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region that encompasses Western Asia and Egypt

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Science Salon
271. Peter Ward — The Price of Immortality: The Race to Live Forever

Science Salon

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 86:17


Shermer and Ward discuss: religious immortality • Church of Perpetual Life in Florida • what it means to live forever • why lives have doubled in length the past century • Stein's Law: things that can't go on forever won't • Why do we age and die? • how to live to 100, 1000, 10,000 years • escape velocity to reach immortality • Aubrey de Grey's program • tech billionaires programs • transhumanists/extropians • diet, exercise, supplements, stem cells, telomeres, and other aging hacks • Ray Kurzweil • cryonics • nanotechnology • brain preservation • mind uploading and digital immortality • Ernest Becker and Terror Management Theory Peter Ward is a British business and technology reporter whose reporting has taken him across the globe. Reporting from Dubai, he covered the energy sector in the Middle East before earning a degree in business journalism from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. His writing has appeared in Wired, The Atlantic, The Economist, GQ, BBC Science Focus, and Newsweek.

Principled
S7E13 | How corporate purpose is foundational to business innovation and success

Principled

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 29:48


What you'll learn in this podcast episode As the business world makes an overdue shift from shareholder to stakeholder capitalism, is it possible that we will see an erosion of innovation? How does a company's purpose impact its success? In this episode of the Principled Podcast, LRN Chief Advisory Officer Ty Francis MBE talks about how corporate purpose and stakeholder capitalism fuel innovation with Mark R. Hatch, CEO of clean energy startup SiLi-ion, Inc., an instigator of the maker movement with the founding of TechShop, author of The Maker Movement Manifesto and The Maker Revolution, and researcher on the influence of “organizational purpose” on innovation and business transformation at Pepperdine University. Mark has dedicated his career to educating the business community on innovation and advanced manufacturing and has spoken at the White House on these topics. Listen in as the two discuss what it means to help people—and companies—around the world do the right thing.   Featured Guest: Mark Hatch Mark R. Hatch is an advanced manufacturing entrepreneur, writer, and sought-after speaker and advisor on innovation, the maker movement, digital strategy, and advanced manufacturing. He has held executive positions for innovation, disruptive technology, entrepreneurship, and intrapreneurship in various industry sectors. Mark is the CEO of clean energy startup SiLi-ion, Inc. and an advisor to Studio MFG, an advanced spatial-web innovation consulting and manufacturing design firm. Mark has dedicated his career to educating the business community on innovation and advanced manufacturing and has spoken about these topics to various audiences—including the White House, TEDx, Global Fortune 500 firms, and Harvard University. He has appeared on prominent media outlets such as ABC, CBS, NBC, Bloomberg, CNN, and Fox, and has been quoted in Bloomberg Business, FastCompany, Forbes, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The LA Times, and The San Francisco Chronicle among other publications. An avid researcher on the influence of “organizational purpose” on innovation and business transformation, Mark is working on his DBA at Pepperdine University and is a faculty member for digital innovation and strategy at Pepperdine's Graziado School of Business. He is also an entrepreneur in residence at UC Berkeley. Mark holds an MBA from the Drucker Center at Claremont Graduate University and a BA in economics from UCI.   Featured Host: Ty Francis Ty Francis MBE is a Welsh-American business development, operations executive, and subject matter expert in Corporate Governance, Ethics, Compliance and Culture and is currently LRN's Head of Advisory Services, and a member of the Executive Team as a Special Advisor to the CEO.  Ty has utilized his expansive network of industry experts and thought leaders to help companies enhance corporate character, culture, D&I and transparency and has launched E&C programs and forums in the US, UK, France, Hong Kong, Japan, Brazil, Singapore, Brazil and the Middle East. He spent over a decade in New York City where he was EVP of Global Programs at the Ethisphere Institute and prior to that led the Corporate Board member business at the New York Stock Exchange's Governance Services division.  In 2019, he was awarded an Honorary Doctorate in Business by the UK's Solent University for his outstanding contribution in the field of corporate governance and international trade. In 2017, Ty was appointed a Member of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (MBE), by Queen Elizabeth II, in recognition of services to business.  Ty also studied at Stanford's Rock Centre for Corporate Governance and Oxford University's Said Business School and is a Certified Compliance & Ethics Professional (CCEP).    Principled Podcast Transcription Intro: Welcome to the Principled Podcast, brought to you by LRN. The Principled Podcast brings together the collective wisdom on ethics, business and compliance, transformative stories of leadership, and inspiring workplace culture. Listen in to discover valuable strategies from our community of business leaders, and workplace change makers. Ty Francis: As the business world makes an overdue shift from shareholder to stakeholder capitalism, is it possible that we'll see an erosion of innovation? How does a company's purpose impact its success? Hello, and welcome to another episode of LRN's Principled Podcast. I'm your host, Ty Francis, Chief Advisory Officer LRN. Today I'm joined by Mark Hatch, an accomplished entrepreneur, advanced manufacturing expert, and sought after speaker on topics of innovation, disruptive technology, and the future of work. Mark holds an MBA from the Drucker Center at Claremont Graduate University. And is presently pursuing a DBA, a doctor of business administration, from Pepperdine University. We are going to be talking today about corporate purpose, stakeholder capitalism, and what it means to help people, and companies around the world do the right thing. After several successful decades in business, Mark is now researching the influence of organizational purpose on innovation and business transformation at Pepperdine, while simultaneously serving as CEO of the clean energy startup, SiLi-ion, amongst other things. Mark Hatch, thanks for joining me on the Principled Podcast. Mark Hatch: Thank you very much, Ty. It's great to be here. Ty Francis: Okay so, for those of us saying to ourselves, "Where have I heard this name before," please tell us a little bit about your professional history. Now, we know you as the founder of TechShop, and an instigator in the maker movement. What else? Oh, yes, you've spoken at White House about advanced manufacturing, and at the Clinton Global Initiative, something my wife [inaudible 00:01:58] was actually involved in during her time at Swiss Re. Mark Hatch:   Oh, how fun. Ty Francis: Yeah, she was at Swiss Re for about 10 years and worked very closely with President Clinton. So, that's a name, it's all too familiar in my household. But I also know you're involved in the Singularity University, which sounds very Star Trekky, which is an interesting side note, especially since we're talking about purpose today. So, I've given an overview, but can you give us a little bit more about your backstory Mark? Mark Hatch:   Oh, hit a couple high points. I'm a former green beret, so I was in the army for three years coming out of high school, which was quite entertaining. And then, I started my first company, an interactive multimedia company back in '80s. One of the things I've discovered that I'm really good at is jumping into something way too early. And then, getting beaten up for years and years until it becomes the obvious next thing. The interesting thing about that interactive media though, was that John McAfee of McAfee Antivirus was one of my first investors. I actually got to know John before he became infamous, I guess. I spent a little bit of time at Avery Dennison, a big package goods company. A little bit of time at Kinkos, where I launched the e-commerce portion for Kinkos. And pulled T1 lines around the United States to wire them all up. Spent a little bit of time doing a health benefits ASP and so forth. But most people, if they know who I am at all, is from the maker movement days wrote a couple books in it, and spent a lot of time traipsing around the globe trying to get people to make things again. Ty Francis: Well, I want to touch a couple of those things. So now, you aren't the average professor, as we've just heard, because you've got some real bites to your bark. Within what you just told me, I did read that you raised over $20 million and turned TechShop into that leading brand in the maker movement, growing it from 1 to 12 locations. And more impressively membership and revenue 20X in five years. I got that right, 20X? Mark Hatch: 20, yeah. As long as you start from a very small base, it's really easy to hit those high numbers. Ty Francis: I think you and I have got a different definition of the word easy.  If that wasn't impressive enough, you also grew that $200 million business at Kinkos by 18%. But I think more impressive than that, and someone who runs a P and L you cut costs by 15 million in a single year. Mark Hatch: In a single year, yeah. Ty Francis: That is both impressive. And I get, your students get a kick out of all that experience. We had a pre-conversation before. And I mentioned that I'm lucky enough to know Sir Richard Branson. And he told me years ago how he went into a bookshop, and pulled a bunch of books off the library that were about business. I think the first 20 he counted, none of the authors had actually been in business, or run a business, and were anecdotal at best. Looking at what you've done and what you've succeeded, how has that happened? And how has that paradigm shifted to you now? Mark Hatch: One, I do actually tend to live in the future. It's a bad habit. I've got a very, very clear view of what I believe is going to happen. And I clearly did not take my desert training in the Special Forces very well, where they beat into your head, never mistake a clear view for a short distance. It will kill you. So, I saw interactive multimedia early. I saw dot com early. I've seen many of these things. What I managed to do with TechShop was raise funds, and grow the base quickly enough so that we actually survive for a solid 10 years. But what I do is innovation. My entire career has been on the edge between in a research and development, or the most recent trends, and then commercializing them, turning them into something that a consumer can understand, and acquire. Ty Francis: So, I am seeing a Star Trek theme in all of this, by the way. Seeing into the future. A Q-esque type person here. But this is fascinating. And you, obviously, have an incredible foundation [inaudible 00:06:08] what you are doing, looking at the past, predicting the future. But I do want to tap more into the research you're doing at Pepperdine. And as part of your DBA, again, I'm looking at this and I have an honorary doctorate, and I feel very, very small right now. Mark Hatch: Congratulations. That's quite impressive actually. Ty Francis: Yeah, but apparently when the air cabin crew asks if there's a doctor on the plane, I'm not allowed to raise my hand. When they say, "What can you help this person with?" I can say, "Well, I've got an interesting anecdote about business." So the DBA you're pursuing right now, I mean, I particularly admire the notion of going back to school for an advanced degree. I've had a limited amount of business success. And during the lockdown, I took three courses, one at a side business university at Oxford, one at Stanford, and one at the London School of Economics. The recurring theme through all of those courses... One was executive leadership. One was DEI and leveraging business through it. And the other was international relations and global politics. Organizational purpose was a common theme through all of those postgraduate and diplomas. And it was fascinating how that was a theme, and linking back into business. So, I want you to talk about your work on organizational purpose. But first of all, can you give me, or us a definition of your definition of organizational purpose? Mark Hatch:    There are like three versions of what purpose means. But to get a little bit technical, the short version is really simple. Like the single word, the single concept is why a corporation exists. That's what purpose means, why? Now, usually, when you use the term, what is your corporate purpose? You're not thinking of the single thing that the word means. You're thinking of a corporate purpose statement, or a development of a series of concepts. Or, as they say in business speak, it's a construct. So, I have adopted George et al's from 2021, which is interesting. Most of this good work has happened just in the last few years. So, purpose in the for profit context captures the essence of an organization's existence by explaining what value it seeks to create for its stakeholders. So, you're creating value. But then he goes on and defines it a little bit more, which I like. "In doing so purpose provides a clear definition of firm's intent, creates the ability for the stakeholders to identify with and be inspired by the firm's mission, vision, and values, and establishes actionable pathways, and an inspirational outcome for the firm." Sorry, that's very technical, but that's the best broad version that includes mission, vision, and values, which people tend to associate with purpose when you ask them what a corporate purpose is. But let me back up a little bit. So, the reason I got intrigued with this was, well first of all, I'm very purpose driven personally. I was, usually, involved with technologies that I found intriguing, and could improve humanity in some way. But my experience at TechShop was at a completely different level. People were joining because of the purpose of this idea that we could remake our lives by going to a shop that had, basically, democratized access to the tools of the industrial revolution. We were giving the average Joe access to tools that they had never had access to, unless they were 80 years old, had come up at three machine shop or something. But we were giving them laser cutters, and 3D printers, and so forth.  And I personally got a level of satisfaction out of that. And I got my staff members to perform at levels I had never seen before. We had members that are evangelists. I mean, it seemed like sometimes they would go out on the street and tell people, "Have you heard of this place? You've got to come in." We had this one member, he quit his job. And he didn't have a great job to begin with, but he quit his job as a night watchman, came up and couch surfed. Like that was a thing for a while, couchsurfing.com where you could go and spend the night at somebody's house randomly. This was well before hotel folks came along. He would evangelize each couch that he slept on became a member, like not the couch, the people. Every place that he went, we got new members. And we thought about maybe paying him just to hang around, and sleep on a new couch every night because he was our best attractor. And so, this got me really interested in this concept of what is your corporate purpose? And how does it play out and impact the organization at large? Ty Francis: I think the biggest question that we have, and I have is when people are talking about this concept, how organizations are dealing with this, how are you articulating this to companies, to brands, to leaders, and how to actually put this into practice? Because many of the conversations I have with boards, with GCs, with anyone, they understand the problem. They see what's happening. They read and they see blogs, and they have conversations with the fellow board members. But it's actually the tangibility of creating a strategy that puts this into place. And something they can follow. I guess what's the sticky sauce? What's the magic wand that you throw over your clients, your peers on how do I actually put this into play? Mark Hatch: So the research that I'm doing specifically came out of kind of the question, how do I deal with the naysayers? How do I convince a board, or a C-suite folks that are like, "Yeah, yeah, yeah, whatever, whatever, whatever. I've got my ESG guy and they're going to keep me between the lanes, and everything's going to be fine." I started down this path as like, what do we actually know about corporate purpose? Where did it spring from? Actually, I go all the way back. What's the original concept of a corporation? Where did that come from? And it goes all the way back. It's crazy. It goes all the way back to pre-Babylonian times. And I won't bore you with all of that, but it turns out you couldn't have a corporation without having a purpose of some kind. It wasn't allowed. The state would not allow it. The king would not allow it. I've got a great quote out of the Law of Corporations 1702, "The sole purpose of a corporation is to improve the society and support the king." Full stop. You can't say, "Okay, I'm here to do like, blah, blah, blah. And I'm going to make this." No, no, no, no. How are you going to help your customers? How are you going to improve society? And how are you going to support the king? And if you don't have an answer to that, I'm sorry, not only will I not give you corporation, if I happen to have given you one, and you have strayed too far, I will shut you down. And this was actually the norm up to about 1880 globally. And there's this great quote. It was Massachusetts Bay Company and they charged this poor sod 200 pounds for overcharging his customer. And then, on Sunday morning, the preacher got engaged talking about the egregious greed, and what can happen. And it was simply against the law. And then, things changed with the 14th amendment, some other bizarre things. But we've had this like weird era, and that's how I would describe it, between 1886 to about 1950, we were set loose. You didn't have to have a purpose at all. You actually didn't need any purpose at all. You could just go down to Delaware and say, "I want to set up a company." And they go, "Great." They still would ask, what are you going to do? And so, in your mind, you had to at least have a customer, or somebody you were going to steal money from. You had to have some idea. So even today in your charters, you have to say, "Okay, I'm going to be in this industry segment," which by the way, you just send them a note and that can change. But about around 1950, that started to shift. So, that was a long winded way of saying, so how do we deal with these guys? And what I wanted to do, and what I'm doing is I'm a practical guy, I'm a practitioner. I don't want to sell them something that doesn't work. What does that mean for your purpose? And so, I'm really intrigued with this idea of empirically based management tools. How do you know something works? Not one of those 19 books that Sir Branson was talking about, but the one that comes out of the trenches. So, I've gone back and I've done a fairly significant review of all of the literature on corporate purpose. What's actually known from a theoretical perspective from doing interviews, which I don't put a lot of weight into because you get what you want out of your interviews. But actual empirical work that's been done in this space. And it turns out those corporations that do have a purpose that's more than simply serving customers, they have substantially superior financial returns. And actually, I think your firm is an example that promulgates that point of view based on research you guys have done in the past. Ty Francis: Our tagline is, principle performance. And I'll add that some research we did last year echoes most of what you're saying. I mean, all of what you're saying. My own advisory team released a report alongside our marketing team. And we called it our LRN Benchmark of Ethical Culture, which is a multi-year, it's a collaborative research effort, which draws data from nearly 8,000 employees, 17 industries, 14 countries. And that study conclusively proves that ethical cultures don't just protect corporate reputations, but they propel the bottom line. Companies with the strongest ethical cultures, strongly outperform by approximately 40% those with weakest ethical cultures. And that was across all measures of business performance, customer satisfaction. You talked about employee loyalty, innovation, adaptability, and growth. It's very simple, and you can make a lot of links to this. But if you keep people happy, if people believe in what you are doing, they will stay. If they stay, they will not leave. If they will not leave, they will not take IP with them. They will not go somewhere else. So, all that money you've invested in hiring them, training them, making them better people they will not take that somewhere else. Mark Hatch: Yeah, your brand positioning, your ability to [inaudible 00:16:32]. The theory is actually pretty well illuminated. Actually, the step that I'm taking... I think we have, in fact, proven that having a higher purpose can, or will result in superior financial success. So, there's my answer to the naysayers. This is really simple besides being the right thing to do, and to feel good about yourself, and your company when you go home at night, and you talk to your kids about what you're doing, your returns are higher. But the next question that I asked is, okay, show me how? Just throwing a purpose together and announcing it from the mountaintop is not the right answer. Now, we are getting results, so kudos to the companies that are executing. But I'm trying to answer the question, okay, how do you operationalize a superior purpose? What are the actual specific financial drivers that create superior firm performance? Innovation, and then specifically radical innovation is historically the largest way that firms create superior returns by far. There are other ways of doing it: brand, financial management, operations, Six Sigma, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. But the number one way of improving your financial performance is actually to do innovation. And then radical innovation in particular. That's my little chunk that I'm chewing on is can I show that firms with a higher aspirational purpose actually get superior innovation returns and superior radical innovation returns? And the quantitative numbers have come in. I'm now working on writing it up. And it's clear like it's 0.0001 chance that it's false. In fact, a higher purpose does drive radical innovation in a very significant way. It explains 30% of the variance of that. And like 35 to 37% of all variance in your innovation. It's huge. So, my answer is, okay, install, purpose, and innovate. Point this amazing effort that you've created, point this missile down the range at radical innovation because you're going to get an enormous return out of it. Ty Francis: You've actually answered the next question I was going to ask about, what this means for the future of business, and what is your vision for how company leaders can apply these insights? As you said, it's not enough for somebody to read in a book about what's happening. It's how they can relate that and put that into practice to change the dynamic of their own companies. We're not just talking about this. Investors are asking companies point blank, define your purpose. What are you doing to make the world around you better? Larry Fingers, writing to CEOs every single year. In the UK, the banking industry are asking, "Yes, we get it. You're raising capital for people, but what else are you doing?" It's a little bit, what have you done for me lately kind of thing. Mark Hatch: We've come full circle now. In 1886, we decided, okay, you don't have to have a purpose. But now, we are rewriting the laws. The SEC in the US, the UK, as you mentioned, the French have done it. The Italians have done it. The Germans did it ages ago. But there's an enormous amount of pressure now on corporations to be able to explicitly measure what their social good is. They don't necessarily call it your purpose, but that's what they're getting at. When I came at this, of course, I have the context of working at Singularity University as a speaker. And I know, I know a friend of mine is Salim Ismail, who's driving this whole exponential organization's effort globally. And, in it, he said, sidebar conversation. "So Mark, I've tried to do these exponential innovation efforts without a massively transformative purpose at the beginning of the effort because the corporation was like, 'Yeah, you're making me feel kind of weird about this idea of changing the world and all that. We're an X company, let's just do the execution part and skip the massively transformative purpose part.'" And he said, "Every single time we did that, it failed. Every single time. We got nominal innovation out of it." And it actually makes sense when you think about the internal resistance of individuals in their risk profiles. Typically, you go to work and you want to have things normal. And then, what's going to happen all day long, and you're competent and so forth. But when you start doing innovation and, particularly radical innovation, you don't know what tomorrow looks like. You don't understand who your customer is. You don't know what the value is per se. And you're thrown in the deep end and you got to figure it out. Now, it's not quite that bad, but it is substantially different than your day-to-day. And it's hard. Doing radical innovation is the hardest part of being in business because you don't know how it's going to come out. That as a background, is like, "Oh my goodness, you're kidding me. You just told me that one of the keys to being able to execute this isn't actually reaching for the stars." It's not like, can we get a 15% increase in this? Or can we cut costs by 10% or 5%? It's can you cut cost by 50%? Can we double our market share? Can we open up an entirely new market segment? Just saying those words creates a new tension in somebody's head. You bring them in and say, "Okay, we're going to get 10% here, and 15% there." And everybody goes, "Oh cool, I don't have to change anything. I can go back to my desk and keep stamping those pieces of paper. And I'm good." You come in and say, "I want a 50% increase. And I need a 30% reduction over here," actually you've lost the audience because for the next five minutes, all they're going to be wondering is whether or not they have a job. Am I qualified to do this? That's what got me going. And we live in the most exciting time in all of human history. We've got more technologies coming on stream in amazing and radical ways, and how they're interacting with one another is absolutely stunning. So, this is the best time in all of human history to do radical innovation. This is the best time to go after actually deep purposes. And I feel sorry for these corporations who are going, "Okay, let's try to get a 12% bump over the next two years." They're doomed. In my mind it's like, forget it. You and I and others in this world are going to teach the executive suite that radical innovation is possible, it will drive the bottom line, make them feel better and will, in fact, change the world. And I'm proving it empirically. That's kind of what I'm excited about. Ty Francis: It reminds me of a quote that was a famous NFL coach. And I can't remember it now and I'll come back to you by the end of the podcast. But it was about reaching for perfection that you'll never attain it. But on the way down, you will hit excellence. And I think this is an area why people aren't reaching for the stars is surprising because it's that competitive advantage. When we talk about how this is a competitive advantage, not just on a social scale, but on a business scale, we've been talking to board directors. We had a collaboration with a group called Tapestry Networks. We spoke to 40 directors of publicly traded companies, I mean 40, 50 companies. And they represented about 70 or 80 different companies across their different board positions. We did this specifically to talk about purpose and culture. We released the findings in a report called Activating Culture and Ethics for Boards late last year. And the results, albeit mostly predictable, the boards want to put culture at the top of their priority list, but they still don't fully understand how to measure it. The refreshing part was that they see that the paradigm shifted from board members having a nose in, fingers out ability to more having nose and fingers in because they are starting to see this as a competitive benefit to having both strategy and culture and purpose aligned. And with that, I think they're seeing they have a better understanding of what corporate purpose should be. I think we're trying to see a tangible move in the... I'm using quotation marks here, a "tone from the top" conversation on how boards are impacting priorities, and are influencing culture. So, how does that help your research for what you are doing now for the future of work? Mark Hatch: You've done the surveys, you know what the answers are. But what I'm trying to do is start a small renaissance around, prove it to me. What are the actual ways that you operationalize it? It's like, okay, employee retention. Okay, measure employee retention. But don't just measure employee retention, invest in your employees. If you know that they're going to hang around longer, don't just sit on your hands, and say, "Oh cool, they're going to be here longer. Woo hoo." No, no, no. What that means is you can't actually invest in them in ways that your competitors can't. That's operationalizing this idea of this competitive advantage, invest in your customers, invest in your brand. What are you doing specifically to drive your brand in relations in a deeper way? You've created this competitive advantage. You've got this great purpose now sitting on the shelf. Great. How are you going to operationalize it? And can we measure it? That's my point. It's can we actually measure it and see what the returns are? Ty Francis: The measurement, that's the trick. Everyone knows what they should be doing, but they don't know how they should be doing it. Mark Hatch: And if you don't measure it, then you don't care about it. Ty Francis: Wasn't that the famous misquote from Peter Drucker what you can't manage, you can measure, or the other way around? Mark Hatch: Right. Ty Francis: So we've been talking a lot about boards and purpose, but we know the SEC, and we're talking about the US. Obviously, although I'm American, I'm also Welsh. So, I'm curious if your research extends to Europe, or other regions. I mean, is this universal? Or is it just stage one USA, stage two [inaudible 00:25:55]? Mark Hatch:    It does work at least in the UK. So, I chose my sample's 50/50, US/UK. 50/50, male/female. Native English speakers, try to control for some other variables. This is clearly true in the UK and the US. My suspicion, obviously, is that it's true in a lot of other parts of the world as well. Other research suggests that it is at least pan-European. Gartenberg's work and others. Gartenberg did some quantitative research that had 500,000 companies in it from around the globe. And they were able to show empirically that purpose does, in fact, drive superior financial returns, similar to what your research did. Ty Francis: When you're talking about this corporate purpose, I've noticed working in the States for a long time, that there is in the States and, to a certain extent, in the UK as well, there's a shareholder driven purpose kind of alignment where there's in broader Europe, France, and Germany, and Italy there's more of a stakeholder driven perception. So, there you see in Germany where you've got the different kind of board levels, and with the very straight labor laws in France, you are seeing that connection between leadership, and the employee base having to be aligned because they've got no choice because if they don't like what their companies are doing, they can change it, and quite dramatically. So, that would be interesting to see how that dynamic between the UK and the US, but then certainly further afield of that, how the European companies and organizations are actually using this corporate purpose vehicle to their competitive advantage. Mark Hatch: Right. One might hypothesize that corporate purpose, that's a fundamental driver. But how you operationalize it may vary from region to region. Maybe brand is a better tool than radical innovation. Maybe employee retention is a better one. I'm not sure. I doubt it, frankly. I think innovation is one of the fundamental things that you do as a business. Drucker would say, you're not even an entrepreneur, if you're not doing innovation. You can call yourself a businessman, but you're not an entrepreneur. And so, I suspect that innovation. And then as we're moving, again, the opportunity set available now to innovate is phenomenal. Radical innovation, it should be a fundamental strategy for any business that's trying to drive purpose into their organization, and with their stakeholders. Ty Francis: Well, before we sign off, and before I get a raft of my very angry American listeners asking why this British guy is talking about American football? It was Vince Lombardi, [inaudible 00:28:28]. And his quote was, and I'll see if I can get this right, "Perfection's not attainable. But if we chase perfection, we can catch excellence." Mark Hatch: Yeah. Ty Francis: So Mark Hatch, this has been a fascinating conversation and one that we have merely pricked the surface of. And I'd like to have you back to talk a little bit more definitively, especially when the research is done, to look at those results. Thank you for sharing your thoughts with me today and us on this episode.       My name is Ty Francis. I want to thank you all for listening to the Principled Podcast by LRM. If you have enjoyed the conversation today, please do give us a top rating on your favorite podcast app. Goodbye for now. Outro: We hope you enjoyed this episode. The Principled Podcast is brought to you by LRN. At LRN, our mission is to inspire principled performance in global organizations by helping them foster winning ethical cultures rooted in sustainable values. Please visit us at lrn.com to learn more. And if you enjoyed this episode, subscribe to our podcast on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Google Podcasts, or wherever you listen. And don't forget to leave us a review.

Stand Up For The Truth Podcast
Bill Perkins: End Times Signs, Israel, World travel, the Rapture

Stand Up For The Truth Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 53:53


We discuss freedom and world travel, prophecy, how Israel is handling the pandemic, timing of the rapture, and signs of the end times. Daily podcast, relevant articles on issues pertaining to Christians and more can be found on Stand Up For The Truth.

Haunted Talks - The Official Podcast of The Haunted Walk
Ep 124 - The First Ghosts - Part 1

Haunted Talks - The Official Podcast of The Haunted Walk

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 33:58


What is the oldest recorded mention of a ghost? Dr. Irving Finkel, Assistant Keeper of Ancient Mesopotamian script, languages and cultures in the Department of the Middle East at the British Museum, joins us to talk about his recent book The First Ghosts: Most Ancient of Legacies. He shares how living with ghosts and other restless spirits has been part of the human experience from the earliest moments of recorded history. Not only is he a leading expert in ancient writing, but also a wonderful and playful storyteller and we are extremely lucky to have him for a special two-part interview. Part two will be released next Friday. Be sure to check out our new Haunted Talks Tees & Haunted Hoodies!

New Books in Israel Studies
Maria Chiara Rioli, "A Liminal Church: Refugees, Conversions and the Latin Diocese of Jerusalem, 1946–1956" (Brill, 2020)

New Books in Israel Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 51:16


The history of the Palestine War does not only concern military history. It also involves social, humanitarian and religious history, as in the case of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Jerusalem. A Liminal Church: Refugees, Conversions and the Latin Diocese of Jerusalem, 1946–1956 (Brill, 2020) offers a complex narrative of the Latin patriarchal diocese, commonly portrayed as monolithically aligned with anti-Zionist and anti-Muslim positions during the “long” year of 1948. Making use of largely unpublished archives in the Middle East, Europe and the United States, including the recently released Pius XII papers, Maria Chiara Rioli depicts a church engaged in multiple and sometimes contradictory pastoral initiatives, amid harsh battles, relief missions for Palestinian refugees, theological reflections on Jewish converts to Catholicism, political relations with the Israeli and Jordanian authorities, and liturgical responses to a fluid and uncertain scenario. The pieces of this history include the Jerusalem grand mufti's appeal to Pius XII to support the Arab cause, the Catholic liturgies for peace and international mobilization during the Palestine War and Suez crisis, refugees petitioning the patriarch for aid, and Jewish converts establishing Christian kibbutzim. New archival collections and records reveal hidden aspects of the lives of women, children and other silenced actors, faith communities and religious institutions during and after 1948, connecting narratives that have been marginalized by a dominant historiography more focused on military campaigns or confessional conflicts. A Liminal Church weaves diocesan history with global history. In the momentous decade from 1946 to 1956, the study of the transnational Jerusalem Latin diocese, as split between Israel, Jordan, Egypt and Cyprus, with ties to diaspora and religious international networks and comprising clergy from all over the world, attests to the possibilities of contrapuntal narratives, reintroducing complexity to a deeply and painfully polarized debate, exposing false assumptions and situating changes and ruptures in a long-term perspective. Roberto Mazza is visiting professor at Northwestern University. He is the host of the Jerusalem Unplugged Podcast and to discuss and propose a book for interview can be reached at robbymazza@gmail.com. Twitter: @robbyref Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/israel-studies

New Books in Middle Eastern Studies
Maria Chiara Rioli, "A Liminal Church: Refugees, Conversions and the Latin Diocese of Jerusalem, 1946–1956" (Brill, 2020)

New Books in Middle Eastern Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 51:16


The history of the Palestine War does not only concern military history. It also involves social, humanitarian and religious history, as in the case of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Jerusalem. A Liminal Church: Refugees, Conversions and the Latin Diocese of Jerusalem, 1946–1956 (Brill, 2020) offers a complex narrative of the Latin patriarchal diocese, commonly portrayed as monolithically aligned with anti-Zionist and anti-Muslim positions during the “long” year of 1948. Making use of largely unpublished archives in the Middle East, Europe and the United States, including the recently released Pius XII papers, Maria Chiara Rioli depicts a church engaged in multiple and sometimes contradictory pastoral initiatives, amid harsh battles, relief missions for Palestinian refugees, theological reflections on Jewish converts to Catholicism, political relations with the Israeli and Jordanian authorities, and liturgical responses to a fluid and uncertain scenario. The pieces of this history include the Jerusalem grand mufti's appeal to Pius XII to support the Arab cause, the Catholic liturgies for peace and international mobilization during the Palestine War and Suez crisis, refugees petitioning the patriarch for aid, and Jewish converts establishing Christian kibbutzim. New archival collections and records reveal hidden aspects of the lives of women, children and other silenced actors, faith communities and religious institutions during and after 1948, connecting narratives that have been marginalized by a dominant historiography more focused on military campaigns or confessional conflicts. A Liminal Church weaves diocesan history with global history. In the momentous decade from 1946 to 1956, the study of the transnational Jerusalem Latin diocese, as split between Israel, Jordan, Egypt and Cyprus, with ties to diaspora and religious international networks and comprising clergy from all over the world, attests to the possibilities of contrapuntal narratives, reintroducing complexity to a deeply and painfully polarized debate, exposing false assumptions and situating changes and ruptures in a long-term perspective. Roberto Mazza is visiting professor at Northwestern University. He is the host of the Jerusalem Unplugged Podcast and to discuss and propose a book for interview can be reached at robbymazza@gmail.com. Twitter: @robbyref Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/middle-eastern-studies

New Books in History
Maria Chiara Rioli, "A Liminal Church: Refugees, Conversions and the Latin Diocese of Jerusalem, 1946–1956" (Brill, 2020)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 51:16


The history of the Palestine War does not only concern military history. It also involves social, humanitarian and religious history, as in the case of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Jerusalem. A Liminal Church: Refugees, Conversions and the Latin Diocese of Jerusalem, 1946–1956 (Brill, 2020) offers a complex narrative of the Latin patriarchal diocese, commonly portrayed as monolithically aligned with anti-Zionist and anti-Muslim positions during the “long” year of 1948. Making use of largely unpublished archives in the Middle East, Europe and the United States, including the recently released Pius XII papers, Maria Chiara Rioli depicts a church engaged in multiple and sometimes contradictory pastoral initiatives, amid harsh battles, relief missions for Palestinian refugees, theological reflections on Jewish converts to Catholicism, political relations with the Israeli and Jordanian authorities, and liturgical responses to a fluid and uncertain scenario. The pieces of this history include the Jerusalem grand mufti's appeal to Pius XII to support the Arab cause, the Catholic liturgies for peace and international mobilization during the Palestine War and Suez crisis, refugees petitioning the patriarch for aid, and Jewish converts establishing Christian kibbutzim. New archival collections and records reveal hidden aspects of the lives of women, children and other silenced actors, faith communities and religious institutions during and after 1948, connecting narratives that have been marginalized by a dominant historiography more focused on military campaigns or confessional conflicts. A Liminal Church weaves diocesan history with global history. In the momentous decade from 1946 to 1956, the study of the transnational Jerusalem Latin diocese, as split between Israel, Jordan, Egypt and Cyprus, with ties to diaspora and religious international networks and comprising clergy from all over the world, attests to the possibilities of contrapuntal narratives, reintroducing complexity to a deeply and painfully polarized debate, exposing false assumptions and situating changes and ruptures in a long-term perspective. Roberto Mazza is visiting professor at Northwestern University. He is the host of the Jerusalem Unplugged Podcast and to discuss and propose a book for interview can be reached at robbymazza@gmail.com. Twitter: @robbyref Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Jewish Studies
Maria Chiara Rioli, "A Liminal Church: Refugees, Conversions and the Latin Diocese of Jerusalem, 1946–1956" (Brill, 2020)

New Books in Jewish Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 51:16


The history of the Palestine War does not only concern military history. It also involves social, humanitarian and religious history, as in the case of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Jerusalem. A Liminal Church: Refugees, Conversions and the Latin Diocese of Jerusalem, 1946–1956 (Brill, 2020) offers a complex narrative of the Latin patriarchal diocese, commonly portrayed as monolithically aligned with anti-Zionist and anti-Muslim positions during the “long” year of 1948. Making use of largely unpublished archives in the Middle East, Europe and the United States, including the recently released Pius XII papers, Maria Chiara Rioli depicts a church engaged in multiple and sometimes contradictory pastoral initiatives, amid harsh battles, relief missions for Palestinian refugees, theological reflections on Jewish converts to Catholicism, political relations with the Israeli and Jordanian authorities, and liturgical responses to a fluid and uncertain scenario. The pieces of this history include the Jerusalem grand mufti's appeal to Pius XII to support the Arab cause, the Catholic liturgies for peace and international mobilization during the Palestine War and Suez crisis, refugees petitioning the patriarch for aid, and Jewish converts establishing Christian kibbutzim. New archival collections and records reveal hidden aspects of the lives of women, children and other silenced actors, faith communities and religious institutions during and after 1948, connecting narratives that have been marginalized by a dominant historiography more focused on military campaigns or confessional conflicts. A Liminal Church weaves diocesan history with global history. In the momentous decade from 1946 to 1956, the study of the transnational Jerusalem Latin diocese, as split between Israel, Jordan, Egypt and Cyprus, with ties to diaspora and religious international networks and comprising clergy from all over the world, attests to the possibilities of contrapuntal narratives, reintroducing complexity to a deeply and painfully polarized debate, exposing false assumptions and situating changes and ruptures in a long-term perspective. Roberto Mazza is visiting professor at Northwestern University. He is the host of the Jerusalem Unplugged Podcast and to discuss and propose a book for interview can be reached at robbymazza@gmail.com. Twitter: @robbyref Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/jewish-studies

New Books Network
Maria Chiara Rioli, "A Liminal Church: Refugees, Conversions and the Latin Diocese of Jerusalem, 1946–1956" (Brill, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 51:16


The history of the Palestine War does not only concern military history. It also involves social, humanitarian and religious history, as in the case of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Jerusalem. A Liminal Church: Refugees, Conversions and the Latin Diocese of Jerusalem, 1946–1956 (Brill, 2020) offers a complex narrative of the Latin patriarchal diocese, commonly portrayed as monolithically aligned with anti-Zionist and anti-Muslim positions during the “long” year of 1948. Making use of largely unpublished archives in the Middle East, Europe and the United States, including the recently released Pius XII papers, Maria Chiara Rioli depicts a church engaged in multiple and sometimes contradictory pastoral initiatives, amid harsh battles, relief missions for Palestinian refugees, theological reflections on Jewish converts to Catholicism, political relations with the Israeli and Jordanian authorities, and liturgical responses to a fluid and uncertain scenario. The pieces of this history include the Jerusalem grand mufti's appeal to Pius XII to support the Arab cause, the Catholic liturgies for peace and international mobilization during the Palestine War and Suez crisis, refugees petitioning the patriarch for aid, and Jewish converts establishing Christian kibbutzim. New archival collections and records reveal hidden aspects of the lives of women, children and other silenced actors, faith communities and religious institutions during and after 1948, connecting narratives that have been marginalized by a dominant historiography more focused on military campaigns or confessional conflicts. A Liminal Church weaves diocesan history with global history. In the momentous decade from 1946 to 1956, the study of the transnational Jerusalem Latin diocese, as split between Israel, Jordan, Egypt and Cyprus, with ties to diaspora and religious international networks and comprising clergy from all over the world, attests to the possibilities of contrapuntal narratives, reintroducing complexity to a deeply and painfully polarized debate, exposing false assumptions and situating changes and ruptures in a long-term perspective. Roberto Mazza is visiting professor at Northwestern University. He is the host of the Jerusalem Unplugged Podcast and to discuss and propose a book for interview can be reached at robbymazza@gmail.com. Twitter: @robbyref Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

The Whole Word Podcast
[Summer Recording Break: Re-Broadcast] Matthew 05 - The Beatitudes and the Sermon on the Mount

The Whole Word Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 13:03


Summer Recording Break (Re-Broadcast)Matthew 05Introduction to the Sermon on the Mount (v 1-2)The Beatitudes (v 2b-12)Salt and Light (v 13-16)The Fulfillment of the Law (v 17-20)Murder (v 21-26) | Adultery (v 27-30)Divorce (v 31-32) | Oathes (v 33-37)Eye for Eye (v 38-42)Love for Enemies (v 43-48)**********Scriptures taken from the Holy Bible, New International Version ®, NIV ® Copyright © 1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc. Used with permission. All rights reserved worldwide.The “NIV”, “New International Version”, “Biblica”, “International Bible Society” and the Biblica Logo are trademarks registered in the United States Patent and Trademark Office by Biblica, Inc.  Used with permission.BIBLICA, THE INTERNATIONAL BIBLE SOCIETY, provides God's Word to people through Bible translation & Bible publishing, and Bible engagement in Africa, Asia Pacific, Europe, Latin America, the Middle East, and North America. Through its worldwide reach, Biblica engages people with God's Word so that their lives are transformed through a relationship with Jesus Christ.Support the show

Taqat Hob | طاقة حب
ما هي تقنية العلاج بالثيتا وكيف يعمل العقل الباطني؟

Taqat Hob | طاقة حب

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022


في هذه الحلقة نستضيف رودريغ حمّال - مخرج سينمائي ومعالج بتقنية الثيتا - للحديث عن العلاج بالثيتا. ما هي هذه التقنية؟ كيف تتم جلسات العلاج من خلالها؟ ما هو العقل الباطني وكيف يعمل؟ كيف تُبنى المعتقدات المحدودة داخل اللاوعي وكيف يمكن أن نختار بكامل إرادتنا الحرّة أن نبدأ بالتنقيب عنها، بفهمها، وبالتحرر منها على مراحل بمساعدة اختصاصي محترف؟

The World Next Week
Finland and Sweden Talk NATO, Biden Hosts ASEAN Leaders, and More

The World Next Week

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 25:14


Finland and Sweden intensify the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) membership process, U.S. President Joe Biden hosts Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) leaders for a special summit in Washington, DC, and Lebanon holds parliamentary elections.   Podcasts Mentioned on the Podcast   Steven A. Cook, “The Middle East's Reaction to the Invasion of Ukraine,” The President's Inbox, May 10, 2022

Hold These Truths with Dan Crenshaw
The Truth About the Ukraine Aid Package and What People Get Wrong About It | Rep. Mike Gallagher and Rep. Mike Waltz

Hold These Truths with Dan Crenshaw

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 54:18


Congressman Mike Gallagher and Congressman Mike Waltz join us to talk about why Americans should support Ukraine's war against Russian invaders. We cover the $40 billion aid package which the House passed this week, fact-check the oft-repeated falsehoods about the war and America's support for Ukraine, and take a broader look at America's Cold War with Russia and China. Congressman Mike Gallagher has represented Wisconsin's 8th District in the U.S. House of Representatives since 2017. Mike served for seven years on active duty in the United States Marine Corps, including two deployments to Iraq. Mike also served as the lead Republican staffer for the Middle East and Counterterrorism on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. Follow him on Twitter at @RepGallagher. Congressman Mike Waltz represents North Central Florida, is a Colonel in the National Guard, and is the first Green Beret to be elected to Congress. Follow him on Twitter at @michaelgwaltz.

New Lines Magazine
The Last Days of the Ottomans — with Eugene Rogan and Faisal Al Yafai

New Lines Magazine

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 47:55


For six centuries, the Ottoman Sultans held dominion across most of the Middle East, North Africa and Southern Europe. But by the eve of the First World War in 1914, the empire was already in steep decline. It is at this moment of crisis that the preeminent historian Eugene Rogan begins his bestselling book “The Fall of the Ottomans.” In this podcast, he talks to New Lines' Faisal Al Yafai about those decisive final years. They discuss the Ottoman experience of the Great War, whether the empire's ultimate collapse was inevitable and how the Middle East of today emerged from the ashes of its defeat. Produced by Joshua Martin

Sibylline Insight Series
Discussing Lebanon's upcoming Elections

Sibylline Insight Series

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 23:42


This week join Valeria Scuto, our Middle East Analyst, along with Anastasia Chisholm and Rhiannon Phillips, our Associate Analysts for the Middle East and North Africa to discuss the upcoming elections in Lebanon.   Lebanon's elections this Sunday, 15 May, will take place amid a protracted economic crisis and persistent resentment against political elites. Despite the common perception that government corruption and ineptitude are to blame for the country's socio-economic deterioration, many Lebanese residents are uncertain of their ability to change the political status quo through their ballots.   Meanwhile, the international community will closely watch electoral processes, amid concerns that the announcement of final results will face delays driven by contestation from losing parties. As such, the weeks following the vote will represent a key flashpoint for domestic unrest. In addition, delays to government formation or obstructions to political and economic reforms will undermine the government's ability to secure third-party donor funding from institutions such as the International Monetary Fund, likely further exacerbating Lebanon's economic collapse in the coming months.

ChinaPower
China's Relationship with the Middle East: A Conversation with Dr. Jon B. Alterman

ChinaPower

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 37:41


In this episode of the ChinaPower Podcast, we are joined by Dr. Jon B. Alterman to unpack the relationship between China and the Middle East. Dr. Alterman begins with an overview of China's role in the region, detailing China's varied individual relationships with different countries. He states that China's growing presence in the region is mostly motivated by Chinese self-interest and China is not willing to commit large sacrifices to deepen its relations with the region or with particular countries like Iran. Dr. Alterman concludes that the future of China-Middle East relations is unpredictable, and the United States should not overestimate China's power in the region. Dr. Jon B. Alterman is a senior vice president, holds the Zbigniew Brzezinski Chair in Global Security and Geostrategy, and is director of the Middle East Program at CSIS. Prior to joining CSIS in 2002, he served as a member of the Policy Planning Staff at the U.S. Department of State and as a special assistant to the assistant secretary of state for Near Eastern affairs, and from 2009-2019 he served as a member of the Chief of Naval Operations Executive Panel.

The Realest Podcast Ever
Ep. 202 - Middle East Matt + El Chado

The Realest Podcast Ever

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 132:35


Back for there first time in a week and a half the guys come back to deliver another dope episode on the heels of Matt's epic visit to the Emirates and the boys being honored by Hennessy and DJ Aye Boogie at The Prime Rib in Philly. Much much to cover in this episode, big announcements and some special surprises as well. To get you through the day and deliver you to the weekend, night market and TRPE's DC Invasion (Sat 5/14 + Sun 5/15) we present to you The Realest Podcast Ever. Enjoy. As always for more exclusive content and resources subscribe to us on Patreon and follow us on social media. Click the links below: •Patreon: https://patreon.com/officialtrpe •Grab Your Tour Tickets Here: https://officialtrpe.com (click the tour tab) •YouTube: https://youtube.com/TheRealestPodcastEver •Twitter: https://twitter.com/officialtrpe •Insta: https://instagram.com/officialtrpe •FB: https://facebook.com/TheRealestPodcastEver •Merch: https://www.teepublic.com/user/trpe?ref_id=12031

POMEPS Conversations
Transitional Justice in Process & Environmental Politics in the MENA(S. 11, Ep. 31)

POMEPS Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 60:53


On this week's episode of the podcast, Jeannie Sowers of University of New Hampshire joins Marc Lynch to discuss POMEPS's newest publication, POMEPS Studies 46:Environmental Politics in the Middle East and North Africa. (Starts at 0:36). Mariam Salehi of Freie University Berlin discusses her new book, Transitional justice in process: Plans and politics in Tunisia. The book discusses the development and design of the transitional justice mandate, and looks at the performance of transitional justice institutions in practice. It examines the role of international justice professionals in different stages of the process, as well as the alliances and frictions between different actor groups that cut across the often-assumed local-international divide. (Starts at 32:24). Music for this season's podcast was created by Bashir Saade (playing Ney) and Farah Kaddour (on Buzuq). You can find more of Bashir's work on his YouTube Channel.

Chatting Rabbis
The great tapestry

Chatting Rabbis

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 27:51


Eliezer and Mendy discuss the value of being non-judgmental and open to conflicting views, before segueing into a recap of the recent conference of Chabad rabbis in Europe, Africa, and Middle East, held in Lisbon, Portugal, and a general history lesson of various worldwide Jewish communities.

#WorkBold Podcast
The UK's ‘Marriott of Space-as-a-Service' on Expanding to the European Continent

#WorkBold Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 14:10


Why MIPIM is So Important for International Relationships, with Brett Million In this episode of the #WorkBold Podcast, Caleb Parker is joined by Brett Million, Head of Strategic Partnerships at NewFlex, the UK's largest Space-as-a-Service operator that deploys the management agreement model. Brett has deep experience in Space-as-a-Service, having served as COO for Regus and managing their growth across the globe in the early 2000s. He is responsible for having created the NewFlex multi-brand growth strategy. In this episode, the two discuss why partnerships are important, how Brett was recruited by NewFlex's CEO to lead their growth strategy and some “behind the scenes” chat on how the Bold transaction took place. Brett announces imminent plans for taking the management agreement model to the European continent in partnership with forward thinking landlords, and how MIPIM has been instrumental in making this possible. Connect with Brett on LinkedIn Connect with Caleb on LinkedIn  If you have any questions or feedback on this episode, email podcast@workbold.co   Value Bombs: The primary mission at MIPIM is to have conversations with friends and very well-known property companies across the continent, and potentially in the Middle East and Asia as well, to launch our international ambitions. - Brett   A big part of MIPIM is having as many face-to-face meetings as you can have while you're but the follow-up afterwards is equally as important, or arguably more important. - Brett There is this constant conversation about carbon output and the question was, “Should people really be flying in for MIPIM?” But the truth is, if we had to do all these conversations separately, we would be flying a lot more. - Caleb Timestamps:  [04:35] What is your role as Strategic Partnership Director?  My role is to work with our team to find clients who want to deploy Space-as-a-Service across assets in their portfolios  [06:00] How did Steve recruit you to join NewFlex?  [07:45] How did you find MIPIM?  [10:30] Can you elaborate on NewFlex's international ambitions?   Resources: Get TSK's weekly 'work made better' newsletter Shoutouts:  Steve Jude, #Workbold Episode - Season 3 Episode 1 Sponsors: Headline Sponsor: TSK TSK creates inspiring workplaces for some of the world's biggest brands across the UK and Ireland, They've been working for 25 years to deliver the best employee experiences and the vision of their clients. Not only do they create great places to work, TSK share workplace content every week from the latest data to inspiring spaces they've designed and built. You can read their latest insights at www.tskgroup.co.uk or check out their LinkedIn and Instagram pages to become a follower, fan and friend. TSK publish weekly thought leadership, research and content featuring their team, clients and partners about workplace, commercial interiors, hybrid working and how others have prospered from investing in workplace. You can check their latest publications and video content in the show notes by signing up to their weekly ‘work made better' newsletter or visit tskgroup.co.uk. Fortune Favours the Bold Bold merges property management & Space-as-a-Service to help office customers grow faster and drive asset value. Bold is a real estate brand owned and operated by NewFlex (www.workbold.co)  Future Proof Your Portfolio with NewFlex NewFlex delivers and manages a range of branded solutions for every type of building, in every type of location, for every type of occupier. Including the flexibility to develop your own brand. All enabled by flexible management contracts where we are invested in making money for you. (www.newflex.com) Launch Your Own Podcast Kopus.com is the leading podcast production and strategic content company for brands, organisations, institutions, individuals, and entrepreneurs. Our team sets you up with the right strategy, equipment, training, and guidance and content to ensure you sound amazing while speaking to your niche audience and networking with your perfect clients. Get in touch jason@kopus.com (www.Kopus.com)

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
Ra'am saves coalition, again, in thunderous Knesset session

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 17:32


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Political correspondent Carrie Keller-Lynn and Diaspora Affairs correspondent Judah Ari Gross join host Amanda Borschel-Dan. We begin with a briefing on the tragic death of journalist Shireen Abu Akleh, 51, who was shot in the head during clashes between Israeli troops and Palestinian gunmen while covering an Israeli army operation in the West Bank city of Jenin on Wednesday. Yesterday was an action-packed day in the Knesset. Let's hear what did -- and didn't -- happen. Ari Gross describes take-aways from a new survey out of the Jewish People Policy Institute that shows deepening entrenchment of attitudes among different segments of Israeli society. And finally, we hear about a kerfuffle between the Jewish Agency, the World Zionist Organization and Women of the Wall. Discussed articles include: Palestinians refuse joint Israeli probe into reporter's death; won't transfer bullet Likud pulls bill to dissolve Knesset after Ra'am gives coalition another chance Poll: In Israel, right-wing Jews now less likely to see shared future with Arabs Jewish Agency pans violence against Women of the Wall at event its own chief backed Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Seismic Soundoff
150: Consequences of contemporary stress in the earth's crust

Seismic Soundoff

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 14:26


Mojtaba Rajabi discusses his upcoming Pacific South Honorary Lecture, "Present-Day Crustal Stress Across Spatial Scales." The present-day crustal in-situ stress field is of extreme importance for understanding both natural processes (e.g., understanding neotectonics, earthquake, and seismic hazard assessment) and anthropogenic activities (e.g., exploration and production of geothermal energy, groundwater, hydrocarbon, mineral resources, CO2, and hydrogen geo-storage). Analysis of the present-day stresses in numerous basins from across the world reveals that significant and complex variations in the present-day stress orientation are commonly observed at different scales. Mojtaba's lecture aims to investigate the pattern of crustal stress at different spatial scales to better evaluate the causes and consequences of contemporary stress in the earth's crust. In this conversation with host Andrew Geary, Mojtaba shares why it's necessary to understand the present-day crustal in-situ stress field, the impact of investigating crustal stress at different scales, and the causes and consequences of contemporary stress in the earth's crust. He also goes over the concept of stress mapping and what his years of experience studying basins have taught him. RELATED LINKS * Register for Mojtaba's course for free (9 June 2022) (https://www.knowledgette.com/p/present-day-crustal-stress-across-spatial-scales) * Discover SEG on Demand (https://seg.org/Education/SEG-on-Demand) * See the full archive of the SEG podcast (https://seg.org/podcast) BIOGRAPHY Dr. Mojtaba Rajabi is an ARC DECRA Fellow at the School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Queensland. He has more than 14 years of extensive experience in crustal stress analysis, geomechanics, and geomechanical-numerical modeling. He graduated with a Ph.D. in Earth Sciences from the University of Adelaide in 2016. Dr. Rajabi has worked on the geomechanical analyses of more than 30 sedimentary basins from across the world including Australia, New Zealand, the Middle East, Mozambique, Iceland, and the Western Mediterranean. Since 2012, Dr. Rajabi has worked on the Australian and World Stress Map projects. He has received over 15 prestigious awards and prizes for his research including the ARC-DECRA Award, the Australian SEG Early Achievement Award, EAGE Louis Cagniard Award, the Royal Society of South Australia's H.G. Andrewartha Medal, and the International Lithosphere Program's Flinn-Hart Award. SPONSOR This episode is sponsored by Geospace Technologies. As the leading innovator and manufacturer of wireless seismic data acquisition systems, Geospace Technologies offers a series of seabed, wireless seismic data acquisition systems designed for extended-duration seabed seismic data acquisition. Geospace is committed to setting new standards for quality, performance, reliability and cost savings to E&P companies and marine geophysical contractors. CREDITS SEG produces Seismic Soundoff to benefit its members, the scientific community, and to inform the public on the value of geophysics. To show your support for the show, please leave a 5-star rating on Apple Podcasts and Spotify. It takes less than five seconds to leave a 5-star rating and is the number one action you can take to show your appreciation for this free resource. And follow the podcast while you are on the app to be notified when each new episode releases. Original music created by Zach Bridges. Andrew Geary hosted, edited, and produced this episode for 51 features, LLC. Thank you to the SEG podcast team: Jennifer Cobb, Kathy Gamble, and Ally McGinnis.

The Whole Word Podcast
[Summer Recording Break: Re-Broadcast] Matthew 04 - What Were the Supernatural Temptations of Jesus?

The Whole Word Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 12:58


Summer Recording Break (Re-Broadcast)Matthew 04Jesus Is Tested in the Wilderness (v 1-11)Jesus Begins to Preach (v 12-17)Jesus Calls His First Disciples (v 18-22)Jesus Heals the Sick (v 23-25)**********Scriptures taken from the Holy Bible, New International Version ®, NIV ® Copyright © 1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc. Used with permission. All rights reserved worldwide.The “NIV”, “New International Version”, “Biblica”, “International Bible Society” and the Biblica Logo are trademarks registered in the United States Patent and Trademark Office by Biblica, Inc.  Used with permission.BIBLICA, THE INTERNATIONAL BIBLE SOCIETY, provides God's Word to people through Bible translation & Bible publishing, and Bible engagement in Africa, Asia Pacific, Europe, Latin America, the Middle East, and North America. Through its worldwide reach, Biblica engages people with God's Word so that their lives are transformed through a relationship with Jesus Christ.Support the show

The John Batchelor Show
#DPRK: #PRC: Kim provocations with nukes. Bruce Bechtol, author. @GordonGChang, Gatestone, Newsweek, The Hill

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 12:32


Photo:  North Korea - Vintage map, Norman B. Leventhal Collection #DPRK: #PRC: Kim provocations with nukes. Bruce Bechtol, author.  @GordonGChang, Gatestone, Newsweek, The Hill https://www.cnn.com/2022/05/08/asia/north-korea-nuclear-ukraine-war-lessons-intl-hnk/index.html Bruce Bechtol, author of North Korean Military Proliferation in the Middle East and Africa: Enabling Violence and Instability, and professor at Angelo State University

This Is Palestine
Remembering Shireen Abu Akleh: A Beloved Palestinian-American Journalist Killed by Israeli Soldiers

This Is Palestine

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 21:19


Shireen Abu Akleh was a trailblazing Palestinian journalist who spent decades covering Israel's brutal military occupation of Palestine. On Wednesday, Israeli soldiers fatally shot her in the face while she was reporting on the Israeli military's invasion of a home in the Palestinian city of Jenin. Shireen was wearing a clearly marked press vest and helmet, but Israeli soldiers shot her and fellow journalists anyway, killing Shireen and wounding others. As an Al Jazeera correspondent born in Jerusalem, Shireen amplified the stories of Palestinians who were subjected to Israel's brutal military occupation, its war crimes, and its everyday injustices.

Dig Deep – The Mining Podcast Podcast
Drilling Uncovering Rich Resources in Senegal With Andrew Grove

Dig Deep – The Mining Podcast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 22:28


In this episode, we chat to Andrew Grove, Managing Director, and CEO at Chesser Resources, an ASX listed West African focused gold junior mining company with projects located in Senegal where they have discovered two high-grade gold Projects at its flagship Diamba Sud project in eastern Senegal. Andrew is a geologist by trade and has become a high achieving Mining and Finance Executive with an established track record of achieving results, generating profits, identifying opportunities, managing risk, and developing teams during his career. He discusses the story of Chesser Resources, the results they have achieved and what the future holds for them.   KEY TAKEAWAYS Chesser Resources has been operating successfully since 2007. Some significant gold geochemical anomalies have been identified across a 15km area. In Diamba Sud, they have made high-grade finds. The resources 780,000 ounces have attributes that show economic mining will be viable. The scoping study revealed the potential for rapid payback with production expected to be 100,000 ounces per year. The whole area has had little historic drilling. Initial results from drilling are very promising. Senegal is one of the most stable democracies in West Africa and mining is well supported. An emerging discovery has been declared at KB West, three miles east and on the same structure that feeds Chesser´s resource. Chesser is well funded. Andrew shares details in the podcast. BEST MOMENTS ‘Senegal is a great investment jurisdiction. ´ ‘This whole area has only had proper drilling for three years and it is delivering a lot.' ‘With the existing balance sheet that gives us quite a war chest to go and aggressively pursue drilling.'   EPISODE RESOURCES Website: https://www.chesserresources.com.au Twitter: https://twitter.com/chesser Contact: https://www.chesserresources.com.au/contact/   VALUABLE RESOURCES mailto:rob@mining-international.org https://www.linkedin.com/in/rob-tyson-3a26a68/ http://www.mining-international.org https://twitter.com/MiningConsult https://www.facebook.com/MiningInternational.org https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC69dGPS29lmakv-D7LWJg_Q?guided_help_flow=3 ABOUT THE HOST Rob Tyson is the Founder and Director of Mining International Ltd, a leading global recruitment and headhunting consultancy based in the UK specialising in all areas of mining across the globe from first world to third world countries from Africa, Europe, Middle East, Asia, and Australia. We source, headhunt, and discover new and top talent through a targeted approach and search methodology and have a proven track record in sourcing and positioning exceptional candidates into our clients' organisations in any mining discipline or level. Mining International provides a transparent, informative, and trusted consultancy service to our candidates and clients to help them develop their careers and business goals and objectives in this ever-changing marketplace.   CONTACT METHOD rob@mining-international.org https://www.linkedin.com/in/rob-tyson-3a26a68/   Podcast Description Rob Tyson is an established recruiter in the mining and quarrying sector and decided to produce the “Dig Deep” The Mining Podcast to provide valuable and informative content around the mining industry. He has a passion and desire to promote the industry and the podcast aims to offer the mining community an insight into people's experiences and careers covering any mining discipline, giving the listeners helpful advice and guidance on industry topics. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Al Jazeera journalist killed in West Bank raid

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 10:23


Israeli troops on Wednesday reportedly shot dead Al Jazeera correspondent Shireen Abu Akleh during a West Bank raid. The 51-year-old Palestinian-American journalist was a household name across the Middle East for her coverage of the conflict. Josef Federman, Associated Press news director for Israel, the Palestinian territories and Jordan, joins John Yang to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - World
Al Jazeera journalist killed in West Bank raid

PBS NewsHour - World

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 10:23


Israeli troops on Wednesday reportedly shot dead Al Jazeera correspondent Shireen Abu Akleh during a West Bank raid. The 51-year-old Palestinian-American journalist was a household name across the Middle East for her coverage of the conflict. Josef Federman, Associated Press news director for Israel, the Palestinian territories and Jordan, joins John Yang to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Middays with Susie Larson
Tom Doyle on miracle gospel stories from the Middle East

Middays with Susie Larson

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 49:36


News headlines from Eastern Europe and the Middle East are hard to read - but God is at work. Missionary Tom Doyle shares incredible stories of transformation and bold faith from former Muslims in the Middle East. His book is "Women Who Risk: Secret Agents for Jesus in the Muslim World."

Pod Yourself A Gun - A Sopranos Podcast
6b07: The Second Coming, with Francesca Fiorentini

Pod Yourself A Gun - A Sopranos Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 105:36


Depression is “Break Stuff” Pointed Inward The world's only socialist wife-guy Sopranos podcast welcomes the return of podcaster, comedian, journalist, and #1 Matt Lieb tolerater Francesca Fiorentini to talk to Matt & Vince about season 6b episode 7, “The Second Coming.” AJ's back in school, but as Fran points out, he doesn't need a political science degree, he needs to smoke a little weed. The only thing liberal arts education can do for AJ is make him depressed. And boy is he depressed. He's so depressed that not even Chamillionaire's Ridin Dirty can convince him that life is worth living. He knows that The US sees the Middle East rolling, and they're hating enough to bomb Iran. How can he live in a world that is so dicked up? Despite Carmela's attempts to cheer him up with Lincoln logs (which some internet research revealed to be  a hot dog split open and slathered with cream cheese, similar to a Seattle-style street dog), AJ's “Rude Goldberg suicide machine” is, of course, constructed incompetently enough to avoid a second episode in a row with a major character death. This is why AJ could never be a mob guy. How can he be expected to wack someone when he couldn't even take out his own depressed self? Tell us your favorite British word for penis in a five-star review on Apple Podcasts. Subscribe to Pod Yourself A Gun on Apple Podcasts. Email us at frotcast@gmail.com; leave us a voicemail at 415-275-0030 Support the Pod: become a patron at patreon.com/Frotcast and get more bonus content than you could ever want, AND if you sign up for the Pod Yourself a Shoutout tier, Vince will give you a mob name on the show. Like last week's newest members: Air Weinstein, The Count, & The Cockroach. -Description by Brent Flyberg.

Cleopatra's Bling Podcast
Interview with Political Commentator, Yousef Alreemawi

Cleopatra's Bling Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 49:37


Over the past years Olivia has found twin passions in learning the Arabic language and advocating for Palestinian liberation. A mentor and teacher who helped to guide her in this journey is Yousef Alreemawi - a lecturer, political adviser and commentator, editor, and friend. They discuss the beauty of Arabic as a language, its unique expressiveness, and his experience as part of the Palestinian diaspora.

Good News from the Middle East with Tom and JoAnn Doyle
Amir Tsarfati On Israel, Ukraine, and Today's Global Chaos.

Good News from the Middle East with Tom and JoAnn Doyle

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 51:25


Amir Tsarfati is a best-selling author, conference speaker, Bible teacher, and followed by 500,000 people on Telegram daily as he brings the news in real time on Israel, the Middle East, and hotspots like the Ukraine-Russia war. He is a Bible prophecy expert and lives in the epicenter of where it will all occur in the future since he was born in Jerusalem and today lives overlooking the Valley of Megiddo known as Armageddon. His new book Revealing Revelation-How God's Plan for the Future Can Change Your Life Now was already a best-seller before it was released just last week. 

Mother Honestly Podcast
How To Flourish: At Home And In The Workplace

Mother Honestly Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 45:58


We are midway through season 7 of the MH Podcast! We are super excited about how this season is going and all the amazing guests and conversations that we have had so far.   In this episode, Blessing and Andrea do a check in on how far the season has come, how fulfilling this season's partnership with Indeed has been and all the great work MH continues to do to ensure that women flourish and level up at work and at home.   Blessing Adesiyan is the Founder of Mother Honestly, a platform reshaping the future of women and families at home and in the workplace. Prior to founding MH and Villo, she spent 15+ years in Fortune 100 companies such as Microsoft, HP, PepsiCo, DuPont, and BASF where she built an operational excellence framework across the United States, Europe, Middle East, and Asia. She has been featured on Fast Company, Forbes, the Wall Street Journal, Crains Business, Parents, Fortune Magazine and more.   Blessing is also an international speaker who has spoken across multiple media / enterprises such as Facebook, Pinterest, NBC, ABC, Fox, NASA, Fortune, SAP, Favor, and more. Blessing obtained her BSc. in Chemical Engineering from the University of Florida, an MSc. in Energy Management from the New York Institute of Technology and an MBA from UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School. Connect with her on Instagram @blessing.adesiyan   Andrea is a passionate communicator and entrepreneur who in 2009 founded Victory Public Relations as an effective PR solution for health, wellness, and beauty brands and the experts who power them. Her understanding of the media, attention to relationships, and ability to identify trends has powered countless exciting campaigns for her clients. She continues to oversee strategy for some of the most innovative beauty brands and medical experts in New York City and beyond, as well as the growth of Victory Public Relations. A graduate of Saint Joseph's University, Andrea lives in Summit, NJ with her husband and two sons. Connect with her on Instagram @andreamullan   This podcast is in partnership with Indeed, the world's number one job site, a company committed to helping women find better work. Visit www.indeed.com/betterwork and join us as we #LevelUpWithIndeed. Become a member of the Mother Honestly Private Network by visiting www.motherhonestly.com/membership and if you are a Company seeking support for your employees and their families, visit www.motherhonestly.com/atwork to provide real solutions at home and at work. The Motherboard launched last week! Get feedback, coaching, and advice on big decisions with the nation's leading thought-leaders on the homefront and workfront, visit www.motherhonestly.com/motherboard to get personalized guidance tailored to you. You can also expense this cost as a stipend, Learning and Development, and or Professional Development You can find Blessing and Andrea on Linkedin; Blessing Adesiyan and Andrea Samacicia Mullan