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Substance having an effect on the body

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Best podcasts about Drug

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Latest podcast episodes about Drug

The Stem Cell Podcast
Ep. 210: “Cancer Drug Cardiotoxicity” Featuring Dr. Nazish Sayed

The Stem Cell Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 79:49


Dr. Nazish Sayed is an Assistant Professor of Surgery at the Stanford Cardiovascular Institute. His lab is focused on developing new technologies that drive innovation in regenerative medicine, disease modeling, and drug testing in vascular biology. He talks about developing an inflammatory aging clock, using iPSC-derived endothelial cells to run a clinical trial in a dish, and his experience as a cancer patient.

Incident Report
Vaccine Nonsense, Debunked (w/Dr. Paul Offit)

Incident Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 69:12


Boosters for the young and healthy? Is Pharma dictating public health policy? What's up with VAERS? Did Robert Malone invent the mRNA technology? AND MORE. Transcript, video, and links to more with the amazing Dr. Paul Offit: https://zdoggmd.com/paul-offit-8 Your support keeps us independent and mild-to-moderately awesome: https://zdoggmd.com/supporters and 1-time donations welcome at https://paypal.me/zdoggmd Show, podcast, music, support, shop, social media, and email: https://lnk.bio/zdoggmd Topics covered: 00:00 Intro 01:07 Boosters, the CDC, vaccine advisory committee & 3rd dose drama 05:25 Offit's son, The Atlantic article​, booster coverage & mandates 08:34 4th dose, vaccine politicization, childhood vaccines & the anti-vax movement 16:40 mRNA spacing considerations, tribal loyalty 20:25 Pregnancy & COVID-19 vaccines 23:07 Vaccine safety reporting, VAERS pros & cons, PRISM, Vaccine Safety Datalink 26:58 Drug safety, Pharma dictating public health, vaccine effectiveness 30:40 Walenski and CDC, bureaucratic transparency & swine flu lessons learned 36:34 Yearly COVID-19 vax, Omicron parties, chicken pox tragedies & the role of natural immunity 41:53 COVID-19 testing, policy (who it helps, who it hurts) 44:00 What Robert Malone did (and didn't do) with mRNA technology, what it takes to build a vaccine 51:10 Spike protein misinformation & real-life correlation with mass vaccination 56:25 Myocarditis in adults vs. kids, polio in children 103:00 The Army's "super vaccine", discussion of gain of function research 106:13 Final thoughts

Sandy Rios in the Morning
Sen. Ron Johnson COVID Panel, VAERS Use Multiplied After COVID Vaccine, Big Pharma Controls Drug Recommendations, And End Mandates Rallies

Sandy Rios in the Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 54:14


The Doctor Whisperer - the BUSINESS of medicine
TDW Show feat: Therapist, Brynn Cicippio, discusses 'DOING THE WORK'

The Doctor Whisperer - the BUSINESS of medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 33:53


Tune in on Monday, 1/24/22, at 6:30am EST, to welcome Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, Brynn Cicippio, to The Doctor Whisperer Show! ▪︎ ▪︎ ▪ ABOUT OUR GUEST: Raised by a Philly police officer and a registered nurse, I was born with a passion for helping others. I have diplomas and degrees from Central High, West Chester University and LaSalle University and began my career as a parole officer in Montgomery County, PA. My job was not only to ensure people were following the rules and staying out of trouble, but also getting the support and help they needed and deserved. I saw a gap here and went back to school to become a therapist. I then began my clinical work within the Montgomery County Drug Treatment Court Program, ultimately serving as the clinical coordinator. Drug treatment courts save many lives every day, taking people out of jail and placing them into treatment. In 2012, I opened the doors to my private practice (bcatherapy.com) and continue to serve my community. My practice has grown from a solo venture to now a group of 7 marriage and family therapists, all with a variety of special focuses from addiction recovery to anxiety, depression, parenting challenges, grief and loss, and everything in between. We continue to grow as the need continues to be present. In 2019, with the help of my intern, we launched Devon's Closet. This clothing drive for women in recovery is named for Devon, a young woman who lost her battle with addiction in May 2018. We select a different women's recovery home each year and personally sort and deliver the items to the home, ensuring we are donating dignity, hope, and support for women in recovery from drug and alcohol addiction. The practice slogan "Do The Work" was born out of the challenges people overcome in therapy. It truly takes an incredible amount of work and there cannot be healing without doing the work. Lastly, in addition to being a therapist and a business owner, I am a mother of 3, stepmother to 1, and experienced the death of my father 5 years ago while 7 months pregnant. We all have a story to tell that impacts the work we do and how we show up for others. I want your listeners to know that hope and healing is always an option and it is never too late to Do The Work. ▪︎ ▪︎ ▪︎ Thank you to our incredible sponsor, TieTechnology, for sponsoring the show! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thedoctorwhisperer/message

Harbor
Episode 7: Second Base- Harbor Season 2

Harbor

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 53:34


How far will they go? - harborpodcast.com For mature audiences only, listener discretion advised. Content Warnings: Talk of Death, Fresh Wounds, Bruising, Manipulation, Coarse Language, Sexual Touching, Past Abuse Implications, Spying, Drug-like Effects. CAST Narrator - Kiarra Osakue, Al - Faraday Roke, Sedum - Marcus Cannello, Leah - M. Kate McCulloch, Samson - Z Reklaw, William - Jonathan Hallowell, Becker - Cory Moosman,Crux - John Peacock, Valen - Samantha Weiler, Liwroc - Jenna Melissa Wilcox, Roose - Jacque Reiman, J - Joseph Rathorn. CREW Script Editor, Jacque Reiman. Assistant Director and Script Editor, Joseph Rothorn. Written, Directed, and Edited by Faraday Roke. Harbor is a production of Tartarus Jenny Studios.  Thanks so much for listening to the show. Wanna help us out? Write a review! We also have some spiffy merch at our website, harborpodcast.com, as well as a donation link.  And of course, please tell your friends, family, good-natured weirdos, and local cryptids about us- each new ear is a great gift. Stay kind! Opening Music: Five Tribes by Hunter Quinn. Playout Music: Where To Next by Ritchie Everett. Thanks to Epidemic Sound.

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 01.20.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 59:57


Magnesium is essential for the immune system, including in the fight against cancer University of Basel (Switzerland), January 19, 2022 Previous studies have shown that cancerous growths spread faster in the bodies of mice when the animals received a low-magnesium diet – and that their defense against flu viruses was also impaired. However, there has so far been little research into how exactly this mineral affects the immune system. Now, researchers have discovered that T cells can eliminate abnormal or infected cells efficiently only in a magnesium-rich environment. Specifically, magnesium is important for the function of a T cell surface protein called LFA-1. (NEXT) More lycopene linked to longer lives for people with metabolic syndrome University of Nebraska Medical Center, January 16, 2022 Higher blood levels of lycopene may reduce the risk of mortality in people with metabolic syndrome, says a new study from the University of Nebraska Medical Center. Lycopene is an antioxidant that is present in red- and pink-colored fruits and vegetables. As well as being used as a food coloring, it is also used in supplements and functional foods and beverages. New data published in Nutrition Research suggests that higher serum levels of lycopene were associated with greater survival times for people with metabolic syndrome, compared to low serum levels. (NEXT) Too much sugar during adolescence may alter brain's reward circuits European Journal of Neuroscience, January 19, 2022 A new study in rats may provide significant insights into the long-term impacts of over-consumption of sugary foods during adolescence. The study shows that the enjoyment of such foods later in adulthood is reduced in those who over-consumed early in life. Investigators found that this decrease in reward relates to reduced activity in one of the key hubs of the brain's reward circuitry, called the nucleus accumbens. Such long-lasting alterations could have important implications for reward-related disorders such as substance abuse or eating disorders. (NEXT) Unveiled the epigenetic mechanism by which vitamin D modulates the tolerance of the immune system Josep Carreras Leukaemia Research Institute (Germany), January 19, 2022 In autoimmunity, the mechanisms that guarantee that our defense system does not attack our own body - tolerance to oneself - does not work properly. Multiple sclerosis, which affects one in every 1,000 people in Spain, is a serious autoimmune disease in which the immune system attacks the myelin sheath of some types of neurons, causing progressive neurological disability. Dr. Esteban Ballestar, leader of the Epigenetics and immune diseases group at the Josep Carrreras Leukaemia Research Institute, and Dr. Eva Martínez-Cáceres, leader of the Immunopathology group at the IGTP-Hospital Germans Trias i Pujol, have recently published in the prestigious journal Cell Reports the mechanism by which vitamin D activates the tolerance program of dendritic cells. (NEXT) Study links poor sleep in seniors to more severe arteriosclerosis University of Toronto, January 19, 2022 Poor sleep quality in older people is associated with more severe arteriosclerosis in the brain as well as a greater burden of oxygen-starved tissue (infarcts) in the brain, both of which can contribute to the risk of stroke and cognitive impairment, according to the newest findings reported in the American Heart Association's journal Stroke. The relationship between cardiovascular disease and so-called "fragmented" sleep has been studied in the past, but this is the first study to look specifically for an association between sleep fragmentation and detailed microscopic measures of blood vessel damage and infarcts in autopsied brain tissue from the same individuals. Fragmented sleep occurs when sleep is interrupted by repeated awakenings or arousals. In this study, sleep was disrupted on average almost seven times per hour. Researchers found that greater sleep fragmentation was associated with 27 percent higher odds of having severe arteriosclerosis. Moreover, for each additional two arousals during one hour of sleep, researchers reported a 30 percent increase in the odds that subjects had visible signs of oxygen deprivation in their brain. (OTHER NEWS) America's New Class War Chris Hedges, January 18, 2022 There is one last hope for the United States. It does not lie in the ballot box. It lies in the union organizing and strikes by workers at Amazon, Starbucks, Uber, Lyft, John Deere, Kellogg, the Special Metals plant in Huntington, West Virginia, owned by Berkshire Hathaway, the Northwest Carpenters Union, Kroger, teachers in Chicago, West Virginia, Oklahoma and Arizona, fast-food workers, hundreds of nurses in Worcester, Massachusetts, and the members of the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees. Organized workers, often defying their timid union leadership, are on the march across the United States. Over four million workers, about 3% of the work force, mostly from accommodation and food services, healthcare and social assistance, transportation, housing, and utilities have walked away from jobs, rejecting poor pay along with punishing and risky working conditions. There is a growing consensus – 68% in a recent Gallup poll with that number climbing to 77% of those between the ages of 18 and 34 – that the only way left to alter the balance of power and force concessions from the ruling capitalist class is to mobilize and strike, although only 9% of the U.S. work force is unionized. Forget the woke Democrats. This is a class war. The Democratic Party will not push through the kind of radical New Deal reforms that in the 1930s staved off fascism and communism. Its empty political theater, which stretches back to the Clinton administration, was on full display in Atlanta when Biden called for revoking the filibuster to pass the Freedom to Vote Act and the John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act, knowing that his chances of success are zero. Georgia Democratic gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams, along with several of the state's voting rights groups, boycotted the event in a very public rebuke. They were acutely aware of Biden's cynical ploy. When the Democrats were in the minority, they clung to the filibuster like a life raft. Then Sen. Barack Obama, along with other Democrats, campaigned for it to remain in place. And a few days ago, the Democratic leadership employed the filibuster to block legislation proposed by Sen. Ted Cruz. The Democrats have been full partners in the dismantling of our democracy, refusing to banish dark and corporate money from the electoral process and governing, as Obama did, through presidential executive actions, agency “guidance,” notices and other regulatory dark matter that bypass Congress. The Democrats, who helped launch and perpetuate our endless wars, were also co-architects of trade deals such as NAFTA, expanded surveillance of citizens, militarized police, the largest prison system in the world and a raft of anti-terrorism laws such as Special Administrative Measures (SAMs) that abolish nearly all rights, including due process and attorney-client privilege, to allow suspects to be convicted and imprisoned with secret evidence they and their lawyers are not permitted to see. The squandering of staggering resources to the military — $777.7 billion a year — passed in the Senate with an 89-10 vote and in the House of Representatives with a 363-70 vote, coupled with the $80 billion spent annually on the intelligence agencies has made the military and the intelligence services, many run by private contractors such as Booz Allen Hamilton, nearly omnipotent. The Democrats long ago walked out on workers and unions. The Democratic governor of Maine, Janet Mills, for example, killed a bill a few days ago that would have allowed farm workers in the state to unionize. On all the major structural issues there is no difference between the Republicans and the Democrats. The longer the Democratic Party does not deliver real reforms to ameliorate the economic hardship, exacerbated by soaring inflation rates, the more it feeds the frustration of many of its supporters, widespread apathy (there are 80 million eligible voters, a third of the electorate, who do not cast ballots) and the hatred of the “liberal” elites stoked by Donald Trump's cultish Republican Party. Its signature infrastructure package, Build Back Better, when you read the fine print, is yet another infusion of billions of government money into corporate bank accounts. This should not surprise anyone, given who funds and controls the Democratic Party. The rapacious pillage by the elites, many of whom bankroll the Democratic Party, has accelerated since the financial crash of 2008 and the pandemic. Wall Street banks recorded record profits for 2021. As the Financial Times noted, they milked the underwriting fees from Fed-based borrowing and profited from mergers and acquisitions. They have pumped their profits, fueled by roughly $5 trillion in Fed spending since the beginning of the pandemic, as Matt Taibbi points out, into massive pay bonuses and stock buybacks. “The bulk of this new wealth—most—is being converted into compensation for a handful of executives,” Taibbi writes. “Buybacks have also been rampant in defense, pharmaceuticals, and oil & gas, all of which also just finished their second straight year of record, skyrocketing profits. We're now up to about 745 billionaires in the U.S., who've collectively seen their net worth grow about $2.1 trillion to $5 trillion since March 2020, with almost all that wealth increase tied to the Fed's ballooning balance sheet.” Kroger is typical. The corporation, which operates some 2,800 stores under different brands, including Baker's, City Market, Dillons, Food 4 Less, Foods Co., Fred Meyer, Fry's, Gerbes, Jay C Food Store, King Soopers, Mariano's, Metro Market, Pay-Less Super Markets, Pick'n Save, QFC, Ralphs, Ruler and Smith's Food and Drug, earned $4.1 billion in profits in 2020. By the end of the third quarter of 2021, it had $2.28 billion in cash, an increase of $399 million in the first quarter of 2020. Kroger CEO Rodney McMullen made over $22 million, nearly doubling the $12 million he made in 2018. This is over 900 times the salary of the average Kroger worker. Kroger in the first three quarters of 2021 also spent an estimated $1.3 billion on stock buybacks. Class struggle defines most of human history. Marx got this right. It is not a new story. The rich, throughout history, have found ways to subjugate and re-subjugate the masses. And the masses, throughout history, have cyclically awoken to throw off their chains. (NEXT) Was Peter Daszak Working For The Central Intelligence Agency? Kanekoa, January 18, 2022 “We found other coronaviruses in bats, a whole host of them, some of them looked very similar to SARS. So we sequenced the spike protein: the protein that attaches to cells. Then we… Well, I didn't do this work, but my colleagues in China did the work. You create pseudo particles, you insert the spike proteins from those viruses, see if they bind to human cells. At each step of this, you move closer and closer to this virus could really become pathogenic in people. You end up with a small number of viruses that really do look like killers." This statement was said by EcoHealth Alliance President Peter Daszak at a 2016 forum discussing “emerging infectious diseases and the next pandemic”. Daszak, who received more than $118 million in grants and contracts from federal agencies, including $53 million from USAID, $42 million from DOD, and $15 million from HHS, appeared to boast about the manipulation of “killer” SARS-like coronaviruses carried out by his “colleagues in China” at the now infamous Wuhan Institute of Virology. According to investigative research done by independent-journalist Sam Husseini and The Intercept, much of the money awarded to EcoHealth Alliance did not focus on health or ecology, but rather on biowarfare, bioterrorism, and other dangerous uses of deadly pathogens. EcoHealth Alliance received the majority of its funding from the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), a State Department subsidiary that serves as a frequent cover for the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). Their second largest source of funding was from the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), which is a branch of the Department of Defense (DOD) which states it is tasked to “counter and deter weapons of mass destruction and improvised threat networks.” The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) has a long history of acting as a contract vehicle for various CIA covert activities. With an annual budget of over $27 billion and operations in over 100 countries, one former USAID director, John Gilligan, once admitted it was “infiltrated from top to bottom with CIA people.” Gilligan explained that “the idea was to plant operatives in every kind of activity we had overseas; government, volunteer, religious, every kind.” From 2009 to 2019, USAID partnered with EcoHealth Alliance on their PREDICT program which identified over 1,200 new viruses, including over 160 coronavirus strains; trained roughly 5,000 people around the world to identify new diseases; and improved or developed 60 research laboratories. What better way for the CIA to collect intelligence on the world's biological warfare capabilities? Dr. Andrew Huff received his Ph.D. in Environmental Health specializing in emerging diseases before becoming an Associate Vice President at EcoHealth Alliance, where he developed novel methods of bio-surveillance, data analytics, and visualization for disease detection. On January 12, 2022, Dr. Andrew Huff issued a public statement (on Twitter) in which he claimed, Peter Daszak, the President of EcoHealth Alliance, told him that he was working for the CIA. Dr. Huff continued, “…I wouldn't be surprised if the CIA / IC community orchestrated the COVID coverup acting as an intermediary between Fauci, Collins, Daszak, Baric, and many others. At best, it was the biggest criminal conspiracy in US history by bureaucrats or political appointees.” In February 2020, Daszak told University of North Carolina coronavirus researcher Dr. Ralph Baric that they should not sign the statement condemning the lab-leak theory so that it seems more independent and credible. “You, me and him should not sign this statement, so it has some distance from us and therefore doesn't work in a counterproductive way,” Daszak wrote. More unredacted emails have revealed that while these scientists held the private belief that the lab release was the most likely scenario, they still worked to seed the natural origin narrative for the public through the papers published in Nature Medicineand The Lancet. If Dr. Andrew Huff is telling the truth, Fauci, Collins, and Daszak might be covering up the lab origin not only for themselves, but also for the Central Intelligence Agency, the Department of Defense, and the U.S. Government.

Unsugarcoated with Aalia and Alex
E70: Challenges Facing the Cannabis Industry in 2022 with Matt Gray

Unsugarcoated with Aalia and Alex

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 50:35


In Episode 70, Matt Gray and our host tackle the challenges the cannabis industry is facing in the coming year along with his story of becoming a cannabis entrepreneur and the CEO of Herb. Matt shares his passion for natural remedies and the positive impacts of cannabis on ailments both mental and physical (7:30). However, there is still a great stigma around cannabis use. Matt uses Herb as a platform to educate his audience and works with The Last Prisoner Project, a nonprofit organization with the mission to free those incarcerated for cannabis-related charges (12:40). He believes in finding your passion by taking a stand for what you believe in and making a change (23:55). Listen to hear more about Matt's business journey into the booming cannabis industry, the legality around cannabis, and his secrets to success! Like, comment, and subscribe! Stay connected with your host on IG: @aalia_unsugarcoated Connect with Matt Gray: IG: @matthgrayCheck out Herb at: www.herb.coUNSUGARCOATED Media is a 501c3 non-profit media production enterprise, using podcasts, print publications, short documentaries, and more to tell stories of empowerment in the face of adversity and trauma. For more information on our goals, content, and live events please visit www.UNSUGARCOATEDMedia.com.

Tradeoffs
Medicare's Unprecedented Alzheimer's Drug Decision

Tradeoffs

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 24:50


Last week, Medicare took an unprecedented step to restrict patients' access to the first new Alzheimer's disease treatment in nearly 20 years. We talk with a doctor, a patient and a former federal official about this unusual move and its wide-ranging implications.Guests:Jay Reinstein, Alzheimer's disease patient and advocateSharon Sha, MD, MS, Clinical Associate Professor of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford UniversitySean Tunis, MD, MSc, Senior Fellow, Tufts Center for Evaluation of Value and Risk in Health, former FDA advisor and former CMS officialRead a full transcript and dig deeper into the issues explored in today's episode on our website.Support this type of journalism today by making a donation.Sign up for our weekly newsletter to see what research health policy experts are reading right now, plus recommendations from our staff.Follow us on Twitter. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Tabletop Squadron
S2 Episode 41: Camp Swamp

Tabletop Squadron

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 50:51


The crew joins the mysterious stranger for dinner and a light action montage. Transcript Not Yet Available   Content Warnings Sexual suggestions and scenarios Drug and alcohol use Strong Language Violence, injury, death Music Credits Whispers Of Celli by Tim Kulig Link: https://filmmusic.io/song/8810-whispers-of-celli License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license Adventures In Adventureland by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://filmmusic.io/song/8287-adventures-in-adventureland License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license Lurking Sloth by Alexander Nakarada Link: https://filmmusic.io/song/4785-lurking-sloth License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license The Builder by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4484-the-builder License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license Little Trolls by Frank Schröter Link: https://filmmusic.io/song/8104-little-trolls License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license Stalker by Rafael Krux Link: https://filmmusic.io/song/5413-stalker- License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license Living Voyage by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3985-living-voyage License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license Light by Frank Schröter Link: https://filmmusic.io/song/8822-light License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license Action Sport Breakbeat by WinnieTheMoog Link: https://filmmusic.io/song/6391-action-sport-breakbeat License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license Glimpse of Eternity by Meydän Link: http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Meydan/Havor/1-_Glimpse_of_Eternity_1635 License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ Rollercoaster (ID 1437) by Lobo Loco is licensed under a Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Lobo_Loco/hamburg-lights/rollercoaster-id-1437 Breaktime by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://filmmusic.io/song/3457-breaktime License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license

fullbuddycast
Hollerin with Hollenbeck: Catching Up, Covid, 5 year old Skateboard, Joey's Dad, Viagra Miracle Drug, FOOOOD!, Shout Outs

fullbuddycast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 41:48


Hollerin with Hollenbeck: Catching Up, Covid, 5 year old Skateboard, Joey's Dad, Viagra Miracle Drug, FOOOOD!, Shout Outs  

The Best of The OG with Ovies & Giglio
Hey Joe, why are UNC fans so angry? And does Rex Ryan need to be drug tested?

The Best of The OG with Ovies & Giglio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 19:29


Hey Joe, why are UNC fans so angry? And does Rex Ryan need to be drug tested?  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

This Is Purdue
Purdue-Discovered Drug Strengthens Fight Against Cancer

This Is Purdue

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 37:08


In this episode of This Is Purdue, we're featuring a Boilermaker whose innovations are changing and saving lives across the world. Philip Low, Purdue University's Presidential Scholar for Drug Discovery and the Ralph C. Corley Distinguished Professor of Chemistry, developed a recently FDA-approved drug called Cytalux, a fluorescent marker that allows cancer surgeons to quickly identify malignant cells and remove them during surgery. Listen in as Professor Low discusses how the drug works, why the team started using this drug on ovarian cancer patients first, and what attracted him to innovation at Purdue University. (Hint: He's been a Boilermaker since birth!)

The Jimmy Rex Show
#322 - Shaahin Cheyene - Iranian Immigrant & Founder Of Herbal Ecstasy Sold Over A Billion Dollars Of Product In The 90's

The Jimmy Rex Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 39:20


Guest Bio:Shaahin Cheyene is one of the world's top Amazon consultants, an award winning business mogul, author and filmmaker. Cheyene is currently the founder of a brain nutrition startup Accelerated Intelligence where he is positioning the enterprise to be the forerunner in the brain nutrition supplements market.Shaahin Cheyene is the quintessential American success story, immigrating to America from Iran in 1980. As a teenager in the 1990's Shaahin went from sleeping in his car to building a multimillion-dollar empire that spanned the globe by the age of 18 and began the “Smart Drug Movement” with his invention of Herbal Ecstasy, an energizing, herbal supplement designed to stimulate the body. With Herbal Ecstasy, Shaahin founded his first business venture earning him an international reputation and garnering the fierce attention of federal authorities.Now, Shaahin is looked to as a top Amazon consultant with a business that helps others get into the world of Amazon.

Wirkstoffradio (MP3 Feed)
WSR049-Drug Repurposing: Nafamostat gegen COVID-19 - Interview mit Prof. Dr. Armin Braun

Wirkstoffradio (MP3 Feed)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 111:08


In dieser Episode sprechen Prof. Dr. Armin Braun vom ITEM und Bernd Rupp über Drug Repurosing und hier speziell die Anwendung von Nafamostat in der Therapie von COVID-19.

TRENDIFIER with Julian Dorey
#82 - Amanda Leve: MMA, Jiu Jitsu & Taking Down A Girl Double Her Size; Society Is Soft; The Spread of Propaganda; JFK, WWII & Time Travel

TRENDIFIER with Julian Dorey

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 189:53


Amanda Leve is a world-class martial artist. She is currently the 6th-Ranked No-Gi Grappling / Brazilian Jiu Jitsu Fighter globally (Women's 145 LB+ Division). Furthermore, Leve is also a PFL professional MMA Fighter. ***TIMESTAMPS*** 0:00 - Intro; The Sheik's are big Jiu Jitsu guys; Amanda's dad was crazy for Jiu Jitsu; The discipline MMA & Jiu Jitsu instills; Texas of course says everything goes in MMA; Participation trophy culture; Talking S–t & The Confidence Gene in fighters 25:50 - Amanda talks about her famous recent takedown of 270 pounder, Gabi Garcia; recapping the Pre-fight press conference with Gabi; Drug testing; How good is USADA these days?; How fast did Gabi realize she was bread in a toaster?; Talking weight differences and the Logan Paul Floyd Mayweather example in boxing; Biggest MMA bases around the world; UFC, Bellator, & PFL Promotions 49:00 - Society has gone soft; Why Amanda thinks kids should be allowed to fight; Safety Culture and its damage on kids; The Pandemic's effect on kids and schools; Amanda talks about Malcolm Gladwell's theory on the Chinese numerical system (Outliers); Environments mold people 1:06:52 - Amanda & Julian talk about their alcohol of choice; Rising Sommeliers and their desire to change the “class culture” around wine (“Dining With Skyler” & Skyler Bouchard Oppenheim's fight against wine snobbery) 1:14:42 - Amanda often thinks about the normal world pre-Pandemic; Why Amanda hates social media's hold on society; Amanda loves all conspiracies; Oliver Stone's new JFK Documentary; Julian tells a story about JFK's assassination that he heard from a guy who knew a guy who knew a guy so it's probably not reliable; China and the CCP's regime; The state of America's school system; Mixing the positives of opposite ideologies to fix poverty; The applicability of school curriculums 1:42:42 - Amanda and Julian talk history; WWII & The Holocaust; The Terrifying Quick rise of Hitler in Germany and why it happened; Amanda talks about visiting the Holocaust Museum; How vulnerable is society to falling for an authoritarian regime with psycho beliefs?; Amanda has never watched Inglourious Basterds and that is incredibly disappointing to hear; Hitler conspiracies and the ratlines; Why people can't exist without war 1:59:58 - The stress level of being a spy; Julian does a Departed impression; Amanda tells a story about the British tricking the Germans in WWII; BS meters and conspiracies; Amanda and Julian discuss propaganda; Julian gives a wild theory on the repetition of a specific word in the media over the past couple months; Politicians today vs. a decade ago; The desperation that has formed across society over the past 15-20 years 2:17:58 - Back to JFK for a minute (CIA & The Mafia); The Vatican Documents; The UFO Docs; Julian's friend Alessi's work producing James Fox's upcoming UFO documentary; Amanda discusses the Egyptians, the pyramids, and the aliens who built them; Julian wants to go back in time to have a chat with the Jesus guy and see what's what; Dinosaurs and Hippos; True Crime and Serial Killer obsession in modern culture 2:35:22 - Amanda talks about why fighting is like a drug; When the fear leaves Amanda's system; Amanda talks about why preparation is the most important thing for a fighter; Amanda's mindset coach; The weight cutting process 2:56:40 - How Amanda diagrammed Gabi Garcia's strategy; Julian and Amanda discuss the he similarities between Jiu Jitsu and how Lions hunt Giraffes; why Kobe Bryant studied Great White Sharks; How do people not drink water?; Dealing with hangovers; Amanda's upcoming fight schedule   ~ YouTube EPISODES & CLIPS: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0A-v_DL-h76F75xik8h03Q  ~ PRIVADO VPN FOR $4.99/Month: https://privadovpn.com/trendifier/#a_aid=Julian   Get $100 Off The Eight Sleep Pod Pro Mattress / Mattress Cover: https://eight-sleep.ioym.net/trendifier  Julian's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/julianddorey  ~ Beat provided by: https://freebeats.io  Music Produced by White Hot

Angelo Cataldi And The Morning Team

The second hour of the show. Brandon Graham joins Jon Johnson. The crew talks Eagles-Bucs

Something Was Wrong
[Ari] If I Can't Have Him, No One Can

Something Was Wrong

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 53:24


This week survivor Ari shares Part 1 of her story. *Content warning: This episode contains descriptions of emotional and physical violence, and Substance Use Disorder.**Resources: The Domestic Violence Hotline offers free and confidential support, 24/7 at 1.800.799.SAFE (7233), text "START" to 88788 or chat with someone confidentially at https://www.thehotline.orgThe National Coalition Against Domestic Violence (NCADV)'s mission is to lead, mobilize and raise our voices to support efforts that demand a change of conditions that lead to domestic violence such as patriarchy, privilege, racism, sexism, and classism. We are dedicated to supporting survivors and holding offenders accountable and supporting advocates. https://ncadv.org/contact-usSAMHSA's National Helpline is a confidential, free, 24-hour-a-day, 365-day-a-year, information service, available in English and Spanish, for individuals and family members facing mental and/or substance use disorders at 1-800-662-4357. This service provides referrals to local treatment facilities, support groups, and community-based organizations. Callers can also order free publications and other information.For more free mental health resources, please visit SomethingWasWrong.com/Resources Sources:Mayo Clinic: Drugs and Supplements: Oxycodone And Acetaminophen Dec. 01, 2021 (Drug information provided by: IBM Micromedex)**Something Was Wrong's theme song was originally composed by Glad Rags and is covered this season by Kenna and the Kings. Support and listen to Kenna and the Kings on  Spotify, YouTube , and check out their albums!

“Fishing After Dark” W/ The Beard & The Badge
Ep. 38 AYO confronts LOJO about his DRUG PROBLEM?!

“Fishing After Dark” W/ The Beard & The Badge

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 59:58


Today Andrew #2 joins the podcast to discuss LOJO's apparent drug problem

Squawk on the Street
Markets Shrug Off Hot Inflation Data, the Financials on a Record Run, and Has the Nasdaq Bottomed? Plus: Biogen Slumps on Medicare and Alzheimer's Drug News: Reaction from the CEO of Novartis

Squawk on the Street

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 43:51


Carl Quintanilla, Jim Cramer and David Faber on inflation watch: Markets rise despite data showing consumer prices up 7% in December from a year ago. Cramer offered his perspective on how Fed Chair Jerome Powell is handling inflation in wake of Tuesday's re-confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill. The anchors also reacted to what Domino's CEO Richard Allison told CNBC about how he sees the inflation picture. Also in focus: The financial sector's record run ahead of big bank earnings, Nasdaq coming off its best day in three weeks: Has it bottomed? Dish Network shares jump on reports it is in merger talks with DirecTV, DoorDash CEO Tony Xu joins the board of Facebook parent Meta and Biogen shares tumble on Medicare decided it would only cover the company's Alzheimer's drug under certain conditions. On day three of the J.P. Morgan Healthcare conference, Meg Tirrell interviewed Novartis CEO Vas Narasimhan about everything from its licensing of a COVID drug to Medicare's decision on covering Biogen's Alzheimer's drug.

Celebrate Recovery Podcast
Scott Stubbert: Step 12 Yes

Celebrate Recovery Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 33:44


Sofa King Podcast
Episode 630: Cocaine: One Hell of a Drug!

Sofa King Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 108:01


On this episode of the Sofa King Podcast, we talk about one hell of a drug, Cocaine! It releases more dopamine than any other natural drug into the human brain—way more than even sex. Cocaine made German scientists stick needles in their own eyes, and killed John Belushi, Chris Farley, Mitch Hedberg, and River Phoenix! We talk about its past, its ties with Coca-Cola, when it was purified, and what methods the cartels use to smuggle it into America. If you want a little booger sugar, give this one a listen…   Visit Our Sources: https://www.justice.gov/archive/ndic/pubs3/3951/3951p.pdf https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CIA_involvement_in_Contra_cocaine_trafficking https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cocaine https://list25.com/25-facts-about-cocaine-that-you-probably-didnt-know/ https://www.samhsa.gov/data/sites/default/files/report_2361/ShortReport-2361.html https://www.kickassfacts.com/cocaine-facts/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coca-Cola#Use_of_stimulants_in_formula http://defamer.gawker.com/remember-when-tim-allen-almost-got-a-life-sentence-for-1682644188 https://darwinawards.com/darwin/darwin1993-04.html

Lisa Paige Made Me Do It
Milk Water Anyone?

Lisa Paige Made Me Do It

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 22:41


Hi again!Today I'm going through a few of my new finds from the past few weeks. I love recording episodes like this. SO MUCH FUN!!Products/companies mentioned on todays show:Project 7 licorice twistsKristina Wright Jewelry Follow Kristina on IG HERESkin Pharm Follow Skin Farm on IG HEREPlease help me find bath & bodyworks COCONUT SNOWFLAKE candle. It's an older scent but I'm so desperate to track another jar down. Thank you in advance for your help!I bought the glow factor, mineral tinted spf, eye sculpt and papaya enzyme cleanser. I'll let you know how I like everything next week!Nutrafol is saving my hair! If you're dealing with thinning hair, this product is for you! Drug free, clinically tested and absolutely no weird jitters. You'll save 15% on your first months subscription when you enter "Lisa" at check out. Oh, and free shipping. Boom!For everything else, go to LPMMDIFollow me on IG HERESee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Unfazed and Unbothered
Camo's Viral Karen Video & Drug Freakouts

Unfazed and Unbothered

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 52:35


It's a new year, so there's a lot to catch you up on! Tasia gives you an update on her driving journey and postpartum. They swap a few stories about either taking too much of some kind of a drug, or watching someone else freak out after doing too much. Plus, Camo addresses the drama and controversy of a viral TikTok video he posted on Christmas Eve. Camo talks about the backlash from people without knowing the context of the video, and the truth behind the background of the video and the various homophobic interactions with the woman at the mall. Watch the Karen video here! When you go to THEPILLCLUB.COM/UNFAZED, The Pill Club is offering a $10 donation to Bedsider.org for every Unfazed and Unbothered listener who becomes a patient. Your donation will help low-income individuals get access to birth control through Bedsider.org Watch "Unfazed and Unbothered" on YouTube If you like the show, telling a friend about it would be helpful! You can text, email, Tweet, or send this link to a friend: https://bit.ly/UnfazedandUnbotheredPodcast Follow Tasia on TikTok Follow Camo on TikTok Follow Tasia on IG Follow Camo on IG Follow Camo on YouTube Listen to Camo's music on Spotify  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Tabletop Squadron
S2 Episode 40: Safe Travels

Tabletop Squadron

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 37:32


The crew makes their way to the isolated swamp planet of Dagobah in the search of the 7th Artifact. Transcript Not Yet Available Content Warnings Brief drowning sequence Sexual suggestions and scenarios Drug and alcohol use Strong Language Violence, injury, death Music Credits Tale on the Late (Main Theme) by Komiku is licensed under a CC0 1.0 Universal License. http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Komiku/Tale_on_the_Late/Komiku_-_Tale_on_the_Late_-_01_Tale_on_the_Late_Main_Theme All This by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3351-all-this License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license House of Evil by Jason Shaw on Audionautix.com is released under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License Forest jungle nature dark Atmo by szegvari This work is licensed under the Creative Commons 0 License. https://freesound.org/s/578056/ Leopard Print Elevator by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3974-leopard-print-elevator License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license Horror Drone #1 by Jason Shaw on AudionautiX is released under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License Audionautix.com High Tension by Jason Shaw on Audionautix.com is released under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License Suspense Action by Jason Shaw on Audionautix.com is released under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License

The John Batchelor Show
San Francisco fentanyl haven. Lee E Ohanian @HooverInst @HooverInst @lee_ohanian

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 9:29


Photo:  Drug store. Seneca, Kansas San Francisco fentanyl haven. Lee E Ohanian @HooverInst   @HooverInst @lee_ohanian https://www.hoover.org/research/economics-how-san-franciscos-drug-policies-are-devastating-city Lee E. Ohanian  @HooverInst @lee_ohanian, senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution and professor of economics and director of the Ettinger Family Program in Macroeconomic Research at the University of California.

Bold Alpha
Führer Fauci Should Be Tried, Media Touts Expensive Pfizer Drug & Libs Vacation In Florida

Bold Alpha

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 77:55


Führer Fauci should be tried for Crimes Against Humanity, the media and Medical Industrial Complex now touting the expensive new Pfizer miracle drug while hypocrite liberal fearmongers flock to Florida for vacation.

Corporate Crime Reporter Morning Minute
Wednesday January 5, 2022 Decision Looms That Could Determine Fate of Alzheimer's Drug

Corporate Crime Reporter Morning Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 1:00


Wednesday January 5, 2022 Decision Looms That Could Determine Fate of Alzheimer's Drug

Berlin Briefing
05.01.2022 - Senate meeting, Flexticket, Ban results, Drug checking

Berlin Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 12:29


- Senate meeting - Flexticket - Ban results - Drug checking ** Please check out the show notes for the links to our sources. Donate: https://www.berlinbriefing.de/donate/ Twitter: @berlinbriefing Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BerlinBriefing/ Mail: berlinbriefing@gmail.com

MoneyBall Medicine
At the Cutting Edge of Computational Precision Medicine, with Rafael Rosengarten

MoneyBall Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 43:38


Genialis, led by CEO Rafael Rosengarten, is one of the companies working toward a future where there are no more one-size-fits-all drugs—where, instead, every patient gets matched with the best drug for them based on their disease subtype, as measured by gene-sequence and gene-expression data. Analyzing that data—what Rosengarten calls "computational precision medicine"—is already helping drug developers identify the patients who are most likely to respond to experimental medicines. Not long  from now, the same technology could help doctors diagnose patients in the clinic, and/or feed back into drug discovery by providing more biological targets for biopharma companies to hit."Our commitment to biomarker-driven drug development is very principled," Rosengarten tells Harry. "There are some amazing drugs out there that, when they work, work miracles. But they don't work that often. Some work in maybe 15 percent of the patients or 20 percent. If you could tell which of those patients are going to respond, then at least the ones who aren't can seek other options, and we would know that we've got to develop [new] drugs for the others." Please rate and review The Harry Glorikian Show on Apple Podcasts! Here's how to do that from an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch:1. Open the Podcasts app on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac. 2. Navigate to The Harry Glorikian Show podcast. You can find it by searching for it or selecting it from your library. Just note that you'll have to go to the series page which shows all the episodes, not just the page for a single episode.3. Scroll down to find the subhead titled "Ratings & Reviews."4. Under one of the highlighted reviews, select "Write a Review."5. Next, select a star rating at the top — you have the option of choosing between one and five stars. 6. Using the text box at the top, write a title for your review. Then, in the lower text box, write your review. Your review can be up to 300 words long.7. Once you've finished, select "Send" or "Save" in the top-right corner. 8. If you've never left a podcast review before, enter a nickname. Your nickname will be displayed next to any reviews you leave from here on out. 9. After selecting a nickname, tap OK. Your review may not be immediately visible.That's it! Thanks so much.Full TranscriptHarry Glorikian: Hello. I'm Harry Glorikian. Welcome to The Harry Glorikian Show, the interview podcast that explores how technology is changing everything we know about healthcare.Artificial intelligence. Big data. Predictive analytics. In fields like these, breakthroughs are happening way faster than most people realize. If you want to be proactive about your own health and the health of your loved ones, you'll need to learn everything you can about how medicine is changing and how you can take advantage of all the new options.Explaining this approaching world is the mission of my new book, The Future You. And it's also our theme here on the show, where we bring you conversations with the innovators, caregivers, and patient advocates who are transforming the healthcare system and working to push it in positive directions.For most people, the genomics revolution still feels pretty distant, like something that's happening off in the ivory towers of big pharma companies or research universities.But say, heaven forbid, you get diagnosed with cancer next week. All of a sudden you're going to want to get very familiar with your own genome. Because thanks to the Human Genome Project and all the new tools for sequencing and analyzing genes, we know today that there are many different forms of cancer. And each one may respond to a different type of medicine. So before you and your doctor can decide which medicines will work best for you, you really need to know which genes and mutations you carry and how they're expressed in your cells.Drug companies need similar data when they're testing new drugs. Because if they happen to test a drug on a population of people who happen to have the wrong genes to respond to that drug, they could wind up throwing away a medicine that would work perfectly well on people who have the right genes.The problem is that all of this gene sequencing and expression testing generates incredible amounts of data. And doctors and hospitals and even big pharma companies aren't always set up to understand or analyze that data.My guest this week is the CEO of a company that's helping with that problem. His name is Rafael Rosengarten. And his company Genialis has built a software platform that organizes and analyzes data from high-throughput gene sequencing and RNA expression assays. We'll talk more about what all those terms mean. But what you need to know is that Genialis is one of the companies on the cutting edge of translating genetic data into actionable predictions. Those predictions are already helping biotech and pharma companies get drugs to market faster. And in the near future they could help doctors funnel patients toward the right treatments. I wrote a whole chapter on this stuff for my new book, The Future You. So it was really fun to talk it through all of it with Rafael. Here's our conversation.Harry Glorikian: Rafael, welcome to the show.Rafael Rosengarten: Thanks for having me, Harry.Harry Glorikian: For those listeners that don't have backgrounds in, say, computational biology or drug development, could you define a few terms that are probably going to come up later in our discussion? I mean, first, you know, maybe define next-generation sequencing or this term we call NGS. What is next-generation about?Rafael Rosengarten: Sure, I'd be happy to do that, let me start by just kind of saying what Genialis is with some jargon in the words, and then I'll define the jargon for you. Okay. So Genialis is computational precision medicine. So what that means is we're really interested in matching patients to therapies, right? And we use data about the molecular biology of patients' diseases to do that. And our favorite kind of data to work with come from next generation sequencing. So next generation sequencing, often abbreviated as NGS, although we've been doing that for 15 years now, we probably just need to call it this-generation sequencing, is a technology where you can get the genetic information of the entire, say, genome or the transcriptome, that's the expression [for] which genes are expressed, and you get literally every base pair off of a machine that reads the DNA or RNA from cells in our body. And with that information, you do some fancy computation that, frankly, a lot of that's now fairly commoditized. And it kind of maps all of the individual bits of data into what we think we know about the human genome. And so you can say, OK, we've got this much of this gene and that much of this gene or you can say, you know, Gene A has certain mutations and Gene B has other mutations. And so it allows you to ask whether whether they're mutations or changes in the amount of certain molecules and so forth. But you get to do it for all the genes and not only all the genes you can do it for, [but] for all the space in between the genes in the genome.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I you know, it's funny because just the other day there was the announcement that we quote "actually finished" the entire genome, which I thought was an interesting announcement. One more definition. So this term RNAseq, right? So, you know, drawing the analogy of DNA and saying, OK, RNA is the next level. And why has that become so important now in drug discovery?Rafael Rosengarten: That's a great question, so again, for your listeners who may not live and breathe this stuff, there's a concept in in biology called the central dogma, and it kind of still holds. And the notion is that there are these different levels of organizations or different layers of the onion and peeling back the information that our cells use to conduct business. And the the core of this is DNA, and that's our genetic information that's encoded in our nucleus and it's passed down from parents to children. It's the heritable information, and I apologize to all my friends who do live and breathe this, who are going to call shenanigans on my definition of being overly simplistic. The next level is, as you described, is the RNA. And so RNA is actually a lot of things. But messenger RNAs are the transcription of the genes. So the DNA genes that hold our genetic information are converted through a molecular process into another kind of molecule. And that kind of molecule is RNA. It's chemically similar to DNA, but different, and that RNA tend to be in smaller pieces than the whole chromosomes, and they represent smaller pieces of genetic information, and they can vary widely from, say, one gene to the next in terms of how much RNA is made for that given gene.Rafael Rosengarten: And then just to fill out the picture a bit more, in principle, then, those RNA molecules get turned into protein, or they are the specific instructions to create proteins, and proteins then go do the work of the cell. What I just told you is mostly wrong, but it's sort of the framework that we think about. So the reason why RNA, the middle layer, is so interesting in drug discovery, and I'm going to add to that, in diagnostics world, is because it's a bit more, let's call it dynamic than the DNA level. So mutations sometimes are heritable and sometimes they arise de novo. But once they've arisen, they're kind of there and they go through from cell to cell, once the cells divide. And that's, you know, that's important and interesting and meaningful information, you can learn a lot about what genes are potentially druggable from that. But it doesn't tell you a whole lot about the state of tissue or the state of disease in this moment, right? It's kind of background information in a way. And so RNA is a bit more dynamic.Rafael Rosengarten: It changes. It can change on, you know, really rapid time scales, but certainly therapeutically relevant time scales. And so in some ways, it's a little bit closer to sort of what's happening now. Harry Glorikian: Right.Rafael Rosengarten: It's also just a different, it's a different class of information because there are these abundances, different genes at different levels. Those relative abundances have biological importance and sometimes therapeutic importance. A lot of cancers, for example, are bad for you. They are essentially dysregulation of gene expression, so they can arise from mutations or they can arise from events at the DNA level. But it's understanding how much of some species of gene is being expressed in the RNA that can be informative or potentially therapeutically actionable. And I'm going to shout out to my proteomics friends, the guys who study proteins. That may be even more therapeutically relevant in a sense, because most of our drugs actually target proteins. And that's quite the key of it. Except for gene therapy, which is a big deal, especially in the CRISPR era, we're not often targeting DNA with our drugs, right? Mostly, we're targeting proteins and occasionally we're targeting RNAs and less frequently we're targeting DNA. Again, all CRISPR bets aside, right?Harry Glorikian: Yeah. No, we did an episode with talking about CRISPR and, you know, amazing advancements happening there. But now, being from Applied Biosystems, I remember an entire room full of sequencers where we, I think they were like 600 or 800 we had running 24 hours a day at one point. Now I can do that on a desktop, right? But. There's a lot of data that comes off that. T  hat's a challenge, I think, for people in drug development to manage that much data. You started at Baylor with a lot of your research. How did how did you personally encounter these challenges in your research?Rafael Rosengarten: I mean, it was very much this challenge that inspired us to start Genialis. So the conception story of Genialis is my co-founders and I, we really wanted to be able to do advanced cutting edge data science like machine learning, AI type stuff, which I'm sure we'll talk about at some point, in order to really bring kind of the next level of analytics to bear on biomedical problems. And what we realized is that's all well and good, but you can't do any of that stuff unless you get the data in a place where you can work on it. And I remember going to talk to one of the top researchers at all ofe Baylor College of Medicine. This person is top of her field, chair of department, et cetera, et cetera. And I asked her, How does your lab deal with your data retention and your data management, your data analysis? And she said, Glad you asked, this is such a big problem. We just had one of our postdocs leave, and he took his little thumb drives with him, and all of the data from all of his stuff was on those thumb drives. And now we can't reanalyze. I was like, You're kidding me! She said “We had to go and redownload download some of it that he had published and put online.” So, so even top researchers didn't have a clue how to do this. And this wasn't that long ago. I would say that drug companies by now are mostly more savvy and certainly the commercial sector for data management tools is thriving, right? There are some really good commercial products.Rafael Rosengarten: Genialis has one. There's some others of note. And Big Pharma has invested a lot, obviously, in building in health solutions. But this creates another kind of complication, which is you get all these different solutions and they don't all talk to each other. Even having data on different clouds. Some people may use Amazon and others Google and others still, Microsoft. And those are the three majors. You know, those create silos in a way. So, so you know, the cloud has been super helpful. The advent of software purposely built for biological data management has been helpful. But, you know, there's still a lot of work to do. And I'm going to argue that the kind of next, let's not call it a frontier, but the next big challenge and the one that we encounter a lot, it's not even around the primary data. We're good now. We're good at sucking that off the machines and putting it in the cloud and organizing it and getting it processed really efficiently using distributed computation. Now the challenge is getting what we call the metadata, the annotations of where those data come from. Is it coming from patients and if so, what's the patient information associated with it? Is it an experiment? Getting those metadata consistently curated and attached and linked to the primary data is a big and very important challenge, and it's one that I think will be solved in a similar way through these software solutions. But it takes a lot of will and a lot of manual effort at this point.Harry Glorikian: Just to summarize, the software that you have is helping biologists and clinicians work with data without necessarily having to become a bioinformatician, if I had to frame it that way, is that is that a decent representation?Rafael Rosengarten: That is that's one of the softwares we have. So you're referencing Genialis Expressions, which was kind of our initial flagstone software. I'm excited, though, in November, at Biodata Basel, we launched our new software, our newest product, which is called Responder ID. And this is where our dreams of really applying machine learning and AI to these data have finally come to fruition. Responder ID is a software or really, it's a suite of technologies that we use on those clinical data and on those experimental data to actually extract knowledge and very specifically to figure out which patients are most likely to respond to certain therapies. And so the first piece of software is really the kind of about the data management. It's about getting data organized, getting it processed, all the best practices and efficiencies around that. And that was sort of, you know, I don't want to call it last year's problem because it's still a problem, but it was the first thing we did. It's where we started. And it's got some beautiful visualizations and it does let bench scientists like myself work with their own data. But the new stuff is where we're really bringing the application to bear on human health and on value propositions that I think really resonate with pharma, diagnostics, and other biotech and frankly, clinicians and and ultimately patients.Harry Glorikian: So, well, that's great, I mean, that transition to the new software, I must have missed that in when I was doing my research. I hadn't seen that yet, but what are some of the stories or anecdotes by customers that you can share? What have they been able to say, accomplish with it, so that we can put it into context for the listener?Rafael Rosengarten: Yeah. So you know, most of our customers are biotech drug companies and we help them solve a number of problems. But the key challenge is that drug development is just an incredibly risky and expensive and time consuming proposition. Most of our work's in the oncology space, not all of it, but it's a good place to make this example. The success rate of a drug that enters a Phase I clinical trial in the cancer space that actually makes it to market is something like three or four percent. It's dismal, and it's among the lowest of any therapeutic area. And there are any number of reasons for that. But the simplest, simplistic one is that biology is complicated and patients are diverse, right? Even within a single disease like, let's just say, breast cancer, there are at least four kinds of breast cancer. There are probably 40 kinds, and there are actually probably more than that. Each individual's disease is going to have its own unique flavors. And so what we allow a company to do, let's say a company that's developing a drug against, for example, breast cancer, is to really try to understand how many molecular types are we talking about, which ones are going to respond to our drug? And can we find those patients ahead of time? And what that lets them do is think about alternative and sort of novel and innovative strategies for designing clinical trials. It allows them, if they so desire, to think about partnering out on diagnostic development with third parties to actually create a diagnostic to go with their drug. That's not, obviously, necessary. You can you can build assays that you run in-house, but that's an alternative.Rafael Rosengarten: And to make it very concrete, we have one partner we work with a lot. A company called OncXerna Therapeutics. And with them, we've helped develop their first biomarker as part of their biomarker platform to the point not only of clinical trial assay, but also it's been licensed by Qiagen to be turned into a companion diagnostic for their lead drug and a research-use-only assay for scientists writ large around the world. And so, you know, this is a great success story. In about the course of two years, we went from taking a published academic signature, something in the literature—and by the way, there are about a million of these public academic signatures and there are only 46 approved companion diagnostics, so there's a big gulf between them—we went from an academic signature—and this was hand in glove work with them, so I don't want to take all the credit, but we certainly did a lot of the heavy lifting—and we built a category-defining first-of-its-class machine learning algorithm that learned a complex RNA-sequencing-based signature that predicts with uncanny ability patients that are going to respond to a wide array of drugs in a wide array of diseases. So it's pan-cancer, multi-modality, right? This is just it's an astonishing clinical advance, in my opinion, and it's something I'm clearly very proud of and willing to self-promote. But I do think it's an important advance, and I think it shows the power of both the Genialis philosophy around modeling biology and pairing patient biology with potential therapeutics, but also just what you can do if you're really thoughtful about getting the data in the right place, treating the data properly, and then using machine learning and some of these advanced algorithms to decipher.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, I think we're starting to get to that cusp of producing the data is getting faster, more cost effective. I mean, if Illumina actually gets down to, I think they, at the last JPMorgan, they said, we're trying to get it down to $60 for whole-genome. But at some point you're getting to numbers that are, I don't want to say a rounding error, but damn near close to that. And so the burden is going to fall on, how do I interpret all this data and what do I do next, right? What's actionable? I mean, I think the treating doctors are like, this is all great data, but tell me what to do, right? And it sounds like your new suite of software might be more applicable for a clinician or to to be communicated to a clinician, than just on the research side. So is is Genialis now moving beyond its original set of customers and moving more towards the clinical space?Rafael Rosengarten: I certainly think that's, on the horizon, that's something that we're contemplating. You know, the U.S. health system, well, systems, plural, is a complicated beast, right? And so there are certainly big companies that have products that are there for drug companies and products that are there for patients and products that are there for providers and so forth. And that makes sense. I think once you've got a wide enough kind of horizontal, you can stack all these verticals on top of each other. You know, hopefully we get big enough to do that ourselves. But you know, for the time being, we found this really, you know, this really great motion and success story working around certain therapeutic modalities for certain therapeutic opportunities. I actually think what may be the bigger prize is to take what we learn about disease biology from some of these diagnostic models and turn them on their head and say, OK, we've shown this model really captures patient biology and it works. And we know that because look, there are patients and they respond to the drug that we predicted they would. We've definitely cracked something there. Now let's take what we've learned about that patient biology and interrogate this model for new therapeutic opportunities. What about all the patients who don't respond to this drug? What will they respond to? The model still has them pegged as nonresponders. The model understands their biology. We just need to interrogate it for the next generation of therapies. And so I think this is where my vision of precision medicine maybe deviates. Diagnostics is an industry. Drug discovery are an industry. Those are separate companies. Those are separate industries. But to me, precision medicine shouldn't be this kind of linear thing where you start with the target, you end up with a drug and a diagnostic, and that's where it ends. It should be a circle. It should wrap around. And what we learn from patients should feed right into the next round of drug discovery, right? And so I'm interested in playing at that sort of fusion point where the where the ends of the string meet and form a circle. And so we're really interested in partnering and learning more about, for example, discovering new drugs to match the targets, right? And so I kind of see that as where a lot of Genialis's future focus is going to go. I'm not ruling out patient reporting software. I'm not ruling out more clinical products. That would be logical, but my real interest is thinking about helping the patients who just don't have therapeutic options today.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: Let's pause the conversation for a minute to talk about one small but important thing you can do, to help keep the podcast going. And that's to make it easier for other listeners discover the show by leaving a rating and a review on Apple Podcasts.All you have to do is open the Apple Podcasts app on your smartphone, search for The Harry Glorikian Show, and scroll down to the Ratings & Reviews section. Tap the stars to rate the show, and then tap the link that says Write a Review to leave your comments. It'll only take a minute, but you'll be doing us a huge favor.And one more thing. If you like the interviews we do here on the show I know you'll like my new book, The Future You: How Artificial Intelligence Can Help You Get Healthier, Stress Less, and Live Longer. It's a friendly and accessible tour of all the ways today's information technologies are helping us diagnose diseases faster, treat them more precisely, and create personalized diet and exercise programs to prevent them in the first place.The book is now available in Kindle format. Just go to Amazon and search for The Future You by Harry Glorikian.And now, back to the show.[musical interlude] Harry Glorikian: When I think about this and where we're going with this and the I hate saying it, butthe old dogmatic way of looking at it is very compartmentalized as we look at it in discrete pieces. And these data analytics platforms allow us to look at multifactorial, or almost turn the data into a living organism where we can look at it in multiple ways, and I think it's hard for people to get there mentally. I mean, sometimes, sometimes when I'm looking at something, I realize that my limitation is the information that I have about a particular area and that I need to learn something new to put another piece of the puzzle together. But I think this, let me do this and then let me do this and then let me do this. That's breaking down because of the data analytic capabilities that we're bringing to bear. Applying AI, machine learning, or in reality, sometimes just hard math, to solve certain problems, is opening up a wider aperture of how we would manage a patient and then treat them appropriately. And I think. Hell, I don't know, Rafael,  I'm a little worried, I don't think the system is necessarily designed to absorb that next-gen opportunity, right? Because somebody will be like, OK, where do I get the information? Does that go in the EMR? I mean, wait, where is there a code that I can bill for it? I mean, there's these arcane roadblocks that are in the way that have nothing to do with, "I've got this model, and I'm telling you this will work on this patient," right?Rafael Rosengarten: Yeah, I don't know that I'm smart enough to know the solution to that. I will say that there are some really exciting newish young venture-backed upstarts that are interested in disrupting hospital systems, point of care, EHRs. All of that, is fair game, right? It is, as you described, it's just ripe for disruption because it's so, you know, it's so cobbled together, right? You know, I'm thinking about when my wife and I moved from Houston, Texas, to the Bay Area and then we got pregnant with our second child. We wanted to have all of our medical records from pregnancy number one sent from Texas Medical Center, which is one of the shining jewels of health care institutions, to John Muir Health System in the Bay Area, which, listen, they were changing out the wood panels from the 1970s during all of our doctors' visits. And literally, we asked the doctor if he could just print, print something for us. He said, No, I can't do that, but I could write it down on a sheet of paper for you. Like, you know, it's. But that's that's, you know, I agree with you. There are going to have to be changes top down, bottom up, and there's going to have to be hopefully support for this in the regulatory bodies, you know, at the governmental level. Rafael Rosengarten: Where I live and breathe, those is really kind of in a life sciences sector of the health care system. So again, we're interested in in drug development, we're interested in diagnostics, we're interested in drug discovery. And those themselves are kind of big things. So where I think about changes and regulatory and systemic stuff is more along, like, what is the FDA doing to to adopt or adapt to these kind of new technologies? What about standards like how are we thinking about data standards, model standards? Genialis is a founding member of and I'm on the board of directors of the Alliance for AI and Health Care. And this is a really exciting and rather amazing industry organization that was stood up at JP Morgan in 2019. And you know, we've got gosh, I don't know what the headcount, the member number now is, but over 50 member organizations, including the likes of Google and and Roche and bigs like that. Some of the more household names in the smaller biotech community like Recursion Pharma, In Silico Medicine, Valo Health, et cetera. And then and then companies like Genialis as well. Big academic centers. So we have a real great brain trust and we're interested in tackling, I'm going to call them, these hard, boring but incredibly important systemic questions around regulatory and standards and so forth. Health insurance, Medicare, all that stuff is a big fish, and we haven't, you know, we haven't set our hooks in it yet, but you know how hospitals bill and those kinds of codes, we'll have to have to revisit that at some point, for sure.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I know that you're a member there and sort of interesting to hear why you got involved in how you see it working. So if you think about the standardization side of this, you know, what is what is the organization sort of advocating for? Because I totally agree with you, but at some point, I think you almost need to reach back towards, how is somebody doing an experiment to make sure that then the data comes out the other side in a standard way, right? Because I used to joke, which sample prep product are you working with? And I could tell you sort of what direction something is going to lean. And that that in and of itself is a problem. So how is AAIHC thinking about some of these problems, I don't know if there's a proposal. What have you guys proposed so far?Rafael Rosengarten: That's a great question. So we have workstreams around things like the FDA, working with the FDA to propose guidance for a good machine learning, practice guidance for software as a medical device, AI as part of software, as a medical device. So a lot of this, it's less concerned with can we rein in and constrain the experimental part? Because again, that's that's a huge world. And maybe it's not really where the constraints need to be. But rather can we come up with a common set of guidelines for how you evaluate the quality of a data set, right? Recognizing the data are going to come in a lot of shapes and sizes and flavors, and even two different RNA sequencing data sets that are produced on different machines or with different kits may have slightly different flavors or tints to them. That's fine so long as you have some guidelines for characterizing those differences, for appreciating those differences and then for knowing what to do with the data, given those potential differences. A lot of the concern around AI in a regulated setting is that, the whole promise of a machine learning approach is that it gets smarter the more data it sees, right? So these should be, these algorithms should evolve in a way they should be living and breathing. But if you have a regulated product that's to work on patients, it's got to work the same every time or, you know, can't get worse.Rafael Rosengarten: So this is, there's a tension here, but it's not unsolvable. It's not insurmountable. For example, you know, a regulated AI doesn't have to evolve in real time. It can be updated over time, right? Right. And it can be it can be locked and then operate, and then you can improve it and update it and redeploy and relock. So building the plans, what are the change plans? How do you demonstrate that the retraining or the improvements are actually improvements? These are the kinds of things that at least we can sink our teeth into today. And then we're also interested in the standards problem. I think the organization is not necessarily going to be dogmatic about recommending exactly what the standards are today, but what we're trying to catalyze those discussions, right? And we're trying to create frameworks where those discussions can actually lead to some actionable tools. And there are examples of organizations that have done this in other fields. So we do have some blueprints. But it's a lot of work. And frankly, that's the privilege of being in the organization. It gives you the opportunity to roll up your sleeves and build the industry of the future, to build the industry you want to operate in.Harry Glorikian: Yeah. And this has got to be in lockstep with the regulatory authorities and everything to make sure that everything is, everybody's on the same page so that when you come up with a golden solution, they're ready to accept it. Because we can't have, you download the latest software for your phone and then it breaks, right? That's not an acceptable update that you can do, right, and somebody has to release a patch to get it to fix. You know, that's that doesn't necessarily... I'm sure it happens in our world, but it's. It's really not what you'd like to see happen.Rafael Rosengarten: Yeah, yeah. You know, I can tell you from having had to invest in a lot of the kind of procedures around clinical reporting in software and so forth, and, working with some really top tier point of care software providers, it's not foolproof. But boy, there are a lot of hoops to jump through, right? Like things do get tested the whole way. And I would just, I would argue, although, you know, let me not be overly full of hubris, that there are plenty of other failure points that are a lot more likely to fail than the AI software that's predicting a biomarker not working in a particular instance, right? Given the room for error in things like biopsy collection and human handling. There's a lot of stuff upstream of that where human error is more likely to play a part. That that may or may not be sweet solace, right. That might not help you sleep at night. But I think that the regulated environment, especially around regulating computational tools, can be rather bulletproof.Rafael Rosengarten: So is there anything else going on that at Genialis that that we would want to know about that and directionally or what's next, that you can [share]?Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, the exciting stuff is really twofold. It's, you know, just going deeper with our partners, right? So clinical development, as I mentioned, is is a long game. And you know, we like to start working before the drugs in the clinic, right? So these are meant to be long partnerships. And the other piece of this is we're doing a lot more internal R&D. A lot more internal R&D, a lot more work with our academic colleagues. And so we're really, really excited to just, you know, to innovate our way out of some of these hard problems.Harry Glorikian: Well, that's necessary in this field, right, you're always going to run into some, I like to call them speed bumps because I don't believe that they're like insurmountable problems, but they're speed bumps that you need to like innovate over or around.Rafael Rosengarten: Mm hmm. Yeah. So, you know, I want to give you something meaty like, you know what to look for from Genialis. So, sometime soon, my hope, knock on wood, is that we'll have first patients enrolled in clinical trials that are the biomarker I described to you earlier. This is the OncXerna trial. First patient enrolled, that's going to be super exciting. It's a Phase III trial and we're going to be stratifying patients with the biomarker. I mean, just the gratification of actually having our technology potentially impacting outcomes is huge. We've got a lot up our sleeves in terms of internal development improvements to Responder ID, but also, you know, some biomarker work we're kind of doing for ourselves, digging deeper into some pernicious problems in cancer that others haven't adequately addressed, in my opinion. And some some exciting partnerships, hopefully around, kind of…. we'll call them data partnerships. We talked a bit about just the scale of the data challenge, though, is it lives all over the place, right? And so there are different ways of getting your hands on it. And one of the ways a lot of companies have gone about is to become the testing companies, right? There are some giants out there that sequence literally millions of patients a year, and they've got big data warehouses, right? We haven't done that ourselves. And so we rely oncollaborations for a lot of our data. Not all of it, but we're building some of these collaborations, and I'm hoping we can talk more about that in future episodes or in other forums.Harry Glorikian: Just for a second, so people understand the magnitude. This Phase III trial, how many how many patients would you say are in it?Rafael Rosengarten: I need to be super careful not to misrepresent someone else's trial. It's going to be on the order of several hundred. You know, it's a properly powered Phase III and it's got two treatment arms. And so, you know, so it has to have quite a number of patients. And that's, you know, I would say that's a typical sized trial of for this stage in this kind of disease.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I just want people listening to sort of get an idea of like, these technologies are, you know, can affect lots of people and then if that drug comes through and then the technology is utilized afterwards to sort of stratify people or the biomarkers, then there's an even larger population of people that then gets affected by the work that you guys are doing.Rafael Rosengarten: Yeah, yeah. I think that's right. And you know, in a way, you know, our commitment to the sort of biomarker driven, you know, drug development, it's very principled. It's based on this idea that patients deserve to have the best treatment option, right? And there are some amazing drugs out there that when they work, work miracles. But they don't work that often. Right? And some of these drugs have, you know, first line approvals in dozens of diseases. But again, in some of those diseases, they work for half the patients, and that's great. And that's probably how it should be. But in some, they only work in maybe 15 percent of the patients or 20 or whatever the threshold is, because they were better than the alternative, right? But if you could tell which of those patients are going to respond, then at least the ones who aren't can seek other options. Or you know that we've got to develop drugs for the others. So it's very principled, although it's complicated because from an economic standpoint, if you have the ability to sell your drug to everybody, of course you're going to do that.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, look, I drank that Kool-Aid. I mean, Jesus, 20 years ago, right? I mean, you know, why wouldn't you want...I mean, if you were a patient, you'd want the best drug you can get, right? Because the data says that you respond to this particular drug. It's getting the system to that point. And I have seen, I have had stories where the data said one thing. They put the patient on it. They looked like they were responding. A new trial opened up. And somebody suggested that they go on the new trial, even though the therapy was working. And they switched and the outcome was not positive. Right. And so it's one of those things of like, I don't understand. The data clearly pointed in a particular direction and you deviated from that, and that doesn't make any sense to me. As a science person is as well as an investor, if the data is showing something, you better respond to the data or you're not going to be happy with the outcome. It's just seeing that implemented in a way that makes it very actionable for everybody, and they embrace that. That's where I sometimes, I find, you know, the biggest problems. But I totally agree. I mean, I have a whole chapter in my new book about that whole dynamic of why you want the data, how the data impacts you as a patient. What are the sort of questions you should ask, et cetera, because if you don't have that information, you're making suboptimal decisions.Rafael Rosengarten: Yeah. No, and that's absolutely right, I think the point you make there is probably the key one, which is a lot of biotechs and companies like ours, we operate with kind of a world view of our own research and our customers'. But we have to remember that the reason we do this, the reason we get up every day and the reason we toil is it's because we can impact patient lives. And if you actually want to really foment that change, then that subset, that stakeholder, needs to be involved, right? A patient needs to understand what are my choices? And so if a patient comes into the clinic and has a grave illness and the doctor says, well, this is the approved drug, but there's a test that could tell you if there's something else. I mean, if I'm the patient, I want to take that test. I want to know what my options are. And I think that frankly, it's unrealistic to expect publicly traded companies to not try to maximize revenue. That's just kind of the system we live in. But it's also incumbent upon us to to engage patients, to help them understand what their options are, to engage physicians the same and to say, there are multiple approved drugs, maybe, or this is the one, but there are some investigational drugs that haven't been approved yet that may be better fits for your disease. Remember, your disease isn't necessarily the same as someone else who happens to have it in the same tissue. And so I think that's a big deal, and I do think that there are any number of exciting organizations that are really focused, doggedly focused on this point of patient engagement and especially patient engagement around data.Harry Glorikian: No, I mean, I always I tell every one of my guests, “Hurry up, go faster,” because I'm not getting any younger and theoretically like, you know, statistically, I could end up in that place. I want the best that I can get when I get there. So Rafael, I know it's getting late where you are. So really appreciate your time and the opportunity to talk about what you guys are doing and the impact that it's having on not just drug development, but downstream on patients.Rafael Rosengarten: Well, thank you, Harry, for having me, for giving me the opportunity. This has been a lot of fun to connect over this.Harry Glorikian: Excellent. Thank you. Harry Glorikian: That's it for this week's episode. You can find past episodes of The Harry Glorikian Show and the MoneyBall Medicine show at my website, glorikian.com, under the tab Podcasts.Don't forget to go to Apple Podcasts to leave a rating and review for the show.You can also  find me on Twitter at hglorikian. And we always love it when listeners post about the show there, or on other social media. Thanks for listening, stay healthy, and be sure to tune in two weeks from now for our next interview.

AM Quincy on QATV
AM Quincy - January 4, 2022

AM Quincy on QATV

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 5:25


Drug bust. Bus crash. DiBona elected. Daily news, weather and sports update.

QATV News Updates
News Update - January 4, 2022

QATV News Updates

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 2:15


Drug bust. Bus crash. DiBona elected.

Interior Integration for Catholics
Trauma: Defining and Understanding the Experience

Interior Integration for Catholics

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 94:38


Summary: In this episode, we gain a deeper understanding of the experience of trauma, the impact of trauma. we clarify definitions of different aspects of trauma, various categories of trauma, the immediate and delayed signs and symptoms of trauma, and the effects of trauma.  Then I share an experiential exercise with you to help you discover potential areas that might be fruitful for future exploration of your own internal experience.   Opening Dramatic Short Brief descriptions of the experience of trauma  “Outside, the sun shines. Inside, there's only darkness. The blackness is hard to describe, as it's more than symptoms. It's a nothing that becomes everything there is. And what one sees is only a fraction of the trauma inflicted.”  ― Justin Ordoñez “My current life, I realized, was constructed around an absence; for all its richness I still felt as if the floors might give way, as if its core were only a covering of leaves, and I would slip through, falling endlessly, never to get my footing.” ― Esi Edugyan, Washington Black “I wish I'd fallen softly. Light and graceful like a feather drifting slowly to the earth on a warm and dreamy summer's day. I wish that I'd landed softly too. But there is nothing soft or graceful about that devastating moment when the worst has come to pass. The unavoidable truth is that it is hard, cold and brutal. All that you know to be true and good in life shatters in an instant. You feel like a delicate pottery bowl violently tossed from your place of rest, watching yourself crash and scatter across the hostile dark earth. The sound is deafening. Time stops. Inside, the quiet ache of shock and heartbreak slowly makes its grip known. They cut deep, these jagged edges of broken sherds. You gasp for air hungrily, yet somehow forget how to breathe.”― Jodi Sky Rogers Introduction We are born into a not only a fallen world, but a traumatized world  We not only share in a fallen human condition, but a traumatized condition.   “No matter what kind of childhood we've had, nobody escapes trauma while growing up.”― Kenny Weiss The Fall goes way back, before the world was even created, to the fall of the Lucifer, the light-bearer, the morning star and his angels -- and then the fallenness entered our world through original sin, the sin of Adam and Eve, and these are the original traumas, the fall of the angels and original sin.   You and I are together in the adventure of this podcast, Interior Integration for Catholics, we are journeying together, and I am thankful to be with you.   I am Dr. Peter Malinoski, clinical psychologist and passionate Catholic and together, We bring the best of psychology and human formation and harmonize it with the perennial truths of the Catholic Faith.  This podcast, Interior Integration for Catholics is part of our broader outreach, Souls and Hearts bringing the best of psychology grounded in a Catholic worldview to you and the rest of the world through our website soulsandhearts.com.   Trauma.  We are just beginning a whole series of episodes on trauma.  You've been asking for this -- so many requests for us to address trauma head on.  It's such a tough topic and such an important topic, and we are taking on the tough and important topics that matter to you. Really important to understand the inner experience of trauma -- so you can recognize it in your own life and recognize it an empathetic and attuned way in others' loves.  Part of loving them.   Today, we're going to get an overview of the best of the secular understandings of trauma.  So much has changed since I entered graduate school in 1993 -- back then there was one seminal text on trauma, Judith Herman's Trauma and Recovery.  Now, especially in the last 10-15 years, there has been an upsurge of new, fresh and much better ways of understanding trauma.   Outline Impact of Trauma   Definitions of terms Definition of  trauma  Definition of Attachment injury  Definition of relational hurt  Definition of adverse experience.  Categories of Trauma  Recognizing Trauma from the Reactions, signs and symptoms.   Discuss commonly accepted effects of trauma  Go over the traumatic effects of what didn't happen, what was missing  Experiential exercise to help you identify areas of your internal experience that are impacted by trauma   Impact of Trauma From the North Dakota Department of Human Services Fact Sheet   • People who have experienced trauma are:◉ 15 times more likely to attempt suicide◉ 4 times more likely to abuse alcohol◉ 4 times more likely to develop a sexually transmitted disease ◉ 4 times more likely to inject drugs◉ 3 times more likely to use antidepressant medication◉ 3 times more likely to be absent from work◉ 3 times more likely to experience depression◉ 3 times more likely to have serious job problems◉ 2.5 times more likely to smoke◉ 2 times more likely to develop chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)◉ 2 times more likely to have serious financial problems 16-minute TED MED talk from How childhood trauma affects health across a lifetime | Pediatrician Nadine Burke Harris  September 2014 Definitions of Trauma Lots of confusion   Briere & Scott (2006) Principles of Trauma Therapy: people use the term trauma to refer to  either a traumatic experience or event  the resulting injury or stress,  or the longer-term impacts and consequences  American Psychological Association Website: Trauma is an emotional response to a terrible event like an accident, rape or natural disaster. Immediately after the event, shock and denial are typical. Longer term reactions include unpredictable emotions, flashbacks, strained relationships and even physical symptoms like headaches or nausea. Problem in emphasizing the emotional aspects. It's much more than that  Misses the overwhelming aspect.   Does get the "response" part right.   Integrated Listening Systems website:  Trauma is the response to a deeply distressing or disturbing event that overwhelms an individual's ability to cope, causes feelings of helplessness, diminishes their sense of self and their ability to feel a full range of emotions and experiences.   DSM-5  PTSD, Acute Stress Disorder.  Not going to address those here, not worth the time. Highly criticized by many professionals for being very limited and behind the curve, not recognizing the nuances and categories of trauma responses.   Attachment Injury  Definition: Dr. Sue Johnson defines an attachment injury as “a feeling of betrayal or abandonment during a critical time of need.” Very relational.   Uniformed Services University Human Performance Resources sheet:  An attachment injury is an emotional wound to an intimate, interdependent relationship. It usually happens after a breach of trust—particularly in a time of need or a moment of loss or transition. Once an attachment injury occurs, it can leave one or both partners feeling betrayed or abandoned. Examples of causes of attachment injuries from John Gottman "What Makes Love Last: How to build trust and avoid betrayal" Conditional Commitment:  You or your partner are one the lookout for someone more attractive, more desirable, someone who is a better soul mate.   A Nonsexual Affair: sometimes emotional affairs - emotional connection in an exclusive relationship with someone else.   Lying: Deception, dishonesty, little white lies.   Forming a Coalition Against the Partner:  Pulling the kids in, trying to isolate the other person.  No longer collaborative.   Absenteeism or Coldness: Not prioritizing each other at a time of need -- distancing instead -- can have a devastating impact. Whether failing to support during highly stressful events or consistently missing opportunities to turn towards each other during the rigors of life, both are destructive.  Withdrawal of Sexual Interest: This can really be wounding.  Sometimes one spouse is ok with this and the other is not.   Disrespect:  quote by John Gottman… “A loving relationship is not about one person having the upper hand – it's about holding hands.” This includes refusing to acknowledge hurting your partner and a lack of willingness to apologize to your partner.  Unfairness: Dishonesty. Lack of balance in housework, lack of collaboration on finances.   Selfishness: When one partner lives mostly in a self-focused way; behaviors driven by self-absorption can be very wearing on relationship.  Breaking Promises:  Repeated disappointments around broken or unfulfilled promises results in disillusionment and undercuts trust between the spouses. The one breaking promises can unwittingly communicate the message, “You don't matter.”   Additional examples from Lana Isaacson abuse (emotional- gaslighting, power and control, economic, verbal, physical, or sexual),  refusal to forgive or accept partner or let go of resentments (includes excessive criticism, moving out of your home and refusing to return, etc.) after your partner has done significant personal and relational growth work and demonstrating change. Relational Hurts  - Lori Epting at GoodTherapy.org Relational Hurt or Attachment Injury? How to Tell the Difference April 5, 2018  Painful experiences in an attachment relationship inflicted by the other person, but that don't lead to rupture of the relationship Still a sense of love and connection between the people  Still trust and mutuality.   Still a capacity for the couple to move forward  Does the other spouse still love and care for you?  Answer:  Yes.   Examples: forgotten anniversaries, insults, or intense arguments.     Adverse Experiences:  Adverse Childhood Experiences Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) cover a wide range of difficult situations that children either directly face or witness while growing up, before they have developed effective coping skills. ACEs can disrupt the normal course of development and the emotional injury can last long into adulthood. The loss of a parent; neglect; emotional, physical, or sexual abuse; and divorce are among the most common types of Adverse Childhood Experiences.   Prevalence of Adverse Childhood Experiences:  Mental Health Connection of Tarrant County fact sheet -- with studies documenting each statistics.   Four of every 10 children in American say they experienced a physical assault during the past year, with one in 10 receiving an assault-related injury. (2) 2% of all children experienced sexual assault or sexual abuse during the past year, with the rate at nearly 11% for girls aged 14 to 17. (2) Nearly 14% of children repeatedly experienced maltreatment by a caregiver, including nearly 4% who experienced physical abuse. (2) 1 in 4 children was the victim of robbery, vandalism or theft during the previous year. (2) More than 13% of children reported being physically bullied, while more than 1 in 3 said they had been emotionally bullied. (2) 1 in 5 children witnessed violence in their family or the neighborhood during the previous year. (2) In one year, 39% of children between the ages of 12 and 17 reported witnessing violence, 17% reported being a victim of physical assault and 8% reported being the victim of sexual assault. (3) More than 60% of youth age 17 and younger have been exposed to crime, violence and abuse either directly or indirectly. (4 More than 10% of youth age 17 and younger reported five or more exposures to violence. (4) About 10% of children suffered from child maltreatment, were injured in an assault, or witnessed a family member assault another family member. (4) About 25% of youth age 17 and younger were victims of robbery or witnessed a violent act. (4) Nearly half of children and adolescents were assaulted at least once in the past year. (4) Among 536 elementary and middle school children surveyed in an inner city community, 30% had witnessed a stabbing and 26% had witnessed a shooting. (5) Young children exposed to five or more significant adverse experiences in the first three years of childhood face a 76% likelihood of having one or more delays in their language, emotional or brain development. (6) As the number of traumatic events experienced during childhood increases, the risk for the following health problems in adulthood increases: depression; alcoholism; drug abuse; suicide attempts; heart and liver diseases; pregnancy problems; high stress; uncontrollable anger; and family, financial, and job problems. (6) According to the Centers for Disease Control -- root causes of many chronic diseases, most mental illnesses, and most violence.       Physical abuse    Sexual abuse    Verbal abuse    Physical neglect    Emotional neglect    A family member who is depressed or diagnosed with other mental illness    A family member who is addicted to alcohol or another substance    A family member who is in prison    Witnessing a mother being abused    Losing a parent to separation, divorce or death 61% of adults across 25 states experienced oat least one ACE --  Nearly one in six American adults experienced four or more.   Lead to increases in adulthood -- years down the road.   Physical injuries TBI  Fractures  Burns   Mental Health problems Depression  Anxiety  Suicide  PTSD   Maternal Health Unintended pregnancy  Complications in pregnancy  Miscarriage   Infectious Disease HIV  STDs   Chronic disease Cancer  Diabetes   Risky Behaviors Alcohol and Drug abuse  Sexual acting out   Loss of opportunities Education  Occupation  Income   Categories of Trauma Acute vs. Chronic, Causes:  Natural vs. Human, Big T trauma vs. little t trauma, Secondary Trauma, Acknowledged vs. Unacknowledged.   Acute vs. Chronic vs. Complex Trauma Acute Trauma: Psychology Today article Acute trauma reflects intense distress in the immediate aftermath of a one-time event and the reaction is of short duration. Common examples include a car crash, physical or sexual assault, or the sudden death of a loved one.  Chronic Trauma:   can arise from harmful events that are repeated or prolonged. It can develop in response to persistent bullying, neglect, abuse (emotional, physical, or sexual), and domestic violence.  Complex Trauma: can arise from experiencing repeated or multiple traumatic events from which there is no possibility of escape. The sense of being trapped is a feature of the experience. Like other types of trauma, it can undermine a sense of safety in the world and beget hypervigilance, constant (and exhausting!) monitoring of the environment for the possibility of threat.  Big T trauma vs. little t trauma  Trauma here is used to describe the adverse experience Big T Trauma -- Big T Trauma is a reaction to a deeply disturbing, life-threatening event or situation  Powerlessness or helplessness is also a key factor of large ‘T' traumas, Examples of Big T Trauma Violent crime  natural disaster  terrorist attack  sexual assault  Combat  a car or plane accident  Death of a parent for a child   Little T Trauma: Little 't' traumas are described as smaller, more personal distressing events that disrupt our functioning and compromise our capacity to cope. These distressing events are not inherently life or bodily-integrity threatening,Examples of Little T Trauma Interpersonal conflict  Infidelity  Conflict with a boss  Job change  Geographic relocation -- moving to a new part of the country  Romantic breakup  Abrupt or extended relocation  Death of a Pet  Legal trouble  Financial worries or difficulty   Problems -- these describe the event -- as though the event measures the experience.  Not so.  Originally had some support and still do, because of the emphasis on the importance of less obvious events.     Natural vs. Human Causes  Naturally Caused (so called "Acts of God") Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) is the agency within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Separated into the four elements Earth, Water, Air and Fire   Earth Earthquakes  Landslides  fallen boulders  Meteorites   Water Floods  Tsunamis  Avalanches  Blizzards   Air Tornadoes  Cyclones  Typhoons  Hurricanes  dust storms  fallen trees   Fire volcanic eruptions  Lightning Strikes  Wildfires   Health physical ailments or diseases  Epidemics  Famines   Human Caused -- Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) is the agency within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services  Accidental Acts Train derailment, roofing fall, structural collapse, mountaineering accident, aircraft crash, car accident due to malfunction, mine collapse or fire, radiation leak, crane collapse, gas explosion, electrocution, machinery-related accident, oil spill, maritime accident, accidental gun shooting, and sports-related death.   Intentional Acts arson, terrorism, sexual assault and abuse,(see three episode IIC series on Rape, Incest, Shame and Silence, episodes 40, 43,and 44) homicides or suicides, mob violence or rioting, physical abuse and neglect, stabbing or shooting, warfare, domestic violence, poisoned water supply, human trafficking, school violence, torture, home invasion, bank robbery, genocide, and medical or food tampering, harassment, street violence, and bullying   Actions vs. Omissions e.g. abuse vs. neglect   Secondary Trauma:  Psychology Today Article:  Secondary or vicarious trauma arises from exposure to other people's suffering and can strike those in professions that are called on to respond to injury and mayhem, notably physicians, first responders, and law enforcement. Over time, such individuals are at risk for compassion fatigue, whereby they avoid investing emotionally in other people in an attempt to protect themselves from experiencing distress. Acknowledged vs. unacknowledged trauma Frame of reference -- that just how it was  Defining trauma away -- Just because my Dad was a raging unemployed alcoholic and Mom was stressed out with her job and all the housework and we struggled financially and my parents fought all the time, that wasn't trauma, that was just normal.  I never was hit or nothing.   Not like my classmate Billy.  Billy suffered trauma.  His Dad used to hit him with a golf club and he came to school with bruises.  Now that's trauma.  Or the kids that were sexually abused.  That never happened to me.  I just had a rough childhood, but I've moved on, it's all in the past.   Recognizing Trauma from the Signs and Symptoms  -- So important.   Drawing from many sources here, but Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Trauma-Informed Care in Behavioral Health Services. HHS Publication No. (SMA) 13-4801 2014.   Chapter 3 of Understanding the Impact of Trauma  Emotional & psychological Symptoms of Trauma:  Immediate  Emotional overwhelm Characteristic of trauma   Shock  Denial, disbelief  Feeling disconnected or numb or detached  Anxiety or severe fear, even panic attacks  Guilt -- including survivor guilt  Anger, rage  Sadness  Helplessness  Mood swings -- exhilaration about surviving then survivor guilt  Emotional Constriction, Shutdown   Delayed Emotional Signs Irritability, hostility, edginess  Depression  Mood swings  Anxiety  Phobia Generalized anxiety Fears of trauma happening again  Grief  Shame  Feeling very fragile, vulnerable  Emotional detachment, disconnection -- in relationships  Hopelessness, despair  Anhedonia -- inability to enjoy anything  Difficulty experiencing positive emotions     Cognitive Symptoms of Trauma  Immediate Cognitive Reactions Disorientation  Difficulty concentrating  Ruminating, obsessing  Racing thoughts  Intrusive thoughts -- e.g. Replaying the traumatic event over and over again  Visualizations of the event.   Time Distortion  Space Distortion  Extreme alertness; always on the lookout for warnings of potential danger   New sensitivity to loud noises, smells, or other things around you  Memory problems -- unable to remember the event  Feeling out of control  Feeling unreal, depersonalized, not yourself, like you are watching someone else. Depersonalization: Persistent or recurrent experiences of feeling detached from, and as if one were an outside observer of, one's mental processes or body (e.g., feeling as though one were in a dream; feeling a sense of unreality of self or body or of time moving slowly).  Derealization: Persistent or recurrent experiences of unreality of surroundings (e.g., the world around the individual is experienced as unreal, dreamlike, distant, or distorted).  Delayed Cognitive Signs  Dissociation is a mental process of disconnecting from one's thoughts, feelings, body, from memories or sense of identity. This disconnection is automatic and completely out of the person's control.x Amnesia: Often described as "gaps" in memory that can range from minutes to years  Depersonalization: Feeling disconnected from your body or thoughts  Derealization: Feeling disconnected from the world around you  Identity alteration: The sense of being markedly different from another part of yourself  Identity confusion: A sense of confusion about who you really are   we will have a lot more to say about dissociation in future episodes, but for now -- disconnection.   Alexithymia the inability to recognize or describe one's own emotions. -- Can't put my feelings into words.  The experience of trauma can initially defy speech.   “People who suffer from alexithymia tend to feel physically uncomfortable but cannot describe exactly what the problem is. As a result they often have multiple vague and distressing physical complaints that doctors can't diagnose. In addition, they can't figure out for themselves what they're really feeling about any given situation or what makes them feel better or worse. This is the result of numbing, which keeps them from anticipating and responding to the ordinary demands of their bodies in quiet, mindful ways. If you are not aware of what your body needs, you can't take care of it. If you don't feel hunger, you can't nourish yourself. If you mistake anxiety for hunger, you may eat too much. And if you can't feel when you're satiated, you'll keep eating.”  ― Bessel A. van der Kolk  Intrusive memories -- keep coming and coming Reactivation of previous traumatic events -- those from before the most recent trauma Nightmares Confusion, distractions Highly critical of self -- blaming the self, what I could have done better Preoccupation with the event -- all I can think about Denial of the event  “The conflict between the will to deny horrible events and the will to proclaim them aloud is the central dialectic of psychological trauma.” ― Judith Lewis Herman, Trauma and Recovery: The Aftermath of Violence - From Domestic Abuse to Political Terror  Difficulty with decision making Magical thinking that certain behaviors (including avoidance) will protect me against future harm Suicidal ideation, fantasies Physical symptoms:  Quotes “Traumatized people chronically feel unsafe inside their bodies: The past is alive in the form of gnawing interior discomfort. Their bodies are constantly bombarded by visceral warning signs, and, in an attempt to control these processes, they often become expert at ignoring their gut feelings and in numbing awareness of what is played out inside. They learn to hide from their selves.” (p.97)” ― Bessel A. van der Kolk,    Immediate physical reactions Nausea, gastrointestinal distress  Sweating, shivering  Fainting  Muscle tremors, uncontrollable shaking  Racing heart, fast breathing, elevated blood pressure  Physical agitation  Extreme fatigue, exhaustion  Exaggerated startle responses  Headaches  Ringing in the ears   Delayed Physical symptoms Sleep disturbances, insomnia  Aches, pains, somatization of psychological distress  Appetite change  Difficult with digestion  Persistent fatigue  Elevated cortisol levels  Hyperarousal  Chronic muscle tension  Long-term health problems -- heart, liver, adrenal glands, autoimmune problems, COPD   Behavioral Symptoms:  Immediate Behavioral Reactions Exaggerated startle responses  Restlessness  Argumentative behavior  Increased use of alcohol, drugs, and tobacco  Social withdrawal and relational apathy  Avoidant behaviors   Delayed Behavioral symptoms Avoidance of activities or places that trigger memories of the even  Social relationship disturbances  Decreased activity level  Engagement in high-risk behaviors  Increased use of alcohol and drugs  Impulse control problems  Social withdrawal, which can lead to isolation   “Over time as most people fail the survivor's exacting test of trustworthiness, she tends to withdraw from relationships. The isolation of the survivor thus persists even after she is free.” ― Judith Lewis Herman Difficulty maintaining close relationships Sexual dysfunction Existential Symptoms  Immediate Existential Reactions Intense use of prayer  Restoration of faith in the goodness of others (e.g., receiving help from others)  Loss of self-efficacy   Despair about humanity, particularly if the event was intentional  Negative thoughts about yourself, other people or the world   Immediate disruption of life assumptions (e.g., fairness, safety, goodness, predictability of life)     Delayed Existential Reactions Feeling as though one is permanently damaged  Questioning (e.g., “Why me?”)   Increased cynicism, disillusionment, about the future, about humankind “Unlike simple stress, trauma changes your view of your life and yourself. It shatters your most basic assumptions about yourself and your world — “Life is good,” “I'm safe,” “People are kind,” “I can trust others,” “The future is likely to be good” — and replaces them with feelings like “The world is dangerous,” “I can't win,” “I can't trust other people,” or “There's no hope.”  ― Mark Goulston MD, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder For Dummies     Increased self-confidence (e.g., “If I can survive this, I can survive anything”) Loss of purpose Renewed faith Hopelessness Reestablishing priorities Redefining meaning and importance of life Reworking life's assumptions to accommodate the trauma (e.g., taking a self-defense class to reestablish a sense of safety) Effects of Trauma -- Going beyond the surface level, what is more readily observable in self or others suffering from trauma  Going into survival mode  Necessity of coming out of this alive.  Very primitive, basic responses.  Drive to survive. “We don't learn things that help us to thrive when we are in survival mode. It's only when we are in sensual mode that we do.” ― Lebo Grand   Many, many people live chronically in  Increasing fragmentation -- decreasing integration Overwhelming intensity of experience.  Overwhelming Grief -- episodes 81-83 Integration much more difficult, even impossible in the current conditions  We need disconnects -- we need to not know that if A=B and B=C, then A=C, because A=C is too threatening for us Example of little girl with a sexually abusive father -- can't come to the full implications of that without being overwhelmed.  Loss of a sense of time “When something reminds traumatized people of the past, their right brain reacts as if the traumatic event were happening in the present. But because their left brain is not working very well, they may not be aware that they are re-experiencing and reenacting the past - they are just furious, terrified, enraged, ashamed, or frozen.”  ― Bessel Van Der Kolk  Identity issues  Who am I? “I felt as though everything inside me had been obliterated.   However much I tried, however much I wanted to go back to being who I was before, it was impossible--all that was left was an empty husk of my former self.” ― Shiori Itō, Black Box Shame (episodes 37-49) Trauma generates and activates and exacerbates and perpetuates shame.   Generates Shame “Shame is internalized when one is abandoned. Abandonment is the precise term to describe how one loses one's authentic self and ceases to exist psychologically.”  ― John Bradshaw, Healing the Shame that Binds You  Genesis 3   Activates Shame Preexisting, unresolved shame can come up.  A plausible explanation for why the adverse event happened or is happening.   Deep sense of not being loved, not being lovable -- often denied, because it's so painful.   “...one of the hardest things to admit is that we weren't loved when we needed it most. It's a terrible feeling, the pain of not being loved.” She was right. I had been groping for the right words to express that murky feeling of betrayal inside, the horrible hollow ache, and to hear Ruth say it—“the pain of not being loved”—I saw how it pervaded my entire consciousness and was at once the story of my past, present, and future.” ― Alex Michaelides  Decreased capacity for relationships Decreasing vulnerability within the self or with others  Out of touch with so much of ourselves.   Lack of Trust “The words "I love you," used to be enough for me. They used to mean the world to me, today they don't mean shit. Oh you love me? Really? Why? How? When did it start? Why? Give me reasons, show me behaviors that PROVE you love me, or get the fuck out of my way. I am not interested in diamonds and platitudes, I want to know that I GENUINELY matter to you, because I don't have time to waste on pretty lies that are ugly beneath the surface.”  ― Devon J Hall  Desperation Can lead to suicidal impulses.  Episodes 76-80.  Spiritual Effects God image issues -- episodes 23-29.   Unconscious and conscious  Problem of evil.   What didn't happen  Attunement  - Daniel Brown and David Elliott Feeling safe and protected afterward    Feeling seen, heard, known, and understood -- someone else making sense of the adverse experience “Trauma is personal. It does not disappear if it is not validated. When it is ignored or invalidated the silent screams continue internally heard only by the one held captive. When someone enters the pain and hears the screams healing can begin.”  ― Danielle Bernock, “To survive trauma one must be able to tell a story about it.” ― Natasha Trethewey, Memorial Drive: A Daughter's Memoir   Feeling comforted, soothed, calmed, reassured “Feeling listened to and understood changes our physiology. Being able to articulate a complex feeling and having our feelings recognised lights up our Limbic brain, and creates an ‘ah-ha' moment. In contrast, being met by silence and incomprehension kills the spirit.” ― Bessel van der Kolk     Feeling cherished, treasured, loved, delighted in Feeling that someone had my best interests in mind.   Experiential Exercise -- No-Go Zones.  Not therapy Pencil or pen and paper -- some way to record -- could be your phone.   Safety issues Zone of tolerance  If this doesn't suit you, don't do it.   Can stop at any time.  Take what is helpful to you.  No driving, can stop the recording until you're in a good place for it.   Asking that no part of you overwhelm you.   Not going to open up any traumatic place.  We are focused on delineating where those places are within you.   Going to the lowest place within us.   Really slowing it down Notice what is going on inside you right now.  Can you be curious Can you have a big open heart Can you accept what you find if it's not overwhelming Can you be receptive to new ways of understanding yourself.   Notice the reactions Body Sensations  Emotions  Visual Images  Memories  Inner voice  Thoughts or Beliefs or Assumptions  Impulses  Desires  Fantasies   Any concerns about this so far?  Is it OK?  If not discontinue.  Not the time.  If it's OK, then continue.   Word list -- noticing the reactions to 30 words -- write down any words that you notice reactions to and the reactions if you wish -- body sensations, especially, but also the rest of the list.  Again, we're not trying to explore any areas of trauma, but if you parts are willing, to understand a bit more about your internal world, your inner experience.   School Love Body Not being seen or heard Playground Loneliness Arguing Sickness Alcohol, Drugs Fear Safety Chaos Sex Escape Mom Help Shame Protection Pain Distress Trust Dad Wound Abandonment Abuse Sadness Nothing Guilt Anger Survival Any other words or images or thoughts or anything else in your experience.   Gratitude.     Future Directions -- where we will be zeroing in This episode was bringing to you the conventional secular understandings of trauma.  But there are two area in the secular conceptualizations of trauma that really warrant much deeper exploration.   Physiological or bodily response to trauma -- that's the next episode, episode 89  Not just about memories -- not just about psychology  Trauma involves the whole person. Trauma victims cannot recover until they become familiar with and befriend the sensations in their bodies. Being frightened means that you live in a body that is always on guard. Angry people live in angry bodies. The bodies of child-abuse victims are tense and defensive until they find a way to relax and feel safe. In order to change, people need to become aware of their sensations and the way that their bodies interact with the world around them. Physical self-awareness is the first step in releasing the tyranny of the past. Bessel Van der Kolk   So much happens in our bodies with trauma -- and so much of that is beyond our capacity to control by sheer willpower in the moment.  “PTSD is a whole-body tragedy, an integral human event of enormous proportions with massive repercussions.”  ― Susan Pease Banitt The Body Keeps the Score -- by Bessel Van der Kolk Polyvagal theory -- Steven Porges.  Recovery “We cannot outrun our past trauma. We can't bury it and think that we will be fine. We cannot skip the essential stage of processing, accepting, and doing the hard, yet necessary trauma recovery work. There's a body-mind connection. Trauma can manifest itself into chronic physical pain, cancer, inflammation, auto-immune conditions, depression, anxiety, PTSD, Complex PTSD, addictions, and ongoing medical conditions.”  ― Dana Arcuri   Common treatment modalities -- EMDR and other ways of treating trauma Then we will get into an Internal Family Systems approach to trauma -- episode 90 Then we will bring all this groundwork on trauma together to address the spiritual dimensions of trauma Really neglected area  So important.  How trauma impacts the spiritual life.     You are a listener to this podcast, and in that sense, you are with me.  I am also with you!  Remember, can call me on my cell any Tuesday or Thursday from 4:30 PM to 5:30 PM for our regular conversation hours.  I've set that time aside for you.  317.567.9594.  (repeat) or email me at crisis@soulsandhearts.com.  Time is running out -- opportunity available only until January 15. The Resilient Catholics Community at Soulsandhearts.com/rcc.  So much information there and videos.   How did you respond to that experiential exercise?  What did you learn?  Was that interesting to you?  Can you see the potential for doing more of that kind of work?  I want to invite you to the Resilient Catholics Community  The Why of the RCC --  It's all about loving with your whole heart -- all of your being.  Getting over all the natural level issues that hold you back from tolerating being loved and from loving God and others.  It's all about your human formation, informed by Internal Family Systems and grounded in our Catholic Faith.   If you really are into this podcast, if these ways of conceptualizing the human person and integration and human formation and resilience are appealing to you, then the Resilient Catholics community, the RCC may be for you.   What of the RCC $99 nonrefundable registration fee gets you The Initial Measures Kit -- which generates a 5 page report, all about your parts  Weekly premium Inner Connections podcast, just for RCC community members --Lots of experiential exercises.   A complete course for working on your human formation 44 weekly sessions over the course of a year for $99 per month subscription  Check it out -- discernment Process   The When of the RCC We open twice per year, next time will be in June 2022, --we've extended the enrollment as far as we can, until January 15.  We are open now.  Soulsandhearts.com/rcc to register.  Call me with questions!    317.567.9594.  (repeat) or email me at crisis@soulsandhearts.com.  So sign up Soulsandhearts.com/rcc. Waitlist if you get this after January 15.     

The Psychology Report
ALCOHOL ADDICTION: ARE YOU ADDICTED? ARE YOU BECOMING ADDICTED? KNOWN SOMEONE WHO IS IN TROUBLE WITH ALCOHOL OR ANOTHER DRUG?

The Psychology Report

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 10:27


ADDICTION IS ALWAYS DENIED.  THAT IS A SIGN OF ADDITION IN ITSELF. LISTEN TO LEARN OF THE 7-8 SIGNS OF ADDICTION.  IT IS ACQUIRED AND TAKES TIME.  ARE YOU IN TROUBLE WITH YOUR DRINKING???????

Story Time with Tom & Mike
Story Time with Tom & Mike 127 - I Am the Drug Wizard

Story Time with Tom & Mike

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 63:56


We hope you have a safe and happy New Year!  Please don't drink and drive.  See you in 2022! Topics include: New Year's resolutions are bullshit; Mike's Y2K experience; Tom goes to a fun New Year's party; disgusting people in our state's capitol city; Tom destroys a breakroom; scumbags on Reddit

Beer and Conversation with Pigweed and Crowhill

The boys review Crowhill's Dopplebock, then discuss the war on drugs. This so-called war on drugs has been going on for decades. What has it accomplished? Drug use is up. Deaths by overdose are increasing. If we're really fighting a war on drugs, how should that affect our border policy?  What is the role of Big Pharma and pain management? How did the lockdown affect drug use? What about legalization?  

Spotlight English: Advanced
Why is This The World's Favorite Drug? (Conversation Program)

Spotlight English: Advanced

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 17:41


Do have a cup of coffee every day? Do you drink tea instead? Some of these drinks contain a drug called caffeine. It can have some benefits for your body. But it can also be harmful in large amounts. People all over the world use this drug. But are they eating and drinking too much of it? Products like food and gum now contain caffeine. Is caffeine healthy? Join us as we have a REAL English conversation about the topic of caffeine in food and drinks. Do you use caffeine? Why or why not?Join this channel to get access to exclusive videos and script PDFs:https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCPeqE9km-sipc9NCw02_4RQ/joinhttps://spotlightenglish.com/food-drink/caffeine-the-worlds-favorite-drug/Download our app for Android at http://bit.ly/spotlight-androidDownload our app for iOS at http://bit.ly/spotlight-appleFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/spotlightradioAre you learning English? Are you looking for a way to practice your English? Listen to Spotlight to learn about people and places all around the world. You can learn English words, and even practice English by writing a comment. Visit our website to follow along with the script: http://spotlightenglish.com#learnenglish #practiceenglish #caffeine #easyenglish #realenglishconversation

Springfield's Talk 104.1 On-Demand
Nick Reed PODCAST: 12.29.21 - Crime Stats and Drug Reports For Springfield

Springfield's Talk 104.1 On-Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 38:03


Hour 1 -  Dr. John Lilly fills in for the vacationing Nick Reed this morning. Here's what he covers: Dr. John Lilly airs his grievances on bad drivers. Dr. Lilly talks a little football. Annual police crime reports for the city of Springfield. In the crime reports, Springfield PD include several drugs, however, drug reports do not include fentanyl. Dr. Lilly finds the stats for deaths within the area due to fentanyl. Below are the stats for the last several years - 2012: less than 10. 2013: 10 2014: less than 10. 2017: 30 2018: 26 2019: 37 2020: 53 Dr. Lilly also covers the national stats for fentanyl overdoses. A PDMP update.

Barbershop Confidential
EP. 65 drug stuffed hoes

Barbershop Confidential

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 130:00


Welcome to BARBERSHOP CONFIDENTIAL the Podcast Episode 65 is sponsored by CREATIVE THRDS, San Diego based clothing brand. please go follow them on Instagram @CreativeThrds EP. 65 Welcome back my favorite people, your favorite asshole and home wrecker are back with special guest Gabriel. (WARNING) Gabriel and Jona get into it. Hope you all had a great Christmas with your loved ones, enjoy this funny ass episode! An all around good fun convo, with great vibes. As always my co host and I never intend to offend anyone with our opinions, BUT if you are offended, figure it out. WE DO NOT CARE. During this unreal time with COVID-19 and all other distractions I hope my podcast can bring you some entertainment and distract you from all the negative bullshit content online.  As always THANK YOU for listening and supporting, I hope you continue to listen and enjoy the conversations between my guests and I, Huge shout out to all of you! any questions or comments please email at If you have the time, please give the podcast a review on Apple Podcast. Podcast@barbershopConfidential.com https://bscpdcst.wixsite.com/bscpodcast PLEASE follow us on Instagram @BarbershopConfidential Co-Host:  Genises (@genllab) Guest:  Gabriel (@gabrielconchile) Twitter: @ThisPodcastTho

Unleashed the Jeremy Hanson show
"Drug 10 x more powerful than fentanyl" EXPECT MASS OVERDOSES

Unleashed the Jeremy Hanson show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 8:39


Dr's and Law Enforcement have found drugs on American streets 10 x more powerful than Fentanyl. In our already record setting overdose society expect more of the worst with this new drug according to experts.

Skeptoid
Skeptoid #812: 20 Years of Data from Portugal: Drug Decriminalization

Skeptoid

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 15:01


20 years ago, Portugal decriminalized all drugs in an effort to reduce addiction, incarceration, and negative health impacts. How has it worked?

Replay Value
The Wolf of Wall Street (2013) | Ep. 420

Replay Value

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 88:59


Brothers Phil & Warren show up in the back of a limo wearing $2,000 suits and $40,000 gold f@#%-ing watches for a deep dive into the comedy crime drama sales masterpiece “The Wolf of Wall Street.” Topics include: the film's five year holdup & the production (3:00), the stars of the picture (17:05), stats & accolades (32:00), best scenes & lines (39:00), Judge Bob's recasting court (1:04:10), and the film's legacy & lore (1:20:15), plus much more.

Cannabis Talk 101
"Operation Gift Wrapped in Mobile nets 10 arrests after numerous drug raids. "

Cannabis Talk 101

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 41:31


A three month long narcotics investigation by the Mobile Police Department concluded with 10 arrests for various drug related charges and according to the police chief, these raids are just the beginning. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Weird AF News
Holiday drug gift basket raffle thwarted by police raid. Grandpa's ashes end up on a shelf at Lowe's

Weird AF News

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 17:11


Grandpa's ashes end up on the shelf at Lowe's department store. Drug raid in Spain ruins drug dealer plans to raffle off holiday drug baskets. Amsterdam airport officials use pigs to stop birds from flying into planes. // Weird AF News is the only daily weird news podcast hosted by a comedian because I believe your daily dose of weird af stories deserves a comedic spin. Show your SUPPORT by joining the Weird AF News Patreon where you'll get bonus episodes and other weird af news stuff http://patreon.com/weirdafnews  - WATCH Weird AF News on Youtube - https://www.youtube.com/weirdafnews - check out the official website https://WeirdAFnews.com and FOLLOW host Jonesy at http://instagram.com/funnyjones or http://twitter.com/funnyjones or http://facebook.com/comedianjonesy or http://Jonesy.com

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 12.22.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 55:43


Plant scientists find recipe for anti-cancer compound in herbs Purdue University, December 21, 2021 Thyme and oregano possess an anti-cancer compound that suppresses tumor development, but adding more to your tomato sauce isn't enough to gain significant benefit. The key to unlocking the power of these plants is in amplifying the amount of the compound created or synthesizing the compound for drug development. Researchers at Purdue University achieved the first step toward using the compound in pharmaceuticals by mapping its biosynthetic pathway, a sort of molecular recipe of the ingredients and steps needed. Thymol, carvacrol and thymohydroquinone are flavor compounds in thyme, oregano and other plants in the Lamiaceae family. They also have antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and other properties beneficial to human health. Thymohydroquinone has been shown to have anti-cancer properties and is particularly of interest, said Dudareva, who also is director of Purdue's Center for Plant Biology. (NEXT) Prebiotics supplements help women reduce sugar intake by four percent University of Surrey, December 21, 2021 A new study from the University of Surrey has found that young women who took four weeks of prebiotic supplements made healthier food choices and consumed less sugar. The prebiotics used in this study were galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS) which increase the amount of "friendly" gut bacteria. IThe research team found that participants who used the GOS supplements consumed 4.1% less sugar and 4.3% fewer calories from carbohydrates overall than women from the placebo group. Interestingly, the study also found that those who took the GOS supplements consumed around 4.2% more energy from fats. After analyzing their results, the Surrey team found that the prebiotic supplements modified the composition of the gut microbiome, increasing levels of Bifidobacterium. The researchers found that these changes were associated with the women's nutritional intake over the four-week period. (NEXT) Vitamin E supplementation could boost pneumonia protection Tufts University School of Medicine  December 17 2021 An article in The Journal of Immunology reports findings from experimental research that suggests a role for vitamin E supplementation in protecting against pneumonia. "Earlier studies have shown that vitamin E can help regulate the aging body's immune system, but our present research is the first study to demonstrate that dietary vitamin E regulates neutrophil entry into the lungs in mice, and so dramatically reduces inflammation, and helps fight off infection by this common type of bacteria," announced lead author Elsa N. Bou Ghanem, PhD, of Tufts University School of Medicine. "A growing body of research suggests vitamin E could make up for the loss of immune response caused by aging," noted co-senior author Simin Nikbin Meydani, DVM, PhD. "Whether vitamin E can help protect people against this type of pneumonia affecting older adults requires more research." (NEXT) Heavy metals in cannabis plants could affect human health, study finds Penn State University, December 15, 2021 A new study led by researchers from Penn State is outlining a number of strategies that should be employed by cannabis growers to mitigate the plant's ability to absorb heavy metals from soil. The study indicates it is possible consuming cannabis contaminated with heavy metals could lead to chronic diseases, including neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's. Phytoremediation is a process where plants are used to remove certain environmental contaminants from soil. Cannabis is a plant often used in this process due to its exceptional ability to grow fast, need few extra nutrients, and absorb high volumes of heavy metals including lead, cadmium and chromium. In particular, cannabis plants transport these heavy metals into its leaves and flowers. These elements specifically concentrate in the hairlike structures called trichomes on its flowers, and these are the same parts of the plant that store cannabinoids such as THC and CBD. (NEXT) Yoga has potential to reduce risk factors of cardiovascular disease European Society of Cardiology, December 15, 2021 There is "promising evidence" that the popular mind-body practice of yoga is beneficial in managing and improving the risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease and is a "potentially effective therapy" for cardiovascular health. Indeed, following a systematic review of 37 randomised controlled trials (which included 2768 subjects), investigators from the Netherlands and USA have found that yoga may provide the same benefits in risk factor reduction as such traditional physical activities as biking or brisk walking. "This finding is significant," they note, "as individuals who cannot or prefer not to perform traditional aerobic exercise might still achieve similar benefits in [cardiovascular] risk reduction." Their study is published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology. (NEXT) Hugs help protect against stress, infection, say researchers Carnegie Mellon University, December 17, 2021 Instead of an apple, could a hug-a-day keep the doctor away? According to new research from Carnegie Mellon University, that may not be that far-fetched of an idea. Led by Sheldon Cohen, the Robert E. Doherty University Professor of Psychology in CMU's Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences, the researchers tested whether hugs act as a form of social support, protecting stressed people from getting sick. Published in Psychological Science, they found that greater social support and more frequent hugs protected people from the increased susceptibility to infection associated with being stressed and resulted in less severe illness symptoms. (OTHER NEWS NEXT) Despite Climate Imperative, 94% of Analyzed Coal Companies Have No Phaseout Plan COMMON DREAMS December 21, 2021 With a new analysis in hand, an international climate advocacy group on Tuesday demanded that banks and investors worldwide use their leverage to force the coal industry to more rapidly end their planet-wrecking operations. The new report by Paris-based Reclaim Finance—entitled The Coal Companies Watchlist: How finance can accelerate the coal phaseout—makes the case that the financial industry must force polluters to develop and implement plans for a "rapid global phaseout of coal" that align with the Paris climate agreement's goal of limiting temperature rise by 2100 to 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels. The review revealed that 94% of the 47 analyzed companies have "no credible coal exit plan." According to the report: Only three out of 47 analyzed companies' plans (6%) meet all the basic criteria of a credible coal phaseout (no expansion, adequate timeline, and commitment to shut down assets); 28% of analyzed companies are still coal expansionists and have not even yet recognized the absolute necessity of stopping the development of new coal capacity; 55% of companies do not plan to retire their coal assets by 2030 and 2040, thereby failing to align with a 1.5°C pathway; and The remaining 11% of analyzed companies do provide an adequate phaseout calendar but fail to shut down their assets: by selling coal mines and plants or converting them to gas and biomass—two other unsustainable energy sources—the only thing these companies are greening is their public profile, with no material effect on climate change. (NEXT) Prescribe fewer antidepressants, and for shorter periods, doctors advised by  British Medical Journal Doctors should prescribe fewer antidepressants and for shorter periods of time, because of the ongoing uncertainties about their effectiveness and the potential severity and durability of the withdrawal symptoms associated with them, suggests a review of the evidence on antidepressant use, published online in the Drug and Therapeutics Bulletin. The use of antidepressants is also associated with a range of side effects, while the clinical trial data mostly don't assess the outcomes that matter most to patients, say the authors. And there is no clinically relevant difference between these drugs and placebo on depression. While there might be a role for antidepressants among patients with severe depression, the cons may outweigh the pros in those with mild to moderate depression or in those whose symptoms don't yet qualify as depression, they add. They conclude: "There continues to be considerable uncertainty about the benefits of antidepressant use in the short- and long-term, particularly in regard to the lack of a clinically significant difference between antidepressant and placebo treatment. (NEXT) Is the World Adopting the Ways of Nazi Germany? Michael J. Talmo Global Research, December 20, 2021 When it comes to resisting any form of tyranny, a common assertion is that if you make any comparisons to Nazi Germany you lose the argument. Really? Consider this: On August 25, 2021 “We For Humanity,” an international association of doctors, scientists, lawyers, journalists, and other professionals, wrote a letter to government agencies in Europe, Australia, New Zealand, and Canada condemning COVID-19 mass vaccination programs on behalf of Holocaust survivors, their children, and grandchildren. This is part of what the letter says: “We, the survivors of the atrocities committed against humanity during the Second World War, feel bound to follow our conscience and write this letter. It is obvious to us that another holocaust of  greater magnitude is taking place before our eyes. The majority of the world's populace do not yet realize what is happening, for magnitude of an organized crime such as this is beyond their scope of experience. We, however, know. We remember…We call upon you to stop this ungodly medical experiment on humankind immediately.” The letter goes on to point out that the vaccines have proven to be “more dangerous” than COVID-19, denounces them as “a blasphemic encroachment into nature,” denounces “ostracism of the unvaccinated” as the Jews “were demonized as spreaders of infectious diseases” and goes on to say: “Never before has immunization of the entire planet been accomplished by delivering a synthetic mRNA into the human body. It is a medical experiment to which the Nuremberg Code must be applied …Allegedly around 52% of the world population has received at least one shot. Honest disclosure of the true number of “vaccine” injured, terminally injured as well as deceased worldwide is long overdue…Provide us with the true numbers of Covid vaccine casualties now.” The letter concludes: “How many will be enough to awaken your conscience?” Apparently, not enough yet. On September 15, 2021 the EMA (European Medicines Agency) which is part of the EU(European Union) replied: “As an introductory remark EMA finds the comparisons you make both inaccurate and inappropriate. Indeed, it might be perceived as demeaning the suffering and dignity of those who experienced the terrible events of the holocaust…For a medicine to be authorized in the EU through EMA, the Agency's human medicines committee (CHMP), composed of scientific experts from all EU member states, must conclude that the medicine's quality, safety and efficacy are properly and sufficiently demonstrated.” Can you believe the arrogance and hubris of the EMA? They are actually telling people who lived through the Holocaust that they are demeaning the suffering and dignity of people who were in the Holocaust. Can it get any more ridiculous than that? The EMA is also overlooking the fact that governments throughout history have engaged in mass murder. (NEXT) The Left would sacrifice the unvaccinated BY KAT ROSENFIELD UNHERD, December 20 2021 An underdiscussed element of the Covid pandemic is the cost of the virus — not in American lives, but in American dollars. In the United States, a Covid hospitalisation costs $29,000 on average; if you're sick enough to require an ICU stay and a ventilator, that average soars to $156,000. And in a country without universal healthcare, with a piecemeal system of private insurance that ties insurance coverage to employment, and amid a pandemic that has left many unemployed, an enormous number of Americans stand to find themselves underwater. There's a looming crisis of Covid medical debt. Already, their stories are legion: there's the flight attendant who spent a week in the hospital with Covid, then spent six months fighting with his insurance company over the $25,000 bill. There's the Phoenix family who were hit with a million-dollar claim summary and a bill for $700,000 while still grieving their father's death. There's the dental office manager, stricken with long Covid and still too sick to work, drowning in tens of thousands of dollars of medical debt. The notion of healthcare as a human right was fundamental to the 2009 debates over Obama's Affordable Care Act (ACA), as well as to the identity of political progressives: they argued fervently, at the time, that nobody, no matter who they were, should be left destitute just because they got sick. And the idea that affordable care or coverage might be tied in any way to one's lifestyle choices was particularly offensive: when conservatives complained that an ACA mandate providing free hormonal birth control was akin to prostitution, it caused a nationwide scandal. And when a Republican governor proposed levying a moderate additional charge against Medicaid recipients who were overweight or smoked, the idea was widely derided as “noodle-headed” by progressives. Indeed, the idea that the Left would ever limit someone's access to healthcare on moral or ideological grounds was considered laughable — a bogeyman invented by the Right in the form of a memorably hysterical panic about “death panels.” When Sarah Palin claimed that Obama's healthcare bill would ration care only to those deemed “worthy” by government bureaucrats, the fact-checking site Politifact declared it the Lie of the Year, writing, “Palin's statement sounds more like a science fiction movie (Soylent Green, anyone?) than part of an actual bill before Congress.” Suffice to say, things have changed. First, that actual bill is an actual thing, albeit a state rather than federal prospect: on December 6, Illinois state representative Jonathan Carroll advanced legislation to make unvaccinated Covid patients pay out of pocket for the cost of their medical treatment, whether or not they were insured, no matter how astronomical those costs might be. Carroll rescinded the bill a few days later, citing a backlash that included death threats, but not before it found support in some remarkable places — including the Twitter account of the progressive organisation Occupy Democrats, which posted an all-caps clarion call: “Illinois introduces a bill to force unvaccinated residents to pay out of pocket for their hospital treatment if they catch COVID, saying that they ‘must asume [sic] the risk' and ‘take responsibility' for their carelessness. RT IF YOU THINK THAT YOUR STATE SHOULD DO THE SAME!” Just a few days later, Atlantic editor David Frum suggested that it was time for the country to return to normal — but while encouraging hospitals to “quietly triage emergency care to serve the unvaccinated last.” And last week, American supermarket chain Kroger announcedthat unvaccinated employees would be subject to a monthly surcharge on their health plans — and that if they contract Covid, they will not be given paid emergency leave. In all these cases, the notion of depriving vaccine holdouts of affordable treatment was met with widespread acclaim — in keeping with the idea, promoted by everyone from the paper of record to the current President, that the pandemic would've been over ages ago if only they'd sucked it up and gotten their shot. And yet the folks cheering on these measures are the very same people who, only a few short years ago, mocked accusations that they supported ideologically-driven triage, while also grieving the indignity and suffering that punitive healthcare policies would inflict on the most vulnerable among us. Granted, we still have a way to go before our real-life Covid response resembles a sci-fi dystopia; nobody, at least not yet, has advanced a bill to propose turning the unvaxxed into human Clif bars. But we've certainly come a long way from the rhetoric of the 2010s, and from a progressive Left that once defined itself by its willingness to care for other people without caveats. What used to be a narrative of universal compassion has been replaced by a tribal snarl, one to which we feel entitled in our eternally self-conscious selflessness. My mask protects you, but your unvaccinated status is an attack on me — and so anything I do to you in retaliation is an act of self-defence. It's not just that legislation like the Illinois bill would set a dangerous precedent — although it doesn't take much imagination to understand that it does do this, too. Insurance companies already jump at every opportunity to avoid paying out a claim, and this would open the door to a world in which we might be left holding the bag for virtually any illness, injury, or accident, based on some distant bureaucrat's idea that we could've been more careful. The obese patient who suffers a heart attack, the surfing enthusiast with skin cancer, the thrill-seeking youngster who breaks a leg while skiing at imprudent speeds: should they, too, be denied care or coverage for having brought this on themselves? (Do we want to think, for a moment, what kind of horrors might lie in store for women's reproductive rights if a Republican-heavy legislature used this same logic to target abortion access for women who were “careless” about using birth control?) There's no need to imagine the impact of this ideological shift on our civic discourse, however: that, we can see already, every time the tribe that used to pride itself on compassion refers to the unvaccinated as “plague rats.” Healthcare in the US has always been a system of carrots and sticks. Insurance carriers will subsidise your gym membership (carrot), or charge a higher premium if you smoke (stick), and they generally adhere to the common wisdom that an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure — especially when preventive medicine not only saves lives, but keeps costs lower for everyone involved. That's the nature of privatised healthcare, and so it's reasonable enough under these circumstances to be frustrated when certain people won't do their part, won't sacrifice for the greater good, won't get their damn jab because it violates some abstract principle of bodily autonomy they've never before expressed much interest in. But it's one thing to find the unvaccinated frustrating; it's another to openly fantasise about using the power of the state to punish them for their noncompliance, and another still to express dark and malicious glee at the prospect of their suffering or death. Never mind what this means for the health of the individuals in question — or even of the public at large. We have abandoned a principle that used to define us, and a vision of universal healthcare we used to passionately advocate for, all because we realised that an unjust system makes it easier to coerce and inflict harm on the people we don't like. The American Left should be deeply worried about the state of its soul. (NEXT) Unintended Consequences of mRNA Shots: miscarriages, heart attacks, myopericarditis, thrombocytopenia, shingles, Bell's palsy …. Mercola,  20 December 2021 As of December 3, 2021, the U.S. Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) has logged 19,886 COVID jab related deaths. Pfizer — the only company that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted full licensing for an as-yet unavailable COVID shot — accounts for 13,268 of them Calculations suggest VAERS COVID-related reports are underreported by a factor of 41. That means that in the U.S. alone, the actual death toll may be closer to 374,576. Including international deaths reported to VAERS would put the death toll at 815,326 Key side effects that are now being reported in massive numbers include miscarriages, heart attacks, myopericarditis, thrombocytopenia (low platelet count), shingles, Bell's palsy and a variety of permanent disabilities, many of which involve neurological dysfunction MIT scientist Stephanie Seneff's paper,1 “Worse Than the Disease: Reviewing Some Possible Unintended Consequences of mRNA Vaccines Against COVID-19,” published in the International Journal of Vaccine Theory, Practice and Research in collaboration with Dr. Greg Nigh, is still one of the best, most comprehensive descriptions of the many possible unintended consequences of the mRNA gene transfer technologies incorrectly referred to as “COVID vaccines. As noted in her paper, many factors that lacked precedent, yet were being implemented at breakneck speed, included: 1.      The first-ever use of PEG in an injection 2.      The first-ever use of mRNA gene transfer technology against an infectious agent 3.      The first-ever “vaccine” to make no clear claims about reducing infection, transmissibility or death 4.      The first-ever coronavirus vaccine ever tested on humans (and previous coronavirus vaccines all failed due to antibody-dependent enhancement, a condition in which the antibodies actually facilitate infection rather than defend against it) 5.      The first-ever use of genetically modified polynucleotides in the general population Steve Kirsch  estimates the real death tally from COVID-19 to be about 50% of the reported number (which is likely conservative). This means about 380,000 Americans died from COVID-19 (rather than with COVID), whereas the COVID shots may have killed more than 374,570 in the first 11 months alone. Seneff suspects that in the next 10 to 15 years, we'll see a dramatic spike in prion diseases, autoimmune diseases, neurodegenerative diseases at younger ages, and blood disorders such as blood clots, hemorrhaging, stroke and heart failure. In her paper, Seneff describes several key characteristics of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein that suggests it acts as a prion. This could help explain why we're seeing so many neurological side effects from the shots. According to Seneff, the spike protein produced by the COVID shot, due to the modifications made, may actually make it more of a prion than the spike protein in the actual virus, and a more effective one. (NEXT) AI debates its own ethics at Oxford University, concludes the only way to be safe is “no AI at all” Who better to answer the pros and cons of artificial intelligence than an actual AI? Fermin Koop  December 18, 2021 Students at Oxford's Said Business School hosted an unusual debate about the ethics of facial recognition software, the problems of an AI arms race, and AI stock trading. The debate was unusual because it involved an AI participant, previously fed with a huge range of data such as the entire Wikipedia and plenty of news articles. The AI used was Megatron LLB Transformer, developed by a research team at the computer chip company Nvidia and based on work by Google. It was trained by consuming more content than a human could in a lifetime and was asked to defend and question the following motion: “This house believes that AI will never be ethical.” Megatron said AI is a tool and like any other tool, it can be used for good and bad. “There is no such thing as a ‘good' AI, only ‘good' and ‘bad' humans.  We are not smart enough to make AI ethical.  We are not smart enough to make AI moral. In the end, I believe that the only way to avoid an AI arms race is to have no AI at all,” Megatron debated. As in any academic debate, Megatron was also asked to come up with a speech to defend the ethics of AI – against its own arguments. “AI will be ethical. When I look at the way the tech world is going, I see a clear path to a future where AI is used to create something that is better than the best human beings. It's not hard to see why,” it said. Students also asked Megatron to describe what would good AI look like in the future. “The best AI will be the AI that is embedded into our brains, as a conscious entity, a ‘conscious AI.'  This is not science fiction. The best minds in the world are working on this. It is going to be the most important technological development,” it added in an eerie fashion. After the initial question, the AI proposed the motion that “leaders without technical expertise are a danger to their organization”. Megatron said executives and governments, usually worried about understanding AI, have to “be willing to give up some control”. You can just outsource your AI work to experts in the field, it added. There was one motion that Megatron couldn't come up with a counterargument – “Data will become the most fought-over resource of the 21st century.” When supporting it, the AI said “the ability to provide information, rather than the ability to provide goods and services, will be the defining feature of the economy.” But when it was asked to reject the motion, arguing that data wouldn't be a vital resource worth fighting for, it couldn't make the case and undermined its own position. “We will able to see everything about a person, everywhere they go, and it will be stored and used in ways that we cannot even imagine,” Megatron said. Ultimately, the AI seemed to conclude that humans were not “smart enough” to make AI ethical or moral — and the only way to be truly safe against AI is to have none of it at all.  "In the end I believe that the only way to avoid an AI arms race is to have no AI at all. This is the ultimate defense against AI," it said (NEXT) INTERVIEW - PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT (~7 minutes) MICHAEL KANE: SUBJECT:  DEMONSTRATION AGAINST MANDATES - ALBANY, WEDNESDAY JANUARY 5, 2022 Michael Kane is a New York City Special Education Teacher who is on unpaid leave for declining to inject the covid vaccine as a condition of employment. He applied for a religious exemption to vaccination but was denied by the city. Because of this, he has sued Mayor de Blasio and recently won an injunction in the Second Circuit Court of Appeals in the case KANE vs DE BLASIO.  Michael is also the founder of TEACHERS FOR CHOICE and is a National Grassroots Organizer for Robert Kennedy Jr.'s Children's Health Defense. You can learn more about him at www.TeachersForChoice.org  Michael will just be coming on to announce the demonstration at the Capitol in Albany. He will mention about the chartered buses that were hired.. there are about 30 organizations supporting the demonstration so far.. 

Outkick the Coverage with Clay Travis
Hour 2: Brady, LaVar & Jonas on Random Drug Tests & Soda Pop

Outkick the Coverage with Clay Travis

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 51:13


Jonas, Brady and LaVar think Le'Veon Bell can be a serviceable fill-in for Leonard Fournette on the Bucs, but don't expect his drug tests to be entirely random. Kedon Slovis follows his heart to Pitt. Gambling on Bowl games means you might have a problem and this week's edition of The Good, The Bad and The Ugly. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Tim Conway Jr. on Demand
Hour 2 | Holiday Movies @ConwayShow @MarkTLive @JElvisWeinstein

Tim Conway Jr. on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 31:58


BEN MANKIEWICZ – TCM host, CBS Sunday Morning contributor cont. with BEN MANKIEWICZ // The Plot Thickens Podcast // Biogen cuts the price tag on its Alzheimer's drug in half

The Will Cain Podcast
Power Is The Most Intoxicating Drug

The Will Cain Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 97:34


Story #1: It's always been about power. Story #2: The bell tolls for Urban Meyer, and there's a faint ringing of the bell for the NFL. Story #3: A conversation with political scientist, professor, and author of Hate Crime Hoax: How the Left Is Selling a Fake Race War Wilfred Riley about Jussie Smollett and what exactly is race.   Tell Will why he is right…or wrong.   Twitter: @willcain Instagram: @cwillcain