Podcasts about Hamas

Palestinian Islamic political organization

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Latest podcast episodes about Hamas

HaYovel | The Heartland Connection
Why the MEDIA DIDN'T REPORT This Part of the Story

HaYovel | The Heartland Connection

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 26:23


On October 29th, a Hamas affiliated terrorist went to Kiryat Arba (near Hebron) and opened fire on the Jewish residents there. Ronen Chananyah, who was inside an Arab-owned store with his son, was shot in the head and killed. What the media didn't tell you, is that the terrorist received a terminal diagnosis that gave him only days to live shortly before the murder. The Palestinian Authority's pay-to-slay program is essentially a life insurance policy that pays people to kill Jews. Unfortunately, the US Administration is not only funding this corrupt and horrendous policy, but they are also condemning Israel for things like daring to elect a right-wing government, or even thinking about annexing parts of Judea and Samaria.

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
How rise of far-right challenges Israel's global relationships

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 16:25


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Diplomatic correspondent Lazar Berman and military correspondent Emanuel Fabian join host Amanda Borschel-Dan on today's episode. Early Friday morning, the Israeli military struck a rocket factory in the Gaza Strip, hours after four rockets were launched at Israel from the Hamas-run Palestinian enclave. What sparked this most recent exchange of fire? We hear about ripple effects from the recent November 1 election, starting with a recent statement from Bahrain. The British government said on Thursday that it would not relocate its embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, backing away after a pledge made by former prime minister Liz Truss to weigh the matter, shortly before she left office last month. Any surprise here? A US-based Orthodox Jewish nonprofit on Wednesday announced a new partnership with the Israeli military to provide kosher food and other supplies to soldiers who arrive in the country for joint training and other activities with American forces. Is kosher food so hard to find in the US? Discussed articles include: Israel strikes ‘rocket factory' in Gaza after rockets launched at south Allies may worry over far-right's election gains, but few can afford to shun Israel Paralyzed Nation no more? ToI experts break down Israel's election results After Netanyahu's win, Bahrain pledges to ‘continue building' Israel partnership With far right ascendant in Israel, Blinken tells Abbas US committed to 2 states UK backs away from possible Jerusalem embassy move floated by ex-PM Truss Orthodox nonprofit teams up with IDF to aid religious troops stationed in US Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. Illustrative image: Secretary of State Antony Blinken, left, and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu arrive for a joint statement after a meeting at the Prime Minister's office, May 25, 2021, in Jerusalem, Israel. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, Pool)See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Greek Current
The limits of Erdogan's charm offensive with Israel

The Greek Current

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2022 13:22


The latest visit to Turkey of Israeli Defense Minister Benny Gantz has put the Israel-Turkey relationship in the spotlight. Despite the continued tensions on a number of issues - from Turkey's hosting of Hamas to Turkish President Erdogan's aggressive rhetoric in the past against Israel - Ankara and Jerusalem have taken several steps to improve relations this year. Sinan Ciddi, the co-author of a recent piece in The National Interest titled “The Limits of Turkey's Charm Offensive”, joins Thanos Davelis to discuss Erdogan's charm offensive with Israel, what's motivating Ankara to try and mend relations with Jerusalem, and whether this effort is, at best, window dressing on a cold peace.Sinan Ciddi is a non-resident senior fellow at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies (FDD), where he contributes to FDD's Turkey Program and Center on Military and Political Power (CMPP). He is also an Associate Professor of Security Studies at the Command and Staff College-Marine Corps University and Georgetown University's School of Foreign Service. Read Sinan Ciddi and David May's latest piece in The National Interest: The Limits of Turkey's Israeli Charm OffensiveYou can read the articles we discuss on our podcast here:Greek central bank chief: ECB should slow rate hikes, needs allies in inflation battleGreece urged to dig harder on phone surveillance scandalMEPs urge Greece to do more to investigate spyware scandalLearn about HALC's #NoJetsForTurkey campaign and take action here: https://hellenicleaders.salsalabs.org/nojetsforturkeyletter/index.html

The Watchman Newscast with Erick Stakelbeck
Israel STRIKES Hamas Rocket Factory; Russia to STRENGTHEN Iran Nuclear Program? | Watchman Newscast

The Watchman Newscast with Erick Stakelbeck

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 11:40


On today's Watchman Newscast, host Erick Stakelbeck breaks down last night's rocket barrage from Gaza into Israel—the first time such attack since August. In retaliation, Israeli fighter jets launched several airstrikes against Hamas positions in Gaza. Could this be a prelude to a larger coming conflict? Plus, U.S. intelligence reportedly reveals that Iran may be seeking Russia's help to acquire additional nuclear materials. Is Tehran now calling in a favor from Moscow after supplying the Russian military with drones in Ukraine? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Secure Freedom Minute
Bibi's Welcome - and Necessary - Mandate

Secure Freedom Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 1:00


Some good news emerged from Israel this week. The electorate of the Jewish State finally decided to reinstate a strong and tested leader, Benjamin Netanyahu, with an actual parliamentary majority. The vote reflected understandable concerns about a toxic brew of growing dangers, including: an imminently nuclear-armed Iran; increasingly deadly weapons in the hands of Tehran's terrorist proxies doing business as Hamas and Hezbollah; and rising violence by jihadist Palestinians within Israel and territories it controls.  This is no time for weak and feckless leadership in Jerusalem.  Another electoral factor appears to have been a repudiation of the outgoing leftist interim government's submissiveness to the dictates of a hostile Biden administration. “Bibi” has shown himself able and willing to stand up to anti-Zionists in Washington. He now has a mandate to do that, and deserves our steadfast support as he fulfills it.  This is Frank Gaffney.

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
Was Israel behind senior Lion's Den member's assassination?

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 17:09


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Editor David Horovitz and military correspondent Emanuel Fabian join host Amanda Borschel-Dan on today's episode. Lion's Den member Tamer Kilani, a member of the upstart Palestinian terror organization, was killed early Sunday by an explosive device attached to a motorcycle detonated in Nablus's Old City. Why or why not could Israel be behind the killing? Yesterday, the Kan television channel aired a recording of Religious Zionist head Bezalel Smotrich that was apparently made last year in which he sounded pretty disloyal to opposition head Benjamin Netanyahu. What was on the recording? We hear why Horovitz thinks that the November 1 elections will indeed be decisive. Three men from northern Israel were indicted on Thursday for allegedly sending a large volume of sensitive information to the Hamas terror group in Turkey, and for plans to sabotage Israel's cellular network in a future war. We hear why this is so dangerous to the IDF. Finally, Horovitz briefly compares Israel's chaotic electoral processes with that of England. Discussed articles include: Alleged assassination in Nablus may signal major Israeli policy change in West Bank Senior member of Palestinian terror group Lion's Den killed in Nablus explosion Smotrich: Netanyahu ‘lying through his teeth,' was desperate to ally with Ra'am Why this election is a defining moment for Israel, how it's run, what it stands for 3 Israelis charged in Hamas plot to sabotage telecom networks used by IDF during war Why the British public is not choosing its leader Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. IMAGE: Mourners carry the body of Tamer al-Kilani, a top fighter in the Palestinian militant group Den of Lions, who the group said was killed by an explosive device planted in a motorcycle, during his funeral in the West Bank city of Nablus, October 23, 2022. (AP Photo/Majdi Mohammed)See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
UN releases 2nd damning Israel report; soaring real estate

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2022 17:58


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Diplomatic correspondent Lazar Berman and real estate reporter Danielle Nagler join host Amanda Borschel-Dan. Berman discusses a 28-page report by The United Nations' ongoing Commission of Inquiry investigating rights abuses in Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip following last year's 11-day fight between Israel and Hamas in Gaza that was released on Thursday. What crimes does it accuse Israel of -- and does the report have teeth? Ukrainian President Zelensky's chief of staff Andriy Yermak held a virtual meeting with leaders of Jewish organizations and prominent Russian-speaking Israelis, asking them to push Jerusalem to provide Kyiv with air defense systems. However, according to a Channel 13 news report over the weekend, Israel has indeed proposed to supply Ukraine with an alert system for aerial threats. We hear why Kyiv is perhaps unhappy with the offer. Israeli housing prices soared a record 19% over the last year, according to a report by the Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS), the largest year-on-year jump since price tracking began. Nagler digs in. The former Dan Pearl hotel, which sits just next to Mamilla, has sat empty for some 15 years. Nagler describes how things may soon change. Discussed articles include: UN report denounces Israel's ‘unlawful occupation,' demands prosecution of officials Top Zelensky aide asks Jewish leaders to press Israel on Ukraine weapons Report: Ukraine not cooperating with Israel on proposed missile alert system Israeli housing prices keep soaring, up a record 19% from last year Plans underway for new Jerusalem hotel after city gets okay to raze central eyesore Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. IMAGE: The United Nation flag waves in the wind on the top of an UN building in Geneva, Switzerland, June 14, 2021. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber, File )See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Daily News Brief by TRT World
October 14, 2022

Daily News Brief by TRT World

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 2:28


*) Palestine's Fatah, Hamas sign 'historic' reconciliation deal in Algeria Palestinian factions have signed an agreement in Algiers aimed at resolving 15 years of discord by holding elections within a year after months of talks mediated by Algeria. The deal aims to end a rift between President Mahmoud Abbas' Fatah movement and Hamas that has split Palestinian governance in besieged Gaza from the occupied West Bank. It also stipulates elections for the Palestinian National Council, a parliament for Palestinians including the millions-strong diaspora. *) Lebanon endorses maritime border deal with Israel Lebanon has approved a US-brokered maritime border deal with Israel, unlocking significant offshore gas production for the eastern Mediterranean neighbours. Announcing the approval of the deal, Lebanese President Michel Aoun described it as a "historic achievement". He said Lebanon was able to recover a disputed area of 860 square kilometres under the agreement. *) Iraq gets new president, PM after months of political gridlock Iraq now has a new president and prime minister after a year of political gridlock and violence in the war-scarred nation. Abdul Latif Rashid, 78, replaces Barham Saleh as head of state after the two-round vote in parliament on Thursday, winning more than 160 votes against 99 for Saleh. After the vote, Iraq's newly elected president named Mohammed Shia al Sudani as prime minister-designate. *) Residents in 'annexed' Kherson begin fleeing to Russia Evacuees from Ukraine's southern Kherson region are expected to begin arriving in Russia after a Moscow-installed official suggested residents should leave for safety. The development is seen as a sign of Moscow's weakening hold on territory it claims to have annexed. The first civilians fleeing from Kherson were due to arrive in Russia's Rostov region on Friday, according to the TASS news agency. And finally… *) More than 600,000 tickets sold for T20 World Cup More than 600,000 tickets have been sold for the Twenty20 World Cup in Australia. The global showpiece starts on Sunday at the preliminary stage, before the big guns join in from October 22. Seven Australian cities are hosting the tournament.

The Times of Israel Podcasts
Nigerian-American filmmaker takes on Sderot and Gaza

The Times of Israel Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 27:13


This week's Times Will Tell brings us Nigerian-American filmmaker Ose Oyamendan (pronounced OH-SE), who spent the better part of a decade filming his feature documentary, "Other Voices," in Israel's Sderot and in Gaza, to capture a story that is not often told. The film brings viewers to the unexpected and unusual peace efforts and unwavering friendship between residents of Sderot, Israel and Gaza as the two bordering nations endure ongoing war, animosity and conflict. "People on different sides of a story find a way not to talk to each other," said Oyamendan, who refused to talk politics or edited it out of the film. "When you take the politics out of it, it's a very strong human story." Oyamendan talks about what initially brought him to the region and what it has been like to spend ten years visiting and spending time in the area, getting to know his protagonists, and how they cope with living in the region. Oyamendan is in Israel this week to premiere the film at the Jerusalem and Tel Aviv Cinematheques. "Other Voices" is also being shown on Amazon Prime. The following transcript has been very lightly edited. The Times Will Tell: I wanted to understand what brought you to this region from Nigeria, and what introduced you to the story and the protagonist in it? Tell us a little bit about that, please. Ose Oyamendan: Where I grew up, there were Jewish kids. There were Lebanese kids, Lebanese Arab kids, and we played together, played soccer together, and when we went to high school, they stopped talking to each other, and I was struck by it. I started life as a journalist and I think I subconsciously carried that story with me. And I wrote a short story about two kids who became friends playing football in Jerusalem. Now, I'd never been to Israel at that time and I don't even think I thought I would come to Israel, wasn't on my radar at all. And so in 2010 I went to Haiti during the earthquake and I ran into this Israeli NGO there. Now, I didn't know there was really NGOs there and they told me the politics of it, why they don't announce. Why they don't make it clear that they're Israeli. I'm just explaining that for listeners. As they told me, sometimes if they announced themselves as Israeli NGOs, maybe some people will pull out. So I was staying in this hotel that was the best hotel in Haiti at that time, because we had power for 6 hours a night and I think we had power from six to eleven, So that was where ABC network guys were, CNN network was, so everybody tried to get their work done then. They came to me and asked if they could use my computer because they've not been able to send messages home. And I didn't think I was very approachable, so I thought it was very interesting it's me that they had the chutzpah. So I said, of course. And while they were looking at it, it was like supposed to be a quick thing, but they were there for like maybe an hour or so. So we started talking and I said I wrote this story, this short story. I've never been to Jerusalem. Can you help me with the geographical accuracy? So they read it, they said oh, it's a great story, what do you want to do with it? I said, well, I want to publish it, I want to try to make a film or a TV series one day about something like this, something I'm passionate about. They said there is another story that is true. Have I heard of Gaza? And I said yes. Have you ever heard of Sderot? And I said no. So they are next to each other and that's where the war is fought for the most part. And there are people on both sides that want a return to the old times when they had peace there. And they were very friendly with each other, and they had a group called Other Voices. And this man, Eitan, who was one of the three people there, was one of them. So I said, okay. I said, I love this story. I would like to follow it. I would like to see. I said, can I come? So we communicated by email and then I came, and I was blown away how close they were to each other. And they were talking on the phone to some people there. And I said they genuinely cared about people on the other side. And then I met Natan, who had lost his daughter in this conflict, and he said, I don't want the other person's daughter to suffer what I've gone through. And so I met a whole swath of people from both sides, and I decided I would love to tell this story. And that's how it started. So that was ten years ago? Yeah, it's very tough to get financing for something like this. I did what a poor filmmaker would do. I have these other jobs that I do, so when I have enough money, I put enough money together to get the crew to come and film, because I wanted to have my very independent, my own observation. And I also decided that I want to know how true these people are. The activists, the protagonists. Because it's very easy to want peace until you lose something. So I wanted to see how committed they were, and I also wanted to go to Gaza. So those days make it longer. I was also struck by how neutral the film was. It felt to me and this is not surprising, really, that it's a relatively small group of activists on both sides. When you compare to the population or even the region where they are, it's small. But I also think one of the reasons why it was fascinating to me is I also felt that a lot of people get lost in the politics of it. And there's this thing that I found, not just here all over the world, like people on different sides of the story find a way not to talk to each other, like they just stand there. And my whole thing for me was when you take the politics out of it, it's a very strong human story, like a very strong, tragic human story. And that's why I said we will not talk politics. Even the people in Gaza, when they will talk about Hamas, I was saying we're going to edit those things out. Because I just felt that the moment you bring politics into it, it just becomes like this fire you can't contain. And of course, there's politics there, but my own passion was to show to people how the kind of life people live there and how people cope with that life. And for me, why it shouldn't be like when you have a child, for instance, and you're not sure if you say goodbye to your child in the morning, you see them in the afternoon. And when I come into Israel at the airport and they said, Where are you going? I said, I'm going to Sderot. They say, Are you crazy? I just feel like we had to get the story of these people trying in their own little to way, live a normal life in a place like this right now. Was Sderot your base for filming? Yeah, because this group are mostly in Sderot. I mean, they spread out around the region, around the kibbutz there, but Sderot was their base and I didn't want to be one of those people with just helicopter in and I want to feel it. I felt I wanted to feel the heat of the other thing and be able to talk about it not with authority, but with some form of knowledge.You must have been caught in rocket attacks as well. Can you talk about that? About staying on both sides of the fence, so to speak? Yeah, I think it was very interesting because we tried for, like, a couple of years to get in [to Gaza] and I could not. I always felt like I don't have a film without going into Gaza. There's many ways to go into Gaza. You have to get Israeli permits, and then you have to get the Palestinian permit. Now, I had an option. I could come in through Egypt, which I thought was easier, but that is not the world of the story for me. I wanted to go because you could actually walk into Gaza. The gate was open, so I wanted to go. So when I went, I had no idea that I needed a permit to go into Gaza. I thought, I just need Israeli pass to go into Gaza. So when I got there, they refused me entry. And they were justifiably angry that I didn't think this was like an anchor, like a country on its own. And I just tried to explain. I didn't know. But I sat there because I was convinced this was my chance to do this. So I tried to find a connection. They were talking about football, and I realized that a lot of them were Real Madrid fans. I followed Barcelona. So we're talking about soccer. So I think we became human. We just became normal people. We could be in Tel Aviv, we could be in Glasgow, anywhere. And then after a while, this man came. I still remember. I can see his face. He came. And the strange thing is, they don't speak good English. I don't speak any Arabic, but we're able to talk soccer. And then this man came. And I said, Are you Real Madrid, too? He said yeah. And then he called me to go and see. So I found that he's the head of the whole place, the whole thing. And I think he just thought I was either crazy or something. I was there for five or six days the first time, so I had to see all my subjects and it's the kind of things I've never seen. And I tell people it's tough to describe Gaza and I don't want to get into the politics of it, but the human aspect of it. They were free to talk politics or talk about their relationship with Israelis, even people that were subjects of the film. They were very bold people. They were bold to say, there has to be another way. And there are people that will say to me, you put my name in, like, this is what I'm saying. But I think because I come into this as a journalist, my life started as a journalist. And you have to protect your subjects sometimes. And there's so much stuff we have on the edit room floor that are just amazing, amazing revelations and stories, but also it may not be good for them or their families. So we have to trade that a little bit gently to protect them, in a sense. Did you come up against anyone on either side who said, I don't agree with what you're doing? I came against a lot of opposition, but I try not to look at opposition as opposition. I look at it as people expressing their opinion. And one of the things that we do take for granted in the free parts of the world is the fact that we are able to have an opinion. And it's a great thing. A lot of people die so we can have opinion, that we can speak, that we can vote and do all sorts of things. So if you come to me and say, I don't agree with this, and I say, yes, it's fine not to agree with it, but do listen, watch the film, listen to the other side. And I've met people that are so I hate to use the term left or right that are very right. And they watch the film, and you'll see the scales just for life, because they've never understood it like this. They've never seen that world like this, because that world is a very political world that people find themselves in. Like I told you, a lot of people know Sderot, a lot of people know Gaza, but all they know about our world is the few inches of print they read in the newspaper or like, they want to make, and that's it. I want them to be able to show the human side of it, to be able to show people mentally. I wanted to be able to take people into that geographical place, just put yourself there and see the way it is and then decide what to decide. How did the protagonists did they feel about it at first? I would say a lot of the people we talked to, they wanted to tell their story. And because we did it for a long time, so we're able to just take the time, get all these people, and then decide what is the story? I think there were a few people that were a little bit shy about it in Gaza. There were people that I would have loved to talk to, I did talk to, and I felt it may not be too safe, some of the things they said. So we just lose those storylines, right? What happens next with this now? Is this the end of the story for you, or did working on it bring up other storylines here in this region that you think about? I'm actually going back to what I came to do originally, like developing a TV series about two kids that brought it to Jerusalem. I just like this. There's something about Jerusalem that I find. It's such a rich place. It's so rich, it's so historical, and everything is there. So I'm working on this TV series I'm developing this TV series about two kids who brought Jerusalem together for one day with soccer. I like the inner sense of kids. I like the global nature of soccer. And I think it's another avenue to say, just take a look at what can happen. IMAGE: Nigerian-American filmmaker Ose Oyamendan (Courtesy)See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Watchman Newscast with Erick Stakelbeck
Israel Sees RECORD NUMBER of Jews Visit Temple Mount in Jerusalem | Watchman Newscast

The Watchman Newscast with Erick Stakelbeck

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 12:56


On today's Watchman Newscast, host Erick Stakelbeck highlights the record number of Jews that have reportedly visited Jerusalem's Temple Mount during this High Holiday season. Over 6,000 Jewish visitors have gone up to the flashpoint holy site in a new monthly record, amid Hamas threats of violence. Plus, we visit the Pool of Siloam, where worshippers cleansed themselves 2,000 years ago before going up to the Temple to worship and the Road of Pilgrimage, where worshipers, including Jesus and the disciples, would have walked up to the Second Temple after cleansing themselves. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Stuff You Should Know
10 Cases of Mistaken Identity

Stuff You Should Know

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 42:34 Very Popular


There's a lot that can go wrong when your identity is at question. Charged with abandoning a baby? Check. Years in prison? That too. Accused of assassinating the head of Hamas? Why not. Learn about the travails of some unlucky saps in this episode.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

EveryDay Voices
Episode 19: The Political Divide You Need to Hear More About

EveryDay Voices

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 37:01


Did you know Palestine has not held presidential elections since 2005? While an array of factors have contributed to that drought, one is the national divide between its two largest parties, Fatah and Hamas. With tensions rising across the region, and with violence spiking in the West Bank, now is a crucial time to examine this divide and its vast impact. On a new episode of EveryDay Voices, we break down this issue with Dr. Mkhaimar Abusada: associate professor and chairman of the department of political science at Al-Azhar University in Gaza. Alongside our hosts Ezzeldeen Masri and Andrew Hirsh, Dr. Abusada shares key insights from the ground, along with historical context and what the future holds. Written and recorded by Ezz Masri and Andrew Hirsh Edited by Andrew Hirsh Music: Kalte Ohren (septahelix remix) by septahelix (c) copyright 2019 Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (3.0) license. dig.ccmixter.org/files/septahelix/59527 Ft: starfrosch

AJC Passport
AJC CEO Ted Deutch on Building a Brighter Jewish Future

AJC Passport

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 27:10 Very Popular


After more than 12 years in the U.S. House of Representatives, Ted Deutch recently stepped down to become the CEO of American Jewish Committee (AJC), the leading global Jewish advocacy organization. In this special episode, learn about the Jewish values instilled in Ted by his parents, growing up in the working-class town of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania where he was one of only three Jewish students in his high school. From his summers at Camp Ramah in the Poconos to his Jewish leadership as a student at the University of Michigan – Ted's experiences as a Jewish leader  inspired him to become a fierce advocate against antisemitism and in support of Israel in the halls of Congress. As he begins this exciting new chapter at the helm of AJC, Ted describes his commitment to enhancing the well-being of the Jewish people and Israel, and how he will help AJC build a brighter Jewish future.  ___ Episode Lineup: (0:40) Ted Deutch ___ Show Notes: 6 Things to Know About AJC CEO Ted Deutch Listen to our latest podcast episode: Synagogue Security Expert on the Importance of Volunteer-Led Protection Follow People of the Pod on your favorite podcast app, and learn more at AJC.org/PeopleofthePod You can reach us at: peopleofthepod@ajc.org If you've enjoyed this episode, please be sure to tell your friends, tag us on social media with #PeopleofthePod, and hop onto Apple Podcasts to rate us and write a review, to help more listeners find us. ____ Episode transcript MANYA BRACHEAR PASHMAN: This week, American Jewish Committee enters a new chapter with a new CEO. Ted Deutch served seven terms in Congress and during that time emerged as a powerful voice for democratic values and the Jewish people. He also became an outspoken defender of the U.S.-Israel alliance, when that defense was needed more than it ever had been. While Ted has been a guest on our podcast before, he joins us now for the first time as AJC's CEO. Ted, welcome back to People of the Pod.  TED DEUTCH: Well, thanks. MANYA: So, we have a lot to get to because we want to introduce you to our audience and really let them get to know you. So, let's launch right into it. Tell us about your upbringing.  TED: I grew up in Bethlehem. I'm the youngest of five. There is an 11 year gap between me and the next closest sibling, my sister and then my three brothers are older still, and 19 years between my oldest brother and me. I am, as my mother eventually came to refer to me, a pleasant surprise.  My father was a painting contractor. They lived in Bethlehem because after he grew up in Chicago, he enlisted in the army after he graduated from high school, was sent by the army to the army specialized training program that was at Lehigh University in Bethlehem.  He met my mother at, I think not surprisingly, at a bagel brunch at the synagogue at the JCC where I grew up, and it's a long story of what happened after. My dad went to fight in the Battle of the Bulge. My mother wound up befriending his family in Chicago and one thing led to another and he wound up moving back to Bethlehem, where he married my mother and raised our whole family.  MANYA: I imagine Bethlehem, Pennsylvania was much like the small town blue collar communities where I grew up. Describe Bethlehem for us. TED: Bethlehem is home to Bethlehem Steel, which was the company that helped make the steel that helped us win World War II, that was the way we always talked about it when I was a kid. And the steel company, it was the largest employer in Bethlehem. So many people, either their families had some connection to Bethlehem Steel or they either worked at Bethlehem Steel. In my dad's case, he was a painting contractor. He painted the offices of Bethlehem Steel, he painted the houses of Bethlehem steel execs. Had an enormous impact on the community.  Over the course of my high school years it started winding down. It was also sort of the end of a great American company which we watched happen in real time. But down Main Street, Broad street downtown, there was one movie theater downtown, there were two actually for a while. And yes, there were little shops and there was a magic shop that I used to ride my bike to after school, when I was little. It was a nice place, a nice community to grow up in. MANYA: Did Bethlehem have a sizable Jewish community?  TED: Not a large Jewish community by any stretch. There was a very close knit Jewish community that had been there for a long time, multiple generations of families. It was the old model where in one building, we had the JCC and our synagogue. So, on the first floor, where you walked in, we actually had the gym and the pool. And then the second floor were the classrooms in the auditorium and the third floor was the sanctuary. So we spent a lot of time there, between Hebrew school and basketball and Shabbat and the rest.  So it was a really nice community but definitely not large. And fortunately for me, it was a community that welcomed a new Rabbi when I was a kid, and one of the first things he decided was that the synagogue needed to send kids to Camp Ramah and it was Rabbi Judah's decision to encourage that.  And I was one of the first, I think it might have been the first to go, and that had an unbelievably significant impact on my Jewish life and the way I view the world and everything else I've done since.  My first year at Ramah, I was 12. I was not quite a Bar Mitzvah, that I know for sure, because I invited camp friends to my bar mitzvah, where I gladly sang Ramah tunes, hoping and expecting that they would all join in and found myself doing a lot of solos during my Bar Mitzvah. My friends didn't quite step up to the moment, but very good memories. MANYA: You mentioned that Bethlehem Steel helped win World War II and your father fought in the Battle of the Bulge, for which he won a purple heart, I believe. Can you talk a little about how he balanced his American patriotism and his Jewish pride?  TED: He went off and fought in World War II and fought the Nazis and, and took with him these two books, both of which I still have. One, a prayer book, the small prayer book, one, a small book of Jewish thoughts that they gave to all of the Jewish members of the armed forces in World War II. The fact that he carried those around with him, still had them and the fact that I have them now is really special.  In the siddur, there's a page where there's a small tear right down the middle. And if you look, and he explained this to me, it was torn down just so that he could have a small sheet that had a Shin on it. And this was what he taped above his bunk when he was in the army, and it was his way of having a little Mezuzah, just to reflect the fact that -- here's a Jewish soldier who was there, as an American and as a Jew. MANYA: You were telling me earlier about United States Army Specialist Daniel J. Agami, back in 2007. He did something very similar.   TED: There's a family who lost their son in recent combat, who went to war and had an Israeli flag that he hung above his bunk and refused to take down despite the fact that they were fighting in a Muslim country. I think about that some, in that straight line from my Dad's experience to this Jewish soldier and the kind of patriotism that the Jews have shown for the country that we live in for so long. MANYA: You were one of three Jews in a class of more than 2,000 students. Did you encounter antisemitism growing up?  TED: There were neighborhoods in my community that still had deed restrictions, where people weren't allowed to sell their houses to Jews. There occasional experiences I had, with people who made comments that were antisemitic. I, for a lot of people, was the only Jew that they knew. I was the Jewish kid. So it's just something that I dealt with from time to time. Which is when my father would share some of his stories. MANYA: And in addition to sharing his own experiences, what advice did your parents give you about confronting that antisemitism?  TED: That's a really good question, Manya, that I haven't been asked and haven't really thought about in a while. My father's advice was clear. Obviously we're talking a lot about my dad, but my mother, she was very smart, had a very strong Jewish identity, she was a very strong woman. And the advice from both of them was to always stand up for yourself and never let people get away with it, and to be strong and be proud and to let them know that. That's a hugely important lesson that I've taken with me my whole life. It's frankly, one of the most important things that AJC does, is to help create strong proud members of the Jewish community, who also won't simply back down and let people get away with it. MANYA: You went to the University of Michigan for undergrad as well as Law school, and it's where you met your wife, Jill. How did you end up going from Bethlehem to Ann Arbor?  TED: It's interesting, my sister went to Penn State, I loved visiting her and the big college experience. I thought I might like to do that. And everybody I talked to had only good things to say about Michigan. It was also by the way, right about the time that The Big Chill came out. Not that my life was guided by fiction, by a movie. But it was literally right at that moment we were making college decisions. And here's his movie about this group of friends that come together for a sad occasion. I don't know if you saw it or are familiar with it, but, boy do they love Michigan. It's when I heard from everyone I talked to, I had friends from my Israel trip the summer before who were going to school there. And it just became the natural destination, and everybody was right. It's an amazing place. And I had an incredible experience there. And met Jill there, which of course makes it the best of all. MANYA: You chaired the University Hillel's governing board, and you were co-editor of Consider magazine, which was launched by Hillel. And this was a magazine that made it its mission to solicit compelling arguments on multiple sides of an issue. Kind of, stoking conversation, right?   TED: I was proud to do it when I was in college, but thinking about where we are now in this time where everyone has their own social media feed that plays to the things that they're interested in passionate about, criticizes the things that they don't like. Everyone has their own, their own feed, their own cable news channel. They are more and more associated with people who believe the things that they believe we were, I think doing an important service that I don't want to overstate it. But when you look back, we could, I think, benefit from a willingness to engage a little more with people whose views are different than ours. And that's what it was about. It's interesting to think about the conversations, the debates we have today, where we always want to just make this a black and white issue. You either believe this or you believe that and as you point out, in almost every occasion there are substantially more than two sides and there's nuance and engaging in a sophisticated way, requires a lot more than then simply throwing down the gauntlet and saying I'm right and you're wrong, or as is troubling these days- I'm right and you're terrible or you're an idiot or you're evil or all of the other things that people say now instead of engaging in meaningful debate. MANYA: But I have to ask, how does that jibe with AJC's advocacy role? I mean, journalists foster conversation. But as an advocacy organization, AJC picks a side.  TED:  There are different sides on different issues. When a conversation is really appropriate, occasionally there are things that are just so clear, that it becomes paramount that you stop trying to look for some competing argument and stand on the side of what is clearly just and right, and in the best interest of a better world.  The best example is when you take the position that we should deny life-saving support to an ally in Iron Dome, the Iron Dome replenishment debate. When you say that you can't support funding for that program, which saves the lives of Israelis and Palestinians, and has prevented conflicts from escalating, and has been used to protect civilians when terrorists from Hamas and Palestinian Islamic Jihad are sending rockets, aimed indiscriminately, but meant to to kill civilians? If you can't support that, if your position is such that this particular ally, only one ally, Israel, which happens to be the only Jewish nation in the world, that if your position is that you can't even support the kind of program that saves the lives of civilians against terror attacks, then there's only so much I'm going to engage on. MANYA: Of course, you're talking about the debate about the Iron Dome funding last spring that pitted you against Rep. Rashida Tlaib.  She was actually in your own party. I want to talk about that a little more.  AJC is nonpartisan. And while you were in Congress, you earned a reputation for sometimes bucking party lines. You didn't side with Democrats on the Obama administration's Iran nuclear deal, you supported the Trump Administration's Abraham Accords. Why did you break rank like that?  TED: At a time when partisanship rages, fighting antisemitism can't, we can't allow that to fall prey to that to partisanship. And likewise, defending the US-Israel relationship and supporting Israel and in handling Israel's position in the world also shouldn't fall prey to partisanship. And that means being very clear, when people take positions that are for partisan reasons or anything else, are outside of the broad consensus that has existed and continues to exist in Congress and in America, that we should support our allies. And, then when it comes to fighting antisemitism, as we've already discussed, that we should come together for the benefit of security of the Jewish people, but also because we're ultimately protecting much more than that when we fight antisemitism. MANYA: You first went to Israel before your senior year in high school with Camp Ramah and you believe being on the ground there really is important to comprehend its significance, its complexities. I personally have not been, so I'm sincerely looking forward to AJC Global Forum in Tel Aviv next June. Since that first trip as a high school student, you've been to Israel countless times now – what memories stick with you? TED: When you have the opportunity, when you go to Israel and you go to Jerusalem and the Kotel and everything that you've done, whatever connection you've had to Judaism, it immediately comes to life. I remember the conversations that we had with Israelis while we were there, which is still something that I think is really important to do every time you visit, that it's not just about looking at sites, but to actually understand the connection that we have as Jews, with people who live in Israel. And to think that this is a place that we're praying about, hoping for, for 2000 years. And every time I go back, I walk into someone's house for Shabbat dinner and some of the shuls and various minyans. Some had already ended, some were ramping down. You could hear from everywhere you walked, people davening. You just think about how unique that is, to be in a Jewish state like that. Every time, I mean, every time that's something that I'm thinking about. MANYA: You introduced a number of your congressional colleagues –both Republican and Democrat – to the Jewish state. But I'd like for you to tell our listeners about one trip in particular that you took with fellow Floridian Ileana Ros Lehtinen – a Republican congresswoman at the time – back in 2014. While you were there, the bodies of three Israeli teenagers were found. Kidnapped and killed by Palestinian terrorists linked to Hamas. TED: Ileana and I went on an official trip together. The first time we were there, the timing was such that we were there for Jill's, my wife's cousin's son's Bar Mitzvah. So we went to this bar mitzvah dinner, and celebration. And we were there just after we had all participated in events all over the country all over the world, about the three boys that had been missing, and all these events took place, and everybody was praying for their safe return.  And it was during the bar mitzvah, that all at this one moment, everyone's phones went off. And everybody looked. It was this incredible moment where the news broke that the bodies of the boys had been discovered, and that they had been killed by terrorists, and which is what so many people had feared. And so first, there's this moment where, where people didn't know what to do, but because it's Israel, and most importantly, it's a simcha. There was almost this defiance, that even having just received this terrible news. People were more passionate about dancing the hora, and about celebrating this bar mitzvah. And that was a really powerful moment.  And then we completely rearranged our schedule for the next day, so that we could attend the funeral for the boys. And there was so much that was so powerful about it, when we pulled up and it looked like literally half of the nation of Israel was walking toward this funeral.  And, and Ileana and I had the opportunity, we were privileged to sit in the front. And the funeral itself was so powerful, the whole experience was so powerful, but then we made a shiva call.  And we had the chance, it was a of all the things I've been able to do in Israel, this was a such a powerful moment for me, because we had the opportunity to pay respects, not just because we were on this trip, but we were on an official trip and we could pay our respects, offer our condolences on behalf of the American people, on behalf of the Jewish community that had been that had been praying all over the world. And as I explained to some of the students who were there, the fellow students of those who were killed. And as I explained in the best Hebrew that I could, that I wanted them to understand that it's one thing to say that, you're not alone at this moment. But having participated in these massive events the week before in my community and in Washington. I wanted them to know that I knew exactly what I was saying and that there were people all over the world who were literally mourning with them. MANYA: You did that here as well  in the United States as well, attended shivas I mean, after the school shooting that killed 17 in Parkland.  TED: I haven't ever thought of that parallel. In both cases. I was an elected official. I was in a place that I desperately wanted to avoid, or I would, I desperately would have prayed that, that the circumstances that led me there never happened. And in both instances, and so in Florida, I went to a lot of funerals after February 14, and a lot of them were Jewish funerals. That's a moment when emotion is the rawest that it can possibly be and, in both cases, we did what we're told to do at shiva: we sat and we listened. We listened to stories about, in both cases by the way, the young lives cut short and all the things that these kids had done in their short lives, and all the things that they would have done if they hadn't been killed. There are a lot of similarities. And coming out of both of those is the rededication to the important work. MANYA: So, what's in store for AJC with you at the helm? Do you have big ideas you want to implement? TED: It's not my plan to come in and, and start to make drastic changes, I'm going to come in and I'm going to listen to everyone, and understand at a deeper level, the work that's done. But the one thing I know for sure, is that that the effort to defend the interests of the Jewish people, to create resilient Jews, wherever they live, to defend all 15 million Jews in the world, by fighting antisemitism, educating people on antisemitism, advocating because ultimately AJC is an advocacy organization, building the relationships that will help to strengthen the community, and speaking out boldly, when it's necessary to make sure people understand what's at stake here.  Those are the things that I look forward to doing. But more than anything else, there is so much work that AJC does to advocate for the Jewish community around the world. And, and to, to enhance Israel's place in the world. And to speak out for human rights, and democracy.  There's so much work that's done that people don't know about. And when you have an organization that's engaged in advocacy, that means you're advocating on a whole host of different issues. And sometimes, we forget that- not we, AJC. But the world forgets that they're all related.  And so when it comes to, to supporting Israel and standing up for the Jewish community,  to be able to know that that we are advocating for the community wherever they live, from Seattle to Chicago, to New York, Buenos Aires, Paris, Jerusalem, and to do it by building the relationships at the local level, at the federal level in Washington, with the ambassadorial corps in Washington and Consuls General around the country. At the UN, where AJC is on the ground every day, at in capitals around the world with with foreign ministers and heads of state, those relationships everywhere in the world that AJC has built that its its volunteers and leaders have spent so much time engaged in, the intergroup work that has come from from that work. All of that strengthens the Jewish community. And, and, and helps to lift up Israel and its place in the world in a way that is unique.  MANYA: You're coming from a role in Congress in which you fought for measures to slow climate change, curb gun violence, have peace with other countries, balancing the nation's budget – a plethora of issues. Here, at AJC, you'll be a little more focused on Israel and the Jewish people. But how are both jobs similar? TED: We talked earlier about Tikkun Olam. And it's important and we're all engaged in that in all of the ways that we choose to be. But when I think about AJC's work, if I'm looking to if I'm looking to our text, it's really it's it's called Kol Yisrael Arevim Ze Bazeh, right - We're all responsible one for another– it's all about Jewish peoplehood and the connections that we have, not just to our fellow Jews in our communities, but everywhere in the world. In the United States, that means making sure that we all understand where we come from, which is both all of the things that our history has provided us –the contributions that we've made to history as a whole, and the impact that history has had on us. MANYA: You are a father of three young'ns in their 20s. Very accomplished, young'ns in their own right, I should add. Why should AJC be paying more attention to their generation?  TED: AJC has this unique opportunity to take the existing program than it does for young people, early in their careers, the programming to create well-educated, passionate advocates, who are and will continue to be leaders in their respective communities, from their schools to their campus, to wherever it is they move when they graduate. That program is so exciting to me and the opportunity to see that continue to grow, so that all of these leaders can then engage in the work that we've just been discussing. For AJC, for everyone, it means not just providing lessons, it means listening, and engaging with young people who have the capacity to lead right now. And we see it on Instagram, with some of the accounts that young people have set up.  We've seen it all over social media, we see it in things that people write, we have to help build that up, meet them where they are, recognize that they're already leaders, contribute to their future growth. That's an enormous opportunity.  And I think that the way that AJC goes about its work can help do that.  Last thing I'll say is this. There are young people who have been so engaged on their campuses, on social media, sometimes feeling, and I had spoken to a number of them, sometimes feeling like they're on an island, and providing a real home for them to come together to confront these issues that they're facing. To help them understand what we can do to change the narrative by lifting up their voices. That's the moment that we're in that I think we really need to capitalize on. MANYA: After the Parkland shooting, you really raised your voice about addressing the forces and circumstances that led to this horrific act of violence. How will that experience, which I know was life changing for so many including yourself, how will that inform the direction you lead AJC? TED: I think the most important thing I learned during that whole experience was the power of young people, high school kids, who helped to start this whole movement from their dining room table and the leadership role that they play. If we're not talking about the threat, then it's going to make it a whole lot harder for all of us who want to prevent these things from happening to succeed. So, yes, we've got to be clear, as we as we talk about, as we acknowledge this rise in antisemitism, and we have to focus on it wherever it comes from, and we need to be clear that the the threats that rising antisemitism pose are threats to the entire community. I talked about this at the UN several years ago, the the fact is when there's antisemitism in the country that is festering and it affects not just the Jews, it is never just the Jews. The guy who went into that Walmart in El Paso. These are people who, so many of them at their core antisemites, you see it and what they've said and what they've written. So we should all be paying close attention to the rise in antisemitism. And we should be working with everyone we can to help educate them about the threat that it poses.  Yes, to the Jewish community, first and foremost, and so that the Jewish community understands that, that there is this recognition and that they can feel safe and and we can build resilience in the Jewish community. But also, for everyone else to understand that we're by tackling antisemitism, we're also helping to make our country and ultimately this is a worldwide phenomenon, clearly, we're helping to create a safer world for everyone. MANYA: Ted, thank you so much for joining us, in your first week on the job, no less. TED: Thanks. This is really fun by the way. MANYA: Well, it's been a pleasure getting to know you and I'm sure we'll have you back on the air again soon. TED: I look forward to it.  

The Biblical Mind
Growing Up Christian in the Gaza Strip (Khalil Sayegh)

The Biblical Mind

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 30:17 Very Popular


In this week's episode, Khalil Sayegh shares his experience as a Palestinian Christian. The territory of Palestine contains two regions: the West Bank and the Gaza Strip. Though they share a people and a history, the two areas are separated by the country of Israel and are ruled by two different governments (the West Bank by the Palestine Liberation Organization and the Gaza Strip by Hamas). Khalil discusses the modern political and religious dynamics at play in the Gaza Strip, including the relationships between Israel and Hamas and between Islam and Christianity. He also surveys Christianity in Palestine, from its use of Scripture to its approach to evangelism. Khalil Sayegh is a Fellow at the Philos Project. He grew up in the Gaza Strip and currently lives in the West Bank. His public work focuses on challenging the negative perceptions of Jewish people in Palestinian society and promoting peace among the various religious groups in the region. He has studied at Bethlehem Bible College and American University. Show notes: 0:00 Growing up in Gaza 1:54 War, mobility, and Christianity in Gaza 5:35 Sunni Islam and political parties 7:24 Gaza's Christian churches 9:15 Interactions between Christianity and Islam 11:03 Political power in Gaza 14:36 Christmas, Hamas, and public Christianity 16:27 Conditions for visiting the West Bank 19:30 Views of Christian Scripture in Palestine 26:11 Evangelism and responses to conversion 28:22 Cultural distinctives of the Palestinian church Show notes by Micah Long

Finding Inspiration Show
Surfing4Peace Transcends Israeli/Arab Conflict

Finding Inspiration Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 10:06 Transcription Available


In the words of the late Doc Paskowitz, “People who surf together, can live together.”In episode #23 the co-founder of Surfing4Peace shares how the mutual love of surfing,  creates bonds that may, even for a moment, transcend the longstanding conflict between Arab and Jew.  Arthur Rashkoven shares the amazing story of how he founded Surfing4Peace alongside Dorian "Doc" Paskowitz, the grandfather of Israeli surfing, and how a group of surfers from Tel Aviv managed to gain worldwide attention."On July 27, 2007, The Los Angeles Times published an article by Louise Roug detailing the plight of Palestinian surfers living in the Gaza Strip and forced to share a single surfboard between them.  Within hours, Doc Paskowitz was on the phone with Arthur in Tel Aviv. They decided then and there that something had to be done.  After a few short weeks, the team had gathered 14 used surfboards from Israeli surf companies, for donation to the small but passionate surfing community in Gaza. "  In 2007, Surfing4Peace entered the fortresslike Erez crossing in Gaza to bring surfboards to Arab Surfers. That area was a volatile security situation, and nobody had been allowed into the Gaza Strip since Hamas took over.  Since the militant group seized control of Gaza, the main commercial crossing has been closed, and many local industries have collapsed.  All of this makes the story of Surfing4Peace even more compelling.  I'm Jennifer Weissmann. Please join me for this inspiring story; it's the best ten minutes you'll spend today. PLEASE LISTEN AND SHARE IT WITH FRIENDS AND ON YOUR SOCIAL MEDIA.Transcript Reading Time: 3-Minutes. https://tlv1.fm/weekend-edition/2015/05/30/meet-the-israelis-surfing-for-peace/https://www.theinertia.com/surf/how-an-israeli-made-it-his-lifes-mission-to-support-fellow-surfers-in-gaza/https://surfing4peace.org/historyhttps://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/22/world/middleeast/22mideast.htmlhttps://www.jpost.com/jewish-world/jewish-features/jewish-surfing-guru-from-hawaii-brings-hope-and-boards-to-gaza-surfers#Surfing4peace#Klinikatlv

Finding Inspiration Show
Surfing4Peace Transcends Israeli/Arab Conflict

Finding Inspiration Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 10:06 Transcription Available


In the words of the late Doc Paskowitz, “People who surf together, can live together.”In episode #23 the co-founder of Surfing4Peace shares how the mutual love of surfing,  creates bonds that may, even for a moment, transcend the longstanding conflict between Arab and Jew.  Arthur Rashkoven shares the amazing story of how he founded Surfing4Peace alongside Dorian "Doc" Paskowitz, the grandfather of Israeli surfing, and how a group of surfers from Tel Aviv managed to gain worldwide attention."On July 27, 2007, The Los Angeles Times published an article by Louise Roug detailing the plight of Palestinian surfers living in the Gaza Strip and forced to share a single surfboard between them.  Within hours, Doc Paskowitz was on the phone with Arthur in Tel Aviv. They decided then and there that something had to be done.  After a few short weeks, the team had gathered 14 used surfboards from Israeli surf companies, for donation to the small but passionate surfing community in Gaza. "  In 2007, Surfing4Peace entered the fortresslike Erez crossing in Gaza to bring surfboards to Arab Surfers. That area was a volatile security situation, and nobody had been allowed into the Gaza Strip since Hamas took over.  Since the militant group seized control of Gaza, the main commercial crossing has been closed, and many local industries have collapsed.  All of this makes the story of Surfing4Peace even more compelling.  I'm Jennifer Weissmann. Please join me for this inspiring story; it's the best ten minutes you'll spend today. PLEASE LISTEN AND SHARE IT WITH FRIENDS AND ON YOUR SOCIAL MEDIA.Transcript Reading Time: 3-Minutes. https://tlv1.fm/weekend-edition/2015/05/30/meet-the-israelis-surfing-for-peace/https://www.theinertia.com/surf/how-an-israeli-made-it-his-lifes-mission-to-support-fellow-surfers-in-gaza/https://surfing4peace.org/historyhttps://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/22/world/middleeast/22mideast.htmlhttps://www.jpost.com/jewish-world/jewish-features/jewish-surfing-guru-from-hawaii-brings-hope-and-boards-to-gaza-surfers#Surfing4peace#Klinikatlv

Jew Wanna Talk Shit
Jew Wanna Talk Qatar

Jew Wanna Talk Shit

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 70:11


We talk with Qatar expert Mike Sexton, about what the deal is with Qatar. What's their relationship to Israel, to AJ+, and why are they trying so hard to be friends with Al-Qaeda and Hamas. Are they trying to be the Regina George of the Middle East?

The Watchman Newscast with Erick Stakelbeck
Temple Mount TENSIONS Rising; Iran ATTACKS Iraqi Kurdistan as Protests Continue | Watchman Newscast

The Watchman Newscast with Erick Stakelbeck

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 12:53


On today's Watchman Newscast, host Erick Stakelbeck highlights the ongoing clashes both on the Temple Mount and throughout east Jerusalem as Israeli police remain on high alert in anticipation of a tumultuous High Holiday period. As Jewish visits resume for Rosh Hashanah, will tensions over the flashpoint site boil over? Danny "The Digger" Herman explains the difficulties Jews face when they try to pray on the Temple Mount, and why it enrages the likes of Hamas when Jews ascend the holiest site in the world. Plus, was the IRGC's recent attack on Kurdish groups in Iraq an act of revenge for the mass protests? Will there be more attacks planned as a way to distract from Iran's widening crackdown on demonstrators? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

hr1 Talk
Der deutsche James Bond | Gerhard Conrad, Ex-BND-Agent

hr1 Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 33:24


Gerhard Conrad umweht etwas der Hauch des Geheimnisvollen, der Ränke und des Risikos. 30 Jahre lang war er für den Bundesnachrichtendienst in manchmal streng geheimen Missionen tätig, die britische Presse sah in ihm eine Art deutschen James Bond. Im hr1-Talk gibt er Einblicke ins Leben der Spione und Aufklärer.

WashingTECH Tech Policy Podcast with Joe Miller
Trump appears to endorse QAnon; 'Incel' movement grows online; Florida petitions Supreme Court on content moderation - Tech Law & Policy This Week

WashingTECH Tech Policy Podcast with Joe Miller

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 5:17


Hey everybody, I'm Joe Miller and here's what's going on in the world of tech law & policy.    ADL Report: Spotify has a white supremacist problem References to Hitler, Pepe the Frog, Tucker Carlson talking about the “great replacement” anti-immigration theory — it looks like songs that contain them are totally fine for Spotify, which the Anti Defamation League finds in a new report has verified at least 40 bands and musicians with hateful lyrics and imagery on their album covers. Also, it's super-easy to get verified on Spotify, even though the company claims to have a handle on this stuff. The Washington Post has the full report.   Trump appears to nod to QAnon The Washington Post's Technology 202 newsletter reports that Donald Trump appears to be showing increased support for QAnon, the conspiracy theory movement that accuses high profile democrats are running some kind of a pedophilia ring in which they drink the blood of children. The Post notes that this conspiracy theory has moved from the fringes to the mainstream political discourse and underscores the inefficacy of social media platforms to catch subtle references to disinformation campaigns. At an Ohio rally on Saturday, Trump took the stage to music that sounded a lot like music associated with QAnon, which many see as a “wink and a nod” to QAnon supporters. Trump has subtly endorsed QAnon on social media, but took a more explicit approach on his own social media platform – Truth Social – by including an image of himself wearing a QAnon lapel pin.   Center for Countering Digital Hate: Incel movement is growing online Another movement that appears to be becoming more mainstream is the so-called incel, or “involuntary celibate” movement is growing online according to a report from the Center for Countering Digital Hate , which also names Google, YouTube and Cloudflare for facilitating the channel, which has 2.6 million monthly site visits and over a million posts. Lots of conversations going on there about mass murder and sexually assaulting pre-pubescent girls.  And the Washington Post also reports that a cop was convicted in Indiana for texting with, what he thought, was a 14-year-old girl, and attempting to meet her at an Olive Garden for sex. It turns out it wasn't a 14-year old girl at all – it was one of a growing number of vigilantes who bait guys like this and then record themselves shaming them, sharing it on the internet. According to the Post, the police had been reluctant to work with these citizen vigilantes to bring alleged pedophiles to trial. But the police are showing increased interest in working with these groups, according to the Post.   BSR: Facebook suppressed Palestian posts during last year's Gaza war Consulting firm Business for Social Responsibility published a report demonstrating how Facebook suppressed posts made by Palestinians during last year's war between Israel and Hamas – it did so by unfairly removing posts in Arabic at a disproportionate rate – posts that had no apparent connection to Hamas at all – compared to those made in Hebrew.    Florida takes anti-content moderation case to Supreme Court The state of Florida wants the Supreme Court to decide whether states can pass laws that prevent social media companies from blocking or limiting certain types of speech – such as some of the speech I just mentioned - hate speech, disinformation – you know, things like that. Florida's petition comes on the heels of the Fifth Circuit upholding a similar law in Texas last week. Florida wants to ban companies from doing this. We published a report in late 2020 on the pattern of conservatives, throughout history, seeking to ban liberal speech, starting almost as soon as European immigrants landed in the new world and wanted to control Native Americans, not to mention slaves. America's entire history is one of suppressing the voices of people of color – not the other way around.   Meanwhile, Microsoft has decided it won't flag disinformation and TikTok apparently enforces its content moderation policies more leniently in favor of users with millions of followers.   Senate confirms new OSTP director, Arati Prabhakar In a 56-40 vote with 10 Republicans on board, the Senate has for the first time confirmed a woman, immigrant, and person of color to lead the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). Previously, Arati Prabhakar led the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.  Dr. Alondra Nelson, a prominent scholar who appeared on this podcast back on Episode 70, had been performing the duties of the OSTP Director role since previous diretor Eric Lander stepped down in February amid accusations that he mistreated subordinates. Dr. Nelson will continue in her role as Deputy Assistant to the President and Deputy Director for Science and Society. More News Virginia's Spanish-language election site is out-of-date   Mozilla report on potential anticompetitive behavior by leading browsers   Washington Post: Health Apps sharing data with advertisers   City of New York to provide free internet/cable for 300K public housing residents   To go deeper, you can find links to all of these stories, plus additional ones, in the show notes. Stay safe, stay informed, have a great week. Ciao.

The New Arab Voice
Making Friends with a Murderer: Normalising with the Assad regime

The New Arab Voice

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 29:38


Last week, the Palestinian group Hamas announced  that they would reconcile with the Syrian regime of Bashar al-Assad.The announcement marks a change in the policy of the Palestinian group, who in 2012 offered support to the Syrian rebels that were seeking to throw Assad from office. Since then, Assad has re-established, with Russian and Iranian help, some sort of control over Syria, and secured his future. To reach this point, approximately half a million Syrian died, and tens of thousands were thrown in the regime prisons. The recent announcement by Hamas, followed similar moves by Turkey. Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu called on the Syrian opposition to normalise with the Assad regime, sparking anger and consternation among Syrian groups in the north of the country. This week on The New Arab Voice we asking why are the likes of Hamas and Turkey moving back to Syria and what does this mean for the revolution and those that continue to struggle for a life free from cruel and barbaric control.We're also looking at a different form of normalisation: the travel bloggers have secured Syrian regime sponsored  visas, and have produced videos that are normalising the idea of a Syria ruled over by the brutal Assad regime. On this episode, we speak with Joseph Daher (@JosephDaher19), academic and researcher at the European University Institute (@EUI_EU) and the author of Syria After the Uprisings: The Political Economy of State Resilience; and with Ayman Abdel Nour (@aabnour) the founder of the Syrian Christians' Initiative for Rights and Dialogue.This podcast is written and produced by Hugo Goodridge. Theme music by Omar al-Fil. Other music by Blue Dot Sessions. To get in touch with the producers, follow then tweet us at @TheNewArabVoice or email hugo.goodridge@alaraby.co.uk.

The Watchman Newscast with Erick Stakelbeck
Israel ON ALERT as Hamas Threatens “Religious War” Over Jerusalem & Temple Mount | Watchman Newscast

The Watchman Newscast with Erick Stakelbeck

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 10:12


On today's Watchman Newscast, host Erick Stakelbeck breaks down the rising aggression ahead of Rosh Hashanah. The Palestinian terror group Hamas is threatening Israel over what it calls “violations against Jerusalem and the Al-Aqsa Mosque” ahead of the upcoming Jewish High Holidays. As thousands of Jews, Israelis and tourists make their way to Jerusalem's Old City, Israeli authorities have announced they would not limit Jewish visits to the Temple Mount. Will there be a showdown on the holiest site in Judaism? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Caroline Glick's Mideast News Hour
Ep. 21: Arab Israelis are building an army under Israel's nose

Caroline Glick's Mideast News Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 77:32


In May 2021, Arab Israelis fully participated in Hamas' war against Israel.This week, former housing minister and Brig. Gen. (retired) Effi Eitam joins Caroline Glick on “Mideast News Hour” to explain what is happening with the Arab Israeli community. The two discuss how Arab Israelis are organizing militarily and socially to advance the cause of Israel's destruction.

Kan English
News Flash September 20, 2022

Kan English

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 5:52


Shots fired at IDF post in northern Samaria; Palestinian security forces arrest Hamas operative in Nablus. Prime Minister Lapid arrives in New York ahead of UN General Assembly. Ahead of Rosh Hashanah. Israel's population approaches 9.6 millionSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Whispering Moon Tarot
Loosen up on the reins- “Pick A Charm” Tarot Love Readings

Whispering Moon Tarot

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 100:20


We intro talking about the phenomenon of “trying too hard.” It gets us out of the groove. Being unattached, in the flow will always gets us where we wanted to go and faster, if we just let it.Starfish 6 minutes Angel Wing 26 minutes Bike 48 minutes Hamas (the hand with the eye) 1:33 minutes We also fit in a love note that was pulled with intention forever ago! Little chickadee!

The Storied Recipe
Honoring the Women of Palestine

The Storied Recipe

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 91:32 Transcription Available


episode 136 Honoring the Women of Palestine Introduction Today, I'm welcoming Mai of Almond & Fig to the podcast so that, together, we can all honor Mai's grandmother, her beloved Teta.Mai's grandmother was born in Palestine long before 1948, when the international community took it upon themselves to declare that parts of her Palestine as the new nation of Israel. She was a young woman when she saw the suffering of 1967, and already a grandmother many times over by the first Intifada of 1987, when both of her sons were arrested. One of those sons, Mai's father, was imprisoned for a year, without charges or evidence of those charges in the Negev desert. At night, he and fellow prisoners took shifts watching for dangerous wild animals. Later, Teta Um Hanna's grandsons, Mai's brothers, were arrested in the second Intifada. Although they were juveniles, they were tried and imprisoned as adults. Victimized by the occupation until the very end, Teta Um Hanna's ambulance was stopped and searched by Israeli's soldiers as she was rushed, dying, into Jerusalem. This is a difficult thing for any family to accept.  However, we do not join Mai in honoring Teta Um Hanna because she suffered these things. Rather, we honor Teta Um Hanna because of the things she did with her life: She raised her siblings, her children, her grandchildren with love and patience. She joined countless other Palestinian women in preserving their culture & recipes, becoming breadwinners, nurturing children made fatherless through resistence, and feeding their entire worlds. How did she manage to do these things? She did them all through her garden, her cooking, and the joy she took in both. Regardless of our politics (which may or may not be influenced by Mai's powerful story), today, Listener, you and I are coming together to honor this small but mighty woman, [name], and the many other women she represents. Here is Mai. Highlights “From the moment she wakes up, she thinks, ‘What should they be eating?'”The 4 men in Mai's family who were arrested - why, where they went, and the conditionsHow Mai's grandmother, her Teta stepped in with her “fatherless” grandkids - and how she loved with foodTeta's remedies :-)What does it mean “This is a day to day occupation?”“We did not commit the Holocaust. We had no part in the Holocaust. But we are paying for the Holocaust.”Why is 1948 so significant?Mai's personal experiences with Israeli soldiers when she was just 10 years oldPalestinians and Hamas - not one and the same; Mai's perspective on HamasHow Mai's grandmother died as a direct result of checkpointsHow Mai thought food would be an escape, but the more she realized that food and recipes are political. “Palestinian food is political… Palestinian recipes are political… Anything with the word Palestine is political… My entire existence is Political.”Mai's shock at the freedom Americans have to raise their own flags - it was an act of victory to carry their flagThe joy her Teta found “even in chopping onions”Musalwa'a: Palestinian Lentils and Rice - a humble dish that is Mai's comfort foodSumac onions - the proper way to make them!!Teta's answer to “How will I know there is enough cumin?”Red lentils vs. Brown lentils  Listen Now Also listen on: APPLE GOOGLE SPOTIFY EMAIL How To Contact Mai Instagram: @almondandfigWebsite: almondandfig.comSee Mai's Teta making Musalwa'a on Instagram Resources About the History of Palestine See Mai's Teta making Musalwa'a on InstagramShort video Mai shared illustrating history of Palestine Can Palestinians return? Points from @letstalkpalestine on Instagram:The Partition Plan of 1947 from @letstalkpalestine on Instagram  About Seraj Libraries

The Epstein Chronicles
The Kinahan Cartel And Their Connections To Hezbollah and Hamas (9/13/22)

The Epstein Chronicles

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 12:28


As the Kinahan cartel continues to be pursued to the ends of the earth by the Americans and the Irish authorities, they are continuing to make connections in the underworld. In todays episode, we take a look at the Kinahan cartel and their connection to the Iranian backed group. (commercial at 8:03)to contact me:bobbycapucci@protonmail.comsource:https://www.thesun.ie/news/9392730/kinahan-cartel-links-hezbollah-terror-group/

Beyond The Horizon
The Kinahan Cartel And Their Connections To Hezbollah and Hamas (9/13/22)

Beyond The Horizon

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 12:28


As the Kinahan cartel continues to be pursued to the ends of the earth by the Americans and the Irish authorities, they are continuing to make connections in the underworld. In todays episode, we take a look at the Kinahan cartel and their connection to the Iranian backed group. (commercial at 8:03)to contact me:bobbycapucci@protonmail.comsource:https://www.thesun.ie/news/9392730/kinahan-cartel-links-hezbollah-terror-group/

Echo der Zeit
Russland: Kritik an Putin wird lauter

Echo der Zeit

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 42:32


Die ukrainischen Truppen haben in den letzten Tagen laut Präsident Selenski 6000 Quadratkilometer an Terrain im Krieg zurückerobert. Dies bringt die russische Armee und die russische Staatspropaganda in Erklärungsnot. Gespräch mit ARD-Korrepondetin Martha Wilczynski in Moskau. Weitere Themen: (06:08) Russland: Kritik an Putin wird lauter (12:34) Besuch der Hamas in Moskau (17:31) Immer mehr Bootsflüchtlinge aus Ost-Libyen (23:35) Eizellenspende in der Schweiz soll möglich werden (27:24) Grünes Licht für den Axpo-Rettungsschirm (31:48) Globalisierung quo vadis? (37:46) Zum Tod von Jean-Luc Godard

New Books in Jewish Studies
Tilde Rosmer, "The Islamic Movement in Israel" (U Texas Press, 2022)

New Books in Jewish Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 80:13 Very Popular


Since its establishment in the late 1970s, Israel's Islamic Movement has grown from a small religious revivalist organization focused on strengthening the faith of Muslim Palestinian citizens of Israel to a countrywide sociopolitical movement with representation in the Israeli legislature. But how did it get here? How does it differ from other Islamic movements in the region? Particularly, what are the differences and connections – if any – with Hamas? And why does its membership continue to grow? Tilde Rosmer examines these issues in The Islamic Movement in Israel (U Texas Press, 2022) as she tells the story of the movement, its identity, and its activities. Using interviews with movement leaders and activists, their documents, and media reports from Israel and beyond, she traces the movement's history from its early days to its 1996 split over the issue of its relationship to the state. She then tell us how the two factions have functioned since, revealing that while leaders of the two branches have pursued different approaches to the state, until the outlawing of the Northern Branch in 2015, both remained connected and dedicated to providing needed social, education, and health services in Israel's Palestinian towns and villages. The first book in English on this group, The Islamic Movement in Israel is a timely study about how an Islamist movement operates within the unique circumstances of the Jewish state that may also help the listeners to make sense of the upcoming Israeli elections. Roberto Mazza is visiting professor at Northwestern University. He is the host of the Jerusalem Unplugged Podcast and to discuss and propose a book for interview can be reached at robbymazza@gmail.com. Twitter and IG: @robbyref Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/jewish-studies

Rumble in the Morning
Need a Non-Alcoholic Beer? Grab a Hamas

Rumble in the Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 0:57


Need a Non-Alcoholic Beer? Grab a Hamas

Kan English
Weak Palestinian leadership behind uptick in West Bank violence

Kan English

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 9:32


The uptick in violence in the West Bank has been blamed on the weakening of the Palestinian Authority. It also comes as the Iranian regime is funneling funds to extremist Arab fundamentalist terrorist organizations such as the Islamic Jihad and Hamas who are filling the vacuum in the West Bank with a growing support of armed resistance to Israel. Dr. Kobi Michael, editor of Strategic Assessment at the INSS, said that a third intifada was not on the horizon but more violence definitely was, mainly because the Palestinian Authority and its leaders were so weak. (photo: Nasser Ishtayeh/flash90) See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

New Books Network
Tilde Rosmer, "The Islamic Movement in Israel" (U Texas Press, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 80:13


Since its establishment in the late 1970s, Israel's Islamic Movement has grown from a small religious revivalist organization focused on strengthening the faith of Muslim Palestinian citizens of Israel to a countrywide sociopolitical movement with representation in the Israeli legislature. But how did it get here? How does it differ from other Islamic movements in the region? Particularly, what are the differences and connections – if any – with Hamas? And why does its membership continue to grow? Tilde Rosmer examines these issues in The Islamic Movement in Israel (U Texas Press, 2022) as she tells the story of the movement, its identity, and its activities. Using interviews with movement leaders and activists, their documents, and media reports from Israel and beyond, she traces the movement's history from its early days to its 1996 split over the issue of its relationship to the state. She then tell us how the two factions have functioned since, revealing that while leaders of the two branches have pursued different approaches to the state, until the outlawing of the Northern Branch in 2015, both remained connected and dedicated to providing needed social, education, and health services in Israel's Palestinian towns and villages. The first book in English on this group, The Islamic Movement in Israel is a timely study about how an Islamist movement operates within the unique circumstances of the Jewish state that may also help the listeners to make sense of the upcoming Israeli elections. Roberto Mazza is visiting professor at Northwestern University. He is the host of the Jerusalem Unplugged Podcast and to discuss and propose a book for interview can be reached at robbymazza@gmail.com. Twitter and IG: @robbyref Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Islamic Studies
Tilde Rosmer, "The Islamic Movement in Israel" (U Texas Press, 2022)

New Books in Islamic Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 80:13


Since its establishment in the late 1970s, Israel's Islamic Movement has grown from a small religious revivalist organization focused on strengthening the faith of Muslim Palestinian citizens of Israel to a countrywide sociopolitical movement with representation in the Israeli legislature. But how did it get here? How does it differ from other Islamic movements in the region? Particularly, what are the differences and connections – if any – with Hamas? And why does its membership continue to grow? Tilde Rosmer examines these issues in The Islamic Movement in Israel (U Texas Press, 2022) as she tells the story of the movement, its identity, and its activities. Using interviews with movement leaders and activists, their documents, and media reports from Israel and beyond, she traces the movement's history from its early days to its 1996 split over the issue of its relationship to the state. She then tell us how the two factions have functioned since, revealing that while leaders of the two branches have pursued different approaches to the state, until the outlawing of the Northern Branch in 2015, both remained connected and dedicated to providing needed social, education, and health services in Israel's Palestinian towns and villages. The first book in English on this group, The Islamic Movement in Israel is a timely study about how an Islamist movement operates within the unique circumstances of the Jewish state that may also help the listeners to make sense of the upcoming Israeli elections. Roberto Mazza is visiting professor at Northwestern University. He is the host of the Jerusalem Unplugged Podcast and to discuss and propose a book for interview can be reached at robbymazza@gmail.com. Twitter and IG: @robbyref Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/islamic-studies

New Books in History
Tilde Rosmer, "The Islamic Movement in Israel" (U Texas Press, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 80:13


Since its establishment in the late 1970s, Israel's Islamic Movement has grown from a small religious revivalist organization focused on strengthening the faith of Muslim Palestinian citizens of Israel to a countrywide sociopolitical movement with representation in the Israeli legislature. But how did it get here? How does it differ from other Islamic movements in the region? Particularly, what are the differences and connections – if any – with Hamas? And why does its membership continue to grow? Tilde Rosmer examines these issues in The Islamic Movement in Israel (U Texas Press, 2022) as she tells the story of the movement, its identity, and its activities. Using interviews with movement leaders and activists, their documents, and media reports from Israel and beyond, she traces the movement's history from its early days to its 1996 split over the issue of its relationship to the state. She then tell us how the two factions have functioned since, revealing that while leaders of the two branches have pursued different approaches to the state, until the outlawing of the Northern Branch in 2015, both remained connected and dedicated to providing needed social, education, and health services in Israel's Palestinian towns and villages. The first book in English on this group, The Islamic Movement in Israel is a timely study about how an Islamist movement operates within the unique circumstances of the Jewish state that may also help the listeners to make sense of the upcoming Israeli elections. Roberto Mazza is visiting professor at Northwestern University. He is the host of the Jerusalem Unplugged Podcast and to discuss and propose a book for interview can be reached at robbymazza@gmail.com. Twitter and IG: @robbyref Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Israel Studies
Tilde Rosmer, "The Islamic Movement in Israel" (U Texas Press, 2022)

New Books in Israel Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 80:13


Since its establishment in the late 1970s, Israel's Islamic Movement has grown from a small religious revivalist organization focused on strengthening the faith of Muslim Palestinian citizens of Israel to a countrywide sociopolitical movement with representation in the Israeli legislature. But how did it get here? How does it differ from other Islamic movements in the region? Particularly, what are the differences and connections – if any – with Hamas? And why does its membership continue to grow? Tilde Rosmer examines these issues in The Islamic Movement in Israel (U Texas Press, 2022) as she tells the story of the movement, its identity, and its activities. Using interviews with movement leaders and activists, their documents, and media reports from Israel and beyond, she traces the movement's history from its early days to its 1996 split over the issue of its relationship to the state. She then tell us how the two factions have functioned since, revealing that while leaders of the two branches have pursued different approaches to the state, until the outlawing of the Northern Branch in 2015, both remained connected and dedicated to providing needed social, education, and health services in Israel's Palestinian towns and villages. The first book in English on this group, The Islamic Movement in Israel is a timely study about how an Islamist movement operates within the unique circumstances of the Jewish state that may also help the listeners to make sense of the upcoming Israeli elections. Roberto Mazza is visiting professor at Northwestern University. He is the host of the Jerusalem Unplugged Podcast and to discuss and propose a book for interview can be reached at robbymazza@gmail.com. Twitter and IG: @robbyref Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/israel-studies

New Books in Middle Eastern Studies
Tilde Rosmer, "The Islamic Movement in Israel" (U Texas Press, 2022)

New Books in Middle Eastern Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 80:13


Since its establishment in the late 1970s, Israel's Islamic Movement has grown from a small religious revivalist organization focused on strengthening the faith of Muslim Palestinian citizens of Israel to a countrywide sociopolitical movement with representation in the Israeli legislature. But how did it get here? How does it differ from other Islamic movements in the region? Particularly, what are the differences and connections – if any – with Hamas? And why does its membership continue to grow? Tilde Rosmer examines these issues in The Islamic Movement in Israel (U Texas Press, 2022) as she tells the story of the movement, its identity, and its activities. Using interviews with movement leaders and activists, their documents, and media reports from Israel and beyond, she traces the movement's history from its early days to its 1996 split over the issue of its relationship to the state. She then tell us how the two factions have functioned since, revealing that while leaders of the two branches have pursued different approaches to the state, until the outlawing of the Northern Branch in 2015, both remained connected and dedicated to providing needed social, education, and health services in Israel's Palestinian towns and villages. The first book in English on this group, The Islamic Movement in Israel is a timely study about how an Islamist movement operates within the unique circumstances of the Jewish state that may also help the listeners to make sense of the upcoming Israeli elections. Roberto Mazza is visiting professor at Northwestern University. He is the host of the Jerusalem Unplugged Podcast and to discuss and propose a book for interview can be reached at robbymazza@gmail.com. Twitter and IG: @robbyref Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/middle-eastern-studies

New Books in Religion
Tilde Rosmer, "The Islamic Movement in Israel" (U Texas Press, 2022)

New Books in Religion

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 80:13


Since its establishment in the late 1970s, Israel's Islamic Movement has grown from a small religious revivalist organization focused on strengthening the faith of Muslim Palestinian citizens of Israel to a countrywide sociopolitical movement with representation in the Israeli legislature. But how did it get here? How does it differ from other Islamic movements in the region? Particularly, what are the differences and connections – if any – with Hamas? And why does its membership continue to grow? Tilde Rosmer examines these issues in The Islamic Movement in Israel (U Texas Press, 2022) as she tells the story of the movement, its identity, and its activities. Using interviews with movement leaders and activists, their documents, and media reports from Israel and beyond, she traces the movement's history from its early days to its 1996 split over the issue of its relationship to the state. She then tell us how the two factions have functioned since, revealing that while leaders of the two branches have pursued different approaches to the state, until the outlawing of the Northern Branch in 2015, both remained connected and dedicated to providing needed social, education, and health services in Israel's Palestinian towns and villages. The first book in English on this group, The Islamic Movement in Israel is a timely study about how an Islamist movement operates within the unique circumstances of the Jewish state that may also help the listeners to make sense of the upcoming Israeli elections. Roberto Mazza is visiting professor at Northwestern University. He is the host of the Jerusalem Unplugged Podcast and to discuss and propose a book for interview can be reached at robbymazza@gmail.com. Twitter and IG: @robbyref Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/religion