Podcasts about Oregon

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State of the United States of America

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  • 53,939EPISODES
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  • Jan 27, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about Oregon

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Latest podcast episodes about Oregon

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
Federalist Radio Hour: The Parent Revolution Is Spreading

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2022 43:30


On this episode of The Federalist Radio Hour, Gabe Kaminsky, an investigative reporting intern at The Daily Wire, joins Culture Editor Emily Jashinsky to discuss how the parent revolution in education is spreading. Read Kaminsky’s investigation exposing how Hollywood-funded progressives in a historically red Oregon town ignored directives from the local school board to keep […]

Offbeat Oregon History podcast
Oregon's literary legacy built on “true confession”

Offbeat Oregon History podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2022 12:24


Margaret Jewett Bailey was not only Oregon's first author of novel-length fiction, she was also the West Coast's first published female author, and its first female newspaper journalist. She was also one of the most colorful characters of a remarkably colorful age. She could be absolutely savage when she felt the situation called for it ... and, in fairness, it has to be admitted that her situation seemed to call for it rather a lot. (French Prairie, Marion County; 1850s) (For text and pictures, see http://offbeatoregon.com/1909c.margaret-bailey-oregons-first-authoress-1of2-565.html)

Peak Northwest
How to play in the snow without spending all your cash on downhill skiing, snowboarding

Peak Northwest

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2022 29:28


Downhill skiing is one popular way to experience the majesty of the mountains, come wintertime. But there are plenty of other options for those seeking a different kind of mountain experience. This week on the Peak Northwest podcast, we discuss snowy activities that don't involve buying a lift ticket or spending time at a ski resort.Check out this guide to Oregon Sno-Parks, read Jamie's story about his first-ever snowshoeing trip and peruse our guide to Mount Hood in the winter. Watch the latest Peak Northwest video to see Jim try surfing on the Oregon coast.[This is a rebroadcast of a January 2020 'before times' edition of the pod] See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

James Crepea Show
James Crepea Show 1/26/22: Recapping Oregon men's basketball loss to Colorado, Oregon women's basketball win over Utah, OSU women's loss to WSU, 1 week to signing day, 247Sports recruiting editor Brandon Huffman

James Crepea Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2022 95:16


On Wednesday's edition of The James Crepea Show on Fox Sports Eugene, James recaps Oregon men's basketball's loss to Colorado, Oregon women's basketball's win over Utah, Oregon State women's loss to Washington State, 1 week to February signing day, 247Sports recruiting editor Brandon Huffman previews signing day

The JV Club with Janet Varney

Unbox your 18th century-era pink powdered wig and throw on your ripped collarless Flashdance sweatshirt for this time-bending chat with the sublime Sarah Marshall (You Are Good, You're Wrong About pods), who delivers her signature thoughtfulness and wit as she and JV talk Oregon, Max Headroom (!), and solving a centuries-old mystery!

Dave 'Softy' Mahler and Dick Fain
Softy and Dick H2 - Petros Papadakis on Rams and fans / NFL overtime rules / Textamonials

Dave 'Softy' Mahler and Dick Fain

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2022 40:11


In the second hour, Dave Softy Mahler and Dick Fain talk to Petros Papadakis about the Oregon basketball court, the Rams relationship with fans in Los Angeles and more hilarity, then the guys discuss how the NFL could change overtime rules in 2022 then listen and react to texts of the day.

Dawgman Radio
Mike Hopkins is back for the Colorado game after being in COVID protocol

Dawgman Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 19:02


The media spoke Wednesday with Washington Head Coach Mike Hopkins, who missed the last two games with the Huskies due to being in COVID protocol. That meant lead assistant coach Will Conroy moved into the head coaching chair, where he went 1-1 on the road against the Oregon schools. Hopkins spoke to the media about being in protocol, what it was like to watch the games instead of coaching them, his advice to Conroy, as well as what UW should expect going up against Colorado Thursday night. The Buffaloes just beat Oregon in Eugene. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Red Line Radio
High On Jim Belushi + Bears Hire A GM

Red Line Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 127:58


The guys are joined by Chicago legend Jim Belushi to catch up on life outside Chicago and his adventures farming marijuana in Oregon. It turns into a deep conversation with a guest appearance from a bald eagle. Yes, a bald eagle. Before and after, we get into the new Bears GM hire, Grayson Allen being a massive punk, the Barry Bonds Hall of Fame debate and whether Mark Buehrle deserves to be enshrined. All Gas No Brakes.

The Wendy Love Edge Show
Season 6, Episode 3: How Can I Improve My Sleep?

The Wendy Love Edge Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 55:56


#shawnjames #FIMM The Wendy Love Edge Show does not dispense medical advice and all of your health choices are your own. Cohost: Branden Lee Guests: Christine Chapman Christine Chapman is the CEO of Chapman Health and Wellness and The Balmb Body Care, an Oregon award-winning topical line. She resides in Spanaway Lake Washington. Chapman has been a nationally accredited respiratory practitioner, who worked in Portland and Vancouver critical care units, including the open-heart team and pediatrics ICU. Christi has provided care since 1991 to respiratory distress patients both acute and chronic. Her experience and compassion for people have brought her to a place of desiring to find the solutions so many of us face with our health today. Chapman is interested in serving others and finding solutions, which is what brought her to work with cannabis. Natural healing for her and her family has proven to work well. Musical Guest: Shawn James https://www.shawnjamesmusic.com Cannabis Expert MD Dr. Brian Nichol pairs a cannabis strain with our musical guest. https://cannabisexpertmd.com/ Mile High News: Candis Dyer https://www.facebook.com/CannaCornerWithCandisDyer Food is Medicine Minute FIMM @learnfromteddi This show is written and created by Wendy Love Edge. Producer and Manager: A. Edge Productions Editing: Flint Woods Theme Song: Written by Samantha Hunt. Arranged and performed by WIll Brand. Sponsors: Karas Healthcare Purely Natural CBD The Relevnt App Irie Bliss Wellness Lit Premium Smoking Supplies Lynsey Camp 131 Inclusion Gallery The opinions expressed on this show are not necessarily those of our producer A. Edge Productions. Shawn James - "Not Alone" Shawn James, INgrooves, YouTube, Dec 3, 2021, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s3nDer_Np84 --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/thewendyloveedgeshow/support

Sounds!
The Reptaliens «Multiverse» – Neustart zu zweit

Sounds!

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 107:49


Während des Lockdowns musste das Ehepaar Bambi und Cole Browning auf seine Bandkumpels verzichten und beschloss, das dritte Reptaliens-Album zu zweit in Angriff zu nehmen. Die Entschlackung hat sich gelohnt. Statt wabernder Synthies gibt es mehr psychedelische Gitarren. Die Songs sind nicht gerade minimal, aber direkter und kompakter. Eine warme Frühlingsplatte aus Portland, Oregon.

Rich Zeoli
Mom Sues Social Media For Causing Phone Addiction and a PA School Board Member Get Heat for Op-Ed

Rich Zeoli

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 49:28


Zeoli Show Hour 4:  In the final hour of the Zeoli Show, Rich discussed a Oregon mom suing Meta (Facebook) and Snap social media platforms for causing her daughter's mental health problems by causing her to become addicted to their cell phone. A Pennsylvania school-board member writes an op-ed to parents explaining he doesn't work for them or their students and part 2 of what's on the cut sheet.

Real Men Connect with Dr. Joe Martin | Marriage | Parenting | Leadership | Ministry

Marc Alan Schelske is a speaker, a self-proclaimed hobbyist theologian, and the author of The Wisdom of Your Heart: Discovering the God-Given Purpose and Power of Your Emotions.  He's been a pastor for more than 20 years, and he's the teaching elder at Bridge City Community Church in Milwaukie, Oregon. Marc also a husband and proud father of two children.   To find out more about Marc, his book, and his online courses, you can visit: http://www.marcalanschelske.com/ or http://www.TheApprecticeshipLab.com -----------------------    If you want to help us transform the lives of even MORE MEN for God's glory, please take a minute to leave us a helpful REVIEW on iTunes: http://www.rmcpodcast.com and SHARE this podcast with any young man (or men) you're mentoring or discipling. And make sure you don't miss an interview episode by signing up for our Man-to-Man eNewsletter at http://www.RealMenConnect.com, and grab your FREE copy of the Real Men Victory Tracker.  Are you stuck? Want to go to the next level in your marriage, career, business, or ministry?  Then maybe it's time you got a coach. ALL CHAMPIONS have one. Let me coach you to help you strengthen your faith, improve your marriage, spiritually lead your family, achieve more, balance your time, grow your ministry, or even stop an addiction. Click here for details: http://www.RMCfree.com   Also join us on: Join the Real Men 300: http://www.RealMen300.com Facebook Group: http://www.realmenuniversity.com/ YouTube: http://www.RealMenTraining.com Facebook: @realdrjoemartin Instagram: @realdrjoemartin Twitter: @professormartin

True Crime Binge
69: Emily & Alisha

True Crime Binge

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 48:44


Bob is joined by Emily Rowney and Alisha Holland, hosts of the podcast “Murder in the Rain.” Created by Emily, Alisha, and their longtime friend Josh, “Murder in the Rain” is a weekly podcast that covers cases from the Pacific Northwest, often including interviews with authors, psychologists, detectives, and victim's families. Bob chats with the pair about the beloved Betty White, karaoke, and leaving the Christmas tree up. They also discuss the tragic murders of Ashley Pond and Miranda Gaddis, two young girls who became the unfortunate victims of a violent member of their Oregon community. To suggest a guest or request an interview, please visit us at TrueCrimeBinge.com   Follow us on all forms of social media @TrueCrimeBinge   Today's Sponsors: babbel.com - Use code "binge" to get 6 months for the price of 3.  surfshark.deals/tcb - Use code "TCB" for 83% off plus 3 extra months for free.  BetterHelp.com/binge - Get 10% off your first month. 

Dr. Gameshow
78. Svelte

Dr. Gameshow

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 74:45


Hosts Jo Firestone & Manolo Moreno play listener-created games with callers!Games played: Dr. Demographics submitted by Trenton Bankert from Lancaster, Pennsylvania, Enchanted Bowl submitted by Natalie Lowe from Muncie, Indiana, and Afford Manolo A Mini Cooper with rules by Charlie Schulman from Brooklyn, New YorkCallers: Michael from St. Louis, Missouri; Erica from Salem, Oregon; Julia & Lilla from Chapel Hill, North Carolina; Benjamin from Fort Worth, Texas; Laura from College Station, Texas; Karl from Golden, ColoradoOutro theme  by Conrad Tao from New York, New YorkThis episode sponsored by:  Magic Spoon - Go to magicspoon.com/GAMESHOW and use the code GAMESHOW to save $5 off!Green Chef - Go to GreenChef.com/gameshow130 and use code gameshow130 to get $130 off, plus free shipping! 

Owned and Operated
#30 - Alex Bridgeman - Running a Podcast Full-Time

Owned and Operated

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 61:00


Alex Bridgeman will be joining us for today's podcast.Alex is from Portland, Oregon and currently resides in Nebraska. He has a past as a research analyst at a wealth management firm where he spent time researching microcaps. During his senior year of college, he decided to start his own SMB podcast "Think Like an Owner." Eventually, he was able to leave his previous job to work more heavily on running the podcast.You'll get to learn about the podcast business model, his print publication of "The Operators Handbook," and the transition to working on a podcast full-time. Enjoy.

Coronavirus 4 1 1  podcast
COVID, Coronavirus, Omicron and Delta variants, and vaccine updates for 01-26-2022

Coronavirus 4 1 1 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 4:45


This is Covid 411, the latest on Omicron and other COVID variants, and new hotspots for January 26th, 2022.The U.S. administration has thrown in the towel, withdrawing its rule requiring workers at big companies get vaccinated or face regular testing. The rule would have impacted more than 80 million U.S. workers and was to go into effect January 4. The Supreme Court halted the plan saying the Occupational Safety and Health Administration overstepped its authority.The battle over facemasks in schools rages on in New York. An appeals judge restored the mask mandate one day after a judge in a lower court ruled the state lacked the constitutional authority to order people to wear face coverings. The governor's office is appealing the decision.Pfizer and BioNTech have started a clinical trial to evaluate a new vaccine specific to Omicron. Current vaccines protect against serious illness and death, but Omicron has had no problem breaking through the vaccines to spread itself. The study will include as many as 1,420 participants.Whether or not they work or add extra protection, most health officials say they do, America isn't so hot on getting booster shots. The CDC says only 40% of fully vaccinated Americans have gotten a booster. And the average number of booster shots given per day has plunged from 1 million in early December to about 490,000 as of last week. Some analysts blame confusion amongst a sea of changing recommendations and guidance.If you watch the 2022 Beijing Winter Olympic Games from your couch, you'll be as close to the action as the sports commentators you're listening to. NBC Sports isn't sending any of its announcing teams to China. They'll be calling the action from Stamford, CT. In the United States, cases were down 14%, deaths are up 35%, and hospitalizations are up 9% over 14 days. The 7-day average of new cases has been trending down since January 14. The five states that had the most daily deaths per 100,000 are Ohio, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Illinois, and Pennsylvania. There are 27,434,325 active cases in the United States.The five areas with the greatest increase in hospitalizations per capita: Montana 98%. Alaska 90%. Wyoming 87%. Alabama 67%. And Arkansas and Oregon 56%. The top 10 areas with the highest number of recent cases per capita according to The New York Times: Uvalde, TX. Nome Census Area, AK. Crawford, IL. Maverick, TX. Douglas, IL. Wyoming, WV. Colbert, AL. Santa Cruz, AZ. Newberry, SC. And Dimmit, TX. There have been at least 871,937 deaths in the U.S. recorded as Covid-related.The top 3 vaccinating states by percentage of population that's been fully vaccinated: Vermont at 79.1%, Rhode Island at 78.4%, and Maine at 77.2%. The bottom 3 vaccinating states are Alabama at 49.2%, Wyoming at 49.6%, and Mississippi at 49.8%. The percentage of the U.S. that's been fully vaccinated is 63.4%.Globally, cases were up 26% and deaths up 24% over 14 days, with the 7-day average trending up since January 17. There are now over 68 million active cases around the world, at 68,965,937.The five countries with the most new cases: France 501,635. The United States 443,072. India 283,540. Brazil 199,126. And Italy 186,740. There have been 5,614,043 deaths reported as Covid-related worldwide. For the latest updates, subscribe for free to Covid 411 on your podcast app or ask your smart speaker to play the Covid 411 podcast. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Quack 12 Podcast
The Quack 12 Watches Oregon vs Colorado

Quack 12 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 69:21


Adam, and Aaron are joined by James Vos of Ditch RItch fame to watch the second half of the Oregon vs Colorado game and recap the week of Duck sports!Check out our website for more Duck-related content. Please, give us a five-star rating and review on apple podcasts!Follow us on twitter! @quack12podcastAnd our Youtube Channel!

The Fabulous Peltoncast: Seattle Sports and More

In our weekly pod, UW men’s basketball gets hopes up by winning with Will Conroy filling in on the sidelines before experiencing a correction at Oregon. Plus Tristan’s teams debut on the latest Coach’s Corner. Contents sponsored by Pagliacci Pizza … Continue reading →

Rust Belt Running
Episode 135 - With Dumb Runner Mark Remy

Rust Belt Running

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 55:20


This week we get to sit down with Mark Remy of DumbRunner.com. He takes us on a trip from a small town in southern Ohio to Portland, Oregon, and from Runner's World to his own satirical running website. Of course that is the journey he plotted out when he graduated from Ohio University. Mark also let's us in on what goes in to writing running satire, and how this idea even started.

Get Up in the Cool
Episode 283: Clinton Davis (Kentucky Fiddle Tunes and Missouri Rules)

Get Up in the Cool

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 42:46


Welcome to Get Up in the Cool: Old Time Music with Cameron DeWhitt and Friends! This week's friend is Clinton Davis. We recorded a few weeks ago at my home in Portland, Oregon. Tunes and songs in this episode: * Gate to Go Through (0:31) * Coondog (22:17) * Plowboy Hop (29:42) * The Wild Horse (35:09) * Give the Fiddler a Dram (39:27) * Bonus track: Cherry River Rag Visit Clinton Davis' website to buy a copy of “If I Live And I Don't Get Killed” http://clintonrossdavis.com/ Follow Clinton Davis on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/clintonrossdavis/ Support Get Up in the Cool on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/getupinthecool Buy Get Up in the Cool merch like t-shirts, phone cases, and masks! https://get-up-in-the-cool-swag.creator-spring.com/ Sign up at https://www.pitchforkbanjo.com/ for my clawhammer instructional series! Check out Cameron's other podcast, Think Outside the Box Set: https://boxset.fireside.fm/

James Crepea Show
James Crepea Show 1/25/22: Baseball HOF vote is contradictory, national college football reporter Brandon Marcello, more transfer portal talk, Colorado basketball reporter Pat Rooney

James Crepea Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 93:54


On Tuesday's edition of The James Crepea Show on Fox Sports Eugene, James discusses how the baseball HOF vote is contradictory, national college football reporter Brandon Marcello of 247Sports returns to discuss his ranking of the new coaching staff hires, more transfer portal talk, Colorado basketball reporter Pat Rooney of the Boulder Daily Camera previews Tuesday night's game between Oregon and CU

Bald Faced Truth with John Canzano
BFT Interview: Greg Biggins

Bald Faced Truth with John Canzano

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 27:31


John Canzano talks with former 247 Recruiting Guru Greg Biggins about all things college football recruiting. Biggins discusses Lincoln Riley's transfer portal strategy, Oregon's star-studded recruiting staff, the bad side of recruiting at the high school level, and much more! Subscribe NOW to this podcast for more great content. Follow @JohnCanzanoBFT on Twitter

Southern Sports Today
CHUCK OLIVER SHOW 1-25 TUESDAY HOUR 1

Southern Sports Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 39:51


Chuck opens the show by talking about how Georgia won a national title without their best receiving option on the team. He then talks about the job Mario Cristobal has in front of him at Miami. Dan Mathews believes that Matt Rhule to this premiere program would be a huge hit. Dave Bartoo of College Football Matrix joins the show for his weekly visit.    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Attached Podcast
Season 3 Ep 9: Secrets, Similarities, and a Super Special New Year

Attached Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022


This episode, in Poppin' Culture, we discuss Disney's Encanto and the impact of family secrets. Then we do an Academic Deep Dive into the new article, “Is Perceived Similarity More than Assumed Similarity? An Interpersonal Path to Seeing Similarity Between Self and Others” by Bradley Hughes at the University of Oregon, John Flournoy at Harvard, and Dr. Sanjay Srivastava, also at Oregon, recently published in the Journal Personality and Social Psychology. Finally, in Good or Bad Advice we discuss relationship advice from social media, especially advice for how to cope with the New Year. 2022 is a potential partner already putting up lots of red flags!Poppin' Culture: hereAcademic Deep Dive: hereGood or Bad Advice:@andr3wsky on tiktok about coping with 2022: here@ivancoyote on Twitter about how to cope with 2022: here@Therapyjeff on tiktok about advice for therapist dealing with 2022: here @geekdetails on tiktok on marriage longevity: here @Tacobellqween on tiktok about Tips of the Day: here Andrew Garfield on societal expectations for love and families: here

The Solid Verbal
Quarterback Transfers: Faith, Fit or Flop?

The Solid Verbal

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 76:51


Ty and Dan highlight the biggest quarterback transfers and evaluate which moves will be perfect fits, which will potentially be flops, and which will require a little bit of faith to succeed. Is Quinn Ewers the player who will bring Texas back? Does Bo Nix to Oregon make sense? Is Max Johnson to Texas A&M a good idea? Why does Kedon Slovis to Pitt feel like a no-brainer? Plus, amid rumors that Jim Harbaugh may be looking to leave Michigan, a quick look at other names who could be in line to replace him.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Sexology
EP266 - How to Become Sexually Dominant with Fredrick Zal

Sexology

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 55:22


Welcome to episode 266 of the Sexology Podcast! Today I am delighted to welcome Fredrick Zal to the podcast. In this episode, we discuss the similarities between the kink and punk rock scenes, how you can explore kink to know if you prefer being a submissive or dominant and ways you can step out of your comfort zone to explore kink.    Fredrick's sexuality education work has focused upon erotically marginalized communities, partnerships, and individuals since 2006 by "Teaching the Art within Sexual Acts" in private lessons, semi-public and private events, and workshops in Oregon, Washington, California, British Columbia, and via Zoom worldwide.      They teach mindfulness, ritual, communication, consent, sexual attitudes reassessment, tantra, kink, and other embodied erotic pathways with an ever broadening understanding of power differentials, socio-political impacts over the centuries, and ways to truly dismantle what they feel in their blood and bones to be a corrupt and flawed acculturalized system.      When not teaching or doing sexuality research; Fredrick endeavors to focus life around what they love, which is the arts, getting outside for adventures, sharing quality time and food with friends, practicing 茶道 (Chado, Japanese Tea Ritual), and movement such as yoga and dance.      In this episode, you will hear:     Looking at the similarities between the kink and punk rock scenes  Understanding that it's normal to have interest in kink   How kink is centered around a heart and mind connection  Ways in which we can cultivate our emotions to fully embody kink  Looking at the differences between tops and bottoms  How you can explore kink to know if you prefer being a submissive or dominant Understanding the powerplay dynamics and their relationship to kink Looking at ways you can step out of your comfort zone to explore kink  The importance of after care and clear communication     Valentine's Day  If you would like to shake things up this Valentine's Day by creating a perfect Sex-cessful date, sign up for my upcoming 2-hour workshop: https://drmoali.clickfunnels.com/optin1640020968176     Thank you to our sponsor Cozy Earth!  https://cozyearth.com/discount/SEXOLOGY   Grab 40% off all products using promo code: SEXOLOGY    Find Fredrick Zal Online  http://www.tantrickink.com     Podcast Produced by Pete Bailey - http://petebailey.net/audio  

Dave 'Softy' Mahler and Dick Fain
Softy and Dick H1 - NFL Playoffs reaction / Soren Petro on Chiefs / UW blown out by Oregon

Dave 'Softy' Mahler and Dick Fain

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 43:21


In the first hour, Dave Softy Mahler and Dick Fain react to the incredible weekend of NFL action and last night's Chiefs win over the Bills, discuss the overtime rules, get the Kansas City reaction from Soren Petro of 810 WHB in Missouri, then talk about the Huskies basketball loss to Oregon.

James Crepea Show
James Crepea Show 1/24/22: Oregon blows out Washington, recapping Pac-12 basketball, CJ Verdell and Travis Dye leaving Oregon, Ducks recruiting, Arizona basketball reporter Bruce Pascoe

James Crepea Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 94:15


On Monday's edition of The James Crepea Show on Fox Sports Eugene, James discusses Oregon blowing out Washington, previewing the week in Pac-12 basketball, CJ Verdell and Travis Dye leaving Oregon, Ducks recruiting and Arizona basketball reporter Bruce Pascoe of the Arizona Daily Star previews Tuesday's game between Arizona and UCLA

Dawgman Radio
DawgmanRadio: Langley Says Things Are Getting Back To Normal For Huskies

Dawgman Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 9:54


After two tough losses at home to Oregon and Oregon State last week, Husky head coach Tina Langley and her team have hit a tough stretch. Now that it is behind them, they will play cross-state rival Washington State (10-6) in a home-and-home situation. Sitting at 5-7 (0-4 in conference) on the season, the Huskies seem at a tipping point right now, but Langley is still upbeat about what she has seen out of her troops. Today Langley met with the media and she was asked about the addition of sophomore forward Lauren Schwartz who followed Langley from Rice. So far this season, Schwartz has averaged just under nine points per game while chipping in with three rebounds and nearly three assists per game. Last week, Schwartz led the team with 18 points in a seven-point loss to Oregon and Langley said one of her biggest attributes has been her versatility and willingness to play any position in order to help her team. Langley noted that at Rice she played some point guard and some of the four position on the floor and she did it equal effectiveness. She also discussed what have been some of the struggles that the team has experienced in their current four-game losing streak and how the team can overcome those deficiencies and how changing the culture is a process and they have been pleased by the growth of the team over the 12 games so far this season. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Backpacker Radio
#134 | Rolf Gunnar Asphaug

Backpacker Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 141:52


In today's episode of Backpacker Radio presented by The Trek, we are joined by Rolf Gunnar Asphaug.  Rolf's adventuring career started in 1987 when he quit his cushy job as a lawyer, and set off to backpack from Tuscon, Arizona to Portland, Oregon on a route he devised using a Rand McNally road atlas.  We of course go deep into this epic journey- we also learn all about the Colorado Mountain Club, for which Rolf used to serve as the organization's president, his time volunteering for Jefferson Country Open Space and a number of Colorado state parks, and we touch on Rolf's Colorado Trail thru-hike last year at the age of 62.    We wrap the show with a triple crown of pizza toppings, and we introduce a pair of new segments- what's in a trail name, and listener voicemails! But first.    Gossamer Gear discount code: Use code “littledonkeygirl” for 15% off at Gossamergear.com.  Enlightened Equipment: Save 10% off Enlightened Equipment's Stock Revelation Quilt or Torrid Jacket with code “ultralight10” here.  Organifi discount code: Go to organifi.com/backpacker, use code “backpacker” and get 20% off your entire purchase. [divider] Interview with Rolf  Time stamps & Questions 00:04:06 - QOTD: What's the most uncommon/odd meal you've had on trail?  00:07:24 - Reminders: BPR Sponsorship & Internship Opportunity  00:10:58 - Welcome Rolf!  00:11:29 - What was your career prior to getting into backpacking?  00:15:40 - The start of Rolf's cross country adventure  00:16:11 - Did you save up for this trip? 00:19:40 - Did you avoid the interstates?  00:20:15 - What was hitchhiking like in 1987?  00:22:10 - Was Zion covered in the Atlas?  00:23:33 - Raisins  00:24:10 - How did you navigate through Zion National Park? 00:24:45 - Post-Zion Events  00:26:22 - Did you ever stay in hotels/motels?  00:27:25 - How did people react when you told them what you were doing?  00:28:09 - Passing through Yosemite  00:29:44: - How do you coordinate meeting up with people on this trip? Pay phones? 00:30:40 - Did you have a specific time frame? 00:31:17 - Did you have awareness of the PCT at that time?  00:32:00 - Which way did you go up Mt. Whitney? 00:32:26 - Did you have the entire route written up?  00:33:11 - Were permits needed yet?  00:33:43 - Did Half Dome have cables then?  00:36:24 - Do you remember your route through San Francisco?  00:38:22 - Did you hike in boots?  00:38:54 - Long Peak Trail Runners 00:40:06 - Was this life changing for you?  00:40:36 - Did you think you were going back to being a lawyer after this? 00:42:18 - Journaling a thru-hike  00:43:17 - How did you path shift after this hike?  00:46:55 - Colorado Outward Bound  00:53:03 - Rolf's Trophies  00:53:45 - Rolf getting creative in court  00:57:34 - How do you think Denver is doing with mass transit?  01:00:35 - Rolf's volunteering experience  01:01:48 - How did you meet your wife?  01:06:04 - Tell us about the Colorado Mountain Club  01:08:11 - What did you do as President?  01:10:12 - What other classes does the CMC offer?  01:11:45 - What does the membership go for?  01:12:56 - How long were you President for CMC?  01:15:26 - Volunteering for Jefferson County, CO  01:18:15 - What is bark patrol?  01:21:54 - How much trash do you pick up on average?  01:22:31 - Cleanliness of CO parks  01:25:34 - How many people are employees vs. volunteers?  01:27:05 - Do you know what parks have foxtails?  01:28:02 - In which park are you most likely to see mountain lions?  01:32:00 - Tell us about your Colorado Trail experience  01:38:18 - Durston Gear  01:40:22 - Chaunce hiking with Harper 01:42:24 - Leo Fact from Zach 01:43:24 - What was your sobering experience at Cascade Creek? 01:49:20 - Thank you, Rolf! 01:50:58 - Find Rolf on Instagram, TikTok, YouTube SEGMENTS Trek Propaganda  8 Things I'm Excited to Do to Attempt a More Sustainable Thru-hike by Rachel Shoemaker Triple Crown of Pizza Toppings  What's in a Trail Name? BPR Voicemails  URL: sayhi.chat/bpr 5 Star Review [divider] Check out our sound guy @Paulybooyshallcross. Subscribe to this podcast on iTunes (and please leave us a review)!  Find us on Spotify, Stitcher, and Google Play. Support us on Patreon to get bonus content. Advertise on Backpacker Radio Follow The Trek, Chaunce, Badger, and  Trail Correspondents on Instagram. Follow The Trek and Chaunce on YouTube. Follow Backpacker Radio on Tik Tok.  A super big thank you to our Chuck Norris Award winner(s) from Patreon: Andrew, Austen McDaniel, Jason Lawrence, Christopher Marshburn, Sawyer Products, Brad and Blair (Thirteen Adventures), Patrick Cianciolo, and Matt Soukup. A big thank you to our Cinnamon Connection Champions from Patreon: Liz Seger, Cynthia Voth, Emily Brown, Dcnerdlet, Jeff LaFranier, Peter Ellenberg, Jacob Northrup, Peter Leven.

Let's Get Psyched
#120 - Physician-Assisted Suicide

Let's Get Psyched

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 30:49


In 1997 Oregon became the first state to pass a law allowing terminally ill individuals to complete suicide with the help of a physician. Only 4 more states followed with their own "Death With Dignity" laws. Have any of the concerns raised in 1997 come to pass? Should this be a human rights issue? Join our discussion with guest David Orentlicher. Dr. Orentlicher is a doctor, lawyer, elected official, UNLV law professor, and medical ethicist, who has studied and published in this very divisive issue. Hosts: Eyrn, Alan, Joshua Guest: Nevada Assemblyman David Orentlicher, MD, JD

Autzen Audibles: DuckTerritory's Oregon athletics podcast
Oregon's very important recruiting weekend

Autzen Audibles: DuckTerritory's Oregon athletics podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 45:55


The Oregon Ducks just hosted over 25 players for visits this past weekend, and we break down the big news and notes to come out of the recruiting weekend. DuckTerritory.com's Matt Prehm, Erik Skopil, and Jared Mack discuss all things Duck football recruiting in this edition of the podcast. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Live Like the World is Dying
S1E36 - Summer on Frontline Nursing in a Rural Area

Live Like the World is Dying

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 60:48


Episode Notes The host Margaret Killjoy can be found on twitter @magpiekilljoy or instagram at @margaretkilljoy. You can support this show and others on Patreon at patreon.com/strangersinatangledwilderness. Transcript Margaret Hello and welcome to Live Like the World is Dying, your podcast for what feels like the end times. I'm your host, Margaret Killjoy, and also welcome back to the show. It's been several months since I put out the last episode and you'll be shocked to know that's because a bunch of stuff happened in my life which is, you know, everything to do with everything that's going on in the world. Um, maybe most importantly I moved and I now live on-grid in Appalachia instead of off-grid and Appalachia, and I'm very happy for the transition. It's pretty cool to have enough electricity to make this show. And also have an oven that works. I really like having an oven. And I also got a puppy, and I got a puppy who is rescued, so I've not—I spent several months where instead of sleeping or getting anything done, I had a puppy. I still have the puppy but now I get to sleep because the puppy is like five months old. So that's where I've been. And, yeah, welcome back to the show. This week I'll be talking with Summer who is my friend who is an ICU nurse in a rural area in in rural Oregon, which is not the most lefty area, and we're going to be talking about pretty much the—the politics of vaccination and some of what they've dealt with during the pandemic. And I think you'll enjoy it. And this podcast is a proud member of the Channel Zero Network of Anarchist Podcasts, and here's a jingle from another show on the network. Duh da duh da da daaaaa. Jingle 1 The Final Straw is a weekly anarchist radio show. It's fucking awesome, and you're never gonna hear me say fucking awesome on our show because we're FCC regulated. Jingle 2 There's a black part of my heart that just flutters when you talk like that. Jingle 1 [Inaudible] talk than more yelling. Jingle 3 It's a weird sort of like nice thing, in a way, that also can get kind of frightening at times. Jingle 1 Thefinalstrawradio.noblogs.org Margaret Okay, so if you could introduce yourself with like your name, your pronouns, and then I guess a little bit about what it is that you do that is the reason I invited you to talk on the show today. Summer My name's Summer. I'm a nurse, I live in Rural Oregon. I use they/them pronouns and I've been working in an ICU and have experienced now working in a Covid ICU—full Covid ICU. And I come from a background of radical politics and we're here today to talk about some of that. Margaret Yeah I guess I wanted to have you on because I've seen some of your social media posts about the hate that you've gotten at the—at the ICU that you work at and I know there's a lot of conversation right now about what do we do about the unvaccinated people who end up in hospital, and you know, combined with the—there's a lot of like news stories about, you know, the ungratitude of the unvaccinated folks and things like that. And I guess I just wanted to talk to you to get more of a firsthand idea of what it's like working at an ICU during Covid in a pandemic. I already set the Covid part. Summer Sure, um, so to give a little context: like I said, I live in a rural area of Organ. It's predominantly conservative, a lot of libertarian bent, um, included in the state of Jefferson—if you're familiar with that as a concept. And we experienced a huge Covid surge in our ICUs August through October of this last fall—or summer into fall. Maybe even into November really. And so rural area with low vaccination rates. Like I said, a lot of libertarian politics. And during that surge we were experiencing some of the worst numbers in the country in terms of infection rates and it hit our hospital pretty hard. We serve, uh, like very wide rural area. We're, um, the highest level trauma center within hundreds of miles. And so we get people from a really wide region of the state and even from Northern California. And our ICU just got flooded with very, very sick Covid patients. It's a fifteen-bed ICU and as soon as that filled up, you know, it really impacted the entire hospital system. And it ended up that our ICU and our step down unit were both full of critically ill Covid patients during that time frame, and we ended up having the National Guard and FEMA nurses present at the hospital to just help it continue to function and help it serve the Covid patients and the rest of the patients in the hospital who needed care. So that's the larger context of what was going on. And then more specifically in my experience, you know, the politics around the pandemic not only impacted, like, who's getting vaccinated and who's not and the numbers and how they grew so rapidly, but really, they impact and trust in the medical system. And there's already a lot of reasons for a lot of different demographics and populations to have distrust in the medical system. But right now we're experiencing that kind of expanding into different demographics and different populations. And the things that I think you're referring to that I've experienced was, you know, there was a day during our surge where the national news actually came into our ICU to report on what was happening in this rural area. And, you know, at that time the vast majority of patients we were seeing were unvaccinated. And that very same day there was a protest outside the hospital against the state vaccine mandate that had not been enacted but was upcoming, that would require all health care workers to be vaccinated, um, barring a religious exemption. So we left a shift where the national news was present, high Intensity, we lost like 3 patients that day in our small ICU I think, um, to walk out of the hospital to hundreds of people across the street protesting the vaccine mandate. And then, you know, of course mixed in there are antivaxxers are—you know, generally antivaxxers— more far-right folks mixed in. It was a pretty tough day, a pretty emotional day for a lot of us walking out from some really intense cases in the ICU to a public that is completely undermining your lived reality, you know, just on the other side of these doors, right? And I think that that's, you know, that's a thing that's been seen at different areas across the country, that tension that's escalated between healthcare and the public. And I think there's so many things that we can say about that. But really, I—you know, this question of like vaxx versus antivaxx, um, it's something I've thought out about quite a lot, obviously. And I actually had a friend somewhat recently who, um—a mutual friend I believe—asked me whether I still have compassion for unvaccinated patients. You know, going off of his experience of having healthcare worker friends who are kind of just totally disillusioned around vaccination rates and taking care of these patients who didn't take what seems like the obvious step to take care of themselves. Margaret Yeah. Summer And the answer to that is like, yes, I definitely still do have compassion for these people, and um I can understand not—I can understand the frustration. I'm still frustrated, right. It's still easy to get really angry. But for me it's the same as any other patients that I treat, whether it's an OD, or a DUI, or people coming in with exacerbations of chronic illness. It's not really my job to judge why someone's in the hospital. It's not my job to moralize their suffering. And if you're in a Covid ICU, that is like a hellhole of suffering, let me tell you. These people are suffering in a major way and experiencing a huge trauma. Not just the patients, but families as well. Margaret Right. Summer I also, you know, have to contextualize it in this much larger situation where we have a government that is, like, face planting, a public healthcare system that is face planting on managing a global pandemic in our country, and this huge amount of misinformation that's out, both about, you know, a vaccine, but also about a virus and what that is, and about a pandemic and what that is, and what it takes to protect yourself from one another. And so I have a lot of compassion for people who, their world is just a different reality. It's a reality where the facts don't line up, right? Margaret Yeah. Summer And a lot of us experience that now, right? Like, what is reality? Sometimes you can't even have a conversation with someone about facts, about what's real and what's not, and I experience that a lot talking to family members in healthcare at this point. Margaret Yeah. I mean, it's interesting comparing it—kind of, like, subtly comparing it to harm reduction, right? I feel like that was actually one of the most, you know, that was like the way of putting it that really got to me, like, when you just set that just now is because I—yeah, I do think of the like, well obviously these people are making decisions that I don't, right? Um, and yet that's a decision we've made at least in terms of the opioid crisis to just not have any judgment towards, and it's kind of interesting. Also because when you talk about the suffering that people are facing, right? Like, it comes up every now and then that someone who is kind of terrible dies, right? Summer Right. Margaret And then, in some ways, especially if they have a lot of like political power or whatever, everyone talking shit on that person who's died. Whatever, I don't I don't care. But on some level there's a certain amount of, like, well can't ask accountability of the dead. You know, like, um, like say—so for example, someone dies doing something very like heroic and good that we all agree is a good thing, but they have a long history of doing bad things. There's kind of a like, well, but they can't do anything about that now, right? There's no way for us to ask for them to do anything about that. And so, maybe even the people who survive who aren't vaccinated who end up in the hospital—I mean I guess what we're kind of saying is, like, get vaccinated or face the consequences. And they were like, “consequences, please.” And then they face the consequences. So on some level— Summer Yeah. Margaret —like what more can you ask? They're suffering, you know. 10:20.19 Summer Yeah. But even in in my regards, some people don't really understand—many people don't really understand the consequences. Not only have many people not really seen what an ICU is, what a ventilator is, what someone's body looks like after weeks on a ventilator. Um, but in their version of reality, the truth that they've been presented, this whole thing isn't real for some of these people. And I'm not exaggerating. Like I have met—I have talked to family members at the bedside of their loved one who has an 80–90% chance of dying—because those were the rates we were seeing in our ICU during that surge—80–90% of our intubated patients were dying of Covid—who says, “I just didn't know. I just didn't think this was real. I didn't think this could happen.” Margaret Yeah. 11:14.96 Summer “If you were going to get a vaccine, which one would you get.” Like, those are conversations I've had with people, you know, and it's—that's what really for me is so heart-wrenching is, like, the dawning of knowledge upon these people in the worst way possible. Like, that shouldn't be the way people have to understand the truth is by watching their family member die because of what they've all believed. Um, and I mean, I've witnessed that regret from family members for sure, and I—this isn't to, you know, I'm not like a flawless person or something. I also get super fucking frustrated and I've had family members yell at me on the phone about Ivermectin, um, when I'm like, that's not—there's no evidence to support that as a treatment in severe Covid cases. Like that's, like, become this, like, this sentence I've repeated so many times. And it's—that's super challenging when you're working with a team around the clock that is like monitoring literally everything that this person's body is doing, from like every milliliter of urine they're producing, to all their blood work, to the pressure that's programmed into the ventilator to keep their lungs open, and then you walk out of the room and there's a family member on the phone yelling at you about how, well there's no evidence to support vaccination, and you're staring at their loved one unvaccinated on a ventilator. You know, it's like this this dissonance. Margaret Yeah. Summer Um, like I—it's like you're reaching across a span that's really great in those instances, you know, because you don't have a common understanding of what the world is right now. Margaret Right. It's funny because I kept waiting, you know, like hearing stories about that—obviously I don't experience them—but hearing those stories, I keep kind of waiting for it to, like, break through and for people to be like, oh okay, like, my cousin died and now all of my other cousins are getting vaccinated and I'm going to and, you know what, I'm going to actually tell my friends at the bar that we should get vaccinated, especially if we keep hanging out at a bar. And like, I kept like waiting for that to happen. And at this point I've completely given up on that ever happening because of— Summer Well it does—it does happen sometimes. And I'm not trying to be, like, a blasting ray of hope, because it doesn't happen a lot, too. You know, but I have seen—like I have cared for a patient who was on a ventilator for over 60 days and then you know, was brought—like he's, the patient's awake now and can talk and whatnot. And any team member, any—whether it's a physical therapist or a nurse or anyone who walks in the room, the patient immediately now asks, “do you have the vaccine.” And because of the experience that this person has had, they've completely changed their mind about vaccination, of course. And at our at our hospital you have to be vaccinated to work there at this point, so it's kind of a like moot question, but I do see people turn around in a really big way. But it's just so unfortunate that they have to have what to me looks like one of the worst experiences I could possibly imagine in order to come to terms with the reality that we're living under, you know? Margaret Yeah Summer And I get it, you know? I get the root of where people are coming from is distrust of the government, distrust of the media, distrust of healthcare. Like, uh, relatable? Like yeah, I get that. I also don't trust those things, you know? Maraget Right. Summer And, you know, depending on what background you come from, you have even more reason. not to distrust those things, especially healthcare. And so I can't, you know, stand on my moral high ground and pretend that I get it and I'm right and they're wrong and I'm smart and they're dumb, you know. Like that doesn't really get us anywhere when the actual reality that I'm faced with is a person in front of me who is deeply suffering, who we're going to try our best to take care of. Margaret Yeah. I, you know, I'm sure you get this daily and maybe it's annoying, but it's like, I can't imagine being able to do what you do, you know, and then, like, maintain enough, um—yeah, okay, like how do you maintain enough faith in humanity to go to work? Is that too blunt of a question? Summer You know, I go to work. I don't know if I maintain faith in humanity. Margaret Ah, okay. Summer But I keep going back somehow. And it's been Hard. It's been really fucking hard. And if anyone's listening and you are close to anyone who's working in healthcare, especially if they're working and an ICU, like, I can't emphasize enough just taking care of your friends, and even just asking, hey man, shit sounds rough. How are you doing? Like, that goes a long way, you know? And yeah, how do I keep doing it? Honestly it's like—and I guess this ties into some of the topics you kind of mentioned talking about today—um, it's the team that I work with that really does make a big difference. And, you know, going into nursing as like a queer person with this radical background, I felt really alienated from my co-workers. I kind of had this, like, mindset that I was like an alien walking into a foreign land and I didn't want anyone to know I was an alien, you know. And I still feel that like every day of my life everywhere I go but— Margaret This is unrelatable. I don't know what you're talking about. Summer Yeah, you have no idea what I mean. Um, but over time I've developed relationships with people who I probably would never have five years ago, and, um, the type of solidarity that I experienced in the workplace might not be like #radical or something, or #anarchy, but um, those bonds are really important and really powerful, and I know that my co-workers would show up for one another in so many big ways, you know, like, it's not called mutual aid there, but it sure as fuck is. The way that I've seen people show up for one another, especially in these crises. And, yeah, it's—that bleeds into so many other things about nursing and mental health and the crisis that's happening in nursing right now. Margaret I mean, we could talk about that. I'm curious about that. Summer Yeah, I think that you know some people are kind of—who aren't in healthcare are kind of aware of what's happening, but I think a large number of people aren't really aware of— Margaret Which is that everyone's rushing to join the field because you all are well-respectcted, well-paid, and taken care of? Loved by society? Summer Yeah—and yeah, not facing these like ruptures of, like, what is real on a daily basis. Margaret Yeah, that's right. Summer Yeah, exactly it's going great. Margaret It's utopian. Summer Become a nurse, everyone. Um, no, but there is a—there's a huge crisis happening right now in nursing and there already was this like nursing shortage, right? Like when I was in nursing school they would talk about the nursing shortage. And really what it was was, like, a lot of nurses were retiring at retirement age, and what I see as the biggest barrier wasn't that no one wanted to be a nurse, it's that—it's twofold. It's like we have an aging population with complex chronic health conditions, so more patients, right? And then we have people who want to be nurses, but we have educational institutions that are trying to make as money as much money as possible, and limiting the number of people who can access degrees in nursing. And we maybe don't have enough educators. Maybe, you know, probably a lot of stuff that I don't know about or not qualified to talk about. But and that was already the baseline when I entered the field of nursing, and then you lay on top of that this huge pandemic that is just totally changed everything, changed what nursing looks like. And like, side note, also a lot of healthcare workers have died of Covid. And it's not like an extreme number, but I think the number from the World Health Organization last October was between like 80- and 180,000. I believe that's worldwide. So—and I don't know what percentage of those are nurses—but like, you know, that does play a role, fear of that probably plays a role, and then it's extreme burnout and trauma. Like, you know, I mentioned earlier that during these surges—and probably these numbers differ from hospital to hospital—80–90% of our patients who were put on ventilators for Covid were dying. And, you know, we're pretty used to dealing with people dying in the ICU. It's kind of, like, what we do is try to prevent people from dying. But inevitably people die. Um, but when you have 80–90% of the people that you're taking care of dying no matter what you do, no matter how hard you work, no matter what interventions you try, it is demoralizing to say the least. You know it's awful. Margaret Yeah. Summer It's truly awful. Um, and it's like an already high-stress job that then you add that on top of, you add the public discourse on top of that, you add the politics, you add the family's yelling at you about whatever treatment they heard about from Joe Rogan or, you know, whatever. It just creates this stress level that's, I think, unprecedented and really difficult to manage. Um, and there's that narrative of, like, the public not caring about nurses, or the public not understanding what they're going through, but even bigger is like policies that reflect a lack of care for human life in this country, which, you know, our job as nurses is to preserve human life. And then we're faced with the government, healthcare—or public health policies that don't value human life. So there's like that dissonance going on. Margaret You talking about the, like, the way the CDC keeps changing, like, what's being valued or whatever? Summer Yeah, I mean just all of it. The way that, um, both presidents who have been elected or serving—or whatever the fuck you call what they do during this pandemic. The way that it's been managed, the way the way capitalism manages this pandemic does not reflect a care for human life, right? It reflects the care for capital. And that just—when your job is to preserve human life and you see all these policies coming down that you're like, what the fuck, what the fuck, what the fuck? Like, this doesn't line up with what we're supposed to do. Like, this doesn't line up at all. And then you have, you know, places that lack appropriate PPE for nurses, like, these policies that don't reflect I care for healthcare workers. It is, like, the whole picture is a big labor crisis, because people of course are going to be like, the fuck am I doing here when I could do x, y, z thing, right? And, like— Margaret You should try podcasting. You don't have to leave the house. Summer I know, I'm thinking about it actually. Margaret Okay, cool. Summer And I am lucky in a lot of ways. Like, I live on the West Coast, I am unionized, my pay proportionally is a lot greater than some parts of the country, like some parts would rule south where nurses are getting paid garbage, right? And don't have a lot of the protections that I do. And, I mean, I can keep listing all these things. Like you mentioned the CDC, like, growing lack of trust in the CDC as an institution, as a healthcare worker, because they just say garbage that is not evidence-based. They tell you you're supposed to, like, work your job based on policies that have no evidence behind it. There's just—everything's starting to feel more and more arbitrary, right. Um, and it's gotten to a point where, like, I hear my coworkers in the break room talking about the different psych meds that they're trying. Or like, the different anti-anxiety pills that they're trying, and the different dosages that they're trying, just to manage, like, their job. Now, off course, that's not everyone. I'm not trying to be like overly-dramatic. But it's definitely a trend. And then the—you know, the other side of that is, like, you have people just leaving the field entirely. But you have a shit ton of people who are going to be travel nurses and, like—a travel nurse, for people who don't know, it's an RN who can pick up a contract. Hospitals around the country do this, and have done it since before the pandemic. You pick up a contract for a certain number of weeks for a certain pay. You work that contract, you move on. Um, people do this for short periods of time, for long periods of time, but during the pandemic it's been totally amplified, because you started having these crisis contracts, some of which were funded by the government, to send nurses to places that were really impacted by the pandemic and lacking staff. And you had these huge, huge incentives—like huge pay bonuses—for working in these extreme conditions. And at first you saw that, you know, in places like New York and whatnot with big surges. But now pretty much everywhere is hurting for nurses, and they will hire travel nurses for up to, you know, 4 or 5 times what staff nurses are making at that same institution. So you work under these conditions for long enough, your management tells you for long enough that they can't do—they can't give you PPE or they can't give you a retention bonus, or they just can't, they can't, they can't. Of course eventually people are going to be like, well fuck this place, I'm going to go make 4 times as much 2 hours away or next state over. And so it's turning into a situation where we have more and more travel nurses in hospitals, and less and less staff nurses. And like, that in itself doesn't sound that problematic until you think about, like, what's the difference between a nurse who's been at the same institution for 10 years and one who's been there for 3 days. It's like a commitment to that institution in a certain sense, right? At least a commitment to the community that they're serving in maybe some way, and knowledge of the way things work there because every hospital is going to be a little different. So it does, you know, in some senses pose a safety concern. Um, and in some cases people who are getting travel contracts are maybe not necessarily qualified to work in the positions that they're getting hired to. And I've seen that happen before. People are chasing the money, and I don't blame them right? So anyway, that's like a lot of talk. The whole crisis. But it really is becoming a crisis. At our hospital I see people who I don't think of as, like, labor organize-y or, like, radical by any means, who would describe themselves as moderate talking about this stuff in terms that are getting more and more pressured. And I see people who are talking about leaving who I would have never imagined would leave. And we have management telling us, we can't pay you more because we have to pay all these travel nurses. Well, if you paid us more we might stay and not become travel nurses, right? Margaret Can I just become a travel nurse and stay here? Actually, do people do that? Summer Yeah, um, no, they try to prevent you from doing that. Margaret Oh, okay. Summer But I have people that I work with who even took travel gigs north like 2 hours, and so they're still living where we live, they just drive 2 hours to work and make 4 times as much. Margaret Yeah, yeah. One of the things you were talking about earlier, you know, watching the nurses like trust the CDC and the government stuff less and less. And it ties into that thing that you were talking about earlier about how a lot of people have good reasons not to trust the government, and so that's like something that we can all—I think anyone who's thought through most things would have reason to distrust the government, right? Any analysis of history, almost regardless of your background, but obviously some backgrounds more than others. There's good reasons to not trust the government. Summer I can think of like 5 reasons not to trust. Margaret Like a little list? Summer Top 5 reasons not to trust them. Margaret Yeah, totally. No, this is good. You're going to be a good podcaster. Better than me. But the thing that works—that it comes down to for me—and it helps that I know people like you. I know medical professionals. You know, my joke for a long time is that the way to get health care in this country is to date a doctor and then stay friends with him. Um, because that's how I had my health care for a very long time, is that my ex is a doctor now. Um you date one boy, you pick the right one. Anyway. Um, and yeah. But the thing is this like—okay, so I don't trust the government. What I trust is people. And so, like, people are like, well why do you trust the government telling you what's good for your health? And I'm like, no, I trust my friends who are doctors. And it's not even like I trust doctors as a category at large, because I also understand why people are nervous around that. And it is this position of privilege where I am around people who have made those choices or have access to those choices to become medical professionals. But it's like, no, I trust you, like I trust you—it's just interesting to me. I don't know like how to—this is my solution. This is how we get, um, you know, all the nurses just go to the people and you'd be like, look hey, don't listen to the government, listen to me. I don't know. Summer A flawless plan. Margaret Maybe, everyone to listening, trust us! What could go wrong? Trust the voices and the headphones. Unlike Joe Rogan, don't trust Joe Rogan. Summer Yeah, don't trust that voice in your headphone. Yeah I really get it. Why not to trust institutions, why not to trust, uh, what feels like big government saying, now do this to your body. You know, it's the good thing to do. But, and before the vaccine came out, you know, I had my own, I'll be honest, I had my own hesitations about whether or not I would get it. But the moment that it was made accessible to me I was at work and I got an email that said, hey, you can make appointment. I picked up the phone immediately and made an appointment. I kind of surprised myself with how, like, my response to it. Like how ready I was to get the vaccine. It was pretty early on, it was last December, um, but part of what really changed it for me is kind of what you're talking about. Like not thinking about it as, like, the government made a vaccine or, you know, Pfizer made a vaccine, but thinking about the individual people who worked on producing that vaccine and, like, you know, we've all met science nerds, right? That's like, they're passionate about their nerd-dom around science and I was just imagining people like in these labs working their fucking tails off to produce something. And, you know, whether they do it for money, or glory, or fame, or out of, like, a care for people, who knows? But, I don't know, for some reason that comforted me, thinking about people like pouring their hearts and their minds into this project. But, I mean, that kind of like brings us back to talking about vaccines, right? Margaret Which vaccine did you get? Summer Um and I have Pfizer. Yeah. Does that mean—is this like a horoscope reading? Does that mean something about me? Margaret Yeah, probably. We need to come up with that. Summer My sun and moon are and Pfizer. Um I just—I've been thinking a lot about this like vaxxed versus unvaxxed thing. And especially in the Biden administration, and how so many liberals—probably more or less well-meaning liberals—thought that, like, Joe Biden was going to turn us around in terms of the pandemic. And what we've seen is, like, definitely not. We have not turned this thing around, you know? Like not even close. By no means have we turned it around. Margaret Well, I mean, you know, there's like a million people a day getting Covid. Oh yeah, nope. I see what you mean. Summer Yeah, yeah. And ultimately it's like, I just take issue with this really neoliberal response where this control of a global pandemic is being placed on the actions of the individual, right? Whether or not the individual makes the like “good” or “moral” choice to get vaccinated, and ultimately to me it feels like this fascist tendency. Like we've, like, identified an internal enemy which is the unvaccinated, right? And like those are the people responsible for all of this, for the economy failing for—like what does that narrative sound like, you know? And like this is all to say, like, yeah, I'm provaxx. I'm vaxxed. Like, I think it's a good Idea. You should probably get vaccinated. But I don't, you know, we're talking about like a global issue here and whether or not your neighbor's vaccinated, ultimately like there's bigger fucking questions of like why there's been such a failure in public health to manage this pandemic. There are countries where this isn't the reality, you know? Margaret Yeah. Summer Their numbers right now are like in the dozens, maybe the hundreds. Like, that could have been our reality if this had been managed differently on a policy level, and I'm not even like a fucking policy nerd, you know? I'm just like, wow y' all did bad. Like this has not worked out. And the hyper-focus on the, like, choice of the individual, just like it does with green capitalism, it pulls our attention away from these larger structural issues and institutional responses to the pandemic. Like, are we really—like, don't question Joe Biden, question your neighbor, you know. Don't be mad at like the CDC, be mad at like the guy out on the street. Like, it's just a really ineffectual way to manage this. And it also—like the narrative around, like, well if only they'd get vaccinated. It's just like writing off the deaths of these people as inevitable and as, like, not worth our care, or our time, or our thought. And I don't think—I mean, maybe I can think of some people who like “deserve” to die of Covid, but I don't think the vast majority of people who are dying deserve it by any means, you know. Margaret Right. Summer And um—and we're at a point too where like even vaccinated people are getting sick, so it becomes, like, this really big question, right? Margaret Yeah, and I guess—I guess it's like people are putting their faith—even if they're not putting their faith in government, they're putting their faith in like Fox News or whoever it is who's, you know, telling them not to get vaccinated. Summer Right, yeah. Margaret Instead of putting their faith in themselves and their own decision making. Yeah, no, that's interesting. You know, okay, so like one of the reasons that, like, you know, green capitalism—it's like the—well, if you'd only change your light bulbs to LEDs a little bit earlier, we wouldn't have climate change, everyone knows that. If you, Summer, hadn't changed—had changed your light bulbs, still hold you responsible for this. And, you know, and so it's like we all see how that's bullshit, and I can see how that that makes sense about this. But it is interesting because some of the—some of the ways it seems like that countries are handling it successfully do challenge some of my anti-authoritarianism on some level. Summer Yeah. Margaret And so it would be less about giving your neighbor the choice, and in some ways it is about like vaccine mandates. It's like, well, if you want to keep working at this thing that you do, you need a vaccine. And I actually don't have—like people ask me a fair amount as, like, a sort of public-facing anarchist or something, people be like, well what is the, you know, anti-authoritarian response about vaccines and stuff. And for me, it's like fairly easy. It's like, well, I don't want to get sick and I don't want to get other people sick, so obviously I take the thing that's available to me that can minimize my chances of that and, you know. But if you're talking about on a policy level, like what does that look like? What does that mean? Summer Yeah, I don't—honestly, I don't know. It's something I've thought about a lot too because I don't want to come across as, like, everyone should do what they want, because I obviously don't feel that way. Like, that's not limiting—that's what we're doing and it's not limiting suffering. It's not preventing people from dying. It's not preventing people who are medically fragile and don't deserve this from dying, you know? Not that—I don't want to come across that way at all and, like, have you have you read Climate Leviathan” Margaret I have not, but I once listened to a podcast where they discuss the basic concept. So I basically have read it. Summer Well, it just it creates this like interesting…w hat would you call it… like, this categorization of different ways that governments could respond to the ongoing climate crisis, right. And there's like climate Mao, which is kind of—resembles like the way a country like China might respond to the climate—or is responding to the climate crisis. And I've been thinking about that in terms of, like, the pandemic. Margaret So using, like, top-down authoritarian control. Summer Yeah, yeah. But like left-wing authoritarian, I guess. And in China the way that they're dealing with pandemic right now from some of the stories I've read is, like, people who have tried to travel there and you test positive and you are forcibly put into isolation, you know. Margaret Right. Summer You know, you're given treatment and you don't really have a choice. Is that good? Ugh, you know, doesn't make me feel good. And then you have a country like ours which is more of, like, neoliberal, that, you know, we're seeing what that response looks like. Like, freedom to the individual and then like what fuck happens then? It's a shit show in its own way, and all the policies are geared towards, you know, maximizing capital instead of valuing humans or human life. Margaret Right. Summer And then there would be like a right-wing authoritarian response, which I don't know what kind of example to give for that. But then there's the, like, what is the response that you're talking about? What do we come up with that's like an antiauthoritarian leftist response to a global pandemic, and I don't know, really. But I do know that, like, things that come to mind are like, we talk a lot about informed consent in medicine and I don't think that people have the right education and right information to make informed decisions around a lot of this. That's like a huge issue, right? Like, our education system, our public health system, our media and the way that—you know, back to what we were talking about earlier, the way that like there's this split in reality, the reality that people are experiencing. Like, people are not making informed choices about their health when they choose not to vaccinate—often. Sometimes they are, but often they aren't, right. Because they don't have access to all the information—or not being given all the information in unbiased manner. So that's one of the things I think about. And then, like, global vaccine equity is huge, right? Because we can't pretend this is just a national issue, like that's absurd, viruses do not, like, acknowledge borders. Like, why we treat this as if it's, like, in an enclosed space ,right, that is called the United States when, um, the border is, like—yeah, it has like very real and fucked up implications in the world. But it's also a concept, right? And like, we need to acknowledge this as a global problem, or else, you know, we're going to keep getting these variants, we're going to keep getting more waves of Covid. So, yeah, I don't really have like a solid answer of, like, how do we deal with this in an antiauthoritarian way. But there's things we can do better, that's for sure. Margaret I had this like huge moment of, somewhere between disappointment and fear, like I think there was, like, a news story that broke about, like, Russia, like, hacked some of the people researching a vaccine and stole their research or whatever. And everyone's like, oh, damn you Russia. And I'm like, wait, what? It wasn't freely available? Like, you like to imagine that when there's a global pandemic all of the smart people who specifically study that get together and say, like, okay, what's the best plan? And then they all figure it out together and we can have our Star Trek moment where we realize we're all going to fucking die unless we do it, right? And something about, like, climate change and carbon emissions and stuff, I see how that like screws the economy—I'm completely in favor of this approach to climate change, mind you—but like I could see the argument for it's really more complex than that and it has all these implications. But I just like can't see a defense of intellectual property for vaccines and for medical care. You know, I just, I cannot fathom— especially, even from a self-interest point of view of like as you said, the, you know, vaccine does not respect borders. And so, like, I'm glad I have my like third shot—my booster shot—but it like kind of irritates me that there's, you know, plenty of people who've never had access to it at all, you know, elsewhere in the world. Summer Mhmm. Margaret I mean, I think that would be part of anti-authoritarianism, right? Is that you have this like, well obviously we don't respect these like borders or capitalism enough to say that, like, you all can, you know, hide the intellectual property of how we take care of ourselves. But it does get into interesting questions around, like, when you when you bring up informed consent, right. Because you're like, okay, well—I'm almost afraid to get into these kinds of—it's such a murky territory. But it's like, okay, if you have a community of people where they're like, oh, we all agree we're not vaccinated and it might fucking kill us and whatever, you know? But in some ways the consent—like, do I consent to allowing people who have not chose to be vaccinated get near me, you know? Like, what direction does the consent go? Like, I don't know the answer to that, but part of me thinks that the, you know, in the same way that we use informed consent with sex around STIs, right? And like, it's not to say that someone who has STIs like shouldn't have sex, it's just that you just need to have an informed, consensual sex. And like all sex, you know, because it's not like it's like a binary where some people have STIs and some people don't. I'm not trying to like, you know—people don't always know and then there's all these things that people have that—this is why it's so messy. And like, so, I'm not trying to be like, oh, if you want to hang out in Plague Village in Plague Town you can, right? I don't know, it gets—it's really complex and I just—like, I actually almost appreciate but mostly begrudge how much all of this challenges, I think not just like my ideological position, but like all the ideological positions that anyone who's actually thinking clearly comes into this with. If you came into the pandemic with a clear ideological position and it hasn't been challenged at all by the pandemic or climate change, I think you're lying to yourself. Summer Yeah, or you've just like—maybe if you're a capitalist you're still just like, yay capitalism, you know. Margaret I'm going to Mars, fuck all you! Summer Yeah, yeah, definitely. I mean there is a lot of nuance and I think it's made a lot of us pretty uncomfortable, right, to be like, should the government tell us not to leave our houses? Like maybe, is that a—maybe that's a good idea? That can't be a good idea. You know, like, it is really uncomfortable. Margaret Yeah. Summer And it's uncomfortable to be an anarchist or an anti-authoritarian and be like, well, the government should definitely just give me money to stay home. Because then it's like, oh, like—well, you know what—I don't have to explain it. But like, I think there is a lot of discomfort. There's a lot of weird ground here and like, it's—I think that, ultimately, it's just hard to imagine a widespread anti-authoritarian response to something when we live under capital and we live under this extreme—in this extreme situation, in extreme circumstances where we have very little control over something That's so widespread and overarching. Margaret I think that is the answer. Summer Yeah. That's not just you like no control, right? Like, we do have some control over our day-to-day lives, over what risks we're willing to accept, how we share information and resources and all that. Yeah, but some of it just feels very, oh yeah, so icky. Margaret Yeah I mean but it also gets to the level of, like, well, for example, something someone could do is stay being a nurse in the ICU. You know? I'm not trying to convince you to stay your job, you do whatever you want. But like, you know, I feel like that is a—you know, because so much of the response—or like, all the mutual aid organizations that popped up, you know, is like, in some ways that is our response. Because we don't control society, but we do control ourselves and we do control, you know, collectively control smaller organizations and things. Which might be too Pat of an answer. Summer I'm sure I'm sure there's like people more creative or smarter or something than I am who have a really great response to, like, what could that look like. But if—I know in my life for me right now it's just become—like my circle's gotten smaller in a lot of ways and I just try my best to take really good care of the people that are closest to me, you know. When my friends get sick with Covid I, like, bring them food, and I bring them care boxes and whatnot. And that seems kind of like mundane or simple. But for me, coming from my like ICU nursing position, that's kind of the best I can do. And help people understand what's going on, too, people who I'm close to who are like, wait, what the fuck does this—wait, what's happening with this thing? Like, not that I'm an authority, but I do have some room to speak from here. So. Margaret Well, is that no okay question to ask you? This will probably come out maybe a week from when we record it, so maybe everything will have changed. But like, what the fuck is happening right now? Is that something I can ask you> Summer Oh god. You mean with like Omicron, or? Margaret Yeah, and like, you know, there's a lot of discussion right now about, like, do we throw our hands up in the air and say, everyone's going to get it anyway? Summer Oh god. Margaret You know, both like in terms of, like, what kind of response is like appropriate—or even like what response like you take in your personal life, or like the people around you take in your personal lives that you respect, you know?—Whose choices around it you respect. Everyone listening do exactly what Summer is about to say and don't think for yourself. Summer Oh my god. Everyone who's listening, do not do as I say. But I think I have a couple of responses to that in terms of, like, what's going on right now with Omicron and, you know, we're seeing a ton of breakthrough infections. We probably all know people who are getting Covid right now. Do we just, yeah, throw our hands up in, like, let nihilism take over and let everyone get sick? No, that is a horrible strategy for managing a pandemic. That's a terrible— Margaret Oh, interesting. 49:57.48 Summer A terrible strategy and, you know, it does kind of bring me back to policy because so much of Biden's campaign or whatever, the dialogue around it has been about vaccination. And vaccination, yes, that's a tool. But that's not—I guess what I'm thinking of is there was like a statement that Biden made at some point that was like, we have such a great vaccine program and rollout and we're, rah rah, we're doing the best. It's just those damn unvaccinated people. And it's like, if we have this many unvaccinated people, is our vaccine campaign really that good? No, it's not. It's not good. It's not going well, you know, we could do better. Margaret We're doing great in the war except for the enemy that keeps winning. Summer Exactly. Yeah, it's like, what the hell? And I, you know, I think that like just throwing our hands up and saying, well everyone's going to get sick, it just fucking sucks because I think people are riding on this notion that, like, well, Omicron seems to confer less severe disease. Which, yeah, that's great, right? But if more people are getting infected—we're playing a statistics game, right? If more people are getting infected, then a smaller percentage can still be a bigger number of people who have severe disease, you know what I'm saying? And in like a place that's, like, where I live, where our resources aren't extensive in terms of like ICU medicine, our ICU is 15 beds. It only takes 15 people with severe Covid for us to be completely overwhelmed in a hospital that's already completely overwhelmed, in a hospital system that's overwhelmed, in a health care system that's overwhelmed. And so even if people—even in another situation where the people coming into the hospital don't have severe disease, they just have bad enough disease to come to the hospital, you're still dealing with a healthcare system that is, like, teetering—and I mean it, like really teetering. So everyone getting sick is not a great solution. I think that like, I can't tell anyone— Margaret But what if we do it all at once? Summer I can't tell anyone what to do, but in terms of what I do in my life is like, you know, I've all along assessed what risk feels appropriate for me and it's a harm reduction thing, right? It's like, we can't expect people to make the decisions that we would make for ourselves. We can give them the best information possible and the resources and hope for the best, you know, hope for the best outcomes. And I'm not going into indoor dining. I have friends that I see, a lot of them are nurses. I do a lot of outdoor activities so I'm able to see people outdoors a lot. I'm still having some dinners with friends, but I live—I also live in a rural area where, like, transmission isn't quite the same as it is in like big cities, right? So probably some people would take issue with some of the activities I participate in. But that's why I'm saying, like, not everyone should do what I do. But, I don't know, you just, you really need to think about the impact, right? Like, it's not not a big deal if you get sick, and I'm saying that with this assumption that whoever's hearing this has, like, a level of health and immune function that I do, and a lot of people don't, you know. Like I think we, like—“we” being, you know, maybe me—not trying to make assumptions about you—but a lot of us think, oh, this this isn't conferring severe disease, and we're not thinking about our friends, our community members who are really compromised at baseline, who are disabled at baseline, who are chronically ill at baseline, and who maybe aren't “useful” to capitalism at baseline. So it's easy to write off their illness and their deaths as insignificant. It's only affecting people who have chronic illness, you know, like we hear this narrative a lot. Like, 40% of Americans have chronic illnesses. 40%! Margaret Oh, that's a high number, yeah. Summer Yeah, and not all of those are gonna, you know, make it so you get severe Covid. But I've treated patients who their, you know, their chronic illness was hypertension. That's what they came in with, and they're intubated now, you know. And I'm not saying this to like fear-monger but just to, like, there isn't some “other” that is the chronically ill that is the immunocompromised, like, people all around us have these things that they're managing at baseline. So all of us getting sick: bad plan, was the summary of what I just said. Margaret Yeah, yeah. Well no, it's—I mean, it's interesting because it talks about the—when you're talking about, like, okay because people hear, okay, Omicron is less likely to cause severe illness. But as you pointed out, more people are still ending up, you know, we're still seeing a spike in severe illness like hospitalizations and death right now as a result of it. And it is—I think it's because, on an individual level, every individual is safer getting Omicron than Delta, potentially, right? Summer Yeah, potentially yeah. Margaret And so, any individual, especially probably those who kind of had in the back of their heads like, well, I'm healthy, I'll probably survive, you know, anyway, going on. Then hear this like reassurance. But yeah, we don't—we don't tend to think of ourselves at scale. We tend to think of ourselves as us, or at least I do way more than I would like to, you know? Summer Yeah. Margaret No, it's interesting. [Laughs] “Interesting.” What a wonderful word for what we're dealing with. Okay, well we're—we're kind of—we're coming up near an hour, but I guess I wanted to ask, do you have any final thoughts about Covid pandemic, you know, why people should go become nurses, or not become nurses, or anything to impart upon our listeners? Summer Um, I guess one thought that I have is, you know, I know a lot of us come from communities like DIY communities or communities that really value that ethic, and I also value that. But I just, like, want to remind people that, who are treating symptoms at home if they do get Covid or whatever they're treating at home, that if you're going to, you know, use herbal, or nontraditional, or traditional remedies to treat things like this, you just also have to have—you have to be judicious, you know. A lot of us have laughed a lot about people using Ivermectin or something like that. But I've treated a patient who was treating Covid at home with tonic water and homeopathic remedies, and I think it's easy to scoff at that, but like, one person's tonic water and homeopathic remedies is another person's, like, tinctures, right? Margaret Right. Summer Like these just are coming from different cultural backgrounds and situations. And that's not me writing off herbalism by any means, I just want to remind people that, like, in any situation, whether it's first aid, whether it's—we're talking about Covid. There's a point at which we can't DIY anymore, you know. And I just want to like throw that out there because, um, it's unfortunate, right, that we have to rely on institutions, but they're there for a reason. The ICU is there for a reason, and we can't DIY the ICU. So um, yeah, and just to have compassion for people who are trying those other remedies that seem absurd to you, because your remedies seem absurd to somebody else, you know. Margaret Yeah. Well, join us next week when we talk about how to set up a DIY ICU. No, no, no, that makes so much sense. And one of the things that I feel like I've learned a lot by talking to people for this show is kind of this, um, like, the institutions that run society are bad, but society is good—or like, the concept of having a society is good. Like DIY is great, but not everything should fall on you, or even the do it ourselves. Like, you know, we actually do need to learn to expand the “ourselves” in do it ourselves. And like, I don't know, I think one of the things that gave me the most hope that you said during all of this is talking about coming into the hospital system, you know, as a, like a queer weirdo, and then being like, oh, I'm not going to get along with anyone, and then like having these deep connections with people outside your usual bubble. I think that that's, like, so important and one of the things that gives me hope is that, you know, there's actually this like—these larger structures that are still just made of people that we can all work together and figure things out. Summer And, I mean, a lot of those people— I get why we should be skeptical of anyone in a lab coat or whatnot. But a lot of those people really do fucking care, and they really want to do their best even if they fuck up sometimes. So, I'm not trying to be like, woohoo, trust all nurses. But like, some of us are, you know, we're doing all right. Margaret Yeah. Okay, well do you have any either, like, personal or like any projects that you want to shout out to draw attention to while you have the moment? Summer I wish I did. I was for a while working on a project around here called Rogue Harm Reduction providing Narcan and STI testing for free, and Narcan training and whatnot. I haven't worked on that project in a while. I got pretty burned out at work, as you can imagine, so I took a step back. But that's a project I'll shout out to, you can look them up on social media. They're great people doing great stuff. Margaret So they do still exist and people can go support them? Summer Yeah. Margaret Awesome, well thank you so much. Thanks so much for listening. If you enjoyed this podcast, please tell people about it. It's the main way that people hear about it is word of mouth or, I guess mostly word of internet mouth at the moment. And, you know, you can feed all the algorithms that run the world that probably shouldn't by commenting, and posting about it to all the social medias, and doing all of those things—they have kind of a vastly disproportionate effect compared to what you might think. Every comment and every thumbs up and every subscription and all of that means that more people will run across this content. And if you want to support the show more directly, you can do so by supporting Strangers in a Tangled Wilderness, which is the publishing collective that publishes this show which I'm part of. And you can do that by going to patreon.com/strangersinatangledwilderness. I used to be supported by a personal Patreon, but owing to various things in my life, specifically that I have a nonprofit job now, I no longer am supported by that I'm supported by my nonprofit job. So instead the Patreon supports a bunch of different people who are making all kinds of awesome content and I'm very excited for people to check out Strangers in a Tangled Wilderness and all the stuff that we're going to be doing in 2022? Yes, that's the year it is. It's a new year. I'm still not very good at that. And I want to thank all the people who support the show, but in particular I want to thank Nicole and James and David and Justine [inaudible], Sean, Hugh, Dana, Chelsea, Eleanor, Mike, Starro, Cat J, The Compound, Shane, Christopher, Sam, Natalie, Willow, Kirk, Hoss the dog, and Nora for making this show possible. All right, that's it and I hope you all are doing as well as you can with everything that's going on, and take care of yourself and take care of each other. Find out more at https://live-like-the-world-is-dying.pinecast.co

DocWorking: The Whole Physician Podcast
139: Financial Independence for Doctors with Dr. Cobin Soelberg

DocWorking: The Whole Physician Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 20:50


“I'd see residents, as soon as they graduate, they'd buy the Mercedes or they'd want to get a big house and (they'd be) really digging themselves into these holes and feeling stuck. Feeling like the only option was to work more.” -Cobin Soelberg, M.D., J.D.   Today's conversation is all about how much is enough and financial independence. Cohost Dr. Jen Barna talks with Anesthesiologist, Financial Planner and Attorney, Dr. Cobin Soelberg. Tune in to this conversation to hear about the 4% rule, the FIRE movement, and some solid ways to get started making your money work for you so you can get on the path to financial independence. As a practicing anesthesiologist with legal and financial training, Dr. Soelberg has a unique expertise and understanding of his colleagues' clinical pressures and the financial worries that keep them awake at night. Dr. Soelberg helps his colleagues destroy their student loan debt, protect their income and assets and create a retirement plan that would make you jealous!      Cobin Soelberg, M.D., J.D. is a Certified Financial Planner candidate and owner of Greeley Wealth Management, a financial planning firm, run by a physician for physicians.  He is the treasurer of his private practice anesthesiology group located in Bend, Oregon.     Check out Greeley Wealth - www.greeleywealth.com today to learn how to start making your money work for you.  You can also email Cobin at cobin@greeleywealth.com Find full transcripts of DocWorking: The Whole Physician Podcast episodes on the DocWorking Blog  How many coaches do you think your favorite actors and athletes have worked with over the years in order to achieve such extraordinary success?   What if you had a team of trusted thinking partners, experienced coaches who have helped hundreds of physicians overcome obstacles and who know what works?    What if you were part of a community of like-minded physicians from across the nation, across specialties and career stages? Your collective brain trust, sharing ideas and experiences, so you would no longer feel like an island, surrounded by people yet alone?   What if you had small group coaching sessions, could interact with your coaches and community as often as you wish, and had virtual courses at your fingertips 24-7 that could help you with things like time and stress management, resilience, and mapping out your future to achieve what matters most to you?   What if you could have all of this for less than the cost of a single 1:1 coaching session per month?   DocWorking THRIVE is the Physician Coaching and Community Subscription Package that Guides You as a Doctor to Embrace Life in the way that is most meaningful to you, integrate that with your work so you can truly thrive, and be a valued member of our growing private community of doctors from across the nation. Join the DocWorking mailing list by clicking here.   At DocWorking, our specialty is Coaching Physicians to achieve the best in life and medicine.    Doctors devote their lives to caring for others. But does that mean they must sacrifice their own health and wellbeing? Absolutely not!   At DocWorking, we have developed a unique way to embrace it all.   The caring for others that you do so selflessly AND the caring for YOURSELF AND YOUR FAMILY that you crave in order to bring it all into the perfect balance specific to YOU.   What if we told you that you CAN have it all? The career you dreamed of when you decided to become a doctor AND the life outside of medicine that you desire?   DocWorking empowers physicians to get back on the path to achieving their dreams.   Coaches and Courses at DocWorking Ace the Boards and Max Your CME Preparing for your board exam or looking for a quick and convenient way to earn CME? Study for your board exam and fulfill your CME requirements with BoardVitals. BoardVitals is the leading online board review platform, with question banks and CME activities available in more than 50 medical and healthcare specialties.   Save Money Now: Refinance Your Student Loan Debt   Take Back Your Time: Get a Virtual Assistant Working in the medical field is fulfilling but it can also be exhausting. Physicians often sacrifice their personal time to carry out their duties. They want to go on vacations, start passion projects, or start side businesses but finding the time seems impossible. Recently, more and more physicians are giving outsourcing a try. Outsourcing allows you to delegate tasks to virtual assistants so you can free up your time and finally do whatever it is you've been wanting to do.   Become a Medical Legal Consultant We at DocWorking are excited to collaborate with Dr. Armin Feldman to bring you this opportunity to develop a side income or even a full time income while using your clinical skills!   Achieve Financial Independence with a Financial Planner/Advisor Change your trajectory: build financial independence and strength by working with our trusted resources. Working with a trusted financial planner and/or financial advisor can help you to create a specific plan that works for you. The right advisor can help you stay on track to reach your financial independence goal and your next vision.   Protect Yourself and Your Family with the Right Insurance Doctors and their families need many types of insurance–and inadequate coverage can cost you dearly. Connecting with trusted insurance professionals in your area is recommended to be sure you're appropriately covered.   Are you a physician who would like to tell your story? Please email Amanda, our producer, at Amanda@docworking.com to be considered. And if you like our podcast and would like to subscribe and leave us a 5 star review, we would be extremely grateful! We're everywhere you like to get your podcasts! Apple iTunes, Spotify, iHeart Radio, Google, Pandora, PlayerFM, ListenNotes, Amazon, YouTube, Podbean You can also find us on Instagram, Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter.    Some links in our blogs and show notes are affiliate links, and purchases made via those links may result in payments to DocWorking. These help toward our production costs. Thank you for supporting DocWorking: The Whole Physician Podcast! Occasionally, we discuss financial and legal topics. We are not financial or legal professionals. Please consult a licensed professional for financial or legal advice regarding your specific situation.   Podcast produced by: Amanda Taran

The Lance Wallnau Show
UK House of Commons Does The Uncommon

The Lance Wallnau Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 25:55


On today's broadcast, Mercedes and I are talking about what's happening in the United Kingdom, where they are leading the way on ending vaccine mandates, mask mandates, and restrictions to everyday life. This is a massive contrast to what is happening in Oregon! Meanwhile, US truckers are pushing back, and when the backbone of infrastructure has something to say, the government would be wise to listen. We're talking about this, supply chain issues, inflation, and more on today's podcast!

The Barbless.co Fly Fishing Podcast with Hogan Brown
Captain Bryce Tedford - Stripers, Smallmouth, Largemouth, and moving to California

The Barbless.co Fly Fishing Podcast with Hogan Brown

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 63:08


Captain Bryce Tedford was raised on Bainbridge Island Washington where he grew up Fly Fishing for Silver Salmon, King Salmon & Sea Run Cutthroat. He began guiding in 1997 out of High School, his guiding travels have included various rivers & lakes in Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Argentina & Chile. Unlike many people who live In Oregon, Washington, or really any western state besides California the last thing on their list of things to do is move to California … Not Bryce. He uprooted his nearly 15 years of guiding steelhead, trout, and smallmouth and moved to Sacramento California in 2010 - sold his drift boat, bought a sparkle boat, and started chasing bass. One of the most energetic and passionate guides in Northern California listen as Hogan talks about Bryce's transition from a swung fly steelhead guide and trout guide to a full-time California Delta guide, why he loves topwater fishing for smallmouth and sharing it with new anglers, and the seasons of the CA delta. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/the-barbless-podcast/support

Beat Check with The Oregonian
Big-time changes coming in Salem as long-time leaders leave

Beat Check with The Oregonian

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 36:25


Change is hard. Oregon's Legislature is about to see a boat load of change – with different people set to lead the house, senate and the governor's office in the span of the next year. It's a fascinating time in Salem. On this episode, Hillary Borrud, state government reporter for the Oregonian/Oregon, explains all the retirements, appointments and moving chairs. We talked about Peter Courtney and Tina Kotek's legacies, who may – or In Kotek's case likely will succeed them, the governor's race and Betsy Johnson's presence in the race, and the legislative session starting February 1 There's a ton to unpack. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Patrick Jones Baseball
Recruiting Coordinator At Tulane University - Jay Uhlman

Patrick Jones Baseball

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 58:55


In today's episode, I speak to Jay Uhlman, the Assistant Coach/Recruiting Coordinator -Tulane University.He is a veteran with over 24 years of experience as both an assistant and head coachJay Uhlman arrived at Tulane after he spent the previous eight seasons as a member of the University of Oregon staff where he was the associate head coach for the last three seasons.He shares some advice to high school parents about going into the recruiting decision-making process. He also talks about elevating standards and challenging players to see their competitiveness.Learn about the importance of building relationships, bridging the gap, getting in the cage, communicating with them on defense, and fielding techniques. Sign Up For Weekly Newsletter See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mind Over Murder
NEW: Author Kevin Sullivan on Ted Bundy

Mind Over Murder

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 48:28


Join "Mind Over Murder" podcast hosts Bill Thomas and Kristin Dilley as we discuss the case of Ted Bundy with Kevin M. Sullivan, author of six fascinating books on the serial murderer. How did Bundy get away with so many murders? Why are historians and true crime fans alike so fascinated with him? How does Kevin Sullivan separate the myths from the reality in this complicated case? What can we learn from this case that will allow us to catch killers and prevent serial murders like those committed by Ted Bundy?Kevin M. Sullivan's Latest Book: The Enigma of Ted Bundy (Wild Blue Press):https://wildbluepress.com/the-enigma-of-ted-bundy-kevin-sullivan-true-crime/Goodreads on Kevin M. Sullivan books:https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/15103926.Kevin_M_SullivanFollow author Kevin M. Sullivan on Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/kevin.m.sullivan.39Please give Mind Over Murder a positive rating here: https://lovethepodcast.com/jpHq3qNew Article in Virginia Gazette: 35 Years Later, Victims' Families in Colonial Parkway Murders Still Searching for Answers, Hope DNA Advances will Solve Case By Em Holter and Abigail Adcoxhttps://www.dailypress.com/virginiagazette/va-vg-colonial-parkway-murders-anniversary-1024-20211022-76jkpte6qvez7onybmhbhp7nfi-story.htmlNew Article in Medium: The Colonial Parkway Murders — A Tale of Two Killers? By Quinn Zanehttps://medium.com/unburied/the-colonial-parkway-murders-a-tale-of-two-killers-1e8fda367a48Washington Post: "Crimes of Passion"https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/opinions/1997/08/15/crimes-of-passion/0a38e8f9-6d04-48e4-a847-7d3cba53c363/New feature article in the Daily Beast: "Inside the Maddening Search for Virginia's Colonial Parkway Serial Killer" By Justin Rohrlichhttps://www.thedailybeast.com/what-happened-to-cathleen-thomas-and-rebecca-dowski-inside-the-hunt-for-the-colonial-parkway-killerCitizens! Check out our new line of "Mind Over Murder" t-shirts and other good stuff !https://www.teepublic.com/stores/mind-over-murder-podcast?ref_id=23885Washington Post Op-Ed Piece by Deidre Enright of the Innocence Project:"The FBI should use DNA, not posters, to solve a cold-case murder" https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2021/06/25/julie-williams-laura-winans-unsolved-murder-test-dna/Oxygen: "Loni Coombs Feels A Kinship To 'Lovers' Lane' Victim Cathy Thomas"Loni Coombs felt an immediate connection to Cathy Thomas, a groundbreaking gay woman who broke through barriers at the U.S. Naval Academy before she was brutally murdered along the Colonial Parkway in Virginia.https://www.oxygen.com/crime-news/loni-coombs-feels-a-kinship-to-colonial-parkway-victim-cathy-thomasCrimeCon will be held April 29-May 1, 2022 in Las Vegas. We will both be there!Details: https://www.crimecon.com/cc22You can contribute to help "Mind Over Murder" do our important work:https://mindovermurderpodcast.com/supportCheck out Mind Over Murder on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mindoverpodcastJoin the Colonial Parkway Murders Facebook page with more than 14,000 followers: https://www.facebook.com/ColonialParkwayCaseFour one-hour episodes on the Colonial Parkway Murders are available on Oxygen as "The Lover's Lane Murders." The series is available on the free Oxygen app, Hulu, YouTube, Amazon, and many other platforms. https://www.oxygen.com/lovers-lane-murders Oxygen" "Who Were The Colonial Parkway Murder Victims? 8 Young People All Killed In Virginia Within 4 Years" https://www.oxygen.com/lovers-lane-murders/crime-news/who-were-the-colonial-parkway-murder-victims Washington Post Magazine: "Victims, Families and America's Thirst for True-Crime Stories." "For Bill Thomas, his sister Cathy's murder is a deeply personal tragedy. For millions of true-crime fans, it's entertainment." https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/magazine/wp/2019/07/30/feature/victims-families-and-americas-thirst-for-true-crime-stories/Daily Press excellent series of articles on the Colonial Parkway Murders: "The Parkway" http://digital.dailypress.com/static/parkway_cottage/main/index.htmlColonial Parkway Murders website: https://colonialparkwaymurders.com Mind Over Murder Podcast website: https://mindovermurderpodcast.comPlease subscribe and rate us at your favorite podcast sites. Ratings and reviews are very important. Please share and tell your friends!https://lovethepodcast.com/jpHq3qWe launch a new episode of "Mind Over Murder" every Monday morning, and a bonus episode every Thursday morning.Sponsors: Othram and DNAsolves.comContribute Your DNA to help solve cases: https://dnasolves.com/user/registerFollow "Mind Over Murder" on Twitter: https://twitter.com/MurderOverFollow Bill Thomas on Twitter: https://twitter.com/BillThomas56Follow "Colonial Parkway Murders" on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ColonialParkwayCase/Follow us on InstaGram:: https://www.instagram.com/colonialparkwaymurders/Check out the entire Crawlspace Media network at http://crawlspace-media.com/All rights reserved. Mind Over Murder, Copyright Bill Thomas and Kristin Dilley, Another Dog Productions/Absolute Zero Productions

The Strong Towns Podcast
Jarrett Walker: ”Prediction and Freedom Are Opposites”

The Strong Towns Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 48:21


This week on the Strong Towns Podcast, host Chuck Marohn welcomes back a special return guest: Jarrett Walker, head of Jarrett Walker + Associates, a transit-planning firm based in Portland, Oregon. Walker has been a consultant in public transit network, design, and policy for many decades now, and has worked all across North America and other countries worldwide. He's also the author of the book Human Transit: How Clearer Thinking about Public Transit Can Enrich Our Communities and Our Lives, as well as the blog Human Transit. Recently while doing his end-of-the-year desk cleaning, Chuck came across an article that Walker wrote in 2018 for the Journal of Public Transportation titled “To Predict with Confidence, Plan for Freedom.” Upon rereading it (for the fourth time), Chuck knew he wanted to talk to Walker about this piece. So, join in for this conversation about the limitations of prediction, starting with a story seven or eight years ago, when Walker was developing a proposed redesign for the bus network in Houston… Additional Show Notes "To Predict with Confidence, Plan for Freedom,” by Jarrett Walker, Journal of Public Transportation (2018). Jarrett Walker (Twitter) Charles Marohn (Twitter)

The Hiker Podcast | Day Hiking, Backpacking, Thru Hiking
The Hiker Podcast: Chamise Kramer, Public Affairs Specialist with the Rogue River Siskiyou National Forest

The Hiker Podcast | Day Hiking, Backpacking, Thru Hiking

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 63:37


Welcome to The Hiker Podcast. This week I am excited to talk with Chamise Kramer, Public Affairs Specialist with the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest! A Southern Oregon local, Chamise Kramer got her art degree in 2001 from Southern Oregon University, and realized that her soul craved the next step. So, she went back to school to become a botanist—because plants are COOL. (Fun Fact: “chamise” is a plant—a shrub—and Chamise's mom is also a botanist. Hence Chamise's name!) Chamise's career in public lands stewardship is approaching two decades, and has included working across all of southwest Oregon for both the U.S. Forest Service and the Bureau of Land Management, and in fields including fire ecology, botany, environmental planning, and most recently, public affairs and community outreach.  Her favorite outdoor places to play include (but aren't limited to!) Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument, the Ashland Watershed, and the Sonoran Desert. Chamise's favorite adventure buddies are her partner, Brian, her 11-year old son, Rye, and their golden retriever, Olli. Resources from this weeks conversation: Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest's website, Facebook, and Twitter Leave No Trace Center for Environmental Ethics Be sure to subscribe to Andy's new YouTube Channel- ‘Andy Neal: Plus Size Hiker”  We'd like to thank our sponsors: CNOC Outdoors making our adventures the best possible, simple, enjoyable, fulfilling and sustainable. Go to https://cnocoutdoors.com and be sure to use coupon code 'Hiker Podcast' for 10% off trekking poles or here:  CS Instant Coffee makers of environmentally sustainable and great tasting instant coffee for the trail. Use our affiliate link to get yours and help the show: https://cs-instant-coffee.peachs.co/a/andy-neal . Big thank you to our Patreon Patron's for supporting The Hiker Podcast: https://www.patreon.com/andynealplussizehiker Music licensed by muscbed.com This weeks opening song is “High Roads” by Upstate which you can listen on our Spotify Playlist: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/5lXwaTWf2f0CUnXiogxCLj?si=c12c1fa33cd94c64 Follow Host Andy Neal on Instagram: www.instagram.com/andyfilmsandhikes Email Andy andy@hikerpodcast.com Go to www.hikerpodcast.com for all our social media accounts, email, and all the ways to listen to The Hiker Podcast! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/hikerpodcast/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/hikerpodcast/support

The Yogi Roth Show: How Great Is Ball
Daniel Jeremiah: 2022 NFL Draft Preview

The Yogi Roth Show: How Great Is Ball

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 47:34


Host Yogi Roth talks with NFL Network's lead draft analyst, Daniel Jeremiah. They talk about Daniel's playing career, his path to where he is now, how the Pac-12 is viewed in the national landscape and Daniel breaks down a few of the Pac-12's elite prospects. That and much more; plus, stick around for another edition of 'The Postscript.'Come discover Daniel Jeremiah's 'It Factor' on "The It Factory: Pac-12 Football with Yogi Roth" presented by Zayo. You can also watch the episode streaming on Pac-12 Insider. Go to www.pac-12.com/insider for more information.Produced by T.J. Brassil in partnership with Blue Ox Films. Executive Produced by David Koppett, Erwin Tugadi and Yogi Roth.

The Nutrition Translator Podcast
120 - The Consequences of Misattunement | Dr. Gregory Devore, Ph.D

The Nutrition Translator Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 70:19


Rebroadcast: Dr Gregory Devore is a clinical psychologist practicing in Portland, Oregon. He specializes in anxiety disorders, depression, OCD, ADHD & relationships. His style is all about evoking greater personal fulfillment by helping his clients overcome fear and avoidance, discover embodiment & authenticity and find a sense of safety, confidence & wholeness within themselves to create more satisfying, healthy relationships. Topics Discussed: What is attunement and why is it so important? How misattunement impacts us in adulthood and our adult relationships. Why we keep repeating certain relationship patterns. The connection between co-dependency & narcissism. The importance of co-regulation & asking for help. How to avoid toxic relationships. How to create healthy, reciprocal relationships. The process of healing shame. Connect with Greg: Website: http://drdevorephd.com/

A Runner’s Life
#118 - Courn Ahn - Using your creativity as a way to create change in your community

A Runner’s Life

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 50:13


In episode 118, I spoke with Courn Ahn (she/her). Courn is a multidisciplinary designer, illustrator, and freelance creative based in Portland, Oregon. Her direct experience as a Korean American has largely shaped her career philosophy, serving as inspiration for the social justice advocacy present in her creative work. Through her freelance studio, she aims to provide accessible design services for small BIPOC business-owners and partner with organisations working directly in the equity space as a force for good. In recent years, Courn has found purpose in using art as a tool for activism, sharing weekly posts navigating intersectional topics through her Instagram account, @courtneyahndesign. In modern life, in the word failure gets a bad reputation, we talk about three areas where she's learned through “failure” which includes: Work Personal relationships Self-care Art is important for culture, it is one of the areas where it holds a mirror back to us as people, we talk about how: Art is a tool for her creativity Art is a tool for expressing her emotions/making your voice heard Art is a tool for making change/community power ————————————————————— Thank you to my patreons your help pays for editing, equipment and much more. If you value the content I deliver, please consider becoming a supporter of my podcast by donating via my patreon page. This helps me provide quality content. https://www.patreon.com/ARunnersLife --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/marcus-brown9/support

Beer Mile Podcast
Ep69 - Charlie Hunter on Joining Union Athletics Club, Training with Donavan Brazier & Craig Engels, Jakob Ingebrigtsen's Strange Warmup Routine, Oregon Glory Days with Cooper Teare and Cole Hocker

Beer Mile Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2022 80:37


Charlie Hunter talks about his decision to sign with Nike and join Pete Julian's Union Athletics Club to train alongside Donavan Brazier and Craig Engels. We also dive into his introduction to running in Australia, racing the Tokyo Olympics 800m, training with Cooper Teare and Cole Hocker at the University of Oregon, almost breaking the Australian 800m national record, his love for cereal, witnessing Jakob Ingebrigtsen's strange warmup routine, and a whole lot more. Follow @CharlieHunter_0 on the Insta. Watch the video version on Spotify or on YouTube: https://youtu.be/tm3B3RdRNlk Help us grow the show: Sauce us a 5-star rating on Apple Podcasts and Spotify Join our Patreon for exclusive, uncut and uncensored content + big giveaways: https://www.patreon.com/beermile Subscribe to Beer Mile Media on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/beermilemedia Brought to you by MANSCAPED: Use code BEERMILE for 20% Off + Free Shipping at MANSCAPED.COM Use code CROBERTSON20 for 20% Off at Athletic Brewing Beer: https://athletic-brewing-co.sjv.io/gbGWzA Topics: Introducing Charlie Hunter Training with Donavan Brazier and Craig Engels Joining Union Athletics Club Who else is joining Union Athletics Club? Pete Julian's personality and coaching style Does Craig Engels actually hate running? Transition to Professional Running Process of Going Pro Buying a Tesla - Dumbest purchase you've made Obsession with cereal Favorite cheat meal Union Athletics Club name and mission Challenging other clubs to race Charlie's start to running and coming to the University of Oregon College culture and partying Throwing shade on Sit & Kick Tokyo Olympics experience 2021 Oregon season of fast racing Almost breaking the Australia 800m national record Racing under pressure Awe factor of meeting world-class athletes at the Olympics Jakob Ingebrigtsen's warmup routine 800 or the 1500 in the future Favorite Aussie beer How do Donavan Brazier and Craig Engels get along US vs Australia slang Social Follow Beer Mile Media on Instagram Follow Beer Mile Media on Facebook Follow Beer Mile Media on Twitter Follow Beer Mile Media on TikTok Join the Beer Mile Strava Club Follow Chris on Strava Follow Chris on Instagram Follow Adam on Strava Follow Adam on Instagram --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/beer-mile-media/support

Clotheshorse
Episode 114: The Return of The Perfect Close (Visual Merchandising with Jessica + Michelle)

Clotheshorse

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2022 143:45


If you've ever bought an entire outfit after seeing it on a mannequin, visual merchandising has worked its magic on you. Visual merchandising uses floor plans, fixtures, displays, outfitting, signage and lots of creative talent to persuade customers to buy more. It's hard work, it rarely pays well, and it involves so much creative problem solving.  Jessica (Vino Vintage) and Michelle (Gentle Vibes Vintage) join Amanda to explain the ups and downs of being the person behind the magic of shopping. Also: Sarah calls the hotline to question what it means to "spark joy." Follow Sarah's no-buy journey on instagram:  @sarah.with.lessHave a retail story you want to share? A weird "interview" that was really just free work? Tell us about it! You can either call the Clotheshorse hotline at ‪(717) 925-7417‬ or record an audio message on your phone and send it via email.  Or you can just send an email: amanda@clotheshorse.world.Welcome Revive Athletics as a new sponsor of Clotheshorse (yay thank you)! . Use promo code “reviveit15” to get 15% off your first purchase at reviveathletics.com!And...please check out Nooworks!  Nooworks is all about making clothes in a sustainable way that make you look and feel good.If you want to meet other Clotheshorse listeners, join the Clotheshorsing Around facebook group.Want to support Clotheshorse *and* receive exclusive episodes and some swag? Then become a patron!You can also make a one-time contribution via Venmo to @crystal_visionsClotheshorse is brought to you with support from the following sustainable brands:Salt Hats:  purveyors of truly sustainable hats. Hand blocked, sewn and embellished in Detroit, Michigan.Republica Unicornia Yarns: Hand-Dyed Yarn and notions for the color-obsessed. Made with love and some swearing in fabulous Atlanta, Georgia by Head Yarn Wench Kathleen. Get ready for rainbows with a side of Giving A Damn! Republica Unicornia is all about making your own magic using small-batch, responsibly sourced, hand-dyed yarns and thoughtfully made notions. Slow fashion all the way down and discover the joy of creating your very own beautiful hand knit, crocheted, or woven pieces. Find us on Instagram @republica_unicornia_yarns and at www.republicaunicornia.com.Gentle Vibes:  We are purveyors of polyester and psychedelic relics! We encourage experimentation and play not only in your wardrobe, but in your home, too. We have thousands of killer vintage pieces ready for their next adventure! Picnicwear:  a slow fashion brand, ethically made by hand from vintage and deadstock materials - most notably, vintage towels! Founder, Dani, has worked in the industry as a fashion designer for over 10 years, but started Picnicwear in response to her dissatisfaction with the industry's shortcomings. Picnicwear recently moved to rural North Carolina where all their clothing and accessories are now designed and cut, but the majority of their sewing is done by skilled garment workers in NYC. Their customers take comfort in knowing that all their sewists are paid well above NYC minimum wage. Picnicwear offers minimal waste and maximum authenticity: Future Vintage over future garbage.Shift Clothing, out of beautiful Astoria, Oregon, with a focus on natural fibers, simple hardworking designs, and putting fat people first.  Discover more at shiftwheeler.comNo Flight Back Vintage:  bringing fun, new life to old things.  Always using recycled and secondhand materials to make dope ass shit for dope ass people.  See more on instagram @noflightbackvintageLate to the Party, creating one of a kind statement clothing from vintage, salvaged and thrifted textiles. They hope to tap into the dreamy memories we all hold: floral curtains, a childhood dress, the wallpaper in your best friend's rec room, all while creating modern sustainable garments that you'll love wearing and have for years to come. Late to the Party is passionate about celebrating and preserving textiles, the memories they hold, and the stories they have yet to tell. Check them out on Instagram!Vino Vintage, based just outside of LA.  We love the hunt of shopping secondhand because you never know what you might find! And catch us at flea markets around Southern California by following us on instagram @vino.vintage so you don't miss our next event!Gabriela Antonas is a visual Artist, an ethical trade fashion designer, but Gabriela Antonas is also a radical feminist micro-business.  She's the one woman band, trying to help you understand, why slow fashion is what the earth needs.  The one woman band, to help you build your brand ! She can take your fashion line from just a concept, and do your sketches, pattern making, grading, sourcing, cutting and sewing for you. Or the second option is  for those who aren't trying to start a business, and who just want ethical garments! Gabriela will create custom garments for you. Her goal is to help one person, of any size, at a time, including beyond size 40.   For inquiries about this serendipitous intersectional offering of either concept DM her on Instagram to book a consultation. Please follow her on Instagram, Twitter, and Clubhouse at @gabrielaantonasDylan Paige is an online clothing and lifestyle brand based out of St. Louis, MO. Our products are chosen with intention for the conscious community. Everything we carry is animal friendly, ethically made, sustainably sourced, and cruelty free. Dylan Paige is for those who never stop questioning where something comes from. We know that personal experience dictates what's sustainable for you, and we are here to help guide and support you to make choices that fit your needs.  Check us out at dylanpaige.com and find us on instagram @dylanpaigelifeandstyleLocated in Whistler, Canada, Velvet Underground is a "velvet jungle" full of vintage and second-hand clothes, plants, a vegan cafe and lots of rad products from other small sustainable businesses. Our mission is to create a brand and community dedicated to promoting self-expression, as well as educating and inspiring a more sustainable and conscious lifestyle both for the people and the planet.Find us on Instagram @shop_velvetunderground or online at www.shopvelvetunderground.comBlank Cass, or Blanket Coats by Cass, is focused on restoring, renewing, and reviving the history held within vintage and heirloom textiles. By embodying and transferring the love, craft, and energy that is original to each vintage textile into a new garment, I hope we can reteach ourselves to care for and mend what we have and make it last. Blank Cass lives on Instagram @blank_cass and a website will be launched soon at blankcass.com.Caren Kinne Studio:  Located in Western Massachusetts, Caren specializes in handcrafted earrings from found, upcycled, and repurposed fabrics as well as other eco-friendly curios,  all with  a hint of nostalgia, a dollop of whimsy, a dash of color and 100% fun.  Caren is an artist/designer who believes the materials we use matter. See more on Instagram @carenkinnestudioSt. Evens is an NYC-based vintage shop that is dedicated to bringing you those special pieces you'll reach for again and again. More than just a store, St. Evens is dedicated to sharing the stories and history behind the garments. 10% of all sales are donated to a different charitable organization each month. For the month of January, St. Evens is supporting Remake, a community of fashion lovers, women rights advocates, and environmentalists on a mission to change the industry's harmful practices on people and our planet. New vintage is released every Thursday at wearStEvens.com, with previews of new pieces and more brought to you on Instagram at @wear_st.evens.Thumbprint is Detroit's only fair trade marketplace, located in the historic Eastern Market.  Our small business specializes in products handmade by empowered women in South Africa making a living wage creating things they love like hand painted candles and ceramics! We also carry a curated assortment of  sustainable/natural locally made goods. Thumbprint is a great gift destination for both the special people in your life and for yourself! Browse our online store at thumbprintdetroit.com and find us on instagram @thumbprintdetroit.Country Feedback is a mom & pop record shop in Tarboro, North Carolina. They specialize in used rock, country, and soul and offer affordable vintage clothing and housewares. Do you have used records you want to sell? Country Feedback wants to buy them! Find us on Instagram @countryfeedbackvintageandvinyl or head downeast and visit our brick and mortar. All are welcome at this inclusive and family-friendly record shop in the country!Selina Sanders, a social impact brand that specializes in up-cycled clothing, using only reclaimed, vintage or thrifted materials: from tea towels, linens, blankets and quilts.  Sustainably crafted in Los Angeles, each piece is designed to last in one's closet for generations to come.  Maximum Style; Minimal Carbon Footprint

Dan Cable Presents
Episode 292: MLTZR

Dan Cable Presents

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2022 70:13


MLTZR (Alex Meltzer) is a Portland, Oregon based beat maker and multi-instrumentalist. I chatted with him about about his workflow, how using permitters can force creativity and focus to a project, as well as his new record 'Big Blocks' available now. To keep up with MLTZR. the sponsors for the episode, and the Dan Cable Presents Podcast, please check out the links below. -----------------------------------------Thank you to DistroKid for sponsoring this episode of the podcast. Use the link below to receive 30% off your first year of DistroKid services.  https://distrokid.com/?c=cable  www.producerowcafe.com www.north45bar.comhttps://mltzr.bandcamp.com/album/big-blocks INSTAGRAM: @almeltzerfaceoff@korgyandbass@north45bar@producerowcafe @dancablepresents @distrokid @vrtxmag   Email: dancablepresents@gmail.com Spotify Playlists: https://open.spotify.com/user/54u8tkp1mevtd0i3cz79qbp8l?si=-4NT4PWPSlSowoXQkJhlkA Venmo: Dan-Cable-PresentsPatreon:https://www.patreon.com/dancablepresents 

Science Friday
Epstein-Barr Virus and MS, Agrivoltaics, Ag School Influence, Social Cues From Saliva. Jan 21, 2022, Part 1

Science Friday

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 48:20


Scientists Are Working On A Universal COVID Vaccine As the Omicron wave of the COVID-19 pandemic continues to spike around the U.S., there are scientists working not on variant-specific boosters, but on a vaccine that might cover every possible strain, past and future. Called universal vaccines, they require a fundamentally different approach from a shot that would target Delta, Omicron, or any other variant. Instead, a universal vaccine would need to train the body to respond to something every variant has in common—or to fill in the blanks of any possible mutations. Vox senior science reporter Umair Irfan reports on the difficult path and ongoing work toward such a vaccine, and why the immune system's T cells and B cells, more than neutralizing antibodies, will dictate our long-term future with the virus. Plus how an undersea eruption near Tonga was one of the most documented volcanic explosions in history, new research assesses the vast toll of global antibiotic resistance, and more stories from the week.   New Research Links Epstein-Barr Virus to Multiple Sclerosis A group of scientists at Harvard University says they have made a major breakthrough in understanding multiple sclerosis. For years, they have been testing out a hypothesis that the Epstein-Barr virus causes multiple sclerosis, a chronic and incurable disease of the nervous system. (Epstein-Barr is the contagious virus responsible for mononucleosis.) Researchers analyzed a dataset of 10 million active-duty military members. They found that service members who contracted the Epstein-Barr virus were 32 times more likely to later be diagnosed with MS. The research was published in the journal Science. Ira is joined by Dr. Alberto Ascherio, professor of epidemiology and nutrition at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, in Boston, Massachusetts, to discuss his team's research and its broader implications.   Saliva Sharing Might Help Kids Identify Their Closest Relationships How do little kids understand who has a close relationship with them? One of the clues they use to figure it out is by noticing who they're swapping saliva with. The closest bonds are with the people who are giving them kisses, sharing their forks, and wiping their drool. Those are the findings of a recent study published in the journal Science. Ira is joined by Ashley Thomas, the study's lead author and a post doctoral fellow in the brain and cognitive sciences department at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, in Cambridge, Massachusetts.   Big Agriculture Schools Face Increasing Donor Conflicts Of Interest A major donor to the University of Illinois wondered what the heck was up. Robb Fraley, a top Monsanto executive at the time, emailed the dean of the agriculture college in 2018 complaining about a professor saying publicly that one of his company's flagship products was causing widespread damage to crops. Monsanto was also a major donor. Fraley accused the professor of being “biased” and “prone to exaggeration.” U of I officials had spent years courting Fraley, and they had listened to him before when he'd complained about a lack of progress on an endowed chair he'd funded. But the 2018 episode highlights potentially thorny situations for public universities, which have cultivated powerful agricultural corporations as donors while public funding has stagnated. Dicamba posed a particularly critical issue to Fraley. After all, he was as responsible as anyone for leading modern agriculture into using lab-designed seeds that could withstand spraying from weedkillers. That Monsanto-branded Roundup Ready pairing of biotechnology with glyphosate herbicide revolutionized grain farming around the world. When glyphosate lost its punch — after weeds grew resistant to Roundup — Monsanto shifted to teaming different genetically modified seeds with the dicamba herbicide. But farmers who'd not adopted the new genetically engineered seeds started complaining about “dicamba drift” and of seeing their crops perish from the effects of the herbicide migrating to their fields. So when U of I weed scientist Aaron Hager spoke about a controversy as big as any in commercial agriculture in ways that didn't sit well with Fraley, the university benefactor let the school know about his displeasure. Read the rest at sciencefriday.com.   Growing Plants—And Providing Solar Energy Food is one of our most basic needs. As the population of the world grows, we're going to need to grow more of it within the same amount of space. The United Nations estimates the world's population will grow by 2 billion people between now and 2050. Access to fresh food is already a problem in many countries, and will likely get worse with more mouths to feed. This is where the concept of agrivoltaics could create a massive change. This farming setup mixes water, energy, and plant growth all in one space. Solar panels collect energy from the sun's rays; underneath those panels is where the plants grow. The setup takes less water than the traditional way of farming, all-in-all creating a more sustainable way to grow food and create energy. Joining Ira to talk about the promise of agrivoltaics is Dr. Chad Higgins, associate professor of biological and ecological engineering at Oregon State University, in Corvallis, Oregon.  

Bertcast's podcast
# 501 - Celebrating 500 Episode's with Halston, Andrew & ME

Bertcast's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 97:52


Today, I sit down with my producer Halston and my cousin Andrew to celebrate 500 episodes of the Bertcast. From the tour bus in Portland, Oregon, we talk about our favorite moments, least favorite moments, we play clips that make us laugh the hardest, why we never released the Ari episode, and much more!    Follow Halston Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/halstonrays    Follow Andrew Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/iamahob      This episode is brought to you by Helix. Get up to $200 off all mattress orders and 2 free pillows at http://www.helixsleep.com/bert    This episode is also brought to you by Noom. Sign up for your trial today at http://www.noom.com/bertcast     This episode is also brought to you by Birddogs. Enter promo code “BERT” and get a free Whistle Tip Football at http://www.birddogs.com    This episode is also brought to you by Draft Kings.    For all TOUR DATE & MERCH click HERE: http://www.bertbertbert.com  Twitter: http://www.Twitter.com/bertkreischer  Facebook: http://www.Facebook.com/BertKreischer  Instagram: http://www.Instagram.com/bertkreischer  Youtube: http://www.Youtube.com/user/Akreischer 

Adam Carolla Show
Part 2: Jim Belushi on SNL, Cannabis, and the Blues Brothers (ACS Jan 20)

Adam Carolla Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 56:43


Adam chats with Jim Belushi 1-on-1 in Part 2 of today's podcast. The guys begin by discussing Jim's property out in Oregon. They also talk about the legalization and benefits of cannabis, Jim's favorite strains, and trying to educate consumers on what's happening in the marijuana industry. Later, Adam asks Jim about his time on Saturday Night Live, his relationship with his brother John, and becoming more philosophical with age. In the last part of the show, Adam and Jim chat about how cannabis can help aid in moving past trauma, love for the legendary ‘Blues Brothers' movie, and Jim's friendship with Dan Aykroyd. Please support today's sponsors! TommyJohn.com/ADAM The Jordan Harbinger Show Geico.com