Podcasts about Latvian

  • 572PODCASTS
  • 833EPISODES
  • 46mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 3, 2022LATEST

POPULARITY

20152016201720182019202020212022

Categories



Best podcasts about Latvian

Latest podcast episodes about Latvian

Talking Translations
Women. Poetry. Translation. A Conversation with Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin and Martina Evans

Talking Translations

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 94:28


Women. Poetry. Translation. A Conversation with Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin and Martina Evans.  To mark International Translation Day, hear readings and a discussion on Irish poetry and translation. This event was a part of the "Women and Literature" series by the Embassy of Ireland in Latvia, in partnership with Literature Ireland and the National Library of Latvia, where the event took place. This panel discussion included special guests from Ireland and Latvia, as well as a spotlight on Latvian poet Astrīde Ivaska's time in Ireland. Our guests:Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin Born 1942 in Cork, Fellow emeritus of Trinity College, Dublin. Ireland Professor of Poetry 2016-19. She has published academic work on the Renaissance and on translation, as well as eleven collections of poetry. Her Collected Poems appeared in 2020 and was awarded the Pigott Prize. She has published translations of poetry from several languages, most recently Dánta Antonella Anedda, translated from Italian into Irish, published by Cois Life in 2019. Lucina Schynning in Silence of the Nicht (poems translated into Chinese) appeared from Sichuan Ethnic Publishing Company, Chengdu, in 2020. With Macdara Woods, Leland Bardwell and Pearse Hutchinson she founded the literary magazine Cyphers and remains its principal editor.Martina EvansMartina Evans grew up in County Cork and trained in Dublin as a radiographer before moving to London in 1988. She is the author of twelve books of poetry and prose. Now We Can Talk Openly About Men (Carcanet 2018) was shortlisted for the 2019 Irish Times Poetry Now Award, the Pigott Poetry Prize and the Roehampton Poetry Prize and was an Observer, TLS and Irish Times Book of the Year in 2018. American Mules, (Carcanet 2021) won the Pigott Poetry Prize in 2022. She is a Royal Literary Fund Advisory Fellow and an Irish Times poetry critic.The conversation was moderated by Dr. philol. Zita Kārkla, a post doc at the Institute of Literature, Folklore and Art of University of Latvia. This podcast episode has been released jointly by the National Library of Latvia and Literature Ireland; Literature Ireland's episode is introduced by the Director of Literature Ireland, Sinéad Mac Aodha.Literature Ireland promotes Irish literary authors and their work worldwide and is funded by Culture Ireland and the Arts Council. To learn more about what we do, visit Literature Ireland's website. For any queries email info@literatureireland.com. The intro/outro music in this series is used with permission from David Hilowitz. Intro sound editing by Ciarán McCann.

Baltic Ways
Latvian Units in World War II: An interview with Dr. Harry Merritt

Baltic Ways

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 30:07


What happens when families and nations fight on both sides of a great power war? Dr. Harry Merritt is a visiting assistant professor in the department of history at Brown University. He shares his research on national and familial feelings among Latvian soldiers in World War II, who were conscripted into the Latvian Legion and Latvian Rifle Corp as the country was occupied by both Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union. Soldiers in both units spoke Latvian with one another, celebrated national holidays, sang traditional songs, and often thought of themselves and their comrades-in-arms as serving the Latvian national cause. Dr. Merritt explores the human stories underpinning this history and what it means for greater narratives in his chapter for the recently published Defining Latvia. Baltic Ways is a podcast brought to you by the Association for the Advancement of Baltic Studies, produced in partnership with the Baltic Initiative at the Foreign Policy Research Institute. The views and opinions expressed in this podcast are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of AABS or FPRI.

Ukraine: The Latest
Vladimir Putin announces annexation of four Ukrainian regions & interview with journalist Kristaps Andrejsons

Ukraine: The Latest

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 46:10 Very Popular


Day 219.Today, we have reaction to Vladimir Putin's historic speech in Moscow where the Russian leader announced the annexation of four Ukrainian regions.We also speak to Latvian journalist Kristaps Andrejsons who's been reporting from across Ukraine.Contributors:David Knowles (Host). Follow David on Twitter @djknowles22Nataliya Vasilyeva (Russia Correspondent).Kristaps Andrejsons (Journalist).Email: podcasts@telegraph.co.ukSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

CBN.com - Family - Video Podcast
Relying on Faith Through Horrors of WWII

CBN.com - Family - Video Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 7:06


For Anna Johnson and her Latvian family, faith came through the clear guidance of her father, who as a pastor, led them though the perilous journey of survival through wilderness and German labor camps by standing on God's word it make it ... ...

CBN.com - Family - Video Podcast
Relying on Faith Through Horrors of WWII

CBN.com - Family - Video Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 7:06


For Anna Johnson and her Latvian family, faith came through the clear guidance of her father, who as a pastor, led them though the perilous journey of survival through wilderness and German labor camps by standing on God's word it make it ... ...

The Insider Travel Report Podcast
What Oceania Cruises' Culinary Excursions Are All About

The Insider Travel Report Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 17:03


Noelle Barille, senior chef instructor on Oceania Marina, talks with Alan Fine of Insider Travel Report about an excursion to the food market in Riga, Lativia, one of the largest in Europe, a UNESCO World Heritage site the size of five zeppelin hangers. The goal was to buy fresh local ingredients for sampling and cooking back at the ship. A special feature of this class was the built-in interaction with the local merchants, because participants were given an envelope with Latvian euros, a short shopping list, and instructions to have fun and "go shopping." For more information, visit www.oceaniacruises.com. If interested, the original video of this podcast can be found on the Insider Travel Report Youtube channel or by searching for the podcast's title on Youtube.

Asketic Podcast
Asketic Podcast #23 Roberts Rūrāns — From Street Art to Medieval Art

Asketic Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 28:26


My name is Miķelis Baštiks, and this is Asketic Podcast, where we discuss design and branding. This time we're meeting illustrator Roberts Rūrāns and talk about how to develop your signature style from street art to medieval art and find global clients while working here in Latvia.I've always really liked to draw, and that's essentially illustration, creation of images.But you didn't start out as a professional illustrator. At first you were doing large-scale graffiti on the streets. I'm interested to hear your retrospective view on how you went from painting large-scale pictures on to painting with extremely fine brushes, going from the utmost maximal to the utmost minimal scale. You started out as a designer, you worked as an in-house illustrator at an agency, now you're an independent freelance illustrator. How did you find yourself on this path to illustration and to realizing this is what you want to do? As I've mentioned before, this path began in early childhood. Drawing has always been my favorite activity, which I did in my free time and not so free time. My parents took me to art schools, and I positioned myself on this trajectory. It seemed like the natural path to take. To draw or create something on a plane. It progressed step by step until I found myself in Jānis Rozentāls Art School. When I finished this Secondary School, I applied to the Art Academy of Latvia but didn't get in at first. Then in England. When it comes to the occupation, I've never considered an alternative scenario for my life.For a while you were a designer. Yes, I was, because back then I knew only of caricaturists, which meant satirical and political cartoons, but that didn't particularly captivate me. I also knew of designers, who work with visuals, but only occasionally do drawings.There are also painters.Exactly, there are painters and artists, who create whatever they want at their studio, organize exhibitions and sell their work. And I wasn't really aware of illustrators, who essentially are commercial artists. Once I enrolled in the Art Academy, I realized I need to get to know this industry better. Like, who are these people that are artists, but also are able to earn something and pay their bills? Those obviously are designers. I'd say I got lucky. I ended up here, in Asketic, a while ago, as you remember.Do you remember the turning point when you chose illustrations over design as your primary pursuit?It actually happened here. When you do other things, you realize what you don't like and that you want to do something else. Here I realised that I lack design skills and that the most enjoyable tasks are the ones where I have to draw something by hand, where I have to come up with ideas for illustrations. You also mentioned my interest in street art, which I've had since being 14. I was influenced by friends and art school. It was a task which grew into a long-time interest. That also played a huge part in me choosing a career of an illustrator. It captivated me so much that I felt I could do it forever.As a professional illustrator, what do you now think of street art and 16-year-olds who create it? If I'm being serious, it was something that I needed at that age, but later people mostly grow out of the interests of their youth or transform them into something more mature.In your street art period, you painted with completely different tools in a large scale, but now your works are particularly small-scale even for an illustrator. Firstly, you draw by hand and, secondly, you use really fine brushes. What do you think of this contrast?Upon reflection, it shows how much I've changed or moved away in my thinking from the place I was back then. I've remained on the same path of visual expression and illustrations, but my way of thinking is completely different. Perfectionism was prominent back then as well. I needed all lines to be neat, they couldn't be wobbly or blurry. Lines and areas had to be sharp. Such visual nuances have remained.Since you primarily paint by hand and not digitally and since you have a tendency towards perfectionism, it would seem that a digital image could be modified much more easily, thus allowing you to attain perfection. What do you do, when you draw by hand? Do you start from scratch or use the eraser? How do you handle yourself?Nowadays there's this beautiful super-eraser called Photoshop, which forgives many mistakes. I have a balance between “perfect” and “non-sterile perfect”, so the human touch is still felt. You have to understand what perfection means to you.When you realized you'll become an illustrator, what made you decide to mostly illustrate by hand – on the paper with real brushes and real paints?That happened gradually. I tried a lot of things, including technical, before I arrived at my current style. I've studied graphics at the Art Academy, I've tried various techniques of graphics, which also involve working by hand. I've also drawn lots of things digitally in various styles. It's been an evolution. By trying these various things, my intuition has told me what are the specific aspects which I like and which I'm ready to continue applying. And those which I dislike.Illustrators represent an interesting position between designers and artists, where you work on orders, but simultaneously you have your own vision and signature, which is the reason why you get chosen and receive orders. You're not an artist, who creates based on their whims, but you're neither a designer who has to be able to work in various styles, and, even if you can, you have chosen your own signature. How do you see your balance between professional occupation, artistic ambition and your developed signature style?This is a very good characterization. I've also said this about illustrators – it's art with a task.When I looked through your website, I saw that your signature style has developed from minimalistic, geometric shapes into an interpretation of medieval art. Do you create your signature intentionally or allow yourself to flow? What happens when people, who knew you six months or a year ago and made an order back then, return as clients? Do you draw in your previous style or you insist that it will look differently now?Yes, I'm in a transitional stage. It's a good question. As you said, it can be seen on my website. There's more simplistic, even minimalist, stuff at the bottom, but now my works are rich in detail. In this transitional stage I still have clients who request my previous type of work. Depending on the task and all other criteria, I either agree or say “No, thank you”.So you do assess the request. You're not willing to apply the style from a previous artistic stage.It depends. Sometimes I am, if the other criteria are quite good.Primarily, financial?Yes, primarily.It's an actual aspect of the topics usually discussed on this podcast. We talk about design, business and branding. These things relate to you as an illustrator as well. You represent an intermediate stage between designers and artists, it is an occupation that lets you earn money and you're also developing your brand. The matter of your signature style also contributes to your branding process. It's one way for a designer and different for an artist. You have the privilege to set out your own path, but, at the same time, the orders you receive tend to direct you in one way or another.It's an old truth that what you show to the world is what others start to want from you. As a literal example, I've worked for the Olympics with an illustration of a sportsman. After that I had several clients from the sports industry who were interested in collaboration. In one interview you mentioned that it's important for artists to show their work, actively participate in competitions and be present on social media. You can't just sit and wait for clients. Many artists probably feel like their job is done once they complete the piece of art. How do you divide your time between creating art, preparing invoices and showing your work in public?It's very unstructured. My calendar day is not split up in hours, I go with the flow, but each part of the work certainly takes its time. I truly believe you have to show your work to people, so they know you exist. And you have to do it regularly. I might not be the best example of this. The perfectionism in me sometimes keeps me back from showing some content. That's not good. I would advise showing even unpolished stuff, work in progress. Nowadays, when it comes to showing yourself, it's mostly about the quantity, not the quality.You're one of the rare creative professionals who understands that you don't have to do everything by yourself. You have not one, but several agents, who allow you to reach the global market. How did you come to that realization? Tell me how it works.I have other helpers, like my accountant, who significantly alleviates my work. I realized that after researching other global illustrators. I saw that it's standard practice. I watched interviews with agents or artists speaking about agents to better understand what that means. I realized it's a good way to reach foreign markets and fight for provisions that are favourable to you on the business side of things. The agent represents me, namely, tries to get the best deal for me. That improves the financial side. The aspect of rights is resolved, whether the client buys or leases my work. The agent takes over the accounting part, sends out invoices, collects money, all that side of things. Essentially does everything, except creates the work. Also does all communication with clients.Can you tell me about the provisions? One would think you just draw a picture and get paid. End of story. You've established the culture very well, where it's not just a binary activity, draw-pay. There are various stages, various criteria. Can you walk me through it? Let's say, I'm an entrepreneur who wants to order your illustration. What are the criteria that make up these provisions?Unless you had told me in the first e-mail everything you want, I would ask you the terms of reference. What exactly you want me to draw, how much, in what time, whether you have a budget in mind or you want me to make an offer? In order to understand the financial side, I'd like to know the ways you intend to use my work. Is it for an event, a website or a longer campaign? Or do you want to acquire all rights and own my work? Following on from that, I or my agent will offer some budget options.Meaning, if I'd like to get one poster for my high school party, the price would be one, but if I wanted to print 100 000 copies of it for boxes of packaging, the price would be different?Yes, exactly. It's not very common in Latvia, since the industry is still new here. Little time has passed since the restoration of independence. But it's a global norm that the artists can indeed sell their rights and their work, but mostly clients lease it. They buy the rights to use it for a certain period of time or type of use. If the client, who you've printed the high school poster for, says he would actually like to use the same illustration for another upcoming event, then the client would ask for a permission to do so and the price for it. If we as artists know that we own our work, we can…Make it work for us?Yes, it can create a passive income. After a while, if the provisions agreed upon with the original client allow it, I can sell the rights to use the same work to others or to the same client for other applications and so on.Could you tell me about the process? Not for pro bono works for local friends. You've worked with quite many global clients and publications. Do they come to you with a clear idea? For example, do they ask you to draw these two people doing this activity, but in your style? Or do they tell you the theme and leave the portrayal up to you, let's say, in one sketch or ten? Do you prepare one tiny sketch or a whole presentation?Tasks tend to differ. There are clients with a clear vision and there are clients who are open to my interpretation of their rough idea. It's best when it's something in-between. You have the artistic freedom, but it's also clear that they know what they want. As for the work process itself, I initially research the theme, so I have a better idea of what I should portray. In the first stage I send out rough, even sloppy sketches that mostly just communicate the idea and concept options. Then the client makes a choice or we find the direction the client wants to take through discussion. I then develop this idea to the next level. First level is a postmark-sized sketch with pen in a notebook.Postmark-sized? Really that small?Yes, it's nothing visual, just gives you the idea. The next level is when I turn this postmark into a postcard, which is bigger and now has a clear composition of how it will look in the end. The third level is a colourful sketch. The composition is refined even more, and it's clear what colours will be used where. This stage is done digitally. Then comes client's approval, some adjustments and then we move on to the final product –a water-colour painting on paper, which, of course, is the best part of the job. The client has only seen the colourful digital sketch with vectors and coloured areas. People have told me that it looks complete and ready-to-use already in that stage. I tell them to wait for a little bit. And when I send them the final work they go “Wow!”. You see the textures. It's flat, but not digital-flat. Overall, it creates a cool impression.Is it still digital? You probably don't send them the physical copy by mail.Yes, in the end it's still digital. I paint it, scan it and send them the file.What was the turning point when you realized you can not only do this for your friends and concerts or create this as a by-product for some visual identity, but that you can work globally as a professional illustrator?The first big successes cemented my confidence that I'm capable and that it's something of value, something that people want and is necessary. But how did that happen? You were drawing your first orders. When was the first breakthrough?I think it's when I was noticed. My first foreign client was Vogue.That's an interesting jump. You're a new illustrator from Riga and then suddenly –– Vogue. I'm inclined to believe there was something in-between. I would like to understand what happened after you decided to become an illustrator –s and many people do, they start drawing, post images on Instagram, but it's not like the next step for everyone is Vogue.They noticed me, but before that I was noticed by “It's Nice That”.Okay, and how did they notice you? Did you send something to them or did they discover you?No, they discovered me. I usually don't send anything, okay, no, I have sent some things, but they did notice me.What did they notice? Your website or Instagram account?It was one specific project that was created in collaboration with “Kus!”. There was this workshop that had artists from the Great Britain collaborating with new Latvian artists to create some short stories.So the first project was non-commercial?Yes.And it was noticed by media?That often is the key – to create something that fascinates you and that you can have fun with. You can push the boundaries of your abilities. It might not be commercialized in this exact form, but the client who would want something less bold will see that you can be really bold, interesting and captivating. They might commission you for a boring job, but they need that confidence that you're a cool guy. So, I was noticed by “It's Nice That” and afterwards the bigger clients started to appear, Vogue being the first one. It's like stairs – you complete one project and it gets noticed by someone else and so on.Is there a system for how you make people take notice of you? Do you post on Instagram and wait for people to call you?Yes, I just post on Instagram and wait.And the waiting has been successful so far?Yes, it has.Very good. How many years have you worked as a professional illustrator?For about seven or eight years.How do you see yourself in ten years? Won't you get bored of drawing? Or is it the way you develop your style and what you will continue doing as long as your hands allow it?Yes, as long as my hands allow it, I will continue doing it. Hopefully I will develop my technique even more. Like you said in the beginning, I used to do large-scale street art, but now I work with very fine brushes, so it's interesting how it will develop further. I go with the flow and follow my interests.It would be quite nice if you painted the façade of some house, but with your current experience and vision.Yes, I have thought of that.If a listener has a façade available for this purpose, let us know.Sure!You'd be willing to do that?Yes, maybe I would.Okay. You have projects where you create posters for summer concerts. You also create illustrations for the New York Magazine. It's clear that the budget and provisions are not the same in both cases. Tell me about the balance between these two projects, where you earn something or create things for different reasons. What's your inner motivation? Why do you do one and the other?As you said, these motivations can vary. There always are three main motivations, namely, financial – the size of budget, then how interesting the project will be – easy, difficult, cool, fun or boring to do, and then the client – their brand, name, how easy or difficult it will be to collaborate, other obstacles. After weighing out this combination, I make a decision on each collaboration. When it comes to collaborations that aren't motivated by the financial aspect and the client's name, such criteria as friendship with the client plays a big role, as it was in the case of concert posters. Or I just know that it will be very cool to work on the specific project because of the huge creative freedom. Besides, I will really like the end-result. You don't say “No” to small, interesting projects.Yes, exactly.Is it different working for global clients? Do they work with a different attitude and implement different processes that we can apply here, in Riga? Or is the world small and everyone works in the same way?There are global clients who work with illustrators a lot, for example, the media. It's the daily life for them. New York Times, I believe, publishes illustrations every day. It's simple with them. They know what to expect from you and you from them. The critique is quick and constructive, and the deadlines are very short.What is a short deadline? Hours, days, weeks?Usually a few days. Once it was one day. From working with illustrators, they've realized that some illustrators work quicker, some slower. No one has asked me to create something in 3 hours, because they see I wouldn't be able to do that, so I don't get such requests. I have had a two-day deadline, which was very stressful for me.I read you're currently studying the drawings of medieval monks.Yes, that's what excites me at the moment. It's the case when your interests from outside the art world also takes the artistic and creative side there. I'm interested in Christianity, mainly traditional Christianity lately. It has a very rich art history. I'm also interested in history. The more I research it, the more my visual side follows course.What would you like to see more of in contemporary illustrations? What would you like to see less of?More personal approach to the visual side and less following trends. Trends are cool and you can get inspired by them and you should get inspired by them to an extent in order to be current. However, there has to be a good balance with a big touch of personality. If not personality, then something that the artist is really good at. I would like to see a more individual approach, and not being afraid of analogue techniques. I, for example, do paintings. My favourite artists, who I follow, are often the ones who work with hands, and it's not on purpose. I just find the aesthetics so interesting. There's this British girl who creates all her illustrations with linocuts. It adds the texture, the liveliness. Her style is quite peculiar. At first it seems very specific. Namely, who would want to pay for this? It's like liquorice. Not everyone likes liquorice, but some do. Since the internet allows us to work with clients worldwide, we can find a lot of people who love liquorice. It's okay, if we can't find that many locally. That adds personality and character to such works. Those are the artists I follow. For example, there's an artist in South Korea who draws everything with coloured pencils. He draws in realism, but it turns out really cool.

Scarves Around The Funnel
Episode 203 – Honey Beer Supernova

Scarves Around The Funnel

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 68:52


Laurie and Mark are joined by Latvian football writer Jānis (Latvian Footy in English) to preview the RFS v Hearts match on Thursday in the Europa Conference League. Sponsored by […]

OceanFM Ireland
The Rovers Review 04/09/2022 - Frank Liivac

OceanFM Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 27:16


Frank Liivac joins us live to reflect on Saturday night's 2-0 home win against Drogheda United. With two goals in his last two games, the Latvian international seems to be settling in well now to the tempo of the League of Ireland. There's also another chance to hear Johnny Kenny's interview with Mark Halton about his current loan spell with Queen's Park in Scotland. Photo by James Fallon.

Ukraine: The Latest
Fighting continues around Zaporizhzhia, how drones have changed warfare, & the view from Latvia

Ukraine: The Latest

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 67:51 Very Popular


Day 190.Today, we discuss the latest updates from the warzone, hear from our correspondent Campbell MacDiarmid who's on the ground in Ukraine and we interview journalist Kristaps Andrejsons, who gives us the view of the war from Latvia.Contributors:David Knowles (Host). Follow David on Twitter @djknowles22Francis Dearnley (Assistant Comment Editor). Follow Francis on Twitter @FrancisDearnley.Venetia Rainey (Assistant Foreign Editor). Follow Venetia on Twitter @venetiarainey.Campbell MacDiarmid (Foreign Correspondent). Follow Campbell on Twitter @CampbellMacD.With thanks to Kristaps Andrejsons. Kristaps is a Latvian journalist who hosts his own podcast, The Eastern Border, which you can find out more about on Twitter @Eastern_Border.Email: podcasts@telegraph.co.ukSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Mythlok - The Home of Mythology
Velinas : The God of the Dead

Mythlok - The Home of Mythology

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 7:28


Velnias or Velinas is a god of the Latvian velis or Lithuanian vles, which which can be compared to a modern day zombie. He is a one-eyed prophet who can raise whirlwinds and lead the souls of the dead through the skies. Like the Nordic or Germanic Wodan, he is similar to the Pickollos or Patollos from the Old Prussian and Lithuanian traditions.Velnias was the assistant of the gods but his legend contains more than that. In the earliest layer of Baltic mythology, Velnias was seen as one of the cosmological creator beings and as one of the creators of the material world. His connection to death and reincarnation dates back to prehistoric times and Baltic ancestral worship.Velnias could appear in various forms, and in most Baltic folk tales, shape sifting is a common element. He was associated with reptiles, birds, and animals. He could also take the form of people from different professions and ages.In folk tales, Velnias was described as a physically attractive man who seeks the love of women and sometimes even married them. Stories about Velnias and his relationship with women were very much disapproved by Christians which later on increased his questionable reputation.In folklore, Velnias is regarded as a creature that's capable of being both clever and stupid. Most commonly, it's described as an anthropomorphic creature that features a tail, horns, and a pair of hooved feet. However, since the devil in Christian beliefs was also depicted in this form, it's hard to tell the difference between the real and post-Christian version. Velnias is said to live in various locations, such as barns, ponds, caves, and marshlands. In folk tales, he is associated with stones, and he carries it in an attempt to throw it into a church.Read more at https://mythlok.com/velinas/

The Autopian Podcast
SPECIAL GUEST! Leonard Yankelovich from Dartz Motorz

The Autopian Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 41:52 Transcription Available


The trio morphs into a foursome when Latvian car builder Leo joins them to talk about "dictator mobiles". Leonard is the brains and brawn behind the company Dartz Motorz, renown for making impressive armored vehicles for world leaders and despots. Dartz has been involved with a number of film productions as well, boasting vehicles seen in the films The Dictator, The November Man and, if you listen to the podcast you'll discover, a brand new movie coming out soon that we think you've heard of! The Autopians find out more about what it takes to build these incredible vehicles, diamond infused water and how many cups of caffeine Leo needs to get through the 2AM podcast from Riga, Latvia (hint more than two). Listen up for "the ride of your life."

EZ News
EZ News 08/26/22

EZ News

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 6:23


**EZ NEWS AUGUST 26, 2022 ** **Tai-Ex opening ** The Tai-Ex opened up 21-points this morning from yesterday's close, at 15,226 on turnover of $2.2-billion N-T. The Tai-Ex followed other regional markets and gained ground on Thursday, as investors waited for a highly anticipated speech from the U-S Federal Reserve chair about interest rates. **8 Associates of Cambodia-Based Fraud Ring Figure Arrested ** **Return to **Table of contents Law enforcement officials say eight associates of a Taiwanese national believed to be a senior figure in a Cambodia-based fraud ring have been detained. According to the Kaohsiung Criminal Investigation Corps, the eight were working for a Taiwanese national who has been identified as the head of a telecoms fraud ring operating out of Phnom Bokor in southern Cambodia. Corps head Hong Sung-tien says the man reportedly instructed his associates here in Taiwan to find people to work for the ring, offering a reward of 3,000 U-S per person sent to Cambodia. The eight detained suspects are known to have conned at least six individuals in Taiwan to travel to the Cambodia on the promise of fake jobs. Police say those six victims paid a ransom (贖金) of 20,000 U-S dollars each to secure their release and have since returned to Taiwan. Officials say an investigation into this case is ongoing and authorities here in Taiwan are seeking the arrest of more suspects in Cambodia. **CWB: Overcast Skies with Sudden Showers and Gusts ** **Return to **Table of contents Forecasters say rainfall will be more limited today, after torrential downpours and thundershowers yesterday afternoon. The Central Weather Bureau says most parts of the island are seeing overcast to clear skies today, as the amount of moisture in the air tapers off (逐漸停止). But mountainous regions and low-lying areas nearby may still see sudden rainfall accompanied by thunder and gusts of wind, particularly in the afternoon. The CWB is reminding people in those areas to be on the alert for rough weather. (NS) **WHO: Global Monkeypox Cases Dropping ** A World Health Organization report says the number of monkeypox cases reported globally dropped by 21% in the last week, reversing a month-long trend (trend) of rising infections. AP correspondent Zerya Shakely reports. **NKorea: Border Fever Cases Not Coronavirus ** North Korea says the latest fever cases detected in its border region with China were tested to be influenza, not coronavirus infections as initially feared. The report today by North Korea's official Korean Central News Agency came a day after the North said it locked down unspecified areas in Ryanggang province after four people had fevers that were suspected to be COVID-19. North Korea maintains there have been no confirmed coronavirus cases in the country since Aug. 10, when leader Kim Jong Un declared a widely disputed victory over the virus, just three months after the country acknowledged (承認) an omicron outbreak. **Latvia Brings Down SovietEra Monument ** Latvia has taken down the centerpiece of a Soviet-era monument in the capital of Riga. The nearly 80-meter high concrete obelisk topped by Soviet stars commemorated (紀念) the Red Army's victory over Nazi Germany. Latvian media broadcast its removal live on Thursday. The monument was built in 1985 while Latvia was still part of the Soviet Union. It had stirred controversy since Latvia regained independence in 1991. Lawmakers voted in May to take it down after Russia invaded Ukraine in February. **OUTRO ** That was the I.C.R.T. news, Check in again tomorrow for our simplified version of the news, uploaded every day in the afternoon. Enjoy the rest of your day, I'm _____.

Reality TV Warriors
Hindsight is 2010

Reality TV Warriors

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 42:24


Let the Chain Gang exemption go, because we are back for our third season of new/old Wie is de Mol episodes - and we're going back to 2010's offering in Japan! Over these nine weeks, two guys who are trying to work out who's moling here and who just sucks - Logan & Michael - are recapping and looking back at all that happened in the Land of Samurai, Shogun and the Rising Sun, continuing with the fifth episode and execution of Hind. In this episode - we (belatedly) celebrate Logan's birthday, Michael has some more Chain Gang news, Barbara gets an early eulogy, we wonder whether there was more than we saw to the Frits heel turn, Karel's real statement is revealed, Michael tries to avoid a pun-off, no-one actually takes pity on Frits, there's another delightful Pieter Jan Hagens dick moment, we reveal where the advantages were hidden, the lack of maximum for the karaoke challenge annoys us, there's an obvious joke and we both take it, Kim gets passive-aggressive, we wonder if Pieter Jan will roast us, the ending of the episode is rushed and we discuss what the Mole actually did. You can find us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram & YouTube or you can tweet Michael & Logan directly! We will see you next week for Episode 6! Please note: This season is intended on being spoiler-free, so please watch the episodes along with us. As with some of our previous Historical seasons, there is a small spoiler section at the end of the episode - starting at 39:31. Any season we have already covered (WIDM 17-22 and Renaissance; België 4-10) is fair game though. There is also a discussion about Latvian and Polish Moles, because of course there is. Additional note: Can anyone blame Pieter Jan for having favourites? Not us - we're far too scared of him!

RNZ: Nine To Noon
A Nazi or a KGB agent? Linda Kinstler's search for her grandfather

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 23:30


Journalist Linda Kinstler grew up not knowing much about her Latvian grandfather, other than he'd disappeared after World War Two. It was only later, as an adult, that she learned her paternal grandfather, Boris Kinstler, had been a Nazi collaborator and member of the SS in Latvia. After the war, he became a KGB agent, and then vanished. In search of answers about her grandfather, Linda Kinstler uncovers his links to a man called Herbert Cukurs, known as the "Butcher of Riga", implicated in the murder of 30,000 Jews in Latvia. In researching her book, Come to This Court and Cry: How the Holocaust Ends, she unravels a tale of revisionism, ultra-nationalism and denialism - issues that are just as timely as ever.

Not Just the Tudors
The Trial of a Latvian Werewolf

Not Just the Tudors

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 49:22 Very Popular


In 1691, a peasant in Livonia - on the eastern coast of the Baltic Sea - announced before a startled district court that he was a werewolf. Yet far from being in league with the Devil, “Old Thiess” insisted he was one of the “hounds of God,” fierce guardians who battled sorcerers, witches, and even Satan to protect the fields and flocks. Not surprisingly, his judges struggled to make sense of the case.In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb talks to two eminent scholars, Professor Carlo Ginzburg and Professor Bruce Lincoln, whose diverging views present a uniquely comparative look at the trial and the startling testimony of Old Thiess. For this episode, the Senior Producer was Elena Guthrie. It was edited, mixed and produced by Rob Weinberg. For more Not Just The Tudors content, subscribe to our Tudor Tuesday newsletter here >If you'd like to learn even more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today!To download, go to Android > or Apple store > See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Crypto Chick with Rachel Wolfson
Ghosts in Decentraland, Dead Army Skeleton NFTs & NFTs Blocked from Minecraft

The Crypto Chick with Rachel Wolfson

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 9:50


Ghosts in Decentraland, Dead Army Skeleton NFTs & NFTs Blocked from Minecraft In this NiFTy News Episode, we discuss the future of gaming & NFTs, mainstream embracing NFTs and the Metaverse, and the Latvian government seizing millions of allegations of money laundering through NFTs. It's interesting times to say the least in the crypto & NFT space. Full show notes: TheNiFTyChicks.io/87 SUBSCRIBE, RATE, & REVIEW: Podcasts: https://theniftychicks.io/itunesSpotify: https://theniftychicks.io/spotifyGoogle: https://theniftychicks.io/GooglePlayYouTube: https://theniftychicks.io/YouTube FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA: Website: https://theniftychicks.ioTwitter: @TheNiftyChicks https://twitter.com/TheNiftyChicksTwitter: @TheJeNFT https://twitter.com/TheJeNFTTwitter: @ErinCell https://twitter.com/erincellInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/theniftychi...Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/TheNiFTyChicks/LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/the-... DISCLAIMER: Neither the hosts nor the guests are acting in the capacity of financial advisors. We are sharing our journey with you as we learn more about this crazy little phenomenon called NFTs. This is NOT financial advice and we make NO RECOMMENDATIONS. We only share with you what we are learning and what we are considering investing in. You must do your own research. Just know that we will always strive for radical transparency with any show associations. We only share with you what we are learning and what we are considering investing in. You must research any financial investment on your own! Just know that we will always strive for RADICAL TRANSPARENCY with any show associations. Happy Minting!See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Consumer Choice Radio
EP134: Welcome to Atlanta

Consumer Choice Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 44:55


Hey there, Yaël checking in from Atlanta!  We go over some of the economic data about a recession. Facts don't matter! Then we hand it off to an interview with friend of the show Matthew to get the latest on Ukraine, Russia, and what is next for liberal democracies in Europe. A good time. INTERVIEW: Matthew Mežinskis is an American of Latvian, Norwegian, and Irish descent, residing in Eastern Europe since 2006. He works in corporate finance, consulting investors across the real estate, hospitality, food & beverage, and online direct lending industries. He was an early board member of Ronald McDonald House Charities Latvija, serving as financial director. He holds a BBA in Finance and Real Estate from the University of Cincinnati. He has been following Bitcoin since 2011. Creator of Crypto Voices podcast and Porkopolis Economics. https://porkopolis.io/ https://twitter.com/crypto_voices -Why people should still care about Ukraine -The role of Russia in central and eastern Europe -Growing monetary trends and the excitement of Bitcoin -Why liberal democracies matter Broadcast on Consumer Choice Radio on July 30, 2022. Syndicated on Sauga 960AM and Big Talker Network. Website: https://consumerchoiceradio.com ***PODCAST***  Podcast Index: https://bit.ly/3EJSIs3 Apple: http://apple.co/2G7avA8  Spotify: http://spoti.fi/3iXIKIS RSS: https://omny.fm/shows/consumerchoiceradio/playlists/podcast.rss Our podcast is now Podcasting 2.0 compliant! Listen to the show using a Bitcoin lightning wallet-enabled podcasting app (Breeze, Fountain, etc.) to directly donate to the show using the Bitcoin lightning network (stream those sats!).  More information on that here: https://podcastindex.org/apps  Produced by the Consumer Choice Center. Support us: https://consumerchoicecenter.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Warren Cycling Podcast
Tour Wrap Up, Interviews and Tour Femmes Start

Warren Cycling Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 64:27


Randy and Dean Warren talk about bicycle racing on many different levels, but focus mostly on the pros.  Dean was in Paris for the finish of the Tour de France and the beginning of the Tour de France Femmes.  Dean talked to several Americans and a Latvian about the Tour.  More racing going on and coming up, especially the revamped new Tour de France Femmes almost halfway through as of this recording. 

The Eastern Border
War in Ukraine: Episode 76

The Eastern Border

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 21:47


This is a bit of an unintentional one. It's been 150 days of the war, I had a small camping retreat in the Latvian countryside, but my listeners told me that the last minute of the previous ep was missing, so I fixed that...and decided that if I'm to do work anyways, might as well record a news ep.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/theeasternborder. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Throwing Fits
*PATREON PREVIEW* Cliqued Up With the Villains

Throwing Fits

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 11:58 Very Popular


A good podcast is like a game of ping pong (this will make more sense later). This week, Jimmy and Larry are beating the heat to talk whether or not our parents know what a collab is, our favorite socks, could we be the next podcast to break up, Japanese butlers, PAWGs, a TF x MR PORTER exit interview, an update on merch and products yet to drop, the Throw Gang's financial sweet spot, an extensive scene report from last week's launch event, requests on the spectrum, rich Minions, accosting Nic Braun, stealing party favors, getting hazed by chicks, the menswear illuminati, James joining the East Villains, Lawrence maybe (read: definitely) getting scammed, Latvian whores, workshopping a Tony Soprano impression and much more. For more Throwing Fits, check us out on Patreon: www.patreon.com/throwingfits. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Latvia Weekly
LW #169: Plans for Conscription and News from June 28th - July 9th, 2022

Latvia Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 77:27


"Iesaukt" (conscript) is the word of the week as Minister for Defense Atis Pabriks announces plans for obligatory military service that could be introduced as soon as next year. Otto and Joe discuss the implications for Latvia's society and security situation along with other major stories from the previous week such as cyberattacks on Latvian infrastructure, new poll data on attitudes towards Russia's invasion of Ukraine, a walrus vacationing in the Baltic sea, and much more! Theme song "Mēs esam ārzemnieki" by Aarzemnieki, used with permission Closing theme song: Think Tank by Audionautix audionautix.com​ Creative Commons — Attribution 3.0 Unported — CC BY 3.0 Free Download / Stream: bit.ly/_think-tank​ Music promoted by Audio Library youtu.be/mbV9t1Z0rA8 Photo credit: Latvijas armija, used with a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)license https://www.flickr.com/photos/latvijas_armija/38526906252

Nul Points: a Eurovision fan podcast
What really goes on backstage at Eurovision

Nul Points: a Eurovision fan podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 23:10


Martyn Williams and Laura Cress are back with another edition of the UK-based Eurovision fan podcast, Nul Points. In this episode the pair chat to Charlie Koncher who worked as an official photographer for the Latvian delegation. He reveals all about what really happens backstage. Plus, Trivia Time returns to bring you some exciting Eurovision facts.

The Benas Podcast
#28 Andrej Lemanis - "Ego-Less" Coaching & Building A Team-Culture

The Benas Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 92:11


“Dre”: Andrej Lemanis, one of the top coaches from Australia joined my podcast today. The Australian coach with Latvian heritage has a rich history of coaching after he stopped playing at a young age. His most notable stop was with the New Zealand Breakers from 2005-2013 where he turned the program around and won 3 NBL championships in a row and took the helm of the Boomers. “Dre” also coached the Brisbane Bullets and currently is coaching Altiri Chiba in Japan. On today's episode the “Top Topics” included culture building with a full-time ‘Culture Guy' during his time with the Boomers, Boomer Battles with Lithuania, “Ego-Less” coaching, Accountability, “Cultural Communication & Coaching”, Expectation from Assistants, Self-Improvement, Reflections and More. We….Had….A….Blast! Dre's Book suggestion: Thinking Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman Topics: Memories of Lithuania Latvian Heritage Background & Career Coaching Life “Ego-Less Coaching” & Trust Building A System & Culture Cultural Communication Coaching Staff Discussions Growth As A Coach ATOs Finding “Dre”: LinkedIn – https://www.linkedin.com/in/andrej-lemanis-0a19aa3/ Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/alemanis To support my Podcast on Patreon click here (Ačiu!!): https://www.patreon.com/bmatke #AndrejLemanis #Dre #HeadCoach #Australia #Boomers #NewZealand #Japan #TeamCulture Sponsors: Not yet :) Find “The Benas Podcast”: Apple: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-b-podcast/id1558492852?uo=4 Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/3Bw5UJNSQLKo0wUybEIza3 Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/show/the-benas-podcast …or just visit my website www.bmatke.com for more info. Get in touch in the comments below or find me on the links below: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bmatke/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/bmatke/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/bmatke3 www.bmatke.com

The Identical Draw Podcast
The Latvian Eagle

The Identical Draw Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 61:00


On this episode of the Identical Draw podcast we talk with Janis Putelis from Meat Eater. Janis grew up hunting whitetails in Michigan but headed out west and didn't look back for many years. The last few years though, Janis felt his heart strings tug him back towards his whitetail roots.  Discover Janis- https://www.instagram.com/janis_putelis/  Watch Janis hunt whitetails- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TBn__mDB1mk Other Topics Covered- - Janis and Steve are coming up on ten years - Did Janis long for the whitetail rut in his early years? - Breakdown of the WI ground Janis hunts - Does Janis want to do more land management? - Is Janis the next Lee Lakosky? - Janis' Kit   Questions or Corrections? Email us info@identicaldraw.com

Start the Week
Justice, war crimes and targeted killings

Start the Week

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 42:01


Linda Kinstler's Latvian grandfather disappeared after WWII and the family never spoke about him. But as she delved into Boris Kinstler's life she found he had been a member of a killing brigade in the SS linked to the ‘Butcher of Riga' Herbert Cukurs, before becoming a KGB agent and then vanishing. She attempts to uncover the truth in Come To This Court and Cry: How The Holocaust Ends, but also interrogates the uncertainties of memory, family, nation and justice. Although Herbert Cukur's name came up frequently at the Nuremberg war crime trials for the killing of tens of thousands of Jews, he managed to escape and find refuge in South America. It was there he was murdered by Mossad agents who left a note from Those Who Will Never Forget saying ‘the condemned man has been executed'. The Israeli investigative journalist Ronen Bergman has uncovered his country's most secret activities in Rise and Kill First: The Secret History Of Israel's Targeted Assassinations (translated by Ronnie Hope). The Nuremberg trials in the aftermath of WWII mark the birth of international law and set the framework of modern human rights law. The barrister and writer Philippe Sands has appeared frequently before international courts, and has been involved in many of the most important cases of recent years from Yugoslavia to Rwanda to Guantanamo. He explains what can be done when countries – like Russia – refuse to recognise the jurisdiction of international law. Producer: Katy Hickman

Mind of a Millionaire
EP: 124 - An American Dream: From Latvia at 18 to Financial Advisor (Guest: Edija Saripova)

Mind of a Millionaire

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 31:45


In this week's episode, Zachary Bouck has a Q&A session with Denver Wealth Management's associate advisor, Edija Saripova. She tells stories from her Latvian background and journey to America, delves into why she became a financial advisor, gives her take on the current market and much more. Tune in to get to know Edija a little better! 

History Impossible
Ukraine and the Latvian Podfather (An Impossible Interview VI): Kristaps Andrejsons of The Eastern Border

History Impossible

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 142:42


Note: Supporters of History Impossible over on Patreon currently have access to the uncut version of this interview, complete with more banter and fun discussion regarding how weird America is. Head over to www.patreon.com/historyimpossible and consider becoming a patron today so you can hear the uncut versions of conversations had on this show plus much more! In this edition of the Impossible Interviews series, we're joined by the one and only Kristaps Andrejsons of the famous Eastern Border Podcast to talk about both his time as not just a history podcaster on the Eastern Border of Europe, but as the podcaster in general of the Baltic states (hence the nickname the "Podfather of Latvia") and how he got there (and what it's cost), as well as all things Ukraine. During the first half of 2022, Kristaps has been covering the Russo-Ukrainian War both from home in Latvia and on the front lines themselves, having spent several weeks traveling all over eastern Europe to reach Odessa and then finally Kyiv where he was given a first-hand glimpse into the chaos that has been unleashed there. Much of this has been covered in his daily dispatches on the Eastern Border podcast feed, as well as in a number of articles for various outlets, including Foreign Policy Magazine. (Check out Kristaps' writing here: https://foreignpolicy.com/author/kristaps-andrejsons/) He's also had in-depth and thought provoking conversations with the likes of MartyrMade's Darryl Cooper and Hardcore History's Dan Carlin. In the case of our conversation, we went in a few different directions. We spend some time dissecting a lot of the arguments surrounding the ongoing conflict, we discuss Vladimir Putin in relative detail, and we take some time to discuss a shared interest of ours--the infamous philosopher who's been called "Putin's Brain" (and even called a modern Rasputin) Aleksandr Dugin and his Traditionalism-fueled multi-polar philosophy.  Hopefully, this episode will be as informative for all of you as it was for me (and even fun, despite some depressing revelations about how this war is likely going to shake out). So with that I say, in Kristaps' words, dasvidaniya tovarich! And remember: happiness is mandatory. History Impossible has been made possible by the following generous supporters on Patreon and PayPal: Elias Borota Charles C Matthew Dakus Nathan Diehl Gavin Edwards Kevin Gony Nathan Grote Al Hall Peter Hauck Mike Kalnins Benjamin Lee Trevor Lindborg Mounty of Madness Jose Martinez Mike Mayleben Judy McCoid Monica Kostas Moros Ryan Mortenson Ben Mullen Molly Pan Jean Peters Brian Pritzl PJ Rader Gleb Radutsky Aleksandr Rakitin Eugene Rosso Aria Saeidi Jon Andre Saether Alison Salo Emily Schmidt Julian Schmidt Cameron Smith Brian Steggeman Pier-Luc St-Pierre Jared Cole Temple Steve Uhler Ricky Worthey F. You

The Cider Shed
Jimmus et Jazzerus: Friendus bestus in eternum

The Cider Shed

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2022 49:37


This week Keri and Peter get smashed into a big sugary yogic rush of an Ambridge week, sans Matthew who was quite busy ecstatic dancing in a field. In between you'll hear Keri lose her Latvian citizenship in straight sets and Peter recall the horny yoga of the sunshine state.Your specials are:• Jim and Jazzer: A moving moving. We Stan (Smith). • Brian in a Leotard. Thoughts, Keri? KERIII?!?!? • The Casey files. A tasting menu of Beth and Steph. But are we amused?• Is Chezzer the new Jazzer? • Natasha wins/stops hearts with her sugar nuke. Keep it away from Brian FFS.Matthew's Festival: https://instagram.com/nosprimaverasound?igshid=YmMyMTA2M2Y=Email us at: hello@thecidershed.comMessage us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheCiderShedPodJoin the Facebook Group: www.facebook.com/groups/357567078923256/?ref=shareFind us on: https://www.instagram.com/thecidershedpod/?hl=en See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Nazi Lies Podcast
The Nazi Lies Podcast Ep. 15: Judeo-Bolshevism

The Nazi Lies Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2022 38:15


Mike: Common-ism [Theme song] Nazi SS UFOsLizards wearing human clothesHinduism's secret codesThese are nazi lies Race and IQ are in genesWarfare keeps the nation cleanWhiteness is an AIDS vaccineThese are nazi lies Hollow earth, white genocideMuslim's rampant femicideShooting suspects named Sam HydeHiter lived and no Jews died Army, navy, and the copsSecret service, special opsThey protect us, not sweatshopsThese are nazi lies Mike: Welcome to another episode of the Nazi Lies podcast. I'm happy to be joined by Rutgers History Professor, Paul Hanebrink, author of the really easy to read book, A Specter Haunting Europe: The Myth of Judeo-Bolshevism. The book charts the development of the belief that communism or certain forms of it are instruments of Jewish power and control, from its pre-history and medieval antisemitism and Red Scare propaganda, through his development among proto-fascist and ultimately a Nazi Party, and the legacy of fascist campaigns against Judeo-Bolshevism in former fascist states. Welcome to the podcast, Dr. Hanebrink. Paul Hanebrink: Thanks very much for having me, it's a pleasure to be here. Mike: So before I opened your book, I was expecting to hear a story of the fascist myth of Judeo-Bolshevism as told primarily by fascists through to the present day, but that's not the story you tell. Instead, you tell more of a people's history of believing that Judaism and communism in whole or in part are linked and tied to bad things generally. Besides the fact that this is your area of expertise, why did you decide to tell this history? Paul: I'm glad that you picked up on that. I am very much interested in how this myth or this conspiracy theory connects to a whole host of other issues. And I came to it actually when I was in Hungary in the 1990s. I'm a historian of Hungary by training, and I was doing my research for my dissertation, and my dissertation was on Hungarian nationalism and its relationship to Christianity in the 1920s and '30s and '40s. I was really struck by how so many of the different phrases and ideas and, sort of, thinking about Jews and communism which I was reading in my archival sources during the day, were reflected in journalism and in sort of public discussion about the recently vanished communist regime and what that had meant for Hungary and for the Hungarian national society. And I knew also that this was not just a particularly Hungarian issue, that this same kind of conversation, the same kind of debates about the relationship of Jews to communism was going on in other countries across the former Soviet bloc, especially in Poland, especially in Romania. And I knew that it had also been a major factor in Nazi ideology and an issue that kept coming back in strange ways even in German society. So I wanted to try to think about why this idea had such legs, as it were, why it seemed to endure across so many different kinds of regimes, and also try to figure out why it was so ubiquitous if you will, why it could be appearing in so many different places and so many different societies simultaneously. And so the book is an attempt to try to paint a broad canvas in which I could explore the different things that it meant to different people at different times. Mike: Okay. One thing I brought up in book club was that the book almost feels like a military history in the way you tell it, very event- and people-heavy and diachronic across the chapters, but told geographically within the chapters. So talk a little bit about your choice of historiography, because it definitely feels like a careful choice you made in how consistent your style remains throughout. Paul: Yeah. Well, I mean, as I said, one of the things I wanted to do was I wanted to capture the sense that this was a conspiracy theory that was powerful in a lot of places at the same time, and that it didn't radiate out from one place to another, but that it sort of sprang up like mushrooms in a lot of different places in different periods throughout the 20th century. I wanted a broad geographical canvas, and I didn't want to just simply focus on one country or do a kind of comparison between two countries or something like that. So I wanted to sort of figure out a way to tell this as a European story, and to be able to track the different ways in which this conspiracy theory circulated across borders and from one political formation or political group to another and also over time. The other thing that I wanted to focus on with this book in addition to the broad geographical canvas was also the notion that I didn't want a book that was just going to be a lot of different antisemitic texts one after the other, and so I just kind of piled them up in a big heap and kind of read them closely and pulled out all the different symbolisms. I wanted instead, to try to show using carefully chosen examples of people or groups or political parties or moments in history or events to really show how this ideological substance, this conspiracy myth, became something that had meaning and had power for people that shaped the way in which they saw and interpreted what they were doing and what others were doing. And so for that reason, I think, very carefully throughout each chapter, I try to find actors in a way that I could hang the narrative on and that I could sort of develop the analysis by leading with specific kind of concrete, more vivid examples. And that may be perhaps what you picked up on when you were reading it. Mike: Okay, so let's get into it. A lot of people know kind of the rudiments of old-school antisemitism and anti-communism, but not how they co-evolved into the myth of Judeo-Bolshevism. So, how did antisemitism and anti-communism become modern? Paul: Yeah, it's an interesting question. What I wanted to try to think about in the book–and I explore this I think most carefully in the first chapter–is the way in which very old ideas about Jews, specifically about the ways in which Jews, have been used to symbolize in a sense a world turned upside down or illegitimate power or some kind of dystopia. And you can see this particular set of ideas throughout a number of centuries going back into the Middle Ages. So I begin with this, this idea that Jewish power is somehow illegitimate power. And then I look very carefully at the accusations that were circulating in Europe during World War I about Jews in a sense gathering power on the homefront while the true members of the nation were away on the front fighting. And so there was a real concern across Europe about Jewish loyalty and about Jews as being potential subversives or traitors or spies. And that feeds very easily into Jews as revolutionaries. So you have these two things that come together in that sort of end of World War I moment where also the Bolshevik revolution breaks out, and that there's this very old language that is familiar and comfortable to so many people thinking about Jews as eager to sort of accumulate illegitimate power, that's the very old story that reaches back to the Middle Ages, but tied to this very particular moment in European history in which there's concern about Jewish responsibility for the collapse, for example, of empires from Russia to the Austro-Hungarian empire, and the role that they're playing in revolutionary movements and revolutionary politics in so many different places across the European continent at that time. And I think it's the crucible of those two in that moment that really creates the Judeo-Bolshevik myth as a particular form of Jewish conspiracy theory. I'm not saying it's different. I'm saying that there are many different faces and iterations of the myth of a Jewish conspiracy, but that this is a particular one or particular version. And that it does particular ideological things, particular political things for people during the 20th century. Mike: Okay, so if modern anti-Semites and modern anti-communists largely belong to the right, their ideas coalesced into this conspiracy theory of Judeo-Bolshevism. Now you honestly don't spend a large amount of space in the book describing the myth of Judeo-Bolshevism, and there's two things going on in your book. On the one hand, you have the myth of Judeo-Bolshevism which is this theory that there is a secret cabal of Jews who control the world through joint efforts of banking finance and world communist movements that operate to destabilize Western civilization through financial panics and revolutions, so there's that. Then on the other hand there's what you spend more time on, which is the perception that communism or at least its excesses in actual existing communism, is Jewish in origin and operation. Like, it's not necessarily a belief in a conspiracy necessarily so much as a dislike of Jews and the belief that they're inordinately involved in communism. So when antisemitism and anti-communism became modern and intertwined, the myth of Judeo-Bolshevism, this totalizing conspiracy theory started to form. Who were the major players in that and what kinds of influence do they have? Paul: Yeah. I guess there are two things I want to pick up on in your question. The first is that I think you're right that I'm more interested in approaching the question in a particular way. And that is that, you know, a lot of the kind of antisemitic rhetoric and antisemitic ideology from the 20th century, there was this real insistence that you could somehow count the number of Jews who were in communist parties, and you could determine that this was a high number and that therefore Jews were somehow responsible for communism. And so much of the politics around trying to resist that was around kind of factually disproving that. I find it much more interesting to sort of not get drawn into the trap of saying, "Well, it's partly right or partly wrong," but to look instead at the way in which this conspiracy gained momentum, and that it came to seem so self-evidently right and sort of self-evidently commonsensical to so many different groups of people. And that brings me to the second part of your question. It's very interesting especially if you look at this moment right after World War I in the early 1920s across Europe, you find all kinds of different political groups across a wide selection of the political spectrum raising this conspiracy theory and using it to try to make sense of the fact that this massive revolutionary movement had broken out. So you certainly find fascists or perhaps proto-fascists, if you like, in the early 1920s really making this central to their ideology. Certainly you see that in the early Nazi Party but also in a number of the other far-right paramilitary groups that you can see active in different parts of Europe at this time. But also, you know, people who might call more mainstream conservatives, people who are definitely interested in a kind of national consolidation but very distrustful of the tactics of fascists or of national socialists, making use of this also, for example, to talk about threats to national sovereignty or threats to borders or, you know, the fear that Jewish refugees from war-torn parts of Eastern Europe are going to flood across the borders, and when they do, they're going to bring with them a revolutionary infection which is going to cause radicalism to break out at home. You can find it also among religious conservatives who are concerned primarily with the breakdown of moral and social order and who are interested in combating what they see as being the evils or the ills of secular modernism. They also blame Jewish communists for in a sense driving it, but also being a kind of reflection of these deeper secular trends which they strongly oppose. So you can find this language in a lot of different places, and there's, in a sense, kind of different coalitions in different countries that form among groups who disagree about a number of policy issues, but have a certain kind of common shared understanding that Jews and political activism, or left political activism and certainly revolutionary politics are somehow all related. And that somehow particular tension has to be paid to that constellation of threats in order to forestall or to ward off some kind of greater danger or challenge to the national body. Mike: So fascist parties rode the wave of the relative popularity of the Judeo-Bolshevism myth, and it became kind of a guiding philosophy in a way for fascist public policy. So talk about Judeo-Bolshevism in the hands of fascist states. Paul: Here I would fast forward to the late 1930s when you really see Nazi Germany making a pitch for being the most resolute enemy of communism on the European continent. I think one of the things that you can see as the Nazi vision of a new order of Europe comes into focus is that people–and far-right movements and far-right nationalist movements across the continent that see their own place in that and see a kind of shared goals and shared vision–find Judeo-Bolshevism almost a kind of shared language in which they can create common ground for working with or collaborating, if you like, with Nazi power. You can see this in France especially on the far right, just before and after the creation of Vichy and the military defeat of France in 1940. You see the far-right really seeing the Judeo-Bolshevik threat as a kind of glue which will allow them to work together with German power to regenerate France. You can also see this on the Eastern Front after the German army invades the Soviet Union in 1941 in Operation Barbarossa. You can find far-right Ukrainian nationalists, Lithuanian nationalists, Latvian nationalists who see the fight against Jewish communists as being a way to make common cause with Nazi power in the hopes that when the war is over, and as they believe, the Germans win, they will be able to reap the rewards by getting, for example, statehood or some other kind of political power. You see this also amongst some of Nazi Germany's East European allies in the war against the Soviet Union, both Hungary and Romania, although those two states are in bitter opposition over so many things, especially territorial claims. Both of them go to war on the side of Nazi Germany precisely because they believe that after the war is over and after Germany has won, they will get some special dispensation in the peace that follows. They go to war against the Soviet Union in the same belief that it's a crusade against Judeo-Bolshevik threat in the East, and that the war against the Soviet Union has to be fought in this way. And so fascist movements, fascist states, or fascists who would like to have a state in the future, see in the Judeo-Bolshevik threat not only a threat to their own national interest, but also a space of common ground or a space of cooperation which will allow them to work with Nazi power even if they disagree with Nazi ideology on other points, and even if the Nazi vision for Europe doesn't actually pan out for them in the way that they hope. Mike: Okay, so with the collapse of the fascist states came an almost immediate transformation of the public's perception of the Judeo-Bolshevism myth. So the new states that emerged were expected to denounce such prejudices as fascist and hence bad, and publics to varying degrees were expected to comply. So talk about the, shall we call it, 'withdrawal effects' of the collapse of fascist states on their publics? Paul: Yeah, you can see this most vividly in Eastern Europe where the collapse of fascism and the defeat of Nazi Germany is accompanied by the arrival of the Soviet Army and the immediate ambitions to political power of communist parties and communist movements across the region. You can see that communist parties have to struggle to seek legitimacy among people in societies where so many people are very well accustomed to thinking of communism as something alien, and also something Jewish. And so from the very beginning, you see communist parties and communist movements wrestling with the fact that in certain segments of society, there's a kind of association of them with Jewish power. And so they try to navigate this. You can also see it, for example, in the efforts by post-war regimes in transition that are either communist-controlled or on the way to being communist-controlled, who are having trials of war criminals. There are many people, you can see this in Hungary and in Romania, who look at these trials and you can say, "Well, these are not trials of fascists. This is in fact a kind of Jewish justice or a kind of Jewish revenge." And so they associate the search for or the desire for justice after the war and the desire to punish real criminals with illegitimate Jewish power that has only come into being because of the fact that the Soviet power has placed it there. And so the fact that there's a complete regime change doesn't change the fact that people across the region still have the memory of the legacy of this language that had been baked into all aspects of political life for the preceding two or three decades. And this very much shapes the way in which people see Soviet power, see Soviet takeover, see communist parties, see especially the crimes that Red Army soldiers commit–you know, rapes and seizures of property–are immediately associated in many people's minds as being somehow Jewish crimes. All of this seems plausible because fascist movements and fascist regimes had conspired with the Germans to eliminate Jewish presence from life across Eastern Europe. And now after 1945, survivors of the Holocaust are in public again trying to put together their lives. And so a group of people who had been absent from public space are back in it. And so that only kind of heightens the attention around Jews and around how suddenly the tables seem to have been turned and how the new political regimes that are coming into being are somehow antithetical to the true national interest or the true national identity. Mike: All right. There was also a certain evolution in the West in response to the experience of World War Two and its aftermath regarding Judaism and communism. What did that look like? Paul: Yeah, one of the things I found really interesting, and I did devote a chapter to it because I did find it so curious, is that at the same time that this story that I'm telling you in Eastern Europe was going on, there is this really interesting transformation of the relationship in political discourse of Jews and communism in Western Europe as a result of the Cold War. You can see this most clearly in the kind of ubiquity of the notion of Judeo-Christian civilization as the thing that Cold War liberals are going to protect against Communist aggression. And this very interesting migration of the adjective Judeo from, you know, Judeo-Bolshevism to Judeo-Christian civilization. And you can see this in all aspects of American popular culture and political culture in the '40s and '50s, a willingness to compare using theories of totalitarianism to compare Nazi crimes to Soviet crimes and to present Jews as being victims of both. But also to, you know, really kind of focusing on Jewish communists–there was a lot of focus for example on Ana Pauker in Romania who served as a really important Communist official–as being, you know, Jews who had lost their way and who had lost their sense of religious tradition and religious identity and become completely transformed morally into this almost monster. There are lots of articles about figures like this presenting her as being just something that's called a Stalin in a skirt or something like this. And these figures were then presented as being empowered by communism to attack the moral and religious values on which Western civilization was founded and which the US-led West was going to defend against Soviet expansion and the expansion especially of Communism and communist ideas into the West. I guess a way to bring it back is to say that there's a very interesting way in which this relationship of Jews and communism is completely recoded and reshuffled by Cold War liberals in the 1940s and 1950s to create this kind of very stout, multi-confessional anti-communism that was so prevalent in the US at that time. Mike: All right, so back to the East. So the death of Stalin and subsequent public inquests into his regime revealed excesses that shaped public perception and public policy across the former fascist world. How did the myth of Judeo-Bolshevism play in the post-Stalin world? Paul: You know what's really interesting is that once Stalin dies, there is a rush by Communist Party leaders across Eastern Europe to blame the excesses of Stalinism on somebody or some group in order to present themselves as charting a new way forward that is going to make communism more compatible with the national character, the true sort of national interests, or to create a kind of truly national path to communism. You can see this happening in Poland and Hungary and Romania and other places as well. And one of the ways in which that sort of political strategy works is by demonizing or accusing the most hardline Stalinist leaders who are now discredited for being anti-national or unnational, and for being Jews. And there were a number of figures who were sort of held up as being examples of this. You can see this in Hungary most clearly where the leading figures of the Communist Party in the early 1950s in the Stalinist period were all men of Jewish background. And so the Hungarian Communist regime, without really launching a major antisemitic campaign, let it be known in all sorts of different ways that this new way forward after the death of Stalin, after especially the Hungarian Revolution of 1956, was going to be built around creating a much more truly Hungarian form of communism that will *wink, wink, nod, nod* have many more ethnic Hungarians at the forefront. You can see something very similar going on in a number of different countries, coming most particularly to a head in 1968 in Poland when there is a major campaign against Jews, accusing them of being cosmopolitan, accusing them of being Zionist, as a way of saying that in fact, the Communist regime in Poland is the truly national regime and it truly represents the interests of the Polish nation. And so Jews become the enemy of this true national communism, and the fervor around that leads the vast majority of what remains of the Polish-Jewish community to emigrate in 1968, leaving what is today a very, very tiny community. Mike: Okay. So, eventually the communist states collapse and their economies are restructured along neoliberal lines. How does Judeo-Bolshevism rear its head? Paul: It rears its head, I think, in two ways. The first is in this, again, as a kind of an antithesis or a kind of opposition, you see right-wing nationalists coming to the fore in 1989 very ambitiously trying to create a new right-wing political party, new right-wing political movement in societies where that had been banned for decades. And they set themselves up as being the true spokespeople for the nation in opposition to the Communist regime that went before which they say was an imposition from abroad by forces that were anti-national, completely forgetting the ways in which the communist regimes across Eastern Europe had worked so hard to try to present themselves as national and to try to build up national legitimacy. And in that process, you find right-wing nationalists really very easily slipping into describing the regimes that had gone as being Jewish or inspired by Jews or recalling the role that Jews had played at various moments in it. So you see it coming back in this politics of memory. The other way in which you see it coming back, and it also has to do with historical memory, is the debates about how to understand World War II and the Holocaust. The stakes around that are very high because in the 1990s, as some of your listeners will undoubtedly remember, there was this new focus that continues to this day on Holocaust memory as being a kind of token or sign of a society that had embraced liberal values of human rights and democracy, the idea that you know, if we commemorate the Holocaust or remember the Holocaust, that's a sign that a society is developing towards becoming a mature democracy. And so for that reason there was a lot of intense interest in how the Holocaust should be represented, how it should be remembered, how it should be written about, how it should be talked about. And in a number of different societies across the former Communist East, you have nationalists who are very wary of this European liberal project, who express their wariness as a dissatisfaction with a memory of the war which they say is one-sided and which they say only prefaces the memories of what they would call "others' Jewish memory", and which doesn't pay sufficient attention to the crimes of communists that had been committed against “us,” “us” being the national community without Jews. And in those debates, there's a lot of focus on what role did Jews play in Communist coming to power right after World War II? What role did Jews play in those parts of Eastern Europe where the Soviet Army had turned up in 1939 in Eastern Poland, parts of Romania, for example? And, you know, did they welcome the Soviet Army and did they, at that time, betray the nation? And how should we remember that? So there was a lot of focus in the 1990s, and into today, about how Jews, communism, fascism, and the Holocaust should all be remembered. Some of your listeners might remember or know about the big controversy in Poland around the historian Jan Gross' book, Jedwabne, which had to do with a big, a truly terrible pogrom in which the Jews of this one particular town were killed by their neighbors. At the core of that event was the accusation that they had collaborated with the Soviets when the Soviets were in power between 1939 and 1941. And that that issue became a live one in Poland in the 2000s because it was tied up with these debates about how to remember the past, but also how to imagine the Polish future in Europe going forward. Mike: Okay, and now you take the book to the present day. So how does the myth of Judeo-Bolshevism live with us today? Paul: I think it lives in a number of different ways. The first place that you see it is in what you might call the ideological arsenal of the far-right in a lot of different countries. If you listened to, for example, what the marchers were saying in Charlottesville in 2017, many of them were talking about how Jews will not replace “us,” “us” being White nationalists. They also in a kind of knee-jerk way were going on about how they were opposed to communism, even though I don't think there were any communists anywhere in the area. But nonetheless, they saw communists as being somehow related. You can see this in the number of really horrific shootings of Jews by shooters in this country and elsewhere, where Jews are associated with immigration. There's this accusation that Jewish cosmopolitans are somehow ringleaders or are organizing the migration of other sorts of racial inferiors into the country. And that's a kind of real play and adaptation of something that was central to Nazi ideology. When, you know, Nazi Germany went to war against the Soviet Union, one of their main arguments was that the Soviet Union was controlled by Jews and that Jewish commissars were going to lead armies of racial subhumans or racial inferiors into the heart of Europe. And that the head of this Jewish-led army were going to be millions and millions of different kinds of migrants who were going to swamp Europe. You can see that kind of language being repurposed and repositioned by the far right to fit into immigration debates today. So that's one place: on the far right. The other place where you really see it is the, kind of, reshuffling of the Jewish conspiracy, and I think this is where I would say the book that I've written really tries to focus on how this particular version of the Jewish conspiracy theory or the Jewish conspiracy myth or the myths of Jewish power took a particular form at a particular historical moment in the 20th century. And that with the end of communism, there has been a reshuffling, and so now the face of the Jewish enemy or the great threat is not a Jewish communist like, let's say, Leon Trotsky who figures so prominently in anti-communist ideology throughout the 20th century, but is now someone like George Soros who is anything but a communist, obviously. He is a very wealthy financier, someone who's not only made a lot of money in the financial markets but also is using it to try to promote things like the open society through his nongovernmental organizations. And so you see this idea of an international Jewish plot or an international Jewish conspiracy linked to things like cosmopolitanism, which are anti-national. These themes have been reshuffled, refolded, and repurposed into a now what is the post-communist age. And so in some sense, if the myth of Judeo-Bolshevism is becoming a kind of substance of historical memory, you can see the conspiracy theory that was at the heart of it lives on because it has acquired, in a sense, new clothes. There's new language to talk about it because it's being fit into new scenarios and put to new purposes. Mike: All right. Well, Dr. Hanebrink, thank you so much for coming on the Nazi Lies Podcast to talk about the myth of Judeo-Bolshevism. The book, again, is A Spectre Haunting Europe, out from the Belknap Press which is an imprint of Harvard. Dr. Hanebrink, thank you once again. Paul: Thank you very much for having me, it was a pleasure talking with you. Mike: The Nazi Lies book club meets every week to discuss the books of upcoming guests on the podcast. Come join us on Discord. A subscription to Patreon gets you access starting as low as $2. Thanks for listening. [Theme song]  

The Audio Long Read
Nazi or KGB agent? My search for my grandfather's hidden past

The Audio Long Read

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 42:34


When my Latvian grandfather disappeared in 1949, my grandmother already knew he had been a member of a notorious Nazi brigade. But then a pension cheque arrived from the Soviet security agency. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

Focus on Europe | Video Podcast | Deutsche Welle
Latvia: Songs against Putin's attack on Ukraine

Focus on Europe | Video Podcast | Deutsche Welle

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 4:58


Latvian singer Intars Busulis has a large fan base in Russia. He has been using social media to tell them about what is really happening in the war in Ukraine – prompting some to turn on the artist.

Mythlok - The Home of Mythology
Perkunas : The Thunder God

Mythlok - The Home of Mythology

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 6:12


The sky deity of the Baltic religion, Perkunas, is regarded as a fertility god and the guardian of law and order apart from being the god of thunder and lightning. He is considered to be similar in powers to other gods such as the Norse god Thor and the Greek god Zeus. The oak, which is the tree most frequently struck by lightning, is regarded as sacred to him.According to ancient tradition, people who were struck by lightning were protected from devils and were treated with bullets made from bronze or flint. The objects that were struck by lightning were also used to cure various ailments, such as fever, toothache, and anxiety. The most popular of all Baltic gods Perkunas, is referred to in Lithuania as dievaitis, an archaic form of dievas.Perkunas is usually depicted as a middle-aged man riding a two-wheeled cart with goats. In some accounts, the thunder god is seen driving a flaming horse or a cart through the skies. He would be identified by the constellation of Ursa Major.Read more at https://mythlok.com/perkunas/

History Happened Everywhere
THE VERDICT: Hell or Highwater in Latvia during 2005-2010

History Happened Everywhere

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 30:34


The judge has his gavel and he's not afraid to use it on Pete's Latvian effort. What grade will the episode receive? Find out now on - The Verdict! THE VERDICT is the companion podcast for History Happened Everywhere episode #52: Hell or Highwater in Latvia during 2005-2010! But if you haven't listened to that episode yet - do go and listen to it first - or else there will be spoilers ahead!   Thanks: Alestorm - Wolves of the Sea (https://youtu.be/z9sdxhuCN6c)   Contact us: hhepodcast.com hhepodcast@gmail.com instagram.com/hhepodcast https://vm.tiktok.com/ZMegovGJ6/ twitter.com/HHEPodcast facebook.com/HHEPod reddit.com/r/hhepodcast

Digging Up Ancient Aliens
The ET building company - Unexplained Structures with Dr. David S. Andersson

Digging Up Ancient Aliens

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 68:15


Turkey, 1995, a site was discovered that made archeologists reevaluate their theories about the Neolithic revolution. But could they still be wrong? In Britton, France, there's fields of standing stones. Could there be a connection to Greece or maybe even further away? A Latvian man builds by himself a large castle, some speculate that he learned how by unlocking knowledge that was handed to the ancient Egyptians. Could this trail lead us out of this world?  Our host Fredrik continues the mission to discover what is genuine, fake, and somewhere in between on the TV-show Ancient Aliens. In this episode we will break down episode 8 from season 2 called “Unexplained Structures”. This episode will take us across the globe, exploring places and buildings that the show claims modern science can't explain.  To see if this is true we have with us Dr. David S. Andersson who is an expert on Mayan civilization. He has also been writing in https://www.forbes.com/sites/davidanderson/ (magazines such as Forbes Science), Washington Post and AiPT to name some. David will also have a chapter in a new book called “Comics and Archaeology” where he will participate with a chapter on pseudoarchaeology and American comic books. You can https://link.springer.com/book/9783030989187 (read more about that project right here). If you wish to know what else Dr. Andersson is up to you should follow https://twitter.com/DSAArchaeology (his twitter @DSAArchaeology).  Remember to https://diggingupancientaliens.com/ (visit my website diggingupancientaliens.com) for a full bibliography and we're mentioning two videos that will be available to watch if you head over there. In this episode we will discuss the following: Göbekli Tepe Cuzco Sacsahuamán White God theories Carnac Stones Menhirs World Grid Theory Pythagorean triangles Carahunge Zorats Karer Homestead Coral Castle

Red Pill Revolution
Memorial Day: Badass Medal of Honor Recipients

Red Pill Revolution

Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2022 89:51


In this episode of Red Pill Revolution, we discuss the unbelievable stories of 5 Medal of Honor recipients. Dakota Meyer, Kyle Carpenter, Salvatore Giunta, John Chapman; All Heros with their own incredible stories that we dive into and discuss. Listen in and pay homage to these remarkable men.   Subscribe and leave a 5-star review today!   Protect your family and support the Red Pill Revolution Podcast with Affordable Life Insurance. This is attached to my license and not a third-party ad!   Go to https://agents.ethoslife.com/invite/3504a now!   Currently available in AZ, MI, MO, LA, NC, OH, IN, TN, WV Email redpillrevolt@protonmail.com if you would like to sign up in a different state   Leave a donation, sign up for our weekly podcast companion newsletter, and follow along with all things Red Pill Revolution by going to our new website: https://redpillrevolution.co   Full Transcription:   Hello, and welcome to red pill revolution. My name is Austin Adams. Thank you so much for listening today. This is episode number 30 of the red pill revolution podcast. And again, thank you so much for listening. Uh, pretty excited about this conversation we're going to have today. It is all surrounding, you know, a little bit in the Memorial day theme here, we are going to be discussing all of, uh, some really incredible stories surrounding some of the medal of honor recipients from our great nation here in the United States of America.   Um, I know we have some people listening abroad, but there's some really incredible stories. Some really incredible people that we're going to highlight to. Uh, so I'm really excited to get into this. A few of the names that we're going to be going over is Kyle Carpenter, Dakota Meyer Salvatore. Gianatta John Chapman, Thomas Paine.   And then we got a sprinkle of some Jocko Willink in here to bowl the, get us into the episode and an outro to the episode. So I think that's the, I don't think you can get any more American than jockowillink. So let's go ahead and jump into this clip here. A little bit of a, some Memorial day United States pride here, here is Jocko Willink   in a country that most people would struggle to find on a map in a compound that few possess the courage to enter men from my previous life. Took the fight to our enemy in that compound, they found men that pray five times a day for your destruction. Those praying men don't know me. They don't know you.   And they don't know America. They don't understand our compassion, our freedoms and our tolerance. I know it may seem as if some of those things are currently missing, but they remain at our core and always will. Those men don't care about your religious beliefs. They don't care about your political opinions.   They don't care if you sit on the left or the right liberal or conservative pacifist or war. They don't care. How much you believe in diversity, equality or freedom of speech. They don't care. Sorry. You've never felt the alarm bells ringing in your body. The combination of fear and adrenaline as you move towards the fight instead of running from it.   Sorry, you've never heard someone cry out for help or cried out for help yourself. Relying on the courage of others to bring you home.   I'm sorry. You've never tasted the salt from your own tears. As you stand at flag draped, coffins bearing men, you were humbled to call your friends.   I don't wish those experiences on you.   But I do wish them had them.   if you had them, it would change the way you act, who would change the way you value. It would change the way you appreciate. You would become quick to open your eyes and slow to open your mouth.   Most will never understand the sacrifice required to keep evil men like those from that distant compound away from our doorstep. But it would not hurt you to try and understand would not hurt you to take a moment to think of the relentless drain on family, friends, and loved ones that are left behind sometimes for weeks, sometimes for months, sometimes for years.   Sometimes forever   ideas are not protected by words, paper and ink may outline the foundation and principles of this nation, but it is blood only blood that protects it   in that dusty compound. A man you have never met, gave everything he had so that you have the freedom to think, speak and act. However you choose.   He went there for all of us, whether you loved or hated what he stood for. He went there to preserve the opportunity and privilege, to believe, to be, and to become what we want.   this country, every single person living inside of its borders and under the banner of its flag. Oh, that man, we owe that man, everything. We owe him the respect that his sacrifice deserves saying, thank you is not enough. We send our best and lose them in the fight against the worst evil this world has to offer.   If you want to respect and honor their sacrifice, it needs to be more than words. You have to live. Take a minute and look around, soak it in the good, the bad and the ugly. You have the choice every day as to which category you want to be in, in which direction you want to move, you have that choice because the best among us, the best we ever had to offer, fought, and bled and died for it.   Don't ever forget that.   Wow. Well, what a way to start the show today? Uh, definitely hit me in my fields, Jocko Willink. They're just kind of outlining what this day is about, right? Th th the Memorial day is, is, you know, shrouded with barbecue grills and, and beach parties with the family and, you know, and all that's amazing and all of that's great.   And I'm sure every soldier who has ever sacrificed his, his life would have wanted it that way. Right? We're, we're, we're celebrating life, not just, you know, being, uh, having sorrow for those that we have lost, but it doesn't take away from the fact that we have to remember what the day's about. You know, we have to remember the reason that we are able to even have this type of weekend and the true reason behind that, which is soldiers who have lost their lives for us to have the freedoms that we have here in the United States.   Now over the last few episodes that, you know, I'm sure it seems like we've had, we've had a tough go here in the United States, you know, the last, the last several months, the last couple of years, even. Um, but I don't think that takes away from, from something that I found pretty powerful in that statement that Jocko Willink just said was that the, the piece of paper is what defines who our country is.   But the blood of the individuals who are willing to defend it is truly what matters in that really rings true. And I think we're going to see that today with a lot of the individuals that we're going to hear their stories and know that they're just everyday people, everyday people just like you and me who decided to go into the military for one reason or another.   Um, but generally, because they're a Patriot because they believe in what our country stands for. And this is something that I've had to wrestle with recently. Right? I am a veteran myself. I am not a combat veteran, so I did not have the experience that these individuals have had. Um, but you know, something that we, we have to remind ourselves during this time is that there is truly a unique individual who's willing to run to the fight.   And every single story that we hear of here is not only the individuals who signed that line, not only the individuals who picked up a weapon and went overseas and left their families, left their children, left their, their, their significant others left everything behind, just so they could S could go and fight for what they believe in.   Right. And that's kind of what I was getting at before, which is that, you know, it's, it's difficult. It's, it's easy to look at all of the flaws that we have in the United States here today. It's easy to look at, you know, the, the political divide in the partisan divides that we have in, in kind of just, uh, you know, diminish what these great men have done for us.   But, but that's, that's such a shallow viewpoint. Right? And, and the reason that these men signed that, that line is not because they believe in the politicians. It's not because they believe. You know, they, they believe in who we are as a nation. They believe in the individuals that are around them. They believe in the, that piece of paper that Jocko Willink just talked about, right.   The constitution, which was written as a, a literal divide between totalitarianism, that we're seeing all across the world right now in almost every so many. So many countries are dealing with, with this totalitarian states, you look at China, you, you look at the way that they're just ripping people off of their streets and like these like home alone, white jumpsuits and, and you know, for how long we've looked at these different countries and thought that just, it could never be like that here.   Well, why is that? Well, that's because of two reasons, two reasons why that is. And the first reason. We have our constitution. Our constitution is, is the founding document of our nation that allows us to have a, a literal defense against individuals who are in the political system, who are trying to take as much power as possible.   The constitution stops us from having people who can go in and become the system. There was already a set system that is out there. There was already a outline of the way that we have to act in the separation of powers and all of these individual things that make it, that, that were pre thought out, knowing that politicians are.   Dirty knowing that politicians are generally corruptible, knowing that people are flawed, right. And that's truly what it is, is people are flawed. And to know that people are flooding and to implement an institution in a piece of paper, a founding document with our constitution, which will allow us to have a literal divide, a literal wall, a defense against those corruptible individuals who seek power in the easiest way to go find it, which is through the political system.   So that is number one. We have our constitution, which is a actual defensive wall against those corruptible individuals on the inside. And that is the number one thing that we have to protect ourselves from. If we're going to remain a free country. Now, number two, which is equally as important is to have, is that what we have the fortune of having here in the United States is the greatest military power in the world.   The greatest military power in the history of. Right. And that doesn't protect us from the inside more than it protects us from the outside. So to allow us to maintain this organization, to maintain this, this ongoing freedom away from other totalitarian individuals who are wanting to come in and push their political agendas, whether they're from, you know, foreign or domestic, right.   Is, is that what you raise your hand? I promise to defend in the country from foreign and domestic enemies, the foreign aspect of that is where the military comes into play. Right. And, and the military is just a broken. A list of individual names who are willing to put themselves, put their lives on the line to make these things happen.   So let's go ahead and let's jump into the very first clip here that we have, which is actually the, so let's do a little bit of background on the, the medal of honor. So all of these individuals that we're highlighting today, our medal of honor recipients. Now it is Memorial day. Some of these individuals, I believe even most of them are not deceased, which is definitely a positive thing.   Um, but just so you know, that. And this is Memorial day, but I am highlighting medal of honor. Right? So the medal of honor is the very first, uh, it was, it was the very first, um, distinguishing factor for the American military  so, uh, Abraham Lincoln implemented the medal of honor, and it's kind of just, it been the most distinguished honor that you can have, uh, being a part of the military.   All right. Now the structure of this with the medal of honor is that you actually have to either get a congressional, um, a Congressman has to put your name down for the medal of honor or your chain of command. So those are two different ways that you can get a medal of honor. So far there's been around 3,500 medal of honor recipients.   Most of those medal of honor recipients were at the very beginning. Like I think it's like 80% of the medal of honor recipients were towards the very, very beginning of when the medal of honor was, uh, was made. And so since then the requirements to receive the medal of honor has gone up and, and become much more, uh, Distinguished in, in there's a lot more, um, I guess, uh, I dunno, there's a lot, there's a lot more, um, specific things that you have to boxes.   You have to check to get the medal of honor, as opposed to what it was like before. So a vast, vast majority came at the very beginning of when the medal of honor was made in the early 18 hundreds. Okay. So there's the background for it now, since then the most recent, uh, requirements change was in 1963, I believe where they began to make these requirements more stringent and you see less and less of these medal of honors today.   So the very first one that we're going to watch here is of Kyle Carpenter. Kyle Carpenter is an incredible story. He's actually the youngest medal of honor recipient ever. Um, it's truly, truly an incredible story. I don't want to take anything away from it for you guys here, so let's go ahead and listen to it.   And then we will discuss.   I joined the Marine Corps because I wanted to devote my life. My body, if need be to something greater than myself or any one individual   in 2010, I deployed with second battalion ninth Marines to Marsha Afghanistan. We were constantly attacked, just like we were every single day for the entire deployment. The fighting was very intense and it wasn't a matter of okay. Is it going to happen, but just a matter of when   myself and amazing friend and fellow Marine, when it scroll up on NICU Fazio, we were on top of that roof together. We were near the end of our four hour post position on top of the roof. When the enemy initiated a daylight attack with hand grenades   I felt like I got hit really hard in the face. My vision was as if I was looking at a TV with no connection, it was just white and gray static. I thought about my family and how devastated they were going to be. Especially my mother that didn't make it home from Afghanistan. And I closed my eyes and I faded out of consciousness for what I thought was going to be my last time on this earth.   my injuries were so severe that still nine years later,   it's hard to comprehend that I survived.   all right. So what it's saying here, I'm going to pause it real quick because it's, it's, it's saying some stuff that's pretty important. Basically. What ended up happening is, uh, Kyle actually jumped on a Brittany. Um, and it says that he has very little recollection of what actually happened during this event.   Um, but according to the information that they had here, he, uh, I'll just read it to, you says, says to this day Kyle's memory of what happened on November 21st, 2010, it remains blurry, but a military review of the incident determined that he had covered the grenade with his body to save the life of corporal Nick, you phrase you on June 19th, 2014, Kyle was awarded the medal of honor.   The nation's highest and most prestigious personal military decoration. All right. I just wanted to read that to you guys. I mean, that's pretty, I mean, literally the, the, um, captain America story right there for you and in a real individual, and, and we feel the need to create false idols, to be able to idolize somebody and think that somebody would have the capabilities or the, the mindfulness or, or the courage to do something during this, in, in that type of situation.   And that's why it's outlined in a movie in captain America, uh, an individual, you know, captain America goes on to jump on the grenade, right? This guy, Kyle Carpenter actually did that in the state of war to save his friends. How truly incredible. And like, you know, it gives me goosebumps just thinking about it.   That's it's amazing. Um, so let's, let's finish this, if there's anything else that comes up, I'll go ahead and read it to you guys. So.   All right. So while one second, while that loads up for us. Um, but yeah, really incredible story. The fact that, you know, that he, this individual actually did, so it says that several grenades were tossed onto the roof where he was at, and one of them, um, would take an enormous toll. It says Kyle was certain that he was going to die when that happened.   Um, it says Kyle is often asked, uh, what the medal of honor means to him. Um, and let's see if we can get this clip going here to discuss what he actually says there for that. Here we go.   We're just here because we're here. No, we got here because of incredible amounts of courage and sacrifice.   the metal represents all whoever raised their right hand and sworn to give their life if called upon for their country, represents those who have never made it home to receive the things and recognition. They deserve. Those who charged the beaches and world war II froze while fighting in Korea. Bled out across the lush fields of Vietnam and those who never made it home because of another deadly blast in the battlefields of Iraq and Afghanistan, those who were tortured for years in prisoner of war camps and those who still rest and just didn't lands forever remaining missing an action.   The metal represents the parents, husbands wives, and loved ones who have heard the dreaded knock on their front doors to find a telegram or service member delivering the unbearable news. This is where the true weight of the metals caring being a medal of honor. Recipient is a beautiful burden, but one, I am honored to carry   all right. And at the end of the video there, what they show is Kyle going ahead and putting on his medal of honor. So, um, really an incredible story, unbelievable story. And one that will, we'll go on in history as the, you know, the, the real captain America courage here with Kyle Carpenter. Um, you know, I almost feel like there should have been his name in the credits of the captain America movie, that they, you know, stole, stole that scene from something that actually happened with a true hero, um, with Kyle Carpenter there.   So what an incredible story. Um, now the next one that we're going to discuss here is going to be a Dakota Meyer. Now Dakota Meyers is a somewhat of a large figure when it comes to combat veterans who have spoken out, he's been on Joe Rogan, I believe once or twice, I think twice where the first time he went on and discussed his story directly in his story is.   A hard one to listen to and in a pretty gruesome one at that. And then, you know, that's kind of the thing that you hear about the differences between war. I don't know, you know, the way that our modern wars are fought is, is a lot of times, you know, you think of a gunfight and you're pressing a button from afar land, or like from, from hundreds of yards away and shooting it, you know, enemy fire zones and, and, you know, you're seeing small areas where you're shooting at and that didn't use to be the case.   Right. You think back to like the way that they fought in, I dunno, think of like, you know, 17 hundreds was like swords and stuff. That's not that far removed from where we are. So there's some really gruesome stories that come out of like older wars and we, we don't have as many hand-to-hand combat stories.   And Dakota Meyer is one of those stories where it really just reminds you of. The real gritty, terrible aspects of even modern war. And, um, we'll hear a little bit more about it when he discusses it here, but he talks about, um, in, in this clip, he not only discusses what he actually went through, what he did.   Um, but Dakota Meyer is an incredible story where I believe he was the only one of his team that made it out of a situation where, um, they basically left them stranded. So I don't want to take away too much of his stories surrounding it. Um, but it's a, it's a really incredible story. That's a little, you know, he, I believe he ends up, um, he gets in the hand-to-hand combat situation with somebody and ends up killing them with a rock man.   Like that's a tear. I can't even imagine what these guys carry around with them. Right. In, in that Kyle Carpenter story, not only the fact that he jumped on a grenade, but the fact that he lived to tell about it, he has very little recollection of what happened. Must be a really difficult thing. To try and wrestle with right.   To try. And you know, how often does that come up in his mind and into not even remember what actually happened? One of the curd must be really, I don't know, I guess a blessing in some ways, but also frustrating because it's such a pivotal moment in your life, right? Like you have how many days of your life that, that, you know, thousands and thousands of days in your life.   And, and to have this one most impactful day, like whether it's with what happened with Kyle Carpenter, where he jumps on that grenade and lives to tell the tale, or whether it's about Dakota Meyer, where he ends up having to take this other man's life. And he talks about not only having to take this man's life, but like the humanity behind it.   And then looking into this man's eyes and knowing that he's just another. Uh, another person just like him, who has a family and kids. And, um, it's, it's, it's tough, but I think it's necessary. We have to know what these people go through to properly be able to memorialize, you know, the other soldiers who actually did fall in these types of situations.   But, um, let's go ahead and listen to the Dakota Meyer story now. Well, I think sometimes people need to hear it from somebody like you, you know, or someone like Jocko or, you know, the, the, the beautiful thing about these podcasts is that you get to hear people's perspective. And a lot of them are eye-opening, you know, they, they they're, they literally can change the world because they changed the way you behave and you interact with people when you listen to it.   Yeah. And that podcast that you did with Jocko, when I was listening to me, it changed my whole day. It changed like how I was going to look at my day. I was, you know, instead of like looking at my day, like up it's a normal day, I was thinking, God damn, I'm lucky. God damn, I'm lucky and goddamn. Imagine.   Experiencing what you, and how old were you at the time? I was 21, 21 years old. And experiencing what you experienced in that insane firefight being locked down. And I mean, how many guys did you wind up engaging with? I don't know. I, you know, I don't know. I mean, everyone that I got an opportunity with.   Right. And it just, you know, it was just, uh, you know, it was so chaotic. I mean, I, you know, I still, I look, I think about all the time, obviously. Um, it's something I could have never experienced. I mean, I trained for war every single day when I was in the Marine Corps. I mean, it was what it was, what my job was and I still could have never imagined that day, the way it was or anything to turn out.   I could've never pictured it. I could've never, and, and I think every day it goes by, I think there's a reckoning of it, right. The way that I seen it that day is not the way I see it today. And, uh, I think that comes with, you know, just, just sharpening and just your body, you know, you change and you, you see different things in perspective, but yeah, I mean, you know, I, I, I, you know, that day, I mean, it's still, I mean, it still is just, you know, just, it's just there and, and, and literally I walked out of there and I, I just think about all the time today.   I just think about all the time of how many generations, just that day were changed. How many generations of, of people's lives were changed? You know, all my teammates died, so don't ever have kids that generations stopped their families forever. So many lives were changed that day by that, that, that piece.   And guess what? And everybody in America had no clue it was going on. Like right now, there are us. Somebody wondering if they're going to be able to come home and see their family again, that's reality, whether you want to ignore it or not like that's reality. And that was me September 8th, 2009. And it was just, um, gosh, it was a chaotic day.   I think that's an important thing to highlight too, is like, you know, what percentage of people that are going into these actual firefight, what is their average age like the, the, the military at that level is primarily made up of, you know,  may be some staff Sergeant like the primary, primary bulk of the individuals who are going in and fighting.   These wars are 18 to 22 year old kids. Right? Like you listen to, uh, you know, all of these conversations around, you know, gun control and, and, you know, should he be able to purchase a gun or not at 18 years old and all this stuff of like the recent events. So the tragic events that have happened. And you don't even remember the fact that worse, our government literally arms 18 olds and sends them to fight on their behalf.   And the 18 year olds that are signing up to go into the military. Don't don't have the big picture in mind. They barely paid attention in government class if like me. Um, and, and they, they really don't even know how our political system works, let alone geopolitics, and what's happening around the world.   And like what's actually going on, um, they're 18 to 22 year old kids who are going to fight the wars of these 85, 70 year old politicians who they don't have a clue what they're actually fighting for other than, you know, what you'll hear a lot in, in these kinds of videos is you'll, they'll hear them talking about who they're with, right.   Their team, um, saving their buddy next to them. That's what they fight for. And the fundamental ideal that they have surrounding what the United States is and what it means to be a Patriot and what the constitution stands for and being the, you know, um, th th the freest country in the world, right? And that's what these 18 year olds, the ideals that they're fighting for in their head at this age, besides the actual, like geopolitical situation of why we're actually going in there, what we're actually doing and why we're doing it, they're kids going into these situations.   And what you'll find is like, this is kind of an interesting conversation. This, you know, he talks about, you know, they were married and they had didn't, weren't old enough yet to have kids, right. They weren't old enough to be able to see what life is actually about when you, when you look at your child's eyes, when they're born, and they didn't get any of that.   And, and not only that, but their, their family lineage has gone. They did, they, they will not reproduce. There will be no duplication of that DNA because of these wars that they were sent to fight at. It's such a young age, And so, you know, to me, it's like these conversations running like is an 18 year old able to carry a gun.   Well, if you're going to allow people to sign up for the military and to go fight on behalf of our government and wars that these 18 year olds don't even understand, yet you gotta, you can't, you can't like have your cake and eat it too. As people say, right? Like you can't not allow an 18 year old to protect his own home because he can't purchase a weapon, but then send him to Afghanistan to go fight the Taliban in the same breath, because you think that it's okay for them to do that under their scenario.   Right. And under your, your reasoning. Right. Because, you know, and that's kind of how you have to look at that gun situation. I guess we'll, we'll take a little skirt side sidetrack here, you know, to me the gun, situation's an interesting one. And especially with the most recent events and things. That, you know, the, if you look at the government from a large standpoint is the government is its own entity, right?   It's its own, uh, household, right? It's a household of 300 million people, and then you break it down to the state level, right? And the state is just a smaller organization of that same family, right? That it breaks down to a smaller number. And inside that you have counties and inside that you have cities and inside that you have subdivisions and inside that you have households, but what the country is, is just its own family entity that has decided that we're on the same team.   Right. And we all live around each other, so we should be kind to each other and we should have some rules and that type of deal. Right. So when you break it down to like the, the household level, the, the, the government in the sense stands when it comes to gun control is basically. The government wants to be able to control weapons for its own personal reasons to defend itself.   Right? As a country, as a country family, it wants to defend its property, right? It wants to be able to do that. And it does that through military action right now, when you break that to the state level, you have sheriffs in the national guard and you have state entities that want to be able to defend itself against its enemies.   And then you have the households, right? You have, you have actual physical subdivisions, you're home in that subdivision, and you need to be able to do what the government does. You need to be able to do what the federal government does, what the state, they all know that they have to do it. It's the same reason.   Joe Biden has a security guard, armed security, all around him at all times. Same thing with celebrities, same thing. You know, all of these people that are preaching gun control are constantly surrounded by their own security who are all. Right, but, but you're, you're the peasant. You don't need that stuff.   You, what do you have to worry about? You're not famous. And like, I am, you're not a political elite. Like me, what do you have to worry about? Right. So they want to strip your right away. But if there's no guns that are allowed, right. If they strip your right to own a handgun or the purchase without, you know, extreme background checks where they get to say whether, you know, you get it or not.   If, if that's allowed, you know, that, that allows them to be, you know, when, when the constitution was written and we're getting on a little bit of a rant here, when the constitution was written, the idea for, for the second amendment was not was, was generally not yet for hunting. Right? Sure. You should be able to have a gun.   Right. But it's also protection of person and protection of property. And it's also protection from a totalitarian government. Right? So, so in the same way that they want to defend themselves against other countries, they want to defend themselves against their enemies. There are people, there are bad individuals, bad countries out there who want to harm.   There are also bad people out there who want to harm the president. There are bad people who want to harm celebrities and there's bad people who want to harm me and you. And so why should it be any different if the government is okay, I can much rather get on the page of the government. If they want to say that nobody gets guns, we don't get guns.   We're going to, we're going to sign a treaty with the UN where everybody just throws all of their weapons in a circle, and we're going to go back to the stone age. And we're just going to beat the shit out of each other with sticks, because that's, you know, we don't like guns anymore. If everybody agrees that we're on the same page and there's no longer going to be gun manufacturers that every single gun that's ever distributed, it has been rightfully returned and checked next to a box so that we know there are zero guns that are out there.   We can have a conversation about that, but if, but if the government wants to be armed, if our president wants armed security, if our celebrities get armed security, if everybody, but the peasants gets to have guns and then they want to take away your rights. No, I'm on, I'm not, I can't buy into that. Right.   Because it, for in the same way as it's, it's, um, it's a microcosm, the family household is a microcosm of what the government is. And so to strip the family of, of their ability to defend themselves, this doesn't work, right. It's the same reason our government will never lay down their arms and just give it to the UN and say, all right, right.   If we're all going to throw in our weapons on an individual level, why don't we do it on the government level? Well, because we all know that there's sneaky ass people out there who want to do you harm there's countries who want to kill American soldiers. Right. We know that we also know that there's individuals out there who are going to break into somebody's house tonight and murder somebody.   It's just, it's just, unfortunately, the side-effect of humanity is there is bad people that are. And that in that you see that in that macro level of our government, our government is not going to just throw their guns into the middle with every other government say, oh, all right, we're all safe. We're going to go back to using sticks, to beat the shit out of each other.   No, they're not going to do that. They know that the power is in the weaponry. The power is in the individual who holds the, the, the most deadly weapon. Right. And so why would we as individuals give that up? All right. Anyways, side note, everybody who goes into the military, if you're going to say 18 is too young to own a weapon to go into a, um, a gun store and purchase an AR to protect yourself, to protect your family, to go hunting, whatever the hell.   Then you have to change the military age. You can't just, you, you can't just allow them to shed blood on your behalf, but not allow them to protect their own home. It makes no sense. So anyway, so let's, let's continue this Dakota Meyer clip. It's amazing how you could have, uh, thousands of days in your life in one day changes the way you look at everything.   One day, it changes the way you look at everything and, you know, and like the further I go on, I look at it different. You know, I always talk about the story of, um, you know, whenever this guy came up behind me and I ended up, I ended up killing him with a rock and I always remember just like, I remember it.   Like I see it every night. Like I remember like I just see his face and I got just, cause there was a point, there was a point that I, I feel like that anybody that when they, whether they're injured or anything, like they realized that. Like they like it. Like, I don't know. I just think there's a point when you look at somebody and they know they're going to die and on there, forget that.   And I, you know, now I look at it and I see it and how we sank that, like   this guy is a son to somebody, his mother and father are gonna miss him. This guy, he believes in his cause as much as I do, he doesn't believe he's wrong. This guy, this guy, he, he could have had a wife or kids that are never going to see their father. Again, just like, you know, my dad, might've never seen me again if it was switched and really, I don't even know.   I don't hate him. I don't even know this guy. We're just here at this place right now, because we were born in two different. When you add a weapons, were you out of, out of him? So my, no, he had came up and he started choking me. Uh, I had shot him once before and he, I was trying to pick my buddy, Donna Lee, my, my, my, one of my closest Afghans daughter.   Lee had been shot. He, he got killed. He had been killed and I came around this terrorist to get him and I was on my knee and this guy came up behind me. And, um, so he didn't have a weapon either. He was, he did, he, he had a weapon and I ended up shooting him from the ground. And I thought he was dead when he fell on the ground.   And I kind of moved down and got down with Donna Lee because I was still getting shot at, from this machine gun up on this hill. And I was trying to make myself small as I could. And, um, this guy ends up coming up with choking me. Like I thought he was, I thought he was dead and he ends up choking me out.   He starts trying to choke me out and eventually led up a little bit and I ended up getting around. And I just got, we were fighting back and forth and I can remember all of us thinking about it was like, don't let his legs to get on me. Like, you know, these guys, their legs are, I mean, they've been crawling up mountains our whole life.   And he was a, he was a pretty big dude. And, um, I just remember getting on top of him, finally got on top of him and I ended up, I was rolling on top of him. He didn't have all the gear on I did. And, um, I ended up, I remember getting on top of him, like, like I was straddling him and I'm just reaching up, trying to grab for anything I can and I'm holding him and I'm holding him down with my throat, with my forearm and I'm just grabbing anything I can.   And finally, I ended up grabbing a rock and I just started beating this dude space in and I started beating and beaten and beaten. And I remember, I remember just like finally, like after hitting him, you know, I don't know, three or four times four or five times, whatever. I remember him, like finally just kind of looking at me and like, just it's it's like, he's like just, I'm just looking at him in the eyes, like obviously closer than me to you right now.   You just see all the, you can tell, like he knows where this is going. And I always think about that, you know, um, obviously I would kill him a million times over again. Right. He, he was the enemy. Like, I don't feel bad about that part of it, but I just think about like, in that moment, if I can find a way to relate to him in that moment, uh, man, I'm taking his life.   We all in America can find a way to connect with each other. If we don't connect with each other because we choose not to, I don't care what your differences are. Like. Don't like find a reason to why we can get along, not why we should not get along. Right. Wow. So that's pretty, um, like I was saying a little, a little intense, right?   That's it's a truly a horrific situation that this man found himself in and how unfortunate to have to be. In a situation where you have to take somebody's life or it's your own. Right. And you said that he said that I would do it a thousand times over if I had to, because he was the enemy. Right. He was going to do that to me.   He came up to me to choke me. There's nothing that I could've done to put, put, put myself out of the situation, besides not go in the military. You know, however many years ago he had been in three years. Um, but, but he was positioned in, in somewhere where he had to defend himself and had to defend the people around him.   And you know, what, what he didn't talk about there was the, what led up to that, but I'm believe none, nobody on his team made it out. It was just him in that situation. And, uh, you know, that's, that's something that's easy to forget too. It's easy to like glorify them. It's easy to like put them on a pedestal because they went off and fought.   But like, man, it's such a mixed emotion. That should be such a powerful thing on Memorial day to like look back at what they actually went through. Right. What, what they actually had to endure both in the, in the moment and then for the rest of their life, after these actions, after defending themselves, after, you know, um, positioning, being positioned in a way where they had to go through this and, and do these things to other people.   And it's probably not very often, well, maybe it is maybe, you know, but, but it's, it's, it's refreshing to hear someone, you know, I guess refreshing and then an interesting to hear somebody go from speaking about. Beating someone's face in with a rock four or five times in, in, in seeing them really just like, decide that they're okay.   Not okay with it, but just decide that like, oh, this might be it right to like, actually have to look at the humanity of an individual in that moment and realize, you know, that maybe this is the end of your life, that you're not going to see your children and, and on both sides of it. Right. It's like the, I don't know.   I think the more developed we get as a world, right? As a consciousness, as an individual, the more we realize that, like these wars, at least from, you know, uh, uh, human aspect, or like just makes no sense to be fought in these manners. Like literally neither of those men knew the geopolitics down to the core of what they were there fighting for.   They were positioned by people in power who had agendas in mind that they wanted to accomplish on the backs of this man losing his life. In this situation where he went to, you know, go choke Dakota Meyer, um, either which way it's like it's a horrific event because he just as easily see whoever picked up that rock first, right?   Whoever was put in a position where they could have walked away alive would have seized that chance. But they were only in that position because of the individuals who put them there. But anyways, let's not take away from that. There were always CISM, heroism, heroism is a word heroic CISM. Let's not take away from their heroism of that individual in that moment who faced their fears and had the courage to fight in this situation.   And, and, and now it, like I said, it's a, it's a mixed emotion. You can't just like throw them up on a pedestal. And you know, you have to have empathy is still right. It's not just like, look at the heroes. It's like, man, what these people had to endure to allow us to. Enjoy our lives, the way that we do allow us to maintain our freedom in our S our sovereignty from other nations and, and how easily it is to forget the horrific actions when just putting them on that pedestal.   When just looking at them as a hero, it's easy to forget everything that they had to go through. And like I said, everything they're going to have to endure from here on out, but it's, it's important to understand how deeply complex these things are, even for an 18 and 19 and 20 year old to have to handle, and to not even be in your head like your adult life, right?   Like you're a 17, 18, 19 years old. You signed that dotted line and then you go off and you have to experience such trauma, and then take that into what you believe to be normal everyday adult life, when you're 24. And you, you have your DD two 14 in your hand, and you're ready to like take on the world.   If you're one of these individuals who went through this, like you don't, you don't have the same lens as everybody. You have such a heavier burden to take into everyday life, to take into your first marriage, to take into your, you know, to, to, to parenting your children. And you have such a different vantage point of what, you know, what it means to, to go into the military and what it means to protect your country and what it means to have a constitution, the way that we do and be willing and able to protect and defend it.   Um, it's heavy, right? Like that, that, that that's a kid 19 years old as a kid. And then they carry that burden into every other year, every other decade, every engagement, every family reunion that whatever it is like to you, you carry that with you. Um, so, you know, it's, it's something that's refreshing too, is looking at all these people and looking at how normal they are, right?   Like every single one of these guys could just be right next to you on a plane. They're, you know, talk to you at the, at the bar or. So, you know, it, it speaks to human resiliency too, right. To be able to experience something that horrific and then to come out and still be able to just leave your house, let alone form a sentence or get on a Joe Rogan interview.   Right. Like man. So the next one we're going to listen to is Salvador. Jiante I hope I'm pronouncing that correctly, but Salvador Gionta um, we will go ahead and listen to this clip and then we will discuss it too. This is a pretty incredible story. I haven't read too deep into it. Um, but I'm, I'm interested to hear it.   So here we go. I grew up in Cedar rapids, Iowa. I'm the oldest of three children. It was the Midwest middle-class sunshine, rainbows green grass. You don't have to lock the door kind of neighborhood. That was where I grew up in Iowa. I was about to graduate high school and I heard a radio commercial come on.   And I said, you know, come on down, see the recruiter. Who doesn't want a free t-shirt I'm working, but I want a free t-shirt of course I want a t-shirt. So I went down and I, uh, I talked to the recruiter and kind of the things that he said started making sense, you know, we're we're country at war. This was 2003.   We just jumped into Iraq. We we've been in Afghanistan since 2001. This is my chance. I can make a difference if this is what I want to do, and I can do it everywhere, but not in Cedar rapids, Iowa. My great grandparents came over from Italy in 1904. No one that I know of in my immediate family served in any sort of military.   This is my chance to say, you know, the juniors are going to go serve. I'm going to do it. Salvatore, Giunta enlisted in the U S army in November of 2003, after excelling in basic training and infantry school, he was deployed to Afghanistan in 2005. And again, in 2000. The second tour would station him at a remote fire base and the deadly Corrine gal valley.   I remember being so excited to go. I wasn't just excited. I was ready. I'm going to go there and kick in doors and solve this, wrap it up. We'll go home. We'll drink some beers and say, you know what? I served in the United States army. I'm proud of that every day. And within three months of being in country, an IED took out a truck and killed four and gunner lost both of his legs.   These are people in their prime of their life. There will never be stronger than they were that day to no longer have it tomorrow. That was when I truly felt that it was in the army. My second deployment was the corn gold valley. It was like nothing that I had never seen in Afghanistan before we were at the bottom of the valley with mountains, just cheer straight, straight up and down on every single side.   And every single place you're going to fight. You are at the bottom and there's no spot you can choose because you don't get to choose a spot. They get to choose the spot. So operation, rock avalanche when he go to, and I guess that's something that's fair to mention too, is they don't even get to pick where they go or like some of the tactical disadvantages that they've been pulled into.   Like, there's a, there's a movie that came out surrounding. Uh, there was a group of Marines who basically did a bunch of home videos, like early in the, you know, like literal, uh, cam corridor mode. Like I think it was like early mid nineties. Uh, there was a group of Marines. I need to think of the name of the movie because it's a true, unbelievably, incredible depiction.   Um, and it really seems like the whole movie that the depiction of it that they ended up doing seemed like a, um, like they took a lot of the scenes of this home movies that they made. And I think there was like four or five medal of honor recipients. I should have clipped that together for you guys too, but really unbelievable.   A movie that, that came out about this specific, it might, it might be this specific area that he's mentioning here where basically there was a big, um, mountain area surrounding the entire, like a full circle mountain. And then down, down in the valley here, um, there was a, uh, a military base that they were put in a forward operating base, right in the middle of these mountains at the very, very bottom where they were at a complete disadvantage from every single point that you could look at, they were at a disadvantage from, and, uh, there was, uh, many, many, uh, soldiers from the U S who died.   Um, and, and every single day in this area that they were, they were fighting. And in this forward operating base, they would receive gunfire just from the mountains and they could barely even see where it was coming. But the vantage point that they were, they were fighting from was just like, imagine, like, I dunno if you've ever seen, like, I guess that's a bad example, but if there's a, there's just a complete circle of mountains around this area, there's a base at the very, very, very circle middle bottom.   So there's nowhere to hide. There's nowhere to run. Um, there's nowhere to, to even cover, to, to, to reload your weapon besides the, you know, the buildings. And so, um, this movie is truly incredible depiction. So I wonder if this is the same base that they were talking about. There is like the, it might've been, um, like he might've said it, but I think it was like they coined it like death valley, um, but a horrific, horrific, uh, tactical disadvantage vantage that these men were in from the beginning.   Like it's not even like they, they, none of them choose to this either like higher up chain of command guy writes a fucking sticky note and hands it to a corporal and says, all right, start a base at the bottom of this mountain without ever actually visiting. And how many people died on the decisions, like on the backs of that decision, how many these young soldiers lives were lost because of this like terrible tactical disadvantage that they were given from the very beginning.   Like they, they didn't even have a chance from the beginning. And, and so whatever this movie is, you gotta find it. It's a, it's a great, it probably one of my favorite military movies of all time. Um, and, and it truly like captures the humanity. Like the essence of what being in the military is, and all the shit-talking and comradery and all the, you know, difficult situations that you find yourself in.   Um, it's a really incredible story. So, um, but if that's not the place that he's talking about, the fact that they're putting our soldiers in these areas over and over again, now I know that there's been like since then, like statements that they came out and said, yeah, there's no, absolutely no reason that we should have actually put a base in this area.   Uh, I dunno, it's crazy, but I'll, I'll find the name of that hopefully before the end of this podcast. And, and, uh, we'll, we'll see if I can give the shout out and let you have a, a good movie to go watch. Cause it's a really, really incredible movie. Um, but let's, let's continue on this clip again. This is Salvador gianatta, um, discussing his, uh, the time that he received the medal of honor for, we had no idea.   Well, we had Intel and there's Intel. It was lots of bad guys. That's what we came here to do.   the first day we got some contact a couple of times, each day, usually small mines, RPGs. There's some bad guys in the shot at us. And we dropped some orders and other things. Apparently there was a lot of people that they deemed innocent that died. Then they're not. We came to help, but now he pissed off everyone.   I'm here still, other than our little areas that we've been watching for the last, you know, day and half, we don't know what's outside of this. We left where we were headed, headed to another village. It's probably only enough, maybe another street kilometers. And we set up for doing listening posts for going in and engaging the villages saying, Hey, you know, what do you need?   What would, what would make your lives better? And how let's let's talk to offer to all of this is to Bravo radio check over. That was a team leader. So I have a radio so I can click over and I can hear what's going on with the other guys. And we started hearing on the radio chaos shooting. Doesn't make chaos to hear chaos from people who'd been doing this restraint.   And we started hearing they're missing people. They're missing things. There's there's Kia's we have, we have Americans killed there. It was bad. We just stayed waiting, listening to a million bad things, happen to our brothers kilometer away. You've never been more ready than you were right there. And we couldn't do anything right over here.   They over overran a scout team position and they overran a gun team. And second tune was going to go into the village. And then we were going to be on one of the side peaks over watching the village. So if anything, anyone started coming from the outside to come and attack them in the village. We already have the high ground above them and we sat there 12 hours, 14 hours just watching and waiting.   And nothing happened. Commander said, we're going to pull out. We'll go back as it was probably two and a half hours. And the sun was down to the moon was big and that moon really does make a, just a huge amount of difference in what you can. And can't see, there was Sergeant Brennan specialist, sack road, the squad leader, staff, Sergeant Gallardo, myself.   Uh, Casey was my solid gunner. And then clarity was my two or three gunner. We went about 200 meters from where we sat. And that was when I I've never seen before or since anything like what, what happened?   The tracers coming, usually one tracer, four balls. So every time you see one that glows, there was four somewhere in between there and absolutely everything. Every single inch of the air in front of us behind you. Was filled with tracers thousands of bullets in the air going both ways at this point, I think within the first five seconds, I think pretty much everyone had been shot somewhere.   Casey and Clary were behind me and Casey had the 2 49 squad. Automatic weapons saw and searched can shoot about a thousand bullets per minute. Clary was shooting is 2 0 3, which shoots a 40 millimeter grenade. But the guys were so close. She couldn't the grenade. He was just making a lot of booms, but it wasn't on them, but he was doing exactly that.   That was a good thing for him to be doing. And so I looked towards my leader, Sergeant Gallardo, I saw Gallardo coming back and I just saw his head Twitch. And it wasn't like a, what was that Twitch? He was like, something just hit his head Twitch and he dropped, sorry. I just ran out and I grabbed, he was kind of flipped over on his back, but he was okay.   So I kind of grabbed him, was pulling him and he was jumping up and we got back and I went to a little bit of desolate. I probably gave us maybe six to eight inches of relief in the ground. And I, we were both there. And when that happened, I got hit Largo's here and I'm here and they're shooting at us from here.   And I just got hit over here, which the people over here can't shoot over here. That is a very serious thing to figure out incredibly quick, why that bullet came from over here, they set up in an L shape, which if we were to do it, we would do it exactly like that. We were trained from from day one in basic training.   It was a battle drill that a near ambush. What do you do if your ambush happens? Well, you charged the line. You're going to win or lose on that, but you're going to win or lose stain where you're at. And if you stay where you're at, you're probably gonna lose. We threw your name. And we ran forward, that road was on the ground and he said, he'd been shot.   Brennan said he was shot as well. He's somewhere up ahead. I can hear this. As I'm running and Garda went for acro Gallardo is the man. I trust the lardo. There's no more grenades. And I was already running forward. So pointless to stop and Gallardo had that growed and chasing and Claire were doing everything they could and they were, they were keeping their heads down.   And when I ran up and I couldn't, I couldn't find Brinton where it should've been   this part haunts my dreams.   Now it's interesting to think in this situation like that, like everything that's going on. You know, all of the intensity of the moment, like gunfire from here, gunfire, from there, you, you like, it's easy to, it's easy to let it escape from, from your mind if you've never been in a situation like that, not I've never been in a situation like that.   So it just, just interesting. The the real time chess match that is happening in a firefight. And so, you know, in, in the stakes are so high. And for him to say that like, you know, in this next moment was one that will stick with me forever, you know, in the intensity of that moment to have a moment that even like within that however many minutes that this firefights happening and you're seeing people drop to your left into your right and to have something significant enough in that moment to, to, to stand out to you and to have to also not only like comprehend everything that's going on around you.   Um, but to, to, to react, analyze strategize, and then take action is like, it, it truly is a special type of individual who can find themselves in a position to gain this medal of honor, because every single one of those decisions has to be correct. Right? The, the, the analyzing the situation, the reaction to the situation, the, you know, calm, cool, and collected, and then the actual action itself, everything had to Evelyn.   You know, perfectly for these men to do what they did. Um, so, you know, just speaks to the intensity of the moment and the intensity of what he's must be talking about coming up here. The fact that there's an individual moment within all of this, that, that sticks with him specifically. So here's that I came out and there was two guys carrying one   crazy. I don't know how anyone else got up here before me. I mean, this all happens like this. I was like a little bit closer. I realized what was going on. I deployed with Berlin before we, the year before we were in Afghanistan for a year. So I'd been with Brendan for maybe four years. He's smarter than me, stronger than me.   He's smaller than me too, but he's faster than me. He's a better shot.   And that's, who's getting carried away June to immediately charged through the persistent enemy fire toward the two insurgents carrying Joshua Brennan. He killed one and wounded. The other Ben carried Brennan to a position of relative safety until medevac helicopters could arrive   25, 2007 30 supportive operation during freedom is unwavering courage. You don't find out if you did the right thing or wrong thing until later. Sometimes maybe if you did the wrong thing, maybe you don't ever find out lardo. My squad came up, I was talking to captain Kearney. He said, you're going to get put in for a middle of,   I said a lot of things, none of which were very happy or, or should be told that. Mendoza had died and Brandon had died. The other guys were going to be okay, they're all in surgery or getting some bullets out. You're going to congratulate me. You're going to pat me on the back and say, thanks stupid the day at the white house.   When the president put around my neck and the front row, I had my family had my wife and my mom and dad and brother and sister. And the second row, I had some aunts and uncles, but the road behind my family was Britain's family. Next to them was windows is family. When, as I felt this light silk ribbon go around my neck, I felt the weight of the sacrifices of those two and the sacrifices of several of the people in that audience.   No one did anything special. I, every single one of us were fighting for our absolute life. If I didn't do that was my. Congratulate and pat it on the back and everyone thinks I'm such a great guy when there's people that will never get a congratulations. Thank you. Or you're the man ever again, or see their family, the mother, the father, the children.   And yet you're gonna congratulate me on the keeper of it stays at my house at night, put it around my neck when I need to, but this is not mine. This is not for me. This represents so much more. This represents not just my boys, not just bringing, not just Mendoza, not, not rugal who died the day before. Not all the guys who, who have been wounded, not all the people who have suffered, not the families that will pay the price for this country.   It's not for any one of those people. It's for all of those people. And if I got to do it, I'm going to do it for them. And there's nothing they wouldn't do for me. So how could I not do this for them?   Yeah, that's heavy. Is he, you know, can't imagine being in that situation, like he said, like getting your metal of honor, while you sit out and watch the families of your friends that didn't have the opportunity to come home, let alone sit there from, in front of the president of the United States being congratulated, right?   Like that, you know, it's like, I'm such a weird, you know, status to obtain because all of the things that came with that, right? Like I wonder how many of those men who have the medal of honor even, you know, look at it in, in a way other than how he looks at it, which is just like, you know, it's not this, like, it's not the Stanley cup, right.   It's not like, it means horrible tragedy happened and you witnessed horrific things in likely your friends or dad and, or seriously wounded. And then too, like. This like celebrity type event where the president is putting a, a necklace around your neck about it. And he can't comprehend the fraction of the agony that you went to, to be standing on that stage, or to look in, to look out and see your friend's parents.   There is cash that's heavy, you know? And, and, and so the Mo the movie I was mentioning earlier was called the outpost. I believe it's, it's, uh, it came out in like 2019. I don't know if this specifically talking about this one place, it might be. Um, I'll have to look deeper into that for you guys, but the corn golf valley is what is where, um, Gionta served, where he got his metal event of a medal of honor.   And so here, here's what it talked about. I was talking about that earlier, like the base at the very like, um, the very bottom of this like mountainous area. And so here's six reasons why the Korengal valley was one of the most dangerous places in Afghanistan. So it says nestled between the high mountains of the Afghan side of the border with Pakistan, the Korengal valley has the most has one of the hardest fought over patches of ground in the war on terror, 54 Americans have been killed in four medal of honors were earned in the valley or its vis immediate vicinity while the case for a fifth is under review.   One of that, um, one was that of the first living recipient of the reward of awards since Vietnam staff, Sergeant Salvatore. That's who we're discussing here today, the American military rarely moves into the valley, but handpicked, Afghan commandos, some trained by the CIA fight constantly with militants there, the Afghan government maintains offices at the Peck river valley, the entryway to Korengal, their police execute raids and patrols, and the continuing attempt to shut down or limit the shadow government operating there.   When the American military was there, they face the same challenges the Afghan forces do today. Some of these dangerous of some of these dangers are common across Afghanistan while others, um, only existed in Korengal valley and the other branches of the pack river valley. So it says the terrain is a nightmare.   Steep mountains, loose shale thick forest is an open patches of land, made the area in nightmare for an occupying force. Command outposts were built in relatively open areas so that defenders could see approaching militias. However, this meant patrol is returning to the base, had to cross the open.   Sometimes under heavy military arms fire from nearby wooded areas and houses, the thick trees in the area allowed fighters to attack us forces from covering concealment. The attack would then hide there. The attackers would then hide their weapons in the forest and return to the civilian population.   The steep hillside allowed snipers to climb above outposts and fire into the bases. As soldiers slept loose rocks on the steep land led to injuries from falls and trips. It says building new bases and keeping them supplied, presented constant challenges, probably just, they show that in the outpost again, I don't know if that's the exact movie.   I'll have to I'll look at that before we're done here, but in the outpost, they showed that like when they would actually go to get supplies, they would drive their Humvees up these mountains. Like right on the cliffs, like horrifying to try, like, you know, you ever drive through like Colorado going up to, uh, like Vail or Breckenridge or something.   And so it's like how I felt, but it's like, not even close to that. It was like this small, small patch of area that yo

Intelligence Squared
The Crimes of History, with Linda Kintsler and Peter Pomerantsev

Intelligence Squared

Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2022 43:26


How do you put a ghost on trial? In Linda Kinstler's deeply personal new book, Come to This Court and Cry, she uncovers the atrocities of her Latvian grandfather's involvement in the Holocaust. In conversation with author, broadcaster and academic, Peter Pomerantsev, she asks how do we account for the brutality of historical events and our personal links to them, as the passage of time means they slip further beyond living memory? Linda and Peter also discuss whether the history of conflict is repeating itself through Russia's current War on Ukraine. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Consumer Choice Radio
EP125: Ukraine, Bitcoin, and Liberal Democracy (w/ Matthew Mežinskis)

Consumer Choice Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 44:59


Yaël is in DC, David is back from his delightful Ontario countryside séjour. We talk about the Davos World Economic Forum, politicians that want to ban ministers from joining, and the loons that follow it, and the media incentives to cover the Johnny Depp/Amber Heard trial. INTERVIEW: Matthew Mežinskis is an American of Latvian, Norwegian, and Irish descent, residing in Eastern Europe since 2006. He works in corporate finance, consulting investors across the real estate, hospitality, food & beverage, and online direct lending industries. He was an early board member of Ronald McDonald House Charities Latvija, serving as financial director. He holds a BBA in Finance and Real Estate from the University of Cincinnati. He has been following Bitcoin since 2011. Creator of Crypto Voices podcast and Porkopolis Economics. https://porkopolis.io/ https://twitter.com/crypto_voices -Why people should still care about Ukraine -The role of Russia in central and eastern Europe -Growing monetary trends and the excitement of Bitcoin -Why liberal democracies matter Broadcast on Consumer Choice Radio on May 26, 2022. Syndicated on Sauga 960AM and Big Talker Network. Website: https://consumerchoiceradio.com ***PODCAST***  Podcast Index: https://bit.ly/3EJSIs3 Apple: http://apple.co/2G7avA8  Spotify: http://spoti.fi/3iXIKIS RSS: https://omny.fm/shows/consumerchoiceradio/playlists/podcast.rss Our podcast is now Podcasting 2.0 compliant! Listen to the show using a Bitcoin lightning wallet-enabled podcasting app (Breeze, Fountain, etc.) to directly donate to the show using the Bitcoin lightning network (stream those sats!).  More information on that here: https://podcastindex.org/apps  Produced by the Consumer Choice Center.  Support us: https://consumerchoicecenter.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Red Line Radio
Barstool Chicago Goes To HQ In New York City

Red Line Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 78:58


Chief Carl Eddie and Dave hit the big apple for their annual NBA Draft Lottery trip. Some chaos ensues. Several laughs. And is there a big free agent coming to the Chicago office with big cat? Here's a hint. He's part Latvian (kind of). There's some Chicago sports sprinkled in all over. All Gas No Brakes

The Totally Ice Hockey Show
Day Five: Where's the Energy, USA?

The Totally Ice Hockey Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 33:20


The United States looked emotional yesterday in their 4-1 loss to Finland, Latvia won their first game of the tournament and the Bukarts family's contribution to Latvian hockey. Mike and Reagan dive deep into Monday's games and look ahead to today's competitions. 

Alexander Garrett
A Reminder of America's Strength With A Latvian Immigrant and a Former US Diplomat

Alexander Garrett

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 66:56


John Livens escaped Russian occupation of Latvia with his family at a very young age. He tells his story of coming to America with me and in his new book, "An Unexpected Journey". Godfrey Harris re-joined to discuss his days as a diplomat and how the strength of American democracy is linked to the strength of the Ukrainian people defending their country. Link to John Livens's book can be found here: https://www.amazon.com/Unexpected-Journey-John-Livens/dp/1737003414 Godfrey Harris of Regan/Harris Mgmt. Group's website can be found here: http://www.americasgroup.com/ More from Alex Garrett Podcasting: https://www.spreaker.com/user/agsportshournyc

The Conversation
Women in the world of animation

The Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 27:05


From the first moving drawings that appeared on screens back in the 1930s to the highly imaginative, emotionally resonant filmmaking of today – animation has come a long way. It is no longer considered a pleasant cinematic distraction for kids. In fact, some of the boldest, most creative and slyly subversive filmmaking can be found in animation. Kim Chakanetsa speaks to two women responsible for bringing animated characters to life. María Cecilia Botero is an actor from Colombia whose career spans five decades. She has experience in everything from performing musical theater, to being a news anchor, to starring in popular telenovelas, to dubbing commercials and most recently voicing the character of the Abuela in the Oscar-Winning Disney film Encanto. Signe Baumane is a Latvian animator based in Brooklyn. Her first of many short stories was published in a local newspaper when she was 14. She went on to illustrate children's books and create sets for puppet theaters. Since she moved to the United States to further pursue animation, Signe has written, directed and animated 15 shorts and two animated films. Her work has been showcased at over 300 film festivals. She uses animation to confront difficult, adult topics, like “Rocks In my Pockets”, which she also voiced, which covers the 100 year history of her family in Latvia. Produced by Emily Naylor. (Image: (L), María Cecilia Botero , courtesy of María Cecilia Botero. (R), Signe Baumane, courtesy of Signe Baumane.)

Pony Tales Podcast
#115: Sasha Kovalova, E1-WOLFPACK

Pony Tales Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 114:36


Aleksandra (aka Sasha) is a badass Latvian Bookchick who spent the last 5 summers conquering challenges and participating in unforgettable stories. Get her unique perspective as a European who overcame language barriers, got 3 years out of a bookmobile, and handled crazy transitions in SW with Covid landing her in the UK for her 4th summer selling. As a non-typical Latvian because of her bubbly demeanor, Sasha will bring a smile to your face as you hear about her journey!

Ukraine Daily Brief
April 22, 2022

Ukraine Daily Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 7:01 Very Popular


The fortieth episode of the DSR Daily Brief. Stories cited in the podcast:Russia says it plans full control of Donbas and southern Ukraine - IfaxFire at Russian defence research facility kills 6 peopleSatellite images show what appears to be a growing mass grave near Mariupol.Estonian and Latvian parliaments say Russia has committed genocideFrance Issues International Arrest Warrant for Carlos GhosnMigration talks an example of ‘constructive' engagement with Cuba, State Department saysAfghan IS group claims series of bombings targeting ShiitesLeaders of 2 Koreas exchange letters of hope amid tensionsIsraeli police storm Jerusalem holy site after rock-throwingProfessor uses trash as a treasure to study life in North Korea See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Ukrainecast
Putin "Liberates" Mariupol

Ukrainecast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 31:56


The Russian President orders troops to seal off the port city. Victoria speaks to defence expert, Justin Crump, about the situation in the city of Mariupol. She also talks to a woman who had an emergency C-section in the basement of a hospital as the fighting was intensifying outside. Anastasia Platonova from the BBC Russian Service – currently based in the Latvian capital, Riga – has been speaking to the mothers of Russian sailors who've gone missing. And the BBC's Lewis Goodall returns to Poland to see how Ukrainian refugees are faring since his last visit. Today's Ukrainecast was made by Estelle Doyle with Osman Iqbal and Ben Cooper. The technical producer was Emma Crowe. The assistant editor was Sam Bonham.

Mythlok - The Home of Mythology
Aitvaras : The Flaming Rooster

Mythlok - The Home of Mythology

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 6:00


The Aitvaras is a type of flying dragon/rooster in Baltic mythology that has been depicted as a luck-bringer or a trickster spirit. They are also referred to as household spirits, little demons, and even nature spirits. It is an unpredictable creature that can transform into various forms depending on its current environment. For instance, it can look like a black cat or a black cockerel inside the house.As a type of serpent, the Aitvaras have the head of a lucky grass snake. They can transform into various shapes and can fly at any time. They are powerful creatures that lived in the forests and roamed the wilds. They can be persuaded into becoming a family guardian or protector. As a guardian, they can bring wealth and happiness to anyone they choose.Before Christianity, the Aitvaras were regarded as semi-divine creatures that could protect a family or a household. They were also used to regulate the wealth of people in their communities.Read more about the Aitvaras at https://mythlok.com/aitvaras/

The Dom Giordano Program
The ‘Latvian Blend' Used By Russians To Bypass Sanctions

The Dom Giordano Program

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 40:21


Full Hour | To lead off today's second hour, Dom Giordano welcomes back Philadelphia chiropractor and concerned citizen Ann Marie Muldoon, who has organized a rally out at Frankford and Cottman tomorrow at 5:30PM ET supporting the Toomey family, after 15-year-old Sean Toomey was left braindead, killing him, after a rogue bullet struck him following a carjacking-gone-awry. Muldoon explains the purpose for the rally and the title of ‘Not One More,' telling of the climate that has become of Philadelphia under District Attorney Larry Krasner, calling for not one more child death in Philadelphia. Muldoon tells why she's taken this upon herself, explaining how her neighborhood has changed, telling that lack of policing and new policies have turned her neighborhood upside down. Then, Giordano circles back to a discussion about the gubernatorial and senate races playing out across Pennsylvania, telling whether he believes if Trump will offer an endorsement in the gubernatorial race, similarly to the endorsement of Dr. Mehmet Oz in the senate race. Then, Giordano tells of a legal loophole that the Russians are using to continue exporting and producing oil, telling of the ‘Latvian blend,' which is essentially Russian diesel being branded under another name to bypass sanctions.  (Photo Illustration by Miguel Villagran/Getty Images)

The MeatEater Podcast
Ep. 324: The Latvian Eagle's Heavy-Assed Arrow

The MeatEater Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 28, 2022 143:14 Very Popular


Steven Rinella talks with Janis Putelis, Kevin Gillespie, Brody Henderson, Seth Morris, Chester Floyd, Phil Taylor, and Corinne Schneider.   Topics discussed: hating spouses that make you do a thing with your kids at the expense of doing another thing with your kids that you'd rather do; Dirty Dan jokes; red dot and Jani's video; solar-boosted battery life of 17+ years; Kevin "Giuseppe" Gillespie; The MeatEater Podcast smarter than doctors; South Dakota's pen raised pheasants; a stream access victory in New Mexico; whose mountain lions?; Mingus' resume; a squishy bobcat as Jani's first taxidermy; pronouncing “nilgai”; the definition of a double entendre; jumping the spring; grumpy middle aged men arguing over math and arrow grain weights; Jani the Believer; MeatEater Podcast Ep. 284: The Archer's Paradox; a poop blasting party; our May 3rd Live Show; cooking nilgai; a thick assed hide; Steve's funny pronunciation of “bagel”; Kevin's feral hog holiday ham recipe; and more.   Connect with Steve and MeatEater Steve on Instagram and Twitter MeatEater on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, and Youtube Shop MeatEater Merch See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

SANDCAST: Beach Volleyball with Tri Bourne and Travis Mewhirter
Aleksandrs Samoilovs: 16 years into his career, the Latvian Lion King continues roaring

SANDCAST: Beach Volleyball with Tri Bourne and Travis Mewhirter

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2022 78:08 Very Popular


This episode of SANDCAST: Beach Volleyball with Tri Bourne and Travis Mewhirter, is SUCH A BLAST! On the show this week is Latvian legend Aleksandrs Samoilovs, known to most as the Lion King. A veteran on the World Tour for 16 years now, Samoilovs has achieved more than anyone could have ever imagined, hailing from a tiny country the size of Idaho: three Olympic Games, No. 1 ranking in the world, medals of every color. And he's still playing – and playing dang good volleyball. There was so much to chat about on this episode, including: How Samoilovs was dubbed the Lion King, and his embracing of the nickname A wild story from South Africa in which Samoilovs and Janis Smedins became No. 1 in the world Why working in a bank for two months was all he needed to know that he needed to become a beach volleyball player His ability to entertain and add value to the sport And so, so, so much more. Such a blast with Samoilovs, one of the greatest sportsmen in beach volleyball. ENJOY! *** Like our content? Leave us a tip :) We don't charge a subscription fee, so everything is much appreciated: https://motivated-author-4500.ck.page/products/sandcast-tip-jar We now have SANDCAST MERCHANDISE!! Rock the gear of your favorite podcast today! https://www.sandcastmerch.com/ If you want to receive our SANDCAST weekly newsletter, the Beach Volleyball Digest, which dishes all the biggest news in beach volleyball in one quick newsletter, head over to our website and subscribe! We'd love to have ya! https://www.sandcastvolleyball.com/ This episode, as always, is brought to you by Wilson Volleyball, makers of the absolute best balls in the game, hands down. You can get a 20-percent discount using our code, SANDCAST-20! https://www.wilson.com/en-us/volleyball Check out our book, Volleyball for Milkshakes, written by SANDCAST hosts Tri Bourne and Travis Mewhirter: https://www.amazon.com/Volleyball-Milkshakes-Travis-Mewhirter/dp/B089781SHB