2014 she was awarded the Knight's Cross of the Order of Merit of the Republic of Poland. Steven Seegel is Professor of Slavic and Eurasian Studies at The University of Texas at Austin. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Locked On Bruins - Daily Podcast On The Boston Bruins
Lysell Off to WHL + Remembering Fred Sasakamoose

Locked On Bruins - Daily Podcast On The Boston Bruins

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 28:08


Sept. 30 is National Day for Truth and Reconciliation in Canada, and host Ian McLaren shares a bit about Fred Sasakamoose and his place in hockey history. Next, the Boston Bruins are gearing up for their first home preseason game, and we can expect the new-look second line to see some action. Plus, Fabian Lysell and Brett Harrison have been assigned to their Canadian junior teams, and Jalen Smereck deserved better from the Ukrainian league. Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Duran Podcast
Ukraine tries to stop Hungary's energy deal with Russia

The Duran Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 16:09


Ukraine tries to stop Hungary's energy deal with Russia The Duran: Episode 1101 Hungary summons Ukrainian ambassador & blasts Kiev for 'interfering' in its internal affairs as row over Russian gas deal heats up https://www.rt.com/russia/536012-hungary-blasts-ukraine-gas/ #Hungary #Ukraine #NordStream2 #TheDuran

CFR On the Record
Academic Webinar: Constraining Putin's Russia

CFR On the Record

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021


Thomas Graham, distinguished fellow at CFR, leads a conversation on constraining Putin's Russia. FASKIANOS: Welcome to today's session of the CFR Fall 2021 Academic Webinar Series. I'm Irina Faskianos, vice president of the National Program and Outreach here at CFR. Today's meeting is on the record, and the video and transcript will be available on our website CFR.org/academic if you would like to share it with your colleagues or classmates. As always, CFR takes no institutional positions on matters of policy. We are delighted to have Thomas Graham with us to talk about Putin's Russia. Mr. Graham is a distinguished fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations and a senior advisor at Kissinger Associates, where he focuses on Russian and Eurasian affairs. He is cofounder of the Russian, East European, and Eurasian studies program at Yale University, and is also a research fellow at the MacMillan Center at Yale. He previously served as special assistant to President George W. Bush and senior director for Russia on the National Security Council staff from 2004 to 2007, and director for Russian affairs from 2002 to 2004. His résumé is very distinguished. I will just also say that he is a U.S. diplomat who served two tours of duty in Moscow, where he worked on political affairs. So, Mr. Graham, thanks very much for being with us today. I thought you could get us started by talking about the primary interests at stake in U.S.-Russia relations. GRAHAM: Great. Thank you very much, Irina, for that introduction, and it's a real pleasure to be with all of you here today. I want to start with three broad points that will frame the rest of our discussion. The first is that the problem that the United States faces is not simply with Putin; it is with Russia more generally speaking. The last seven years of very difficult, challenging adversarial relationship is really not an aberration in the history of the relationship between our two countries. In fact, from the moment the United States emerged as a major power on the global stage at the very end of the nineteenth century, we have had a rivalry with Russia. And the issues that divide us today are the ones that divided us 125, 150 years ago: We have opposing worldviews. We have different geopolitical interests. And clearly, we have different systems of values that inform our domestic political systems. This rivalry has intensified, ebbed and flowed during the twentieth century. But the effort we made at partnership after the breakup of the Soviet Union up until 2014, marked by the eruption of the crisis in Ukraine, is really the aberration in the history of relations between our two countries and one that was founded very much on the fact that Russia endured a period of strategic weakness. So the issue we have to deal with Russia and how we're going to deal with Russia well into the future, even after Putin departs—which he will, obviously, at some point, if only for biological reasons. The second point that I would make is that Russia is not going to go away. We hear a lot in the public debate in the United States about Russian decline, about the population/demographic problems it has, about its stagnating economy, and so forth. None of this is necessarily untrue, but I think it tends to exaggerate the problems that Russia faces. It ignores the problems that all other major countries face—including China, the United States, and many major European countries—but it also overlooks the very great strengths that Russia has had for decades that are going to make it a player and an important player on the global stage, nuclear weapons to begin with. We should never forget that Russia remains the only country that can destroy the United States as a functioning society in thirty minutes. Russia has the largest natural endowment of any country in the world, a country that can pretend to self-sufficiency and, in fact, is better placed than most other countries to deal with a breakdown in globalization in the decades to come if that, indeed, happens. It has a veto on the U.N. Security Council, which makes it an important player on issues of importance to the United States, and it has a talented population that has fostered a scientific community that, for example, is capable of taking advances in technology and developing the military applications from them. Just look at the strength that Russia exhibits in cyberspace, for example—again, a major challenge for the United States. So Russia is going to continue to be a challenge. One other thing that I should have mentioned here is that the Russian state throughout history and Putin's Russia today has demonstrated a keen ability to mobilize the resources of their own society for state purposes. So even if in relative terms they may be weaker and weakening vis-à-vis China and the United States, in some ways that political will, that ability to mobilize, allows Russia to play a much larger role than mere indicators of its economic size and population size would suggest. Now, Russia clashes with the United States across a whole range of issues, and as I said that is going to continue for some time. And this brings me to my third point: How we should think about American foreign policy, what our guidelines should be in dealing with Russia. And here there are three, I think, key elements to this. First, the United States needs to preserve strategic stability. We need to have that nuclear balance between us (sic) and the United States. This is an existential question. And as I already mentioned, Russia does have a tremendous nuclear capability. Second, the United States should seek to manage its competition with Russia responsibly. We want to avoid or reduce the risk of a direct military conflict that could escalate to the nuclear level. This is—also, I think, recognizes that the United States is not going to be able to compel Russia to capitulate on issues that are of interest to us, nor are we going to be able to radically change the way they think about their own national interests. So it's a competitive relationship and we need to manage that responsibly. And finally, given the complex world that we live in today—the very real transnational challenges we face: climate change, pandemic diseases, proliferation of weapons of mass destruction—the United States should seek, to the extent possible, ways to cooperate with Russia in dealing with these issues. We should recognize that Russia is not necessarily the only player nor necessarily the most important player in dealing with these challenges, but it does have a role to play along with other major powers in handling these transnational issues. So those, I think, are three sort of broad points that help set the stage for our discussion. Now let me turn sort of very briefly to the questions about U.S. policy. How do we deal with this Russia? What are sort of—the way we should think about American foreign policy? And here the point I would make is that we should think of the policy in terms of what I would call the three Ds: defense, deterrence, and dialogue. Now, defense and deterrence in many ways go together. If you have a very good defense, if you demonstrate an ability and willingness to defend your interests effectively and deliberately, then you tend to deter another power. They have less reason to want to attack you. But if deterrence fails, you very much need to be able to defend yourself—to disrupt Russian operations in cyberspace, for example, or disrupt military operations by the Russians that you find problematic in some way. So defense and deterrence go together, and we need to think about that. Now, you build these elements on a number of other things that we're all familiar with. A strong military—strong, capable military—is, obviously, an element of both defense and deterrence, and something that we have managed quite well in the past and I imagine will manage quite well going into the future. Cyber defenses are also an important element of constraining Russia on the global stage. Now, here the United States really has much room for improvement. We built our internet, our cyberspace largely for the accessibility, the ability to pass information from one entity to another, and we spent much less attention to the security of that system. As cyberspace has become more important to our socioeconomic and political lives, we really need to devote much more attention to cybersecurity, hardening our commuter—computer networks, for example, making sure we have strong passwords and so forth, something that I think we now recognize but we need to put a much greater effort into doing that. Third area of defense and deterrence is strong alliances. When we're thinking about Russia, this is clearly the transatlantic community, NATO, our relations with our other European partners. And here, we need to develop the types of military/defense cooperation that we need to demonstrate quite clearly that the United States, along with the rest of the NATO allies, is ready and prepared to meet its Article 5 guarantees to collective security should the Russians do something that is untoward in our neighborhood. And then, finally, and I think of increasing importance, is the question of national unity. National unity, national resilience, has really become a key element in defense and deterrence at this point. We need to demonstrate to the Russians that we have sufficient national unity to clearly identify what our interests are and pursue them on the international stage. One of Putin's close colleagues several years ago said that what Putin is doing is messing with the Americans' minds, and certainly we've seen that over the past several years. Putin hasn't sowed the discord in the United States, but he certainly has tried to exploit it for Russian purposes. And this is something that he's going to concentrate on in the future, in part because he recognizes the dangers of military confrontation with the United States. So great-power competition, from the Kremlin's standpoint, is going to move very, very quickly from the kinetic realm to the cyber realm, and we need to be able to deal with that. So building national unity at home, overcoming our polarization, is really perhaps one of the key steps in constraining Russia on the global stage. And then, finally, some very brief words about dialogue. We tend to downplay this in our national discussion. Many believe that diplomatic relations are—should not be branded as a reward for bad behavior. But I think if you look at this objectively, you'll see that diplomatic relations are very important as a way of defending and advancing our national concerns. It's a way that we can convey clearly to the Russians what our expectations are, what our goals are, what our redlines are, and the responses that we're capable of taking if Russia crosses them. At the same time, we can learn from the Russians what their goals are, what their motivations are, what their redlines are, and we can factor that into our own policy. This is a major element of managing the competition between our two countries responsibly. You'll see that we have begun to engage in negotiations and diplomacy with the Russians much more under President Biden than we did under President Trump. We've already launched strategic stability talks with the aim of coming up with a new concept of strategic stability that's adequate to the strategic environment of the present day and the near future. We've engaged in cybersecurity talks, which my understanding is have, in fact, had some success over the past several weeks. Where we, I think, have lagged is in the discussion of regional issues—Europe, Ukraine, the Middle East, for example. These are areas where there is still potential for conflict, and the United States and Russia ought to be sitting down and talking about these issues on a regular basis. So three Ds—defense, deterrence, and diplomacy or dialogue—are the ways that we should be thinking about our relationship with Russia. And obviously, we'll need to adjust each of these three elements to the specific issue at hand, whether it be in Europe, whether it be in the nuclear realm, cyberspace, and so forth. Now, with that as a way—by way of introduction, I am very pleased to entertain your questions. FASKIANOS: Tom, thanks very much for that terrific overview and analysis. We're going to go to all of you now for your questions. You can either raise your hand by clicking on the icon, and I will call on you, and you can tell us what institution you are with; or you can type your question in the Q&A box, although if you want to ask it you can raise your hand. We encourage that. And if you're typing your question, please let us know what college or university you're with. So I'm going to take the first raised-hand question from Babak Salimitari. And unmute yourself. Q: Can you guys hear me? GRAHAM: Yes. FASKIANOS: Yes. Q: Hello. I'm a third-year UCI student, economics. I have a question. I'm going to sound a bit like Sean Hannity here, so please forgive me, but I have a question about that Nord Stream 2 pipeline that you constantly hear on the news, and it just doesn't make that much sense for me of why this pipeline was allowed to be completed into the heart of Europe considering Russia's strength with natural gases and the leverage that they have over Europe with that pipeline. Why was that allowed to be completed? GRAHAM: Well, I think from the standpoint of the Biden administration this was a matter of what we call alliance management. Germany is clearly a key ally for the United States in Europe, and the Germans were very committed to the completion of that pipeline, starting with Chancellor Angela Merkel down through I think both the leading political parties and the German business community. So I think they made the decision for that. But let me step back because I'd like to challenge a lot of the assumptions about the Nord Stream 2 project here in the United States, which I think misconceive it, misframe the question, and tend to exaggerate the dangers that is poses. The first point that I would make is that Europe now and in the future will have and need Russian gas. It's taken a substantial amount in the past—in the past decades, and even as it moves forward towards a green revolution it will continue to take considerable amounts of Russian gas. It can't do without that gas. So the Nord Stream 2 pipeline, contrary to what you hear in the United States or at the U.S. Congress, I don't think poses an additional threat to Europe's energy security, no larger than the threat that was posed before that pipeline was completed. The Europeans, I think are aware of the problems that that poses, and they've taken steps over the past several years to integrate the gas—the gas distribution network in Europe, to build facilities to import liquified natural gas, all as a way of eroding the leverage that Gazprom might have had over energy markets in Europe. And that has been quite successful over the past—over the past several years. Now, I think, you know, the other issue that comes up in the discussion in the United States is Ukraine, because Nord Stream 2 clearly provides Russia with a way to import the gas into Europe and bypass Ukraine at the—at the same time. And Ukraine is going to suffer a significant loss in budgetary revenue because of the decline in transit fees that it gets from the transportation of Russian gas across its territory. You know, that is a problem, but there are ways of dealing with that: by helping Ukraine fill the budgetary gap, by helping Ukraine transition away from a reliance on gas to other forms of energy, of helping Ukraine develop the green-energy resources that will make it a much more important partner in the European energy equation than it is now. And then finally, you know, it strikes me as somewhat wrongheaded for Ukraine to put itself in a position where it is reliant on a country that is clearly a belligerent for a significant part of its federal revenue. So we need to think hard with the Ukrainians about how they deal with this issue, how they wean themselves off Russian transit fees, and then I think we have a situation where we can help Ukraine, we can manage the energy-security situation in Europe, we can reduce any leverage that Russia might have, and that Nord Stream 2 really doesn't pose a significant risk to the United States or our European allies over the long run. FASKIANOS: Thank you. We're going to take the next question from the written queue from Kenneth Mayers, who's at St Francis—sorry, that just popped away; oh, sorry—St. Francis College. Thinking beyond this triangular framework, what pathways and possibilities can be envisioned for a more positive dimension of working together in mutually, even globally, beneficial ways? GRAHAM: What triangular relationship are we talking about? FASKIANOS: His—thinking beyond this triangular framework and— GRAHAM: Oh, OK. So I think it's defense, deterrence, and diplomacy is the— FASKIANOS: Correct. GRAHAM: OK. Can you repeat the final part of the question, then? FASKIANOS: What pathways and possibilities can be envisioned for a more positive dimension of working together in mutually beneficial ways? GRAHAM: Well, there are a number of areas in which we can work together beneficially. If you think about proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, for example, the United States and Russia over the past two decades have played a major role in both securing weapons that were located in Russia, but also in securing highly-enriched uranium that was in Soviet-designed reactors throughout the former Soviet space. We have taken a lead together in setting down rules and procedures that reduce the risk of nuclear material—fissile material getting into the hands of terrorist organizations. And we have played a role together in trying to constrain the Iranian nuclear program. Russia played an instrumental role in the conclusion of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action that we signed in 2015 that the Trump administration walked away with, but they will continue to play a role in constraining Iranians' nuclear ambitions going forward. And we've also worked in a cooperative fashion in dealing with the North Korean nuclear program. So there are areas in nonproliferation where the two countries can work together. On climate change, I mean, I think the big challenge for the United States is actually persuading Russia that climate change is a significant threat to their own security. They're slowly beginning to change that view, but as they come around to recognizing that they have to deal with climate change there are a number of areas where the two countries can cooperate. One of the things that climate is doing is melting the permafrost. That is destabilizing the foundation of much of Russia's energy infrastructure in areas where gas and oil are extracted for export abroad. The United States has dome technologies that the Russians might find of interest in stabilizing that infrastructure. They suffer from problems of Siberian fires—peat-bog fires, forest fires—an area that, obviously, is of concern to the United States as well. And there may be room for cooperation there, two. And then, finally, you know, the United States and Russia have two of the leading scientific communities in the entire world. We ought to be working together on ways that we can help mitigate the consequences of climate change going forward. So I see an array of areas where the two countries could cooperate, but that will depend on good diplomacy in Washington and a receptivity on the part of the Russians which we haven't seen quite yet. FASKIANOS: Thank you. Let's go next to Jeffrey Ko. You can unmute yourself. Thank you. Q: Hi. So I'm Jeffrey Ko. I'm an international relations master's student at Carnegie Mellon. And my question has to deal with these private military forces, and especially the Wagner Group. And so I would like to know, you know, how does this play into our security strategy regarding Russia in countries that have seen proxy warfare? And how does this—how difficult will it be to engage with Russia either diplomatically or militarily on the use of these gray-zone tactics, and specifically utilizing the Wagner Group as an informal branch of Russia's military? GRAHAM: Well, look, I mean, I do think that we need, one, to sit down and have a discussion with Russia about the use of these private military forces, particularly the Wagner firm, which has played a significant role in a number of conflicts across the globe in the Middle East, Africa, and in Latin America. But we also ought to help the countries that are of interest to us deal with the problems that the Wagner Group causes. You know, the United States had to deal with the Wagner Group in Syria during the Syrian civil war. You know, despite the fact that we had a deconfliction exercise with the Russians at that point, tried to prevent military conflicts between our two militaries operating in close proximity, when the Wagner forces violated those strictures and actually began to attack a U.S. facility, we had no hesitation about using the force that we had to basically obliterate that enemy. And the Wagner Group suffered casualties numbering in the hundreds, one to two hundred. I think the Russians got the message about that, that you don't—you don't mess with the United States military, certainly not while using a private military company like Wagner. You know, in places like Libya, where Wagner is quite active, I think the United States needs a major diplomatic effort to try to defuse the Libyan crisis. And part of the solution to that would be negotiating an agreement that calls for the withdrawal of all foreign military forces and certainly private military groups from Libyan territory, and lean on the Russians to carry that through. In any event, you know, this is not going to be an easy issue to resolve. I think we deal with this by—country by country, and we focus our attention on those countries where our national interests are greatest. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question from Jill Dougherty, who's at Georgetown University. The Putin administration appears to be hardening its control of Russia's society with the purpose of keeping Putin in power at least until 2036. Most recent example is the Duma elections that just took place. Will this crackdown domestically affect or damage U.S.-Russia relations? GRAHAM: Thank you, Jill. Always a good question and always a difficult question to answer. You know, I think the issue here is the extent to which the Biden administration wants to make the domestic political situation in Russia a key item on its agenda with Russia over the next—over the next few years. You know, my impression from the conversations I've had with people in the administration—in and around the administration is that President Biden is not going to focus on this. You know, his focus really is going to be China, and what he wants to do is maintain something of a status quo in the relationship with Russia. You will notice that the second round of sanctions that the United States levied with regard to the poisoning of Alexei Navalny, something that was mandated by U.S. law, were actually quite mild—much less extreme, much less punitive than the legislation allowed—I think a signal that the Biden administration was not going to let domestic political issues in Russia overwhelm the agenda that the United States has, which is going to be focused on strategic stability, cyber issues, and so forth. So my immediate reaction is that the Duma election is really not going to have a dramatic impact on the state of the relationship between our two countries. We accept the fact that Russia is an authoritarian system. It is becoming more authoritarian. We will continue to try to find ways to support those elements of civil society we can, but always being careful not to do it in ways that causes the Russian government to crack down even harder on those individuals. This is a very sort of difficult needle to thread for the United States, but I think that's the way we'll go and you won't see this as a major impediment to the improvement of relations—which, as we all know, are at a very low level at this point in any event. FASKIANOS: Great. Thank you. Let's go next to Sujay Utkarsh. Q: Hi, yeah. Can you hear me? GRAHAM: Yes. FASKIANOS: Yes. Q: Awesome. So, regarding the issue about cyber warfare, I was wondering if you can go into more detail about what advantages the Russians have in cyberspace and what the United States can do to compete with those advantages. GRAHAM: A good question and a difficult question for people outside the government to answer, since we're not privy to all the information about Russian cyber capabilities nor are we privy to the information about American cyber capabilities. Both countries cloak those programs in a great deal of secrecy. You know, it seemed to me that one of the advantages that perhaps Russia has is that it's a much more closed society than the United States. Now, I'm thinking simply in terms of the way societies can be disrupted through cyberspace. We're a much more open society. It's easier to access our internet. We are—just as I mentioned before, we are a polarized society right now. That allows Russia many avenues into our domestic political system in order to exacerbate the tensions between various elements in our society. The United States can't reply in the same way in dealing with Russia. You know, second, Russia, in building its own internet, its own cyberspace, has paid much more attention to security than the United States has. So, you know, I would presume that its computer systems are somewhat harder to penetrate than American systems are at this point, although another factor to take into account here is that much of the initial effort in building up cyberspace—the Web, the computer networks—in Russia was built with American technology. You know, the Googles, the Intels, and others played an instrumental role in providing those types of—that type of equipment to the Russians. So I wouldn't exaggerate how much stronger they are there. And then, finally, I think what is probably one of the strengths, if you want to call it that, is that Russia is probably a little more risk-prone in using its cyber tools than the United States is at this point, in part because we think as a society we're more vulnerable. And that does give Russia a slight advantage. That said, this shouldn't be a problem that's beyond the capability of the United States to manage if we put our minds to it. We have done a lot more over the past several years. We are getting better at this. And I think we'll continue to improve in time and with the appropriate programs, the appropriate education of American society. FASKIANOS: Thank you. The next question is a written one from Kim-Leigh Tursi, a third-year undergraduate at Temple University. Where do you see Russia in relation to the rise of China, and how does that affect how the U.S. might approach foreign policy toward Russia? GRAHAM: Well, you know, that's an important question, obviously one that a lot of people have focused on recently. You know, Russia and China have developed a very close working strategic relationship over the—over the past several years, but I think we should note that the Russian effort to rebuild its relations with China go back to the late Soviet period to overcome the disadvantages that then the Soviet Union felt they had because of the poor relationship with China and the ability of the United States to exploit that relationship to Moscow's detriment. So relations have been improving for the past twenty-five, thirty years; obviously, a dramatic acceleration in that improvement after 2014 and the breakdown in relations between Russia and the West. Now, there are a number of reasons for this alignment at this point. One, the two countries do share at a very general level a basic view of for—a basic dislike of what they see as American ambitions to dominate the global—the global security and economic environment. They don't like what they consider to be American hegemonic goals. Second, the economies seem to be complementary at this point. Russia does have a wealth of natural resources that the Chinese need to fuel their robust economic growth. You have similar domestic political systems. And all of this, I think, is reinforced by what appears to be a very good personal relationship between President Putin and President Xi Jinping. These two leaders have met dozens of times over the past five to seven years and have maintained, I think, very robust contact even during the—during the pandemic. So there are very good strategic reasons why these two countries enjoy good relations. They are going to step those up in the near term. The Russians are continuing to provide the Chinese with significant sophisticated military equipment. They've also undertaken to help the Chinese build an early warning system for ballistic missiles, and when that's completed it will make China only the third country in the world to have such a system along with Russia and the United States. Now, I would argue that this strategic alignment does pose something of a challenge to the United States. If you look at American foreign policy or American foreign policy tradition, one of the principles that has guided the United States since the end of the nineteenth century, certainly throughout the twentieth century, was that we needed to prevent the—any hostile country or coalition of hostile countries from dominating areas of great strategic importance, principally Europe, East Asia, and more recently the Middle East. A Russian-Chinese strategic alignment certainly increases the chances of China dominating East Asia. Depending on how close that relationship grows, it also could have significant impact on Europe and the way Europe relates to this Russian-Chinese bloc, and therefore to the United States as a whole. So we should have an interest in trying to sort of attenuate the relationship between the two countries. At a minimum, we shouldn't be pursuing a set of policies that would push Russia closer to China. Second, I think we ought to try to normalize our diplomatic relationship with the Russians. Not that we're necessarily going to agree on a—on a range of issues at this point, but we need to give the Russians a sense that they have other strategic options than China going forward—something that would, I think, enhance their bargaining position with the Chinese going forward and would complicate China's own strategic calculus, which would be to our advantage. I think we also should play on Russia's concerns about strategic autonomy, this idea that Russia needs to be an independent great power on the global stage, that it doesn't want to be the junior partner or overly dependent on any one country as a way, again, of attenuating the tie with China. The one thing that I don't think we can do is drive a wedge between those two countries, in part because of the strategic reasons that I've mentioned already that bring these two countries together. And any very crude, I think, effort to do that will actually be counterproductive. Both Beijing and Moscow will see through that, quite clearly, and that will only lead to a closing of the ranks between those two countries, which as I said is a strategic challenge for the United States going forward. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question from Holli Semetko, who's at Emory University. Polarization is something we must overcome, as you said, but those of us working on social media have some evidence to suggest that social media has fostered political polarization in the U.S. Yuri Milner, a Russian Israeli entrepreneur, invested in an early round of Facebook funding with help from VTB, a Russian state-controlled bank, as well as his investment in Jared Kushner's real estate firm. What is the level of FDI from Russia in the U.S. and do you see it as a threat to national security? GRAHAM: Well, look, I mean, the actual level of Russian FDI in the United States is quite small. You know, you have some few, I think, good examples of it—the one that you've mentioned with Yuri Milner, for example. There was some investment in a steel factory some years ago. But by and large, there hasn't been a significant amount of Russian foreign direct investment in the United States. I think our growing concerns about Russia have made us even more leery of allowing Russian investment, particularly in sectors that we consider critical to American national security. So I'm not deeply concerned about that going forward. I think we probably face a much greater challenge from the Chinese in that regard. Of course, you've seen efforts by the United States to deal more harshly or look more closely at Chinese investment in the United States over the past several years. Let me just make one sort of final point on social media since it's come up. You know, Russia is a problem. We need to pay attention to Russia in that space. But again, I don't think that we should exaggerate Russia's influence, nor should we focus simply on Russia as the problem in this area. There is a major problem with disinformation in social media in the United States, much of that propagated by sources within the United States, but there are a host of other countries that also will try to affect U.S. public opinion through their intrusions into American social media. You know, given our concerns about First Amendment rights, freedom of speech and so forth, you know, I think we have problems in sort of really clamping down on this. But what we need to do, certainly, is better educate the American public about how to deal with the information that crosses their electronic devices day in and day out. Americans need to be aware of how they can be manipulated, and they need to understand and know where they can go to find reliable information. Again, given the political polarization in our country today, this is a very real challenge and difficult one. But I think if we think long term about this problem, the key really is educating the American public. An educated American public is going to be the best defense against foreign countries, other hostile forces trying to use social media to undermine our national unity and exacerbate the politics of our country. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question from Eoin Wilson-Manion, who's raised his hand. Q: Hello. Can you hear me now? GRAHAM: Yes. FASKIANOS: Yes. Q: Awesome. Well, thank you. I just wanted to ask if you could touch a little bit more on Russia's presence in Syria and what that means for U.S. interests in Syria and I guess the larger Middle East. I'm Eoin from Carnegie Mellon University. Thanks very much. GRAHAM: Well, you know, the Russians entered Syria in 2015 militarily largely to save Assad from what they thought was imminent overthrow by what they considered a radical Islamic force, a group of terrorists that they thought would challenge Russian interests not only in Syria but would fuel extremist forces inside Russia itself, particularly in the North Caucasus but farther afield than that—even into Moscow, into areas that were Muslim-dominated inside Russia itself. So they had very good national security reasons for going in. Those ran—I mean, the Russian presence in Syria clearly has run counter to what the United States was trying to do at that point since we clearly aligned against Assad in favor of what we considered moderate reformist forces that were seeking a more sort of democratic future for Syria as part of this broader Arab Spring at that time. So there was a clear conflict at that point. You know, subsequently and in parallel with its continued presence in Syria, the Russians have extended their diplomatic—their diplomatic effort to other countries in the region. Russia enjoys a fairly robust diplomatic relationship with Israel, for example, that has been grounded in counterterrorism cooperation, for example. They have a sort of strange relationship, largely positive, with Turkey that they have pursued over the past several years. We know of the ties that they've had in Tehran, in Iran for some time. They have reached out to the Saudis and the Saudis have bought some military equipment from them. We see them in Egypt and Libya, for example. So they're a growing presence, a growing diplomatic presence in the Middle East, and this does pose some problems for the United States. From the middle of the 1970s onward, one of the basic thrusts of American foreign policy was to limit the role the Russians played in the Middle East. We sidelined them in the negotiations between the Arabs and the Israelis in the 1970s and in the 1980s. We limited their diplomatic contacts to countries that we considered critical partners and allies in that part of the world. Now I think the geopolitical situation has changed. Our own interest in the Middle East has diminished over time, in part because of the fracking revolution here in the United States. Gas and oil, we've got close to being independent in that area. We're not as dependent on the Middle East as we once were for energy sources. And also, as, you know, the Biden administration has been clear, we do want to pivot away from the Middle East and Europe to focus more of our energies on what we see as the rising and continuing strategic challenge posed by China. So I think that means that going forward the United States is going to have to deal with Russia in a different fashion in the Middle East than in the past. We're going to have to recognize them as a continuing presence. We're not going to be able to push them out, in part because we're not prepared to devote the resources to it. We have countries that are still important to us—Saudi Arabia, Israel for example—that do want a Russian presence in the Middle East. And so what we ought to do, it seems to me, is to begin that discussion about how we're going to manage the rivalry in the Middle East. Now, it's not all simply competition. There are areas for cooperation. We can cooperate in dealing with Iran, for example, the Iran nuclear dossier, as we have had in the past. Neither country has an interest in Iran developing nuclear weapons. Second, I think the two countries also would like to see a Middle East that's not dominated by a single regional power. So despite the fact that the Russians have worked together quite closely with the Iranians in Syria, they don't share Iranian ambitions elsewhere in the Middle East. And if you look at the diplomatic ties that the Russians have nurtured over the past with Turkey, with Israel, Saudi Arabia for example, none of these are friends of Iran, to put it mildly. So we can talk, I think, to the Russians of how our—you know, we can conduct ourselves so as to foster the development of a regional equilibrium in the Middle East that tends to stabilize that region, makes it less of a threat to either country, less of a threat to America's European allies, and use this as a basis for, again, sort of not escalating the tension in the region but moderating it in some ways that works to the long-term advantage of the United States. FASKIANOS: Next question from Michael Strmiska, who's a professor at Orange County Community College in New York state. Do you see any hope of persuading Russia to abandon its occupation of Crimea in the near term? Or do you think this is like the occupation of the Baltic states of Lithuania, Latvia, and Estonia after World War II, where a very long timespan was needed before any liberation was realistically possible? GRAHAM: Well, I guess my answer to those two questions would be yes and no, or no and yes. On Crimea, you know, I see no sort of near-term scenario that would lead to the Russians agreeing to the return of Crimea to Ukraine. Quite the contrary, Russia has taken steps since 2014 they continue at this point to further integrate Crimea into the Russian Federation politically, economically, socially, and so forth. The Russians have also built up their military presence in Crimea as a way of enhancing their domination or their influence in the greater Black Sea region. So I see no set of circumstances that would change that, certainly not in the—in the near term. And I think, you know, the Ukrainian effort to focus attention on Crimea is not going to, in fact, gain a great deal of traction with Europe nor with the United States going forward, though we will maintain the principled position of not recognizing Russia's incorporation or annexation of Crimea. You know, I don't think that the Crimean and Baltic situations are necessarily analogous. You know, in the Baltic states there was a significant indigenous element, governments in exile, that supported the independence of those countries. There was a fulcrum that the United States or a lever that the United States could use over time to continue pressure on the Soviets that eventually led to the independence of those countries as the Soviet Union broke down and ultimately collapsed at the end of the 1980s into 1991. I don't see any significant indigenous element in Crimea nor a movement of inhabitants of Crimea outside Crimea that wants Crimea to be returned to Ukraine. I think we need to remember that a significant part of the population in Ukraine is Russian military, retired Russian military, that feels quite comfortable in—within the Russian Federation at this point. So if I were being quite frank about this, although I think the United States should maintain its principled position and not recognize annexation of Crimea, I don't see anything over the long term, barring the collapse of Russia itself, that will change that situation and see Ukraine (sic; Crimea) reincorporated into the Ukrainian state. FASKIANOS: So there are a couple questions in the chat about Russia's economy: What is their economy like today? And what are the effects of the sanctions? And from Steve Shinkel at the Naval War College: How do you assess the tie between Russia's economy and being able to continue to modernize its military and ensure a stable economy? And will economic factors and Russia's demographic challenges be a future constraining factor? So if you could— GRAHAM: Yeah. No, no, just take the economy. Obviously, a big issue, and it will be a constraining factor. I mean, the Russian economy is stagnating and it has for some—for some time. They enjoyed—the Russian economy enjoyed a very rapid period of growth during President Putin's first presidential—two presidential terms in the 2000s, but since the financial crisis of 2008 and 2009 Russia has run into very difficult economic times. In fact, it's never really recovered from that crisis. If you look at the past ten years, barely any growth in the Russian economy at all. If you look at the impact that that has had on Russians themselves, there's basically been no growth in real disposable income; rather, a decline over the past six or seven years. I think the Russians recognize that. The question is whether they can come up with a set of policies that actually will reverse that and that lead to a more robustly growing economy. Now, what the Kremlin has tried to do is not so much reform the economy—which I think is necessary if they're going to enjoy robust economic growth—as much as professionalize the economy; that is—that is, bring in a younger sort of cadre who are well educated, many of them educated in the West, who understand how modern economies function and can keep the economy stable at least at the macro level. And this is one of the reasons that Western sanctions have not had nearly the impact on Russian behavior that many had hoped for or anticipated back in 2014 when we began to turn repeatedly to this tool in response to Russian activities and operations against Ukraine. You know, it has had some impact. I think the IMF would say that it's probably taken a percentage point off—or, not a percentage point, but a tenth of a percentage point off of Russia's GDP growth over the past several years. That certainly hasn't been enough to change Russian behavior. But it hasn't been more, in fact, because the governors of the—of the central bank have dealt quite adeptly with that, and maintain said Russian macroeconomic stability and some sort of foundation for the economy to grow going forward. I imagine that's going to continue into the—into the future as well. So it is a constraining factor. Then I would end with what I—with a point that I made in my introduction. Russia does have a tremendous ability to mobilize its resources for state purposes, to extract what it needs from society at large to modernize the military, to maintain certainly Russia's defenses and also some capability to project power abroad. So I wouldn't write them off because of that. I think it's going—still going to be a serious power, but not nearly as great a challenge to the United States as if it, in fact, solved its demographic problems, its economic problems, and had a robustly growing economy, greater resources that it could devote to a whole range of things that would improve its standing on the global stage vis-à-vis the United States and vis-à-vis China. FASKIANOS: Well, with that we are at the end of our time. And I apologize to everybody. We had over twenty written questions still pending and raised hands. I'm sorry we couldn't get to all of you, but we do try to end on time. So, Thomas Graham, thank you very much for sharing your insights and analysis with us today. We appreciate it. And to all of you for your terrific questions and comments, we appreciate it. Our next Academic Webinar will be on Wednesday, October 6, at 1:00 p.m. Eastern Time. And we will focus on the Indo-Pacific with Dhruva Jaishankar, who is the executive director of the Observer Research Foundation America and nonresident fellow at the Lowy Institute. And in the meantime, I encourage you to follow CFR at @CFR_Academic and visit CFR.org, ForeignAffairs.com, and ThinkGlobalHealth.org for new research and analysis on global issues. So, Tom, thank you very much. GRAHAM: Thank you. Good luck to all of you. (END)

Dave Lukas, The Misfit Entrepreneur_Breakthrough Entrepreneurship
269: Necessity and the Other Side of Success with Immigrant Entrepreneur, Martin Sawa

Dave Lukas, The Misfit Entrepreneur_Breakthrough Entrepreneurship

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 53:42


This week's Misfit Entrepreneur is Martin Sawa. Martin was the son of penniless Ukrainian immigrants and was on a path for the same kind of life when he made a decision. At almost 30, he quit his dead-end job to go into real estate and compete in the high stakes commercial real estate market in San Francisco. He struggled, but eventually found enormous success culminating in a $400 million deal that basically allowed him to retire and pursue his passions for writing. He had it all – but he had to confront the true cost of the sacrifices he made to get there. He wrote about his story and incredible lessons learned in The Other Side of Success: Money and Meaning in the Golden State. Martin came from nothing, sacrificed everything and went through tragedy to find success, and ultimately learned what really matters on his entrepreneur journey and I'm excited to have him share it with you in this episode. ​www.martinsawa.com Martin's parents lived under both Hitler and Stalin. They made it through the war and were put in a displaced person's camp in Austria for several years and finally made it to the US. They were resettled in rural Wisconsin. Martin was sort of an outsider in that he had trouble with the language, etc. He was able to go to and work to pay for a Jesuit boarding school and this helped him. He then went to college in the mid-west and after headed out to California. He got a job in Oakland, got married, and as he approached 30 years old was dead broke and hating his job with another kid on the way. He had his “aha” moment when he was working at zoning counter for his job in the city planner's office. A developer came in and started screaming at him to process his project. In that moment, Martin just walked away and continued out the door – vowing never to have a job again and would work for himself from then on. He was driven by necessity. He had some sales experience from when he was younger doing door to door sales. He chose commercial real estate as the biggest things he could sell that would pay the biggest commissions. It took him a year before he made any money. Eventually, he worked for a broker and climbed up the ladder. He was divorced by this time and he and his new wife moved to Los Angeles. He was traveling and doing mega-deal internationally. He reached a point where he felt he was done and quit. He later went back when invited to do a deal with an old colleague. They bought a building in San Francisco. His wife, who was everything in his life, dropped dead one night from a heart attack. He had to work through that and did so. He did a large deal that gave him the ability to do what he wanted to do and that was how he got into writing and consulting. Can you give perspective on why the US is such a great place to reach one's dreams? The worst possible situation for his parents was nothing compared to the worst possible scenario in the US. Just living in the US was better for them and is for many. In the US, the children could do better than the parents and his parents instilled this in him. The US gives the opportunity, not the guarantee – in many places there is no opportunity. What went through your mind when you walked out on your job? Martin had a big fight with his wife that night. The mindset became one of necessity He knew that he had to put skin in the game to really achieve great things, so he did. You have to figure out a way and it makes you have to get up early and go to bed late to make it happen. Advice for those looking to make the leap to entrepreneurship? Just do it. You'll never know all you'll need to know. Everyone has a plan until they get punched in the face and you just have to understand that the majority of the time, plans do not work out the way you thought. It's the ability to keep going that matters. What was your mindset as you went through this journey? In the first year, it was necessity. He had to take care of his family some way, somehow. He even played the credit card game to make things work. He kept putting more skin in the game and growing the size of his deals because he knew that the reward was greater, even with the risk. At the 24 min mark, Martin talks about the other side of success and he you overcame the tragedy and challenges… It's hard to find meaning in the material world. Meaning is found in the world of the unseen (spiritual, etc.) Where do you get the willpower that you've used to overcome and keep going? You have to develop the skill to figure out what works best for you. You can read every personal growth book out there, but in the end what works for you will be specific to you and you have to synthesize it and make it work. It is easier to do something when it is specific to you and you've created it. ​ Other advice on how to success? Put skin in the game. Rely on your experience whenever possible. Thoughts on truly finding meaning? Ask what you believe to be true? What you believe will govern and guide your life, so make sure what you believe is true for you. Next ask, who do you admire? What are their qualities? Align what you believe (core values) with what you do in the material world. When the alignment is there, you find meaning.   Best Quote: Put skin in the Game!   Martin's Misfit 3: Have you put skin in the game? No risk, no reward and skin in the game is the best motivator. What do you believe to be from the top down? Are you living true to yourself? Is you pursuit of material success in alignment with your core values? Show Sponsors: Aloa (20% for 4 months!):  Aloa.co/Misfit Five Minute Journal www.MisfitEntrepreneur.com/Journal

Montero On Boxing
Episode 283: Oleksandr Usyk dominates Anthony Joshua

Montero On Boxing

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 119:45


On episode 283 of The Neutral Corner boxing podcast, host Michael Montero eats crow for his Joshua vs Usyk fight prediction. He'll be joined by guests who called the Usyk victory, and Montero will break down the historical significance of the Ukrainian's achievement. Where does Usyk rate pound for pound? Does he deserve the top spot, or is Canelo Alvarez still number one? https://youtu.be/r8qah3O-wPc

Fight Night Boxing Podcast
Fight Night Extra: AJ dethroned by Usyk, the fallout

Fight Night Boxing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 50:28


Gareth A Davies and Nick Peet pick the bones out of an historic night at the Tottenham Hotspur Stadium which saw Oleksandr Usyk announce himself to the heavyweight division.The undefeated Ukrainian put on a boxing masterclass to become the unified Heavyweight champion. We discuss what next for AJ and if his intention to take the rematch is the correct one.We also look back on the undercard including impressive wins for Callum Smith and Lawrence Okolie and a questionable decision for Campbell Hatton See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Fight Site Podcast Network
TENGRIDOME, Episode 21: Anthony Joshua vs. Oleksandr Usyk Post-Fight Discussion

The Fight Site Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 88:44


Tumen is joined by the Fight Site founder and boxing historian Kyle McLachlan and the Fight Site's boxing analyst Lukasz Fenrych to gush about the peerless masterclass in technical boxing that was Oleksandr Usyk's performance against Anthony Joshua. They recap the fight, ruminate on the significance of Usyk's achievement, and try their best to mythbust some of the weird talk circulating online about Anthony Joshua's inability to handle the Ukrainian's fighting prowess. Follow Iggy on twitter: https://twitter.com/chunguskhan03 Follow Kyle on twitter: https://twitter.com/CombatChr Follow Lukasz on twitter: https://twitter.com/craftyboxing Check out our written content on the website: https://www.thefight-site.com/ Support us directly on Patreon for exclusive content and access to the discord: https://www.patreon.com/fightsite We now have exclusive merchandise at teespring.com/stores/the-fight-site-shop.

New Books Network
Vladislav Davidzon, "From Odessa with Love: Political and Literary Essays in Post-Soviet Ukraine" ( Academica Press, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 58:16


The Tashkent-born Russian-American literary critic, editor, essayist, and journalist Vladislav Davidzon has been covering post-Soviet Ukraine for the past ten years, a tumultuous time for that country and the surrounding world. The 2014 “Revolution of Dignity” heralded a tremendous transformation of Ukrainian politics and society that has continued to ripple and reverberate throughout the world. These unprecedented events also wrought a remarkable cultural revolution in Ukraine itself. In late 2015, a year and a half after the 2014 Revolution swept away the presidency of the Moscow-leaning kleptocratic President Viktor Yanukovich, Davidzon and his wife founded a literary journal, The Odessa Review, focusing on newly emergent trends in film, literature, painting, design, and fashion. The journal became an East European cultural institution, publishing outstanding writers in the region and beyond. From his vantage point as a journalist and editor, Davidzon came to observe events and know many of the leading figures in Ukrainian politics and culture, and to write about them for a Western audience. Davidzon later found himself in the center of world events as he became a United States government witness in the Ukraine scandal that shook the presidency of Donald Trump. From Odessa with Love: Political and Literary Essays in Post-Soviet Ukraine (Academica Press, 2020) tells the real story of what happened in Ukraine from the keen and resilient perspective of an observer at its center Steven Seegel is Professor of Slavic and Eurasian Studies at The University of Texas at Austin. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Literature
Vladislav Davidzon, "From Odessa with Love: Political and Literary Essays in Post-Soviet Ukraine" ( Academica Press, 2020)

New Books in Literature

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 58:16


The Tashkent-born Russian-American literary critic, editor, essayist, and journalist Vladislav Davidzon has been covering post-Soviet Ukraine for the past ten years, a tumultuous time for that country and the surrounding world. The 2014 “Revolution of Dignity” heralded a tremendous transformation of Ukrainian politics and society that has continued to ripple and reverberate throughout the world. These unprecedented events also wrought a remarkable cultural revolution in Ukraine itself. In late 2015, a year and a half after the 2014 Revolution swept away the presidency of the Moscow-leaning kleptocratic President Viktor Yanukovich, Davidzon and his wife founded a literary journal, The Odessa Review, focusing on newly emergent trends in film, literature, painting, design, and fashion. The journal became an East European cultural institution, publishing outstanding writers in the region and beyond. From his vantage point as a journalist and editor, Davidzon came to observe events and know many of the leading figures in Ukrainian politics and culture, and to write about them for a Western audience. Davidzon later found himself in the center of world events as he became a United States government witness in the Ukraine scandal that shook the presidency of Donald Trump. From Odessa with Love: Political and Literary Essays in Post-Soviet Ukraine (Academica Press, 2020) tells the real story of what happened in Ukraine from the keen and resilient perspective of an observer at its center Steven Seegel is Professor of Slavic and Eurasian Studies at The University of Texas at Austin. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literature

Shoot the Defence
#StudioInter Ep. 93: "Inter Should Have Addressed The Goalkeeper Position Years Ago"

Shoot the Defence

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 67:07


This is #StudioInter, the world's number 1 podcast in English dedicated entirely to FC Internazionale Milano – where it's 100% Inter, 100% of the time, only on SempreInter.com. In this weeks episode of #StudioInter the boys are joined by Ukrainian football expert, writer and broadcaster Andrew Todos. Topics include: Preview of the Champions League clash against Shakhtar Donetsk; The Samir Handanovic situation at Inter; Review of the matches against Fiorentina and Atalanta; Preview of the upcoming Serie A clash with Sassuolo; All of this and this weeks Moggi, Moratti, Frog and much much more on this weeks episode of #StudioInter. So sit back, relax and join the boys as they delve deep into the black and blue world of the Nerazzurri. Subscribe and listen to #StudioInter on: iTunes, Apple Podcasts, Podbean, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon and YouTube Host: Nima Tavallaey. Guest: Andrew Todos from Zorya Londonsk. Panelists: Mike Piellucci, Mohamed Nassar & Jake Smalley Edited by: Renato Brea. Illustration/design: Tin Milekic.

StudioInter
Episode 193: #StudioInter Ep. 193: "Inter Should Have Addressed The Goalkeeper Position Years Ago"

StudioInter

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 65:38


This is #StudioInter, the number 1 podcast in English dedicated entirely to FC Internazionale Milano – where it's 100% Inter, 100% of the time only on SempreInter.com.In this weeks episode of #StudioInter the boys are joined by Ukrainian football expert, writer and broadcaster Andrew Todos.Topics include: Preview of the Champions League clash against Shakhtar Donetsk; The Samir Handanovic situation at Inter; Review of the matches against Fiorentina and Atalanta; Preview of the upcoming Serie A clash with Sassuolo; All of this and this weeks Moggi, Moratti, Frog and much much more on this weeks episode of #StudioInter.So sit back, relax and join the boys as they delve deep into the black and blue world of the Nerazzurri. Host: Nima Tavallaey.Guest: Andrew Todos from Zorya Londonsk.Panelists: Mike Piellucci, Mohamed Nassar & Jake SmalleyEdited by: Renato Brea.Illustration/design: Tin Milekic.

The Chris Voss Show
The Chris Voss Show Podcast – The Last Million: Europe’s Displaced Persons from World War to Cold War by David Nasaw

The Chris Voss Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 42:16


The Last Million: Europe's Displaced Persons from World War to Cold War by David Nasaw From bestselling author David Nasaw, a sweeping new history of the one million refugees left behind in Germany after WWII In May 1945, after German forces surrendered to the Allied powers, millions of concentration camp survivors, POWs, slave laborers, political prisoners, and Nazi collaborators were left behind in Germany, a nation in ruins. British and American soldiers attempted to repatriate the refugees, but more than a million displaced persons remained in Germany: Jews, Poles, Estonians, Latvians, Lithuanians, Ukrainians, and other Eastern Europeans who refused to go home or had no homes to return to. Most would eventually be resettled in lands suffering from postwar labor shortages, but no nation, including the United States, was willing to accept more than a handful of the 200,000 to 250,000 Jewish men, women, and children who remained trapped in Germany. When in June, 1948, the United States Congress passed legislation permitting the immigration of displaced persons, visas were granted to sizable numbers of war criminals and Nazi collaborators, but denied to 90% of the Jewish displaced persons. A masterwork from acclaimed historian David Nasaw, The Last Million tells the gripping but until now hidden story of postwar displacement and statelessness and of the Last Million, as they crossed from a broken past into an unknowable future, carrying with them their wounds, their fears, their hope, and their secrets. Here for the first time, Nasaw illuminates their incredible history and shows us how it is our history as well.

Hard Factor
9/23: Hunter Biden's Ukrainian Emails from Laptop Confirmed as Genuine

Hard Factor

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 66:44


A Politico article from Ben Schreckinger confirms that some of the Ukrainian business related emails talking about “the big man” in Hunter Bidens laptop were confirmed to be real and genuine. They went on to cover themselves saying "While the leak contains genuine files, it remains possible that fake material has been slipped in." Not to brag but Hard Factor was one of the few “media” sources that predicted the materials in Hunter Biden's stolen laptop were real, especially the sex stuff. Cup Of Coffee in the Big Time 00:00:00 - Timestamps 00:07:51 – Fun Fact – Space suits used to cost 12 million dollars in 1974 per spacesuit and NASA is going to pay 1 billion dollars for the new space suits 00:11:18 – Holidays: Celebrate bi sexuality, dogs in politics day, national checkers day 00:13:19 – Today in History – 1779 John Paul Jones, screamed “I have not yet begun to fight”, 1846 Neptune observed for first time, 1980 Bob Marley's last concert 00:17:08 – Honorable Mentions: NFL parlay better lost but paid 133k from MGM; Spaceforce uniforms causing a buzz; Tim Scott and Cory Booker stalemate on police reform bill, Michael Flynn thinks covid vaccines are being put in salad dressings 00:20:34 - #3 – Thanos – The new movie the Eternals has links to Thanos the main villain of the Avengers movies 00:22:40 - #2 – Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell gave a speech about the economy with emphasis on inflation and interest rates 00:28:22 - #1 – Hunter Biden Laptop is real confirmed by independent sources in a new Politico article from Ben Schreckinger 00:38:22 - A couple of guys in Byram Mississippi saw a “free car” on the side of the road with the keys in it and took it but it turns out the owner was dead in the trunk TTIM - 00:46:53 – England - Boris Johnson – For the first time ever in an interview with Savannah Guthrie Boris admitted to having six kids with one on the way 00:50:11 – China – A giant moon got loose from the moon festival and rolled down the street 00:51:48 – Canary Islands – A major volcanic eruption is happening and homes are being destroyed with several thousand evacuations going on 00:56:20 - A man had a horrible and rare medical condition where he ejaculated from his rear end due to a hole from a catheter that crossed the lines These stories and more… brought to you by our fantastic sponsors. Laithwaites Wines - Now, get six amazing bottles of wine, plus two bonus bottles and two stemless wine glasses for $49.99 (plus tax) with free delivery. Just text HARD to 64-000! To get this special offer, text HARD to 64-000. That's HARD to 64-000. Terms apply, available at laithwaites.com/terms. Raycon Earbuds - Raycon exists to prove that premium audio doesn't have to price you out. We're here to defy the industry by tailoring our tech to the people– giving them booming audio and luxurious comfort. Get 15% off their Raycon order at buyraycon.com/hardfactor. Express VPN - Protect your online activity TODAY with the VPN rated #1 by CNET. Visit our exclusive link ExpressVPN.com/hardfactor and you can get an extra 3 months FREE on a one-year package. Leave us a Voicemail at 512-270-1480 or or send us a voicememo to hardfactorvoicemail@gmail.com & leave a 5-Star review on Apple Pods to hear it on Friday's show Follow/Subscribe @HardFactorNews on Instagram, Twitter, TikTok, YouTube, Facebook, Apple Pods and Spotify to support the Show!

The CyberWire
Ransomware is rising, and governments try to evolve an effective response. A look at the cyber underworld. Snooping smartphones. An advance fee scam is criminal business as usual.

The CyberWire

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 28:05


BlackMatter continues to make a nuisance of itself on a large scale. The US is woofing about taking action against ransomware, and Treasury has sanctioned a rogue cryptocurrency exchange, but some advocate stronger measures. Where did all those Ukrainian cybercriminal chat platforms go? A warning of the “censor mode” in some Chinese manufactured smartphones. Caleb Barlow shares thoughts on CMMC certification. Our guest is Kevin Jones of Virsec with reactions to the White House Cybersecurity Summit. And, hey, no, really, Apple is not celebrating the iPhone 13 by giving away a stash of Bitcoin. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news briefing: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/10/183

Fight Night Boxing Podcast
Fight Night Extra: AJ vs Usyk preview special!

Fight Night Boxing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 49:32


Ade oladipo and Gareth A Davies discuss the HUGE heavyweight title fight this weekend between Anthony Joshua and former undisputed cruiserweight kind Oleksandr UsykThe pair are joined by the last cruiserweight to face Usyk, Tony Bellew. He reveals that the Ukrainian will be AJ's toughest opponent yet and is a better boxer than fellow heavyweight Tyson FuryWe also hear from Usyk himself, undisputed super lightweight champ Josh Taylor also tells us how he expects the bout to go, and we discuss a packed undercard featuring Lawrence Okolie and Callum Smith See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

5 Live Boxing with Costello & Bunce
Chisora on fighting Usyk; and Usyk on fighting AJ

5 Live Boxing with Costello & Bunce

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 33:05


Derek Chisora, the last man to step in the ring with Oleksandr Usyk, shares his insights on how Anthony Joshua can beat the Ukrainian star. Then, Steve speaks to Usyk himself about his attitude towards the fight and his perennially relaxed attitude.

Real Estate Time Freedom Show by InvestorFuse
Ep 106: From a Ukrainian Refugee to a $300K per Month Wholesale Business | Viktor Rybachuk

Real Estate Time Freedom Show by InvestorFuse

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 62:54


Viktor Rybachuk joins the show to break down his wholesaling operation which is now grossing $300k/month with aspirations in the near future to get to $1Million/month. Viktor came to this country originally as a refugee from Ukraine and started doing real estate part-time while he was a full-time nurse! He now has a team of 17 people that he is growing to 32.   Viktor discusses the biggest levers that have helped professionally and personally.  Follow him on Instagram @ViktorGLG

Philokalia Ministries
The Evergetinos - Vol. I, Hypothesis IX, Part III and Hypothesis X, Part I

Philokalia Ministries

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 68:32


Tonight we concluded a brief section from Hypothesis Nine and began reading Hypothesis Ten. The subject matter of these readings is rather fierce; presenting us over and over again with the experience of death. What is the experience of the soul at the moment of death bearing within it  its vices and virtues alone.?  We are presented with images and visions of the Saints who describe a malignant evil set upon the demise of those seeking to follow the narrow path that leads to the kingdom. Even at the moment of death the evil one is there to accuse and weigh in the balance individual's vices and virtues. If anything these images stress for us the reality of evil and hostile powers set upon our demise and that the spiritual life and struggle has cosmological scope.  Such truths remind us of the necessity of constant vigilance in the spiritual warfare. We must desire to the kingdom above all things and seek it with purity of heart and intention. It is this alone that sets us upon the path to the kingdom with a holy boldness even when faced with these hostile powers in their most fearful form. --- Text of chat during the group: 00:16:50 Ed Kleinguetl: Orthodox theory of the toll houses   00:22:57 Carol Nypaver: Page?   00:23:12 Ashley Kaschl: 84   00:46:37 Rachel (30): Yes, exactly! What a sobering reflection.   01:06:46 Eric Williams: When being chased by a wild beast, one needn't run fastest - just faster than one's companions. ;)   01:07:22 Rachel (30): lol   01:14:21 Tyler Woloshyn: Have a blessed evening folks. I am off to my Ukrainian class. Please pray for Canada during our federal election tonight. God bless! :)   01:15:06 Erick Chastain: will do!   01:15:49 renwitter: “Do we all flap”

The Film Vault
Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings//The Tribe//The Snowtown Murders

The Film Vault

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 66:16


Bryan and Anderson review the latest Marvel movie and then move on to two powerful and upsetting movies including an Australian movie based on a true story and a Ukrainian movie consisting of nothing but deaf actors who only communicate through sign language… without subtitles. Huge thanks to Byron Klosterman for assigning that one! TFV Patreon is Here for Even More Film Vault NEW MERCH PAGE is HERE!  Listener Art: Grant Baldwin  Featured Artists: Devin Cuddy Anderson's Video Review of Shang-Chi Subscribe to Anderson's Video Reviews Here. CONECT WITH US: Instagram: @AndersonAndBryan Facebook.com/TheFilmVault Twitter: @TheFilmVault HAVE A CHAT WITH ANDY HERE ATTY & ANDY: DIRECTED BY A FOUR-YEAR-OLD Subscribe To Anderson's Youtube Channel Here THE COLD COCKLE SHORTS RULES OF REDUCTION MORMOAN THE CULT OF CARANO Please Give Groupers a Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score Here Please Rate It on IMDB Here The Blu-ray, US The Blu-ray, International Groupers is now available on these platforms. On Amazon On Google Play  On iTunes On Youtube On Tubi On Vudu Flickfessions: Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings The Tribe The Snowtown Murders

Kickass News
Alexander Vindman on Doing What's Right

Kickass News

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 44:03


Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Vindman (Ret.) is the whistleblower who exposed former President Donald Trump's notorious phone call Ukrainian president Volodymyr Zellensky that led to the second impeachment of Trump.  Vindman reveals the weird activity that tipped him off that this was going to be an unusual phone call, the moment when he realized Trump may have violated the law, and what happened when he reported the matter to his own brother.  He describes the almost immediate pressure campaign to silence him, how his military training came in handy when he testified in the Congressional Impeachment Hearing, and why he feels that the Impeachment committee and the press focused too much on the prospect of a "quid pro quo."  Plus he talks about the effort to rob him of his expected military promotion and how he's now reaching out to help other victim's of bullying. Order Alexander Vindman's new memoir HERE, RIGHT MATTERS: An American Story on Amazon, Audible, or wherever books are sold.  Subscribe to Kickass News on Apple Podcasts or Spotify, and keel with us at www.kickassnews.com or on Twitter at @KickassNewsPod.  Kickass News is part of the Airwave Media podcast network.  Visit Airwave at www.airwavemedia.com or on Apple Podcasts to discover our other excellent podcasts like Infamous America, Investing for Beginners, The Accidental Creative, and Into the Impossible.