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2019 single by Iggy Azalea

  • 11,458PODCASTS
  • 17,109EPISODES
  • 39mAVG DURATION
  • 9DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Nov 28, 2021LATEST
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Best podcasts about Started

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Latest podcast episodes about Started

Chains & Gears
S4 Ep48: Episode 2: Brittany Parffrey - MTB/Crit Specialist

Chains & Gears

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 35:03


Hope everyone had a safe and wonderful Thanksgiving! With some more time on my hands I was able to get a great recording in with Brittany. Started with the dirt on a MTB that did not quite fit her, she worked her way up to big time racing to now racing for a D1 crit team. On the side she is at UTSA for graduate school, racing for the team and won this season's Collegiate Nationals for her school. Just an FYI, listen in to hear Brittany's Team Announcement for 2022. Mentioned info: Her roots, intro to bikes, D1 crits, team announcement, UTSA cycling, Nationals, and more! Our Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/chainsgearspodcast/ Our Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/chainsgearspodcast/?ref=nf&hc_ref=ARShu25Wr5CLTiLrbWGT2Y7b3T0fT4hKInPfeueTY9j65DsD51rpbbZoySNVafdfZ_o Brittany's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/parf_inator/ Colavita Team: https://instagram.com/colavita_hellofresh?utm_medium 

World News with BK
Podcast#276: Russia mine explosion, Bulgaria bus disaster, Chaturbate girl shoots self in genitals

World News with BK

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 152:44


Started this week with the mining explosion in Russia that killed more than fifty, then went on to bus disasters in both Bulgaria and Mexico. Then it yet another India rectal air compressor death, Omicron variant panic, Solomon Islands protests, French soccer star sex tape extortion scandal, and a Chaturbate webcam model shoots self in vagina while doing sexual streaming. Music: West Side Story/"America"

Jentezen Franklin Podcast
How to Finish Stronger Than You Started

Jentezen Franklin Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021


You can find the faith to overcome and finish stronger than you started! You can do better than you’re doing right now. In “How to Finish Stronger Than You Started,” you’ll see that how your story began is far less important than the direction you’re traveling now. Are you moving toward God, or away from Him? Just because you had a bad start, or made some poor decisions along the way, doesn’t mean you have to walk out that destination. You can change the course of your future today!

Cougar Sports Saturday
Top 5: BYU Basketball Teams That Started Season 6-0

Cougar Sports Saturday

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 13:35


Producer Dallen Graff joins Mitch Harper and Matt Baiamonte for the weekly Top 5. This week, the guys look at the five times BYU basketball teams started a season 6-0. The list includes some of BYU's best teams, like the Jimmer-led squad in 2010-11. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Noob Spearo Podcast | Spearfishing Talk with Shrek and Turbo
NSP:175 Josh Bollen | Always Learning

Noob Spearo Podcast | Spearfishing Talk with Shrek and Turbo

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 102:09


Interview with Josh Bollen Today's episode is with Josh Bollen from Sydney! He has submitted several recipes to 99 Spearo Recipes and is passionate about cooking and eating food he's foraged or caught and foraged. He has a love for making food look good and when you see his recipes you will understand why! We chat about smoking fish, dry aging meat and the magic of vacuum packing and how to get the best and most out of your catch. Have a listen to this interview and stay tuned for 99 Spearo Recipes for his recipes and a ton more! We also chat about anxiety in diving, how to deal with it and ways to improve your experience of life. Enjoy listening and let us know your thoughts in the comments! You can support us and secure yourself a copy by supporting our campaign! What is the most unusual food you have foraged or caught yourself?   Important times: 00:13 Intro 02:04 Noober Stories 05:00 Welcome Josh! Always learning - what does that mean to you? 06:18 You have an interest in jewelry? 07:53 A passion for plating food 09:09 Connecting the catch with the food 11:16 Where are you in the world? 13:25 You have been vacuum packing food? 16:55 Fish wings 17:54 How long should fish be cooked for? 19:50 Food was your gateway drug into spearfishing 22:36 Started spearfishing in 2019 23:15 What appeals to you in spearfishing? What struggles have you had? 26:05 Observing nature and the underwater world 28:22 Bush food and a very underused plant: Pig Face 34:50 What was your first memorable fish? 35:50 Leather Jackets are great eating and some fish Josh avoids 37:17 Smoking fish: How do you do it? Controlling temperature, airflow, etc 43:09 Scary moments in your spearfishing and seeing sharks 45:59 What are your favourite species to hunt and how to hunt Blackspot Goatfish 49:57 Dry aging your fish - do you need a dedicated fridge? Moisture? How to hang them up, etc 56:03 Being thoughtful and intentional with your food and storage 58:02 99 Spearo Recipes: you submitted several recipes! 59:26 Octopus: tenderize it! 01:01:39 My Octopus Teacher and Seaspiracy 01:05:27 Deep dive chat about anxiety and diving 01:06:54 Risk vs reward 01:08:18 How do you stay calm and cope? 01:11:23 Do you have a mantra or ways of calming down? 01:12:34 Learn to distance yourself from your thoughts and make rational decisions 01:16:30 Risk/stress/discomfort has a place and a value in daily life 01:17:41 A life worth living 01:18:25 Keeping the connection to nature that our ancestors had 01:20:20 Funny stuff, dehydration and sea sickness 01:22:30 I use Aqualyte to cope 01:23:28 What's in your dive bag? Cressi wetsuit, Rob Allen speargun and roller guns, fin upgrades 01:31:12 DIY flashers 01:35:12 Spearo Q&A Where is your dream spearing destination? Favourite dive buddy? Single best piece of advice: SLOW DOWN! Describe the spearfishing experience: FREEDOM! 01:38:36 Outro Listen in and subscribe on iOS or Android   Important Links Noob Spearo Partners and Discount Codes . Use the code NOOBSPEARO save $20 on every purchase over $200 at checkout – Flat shipping rate, especially in AUS! – Use the code NOOB10 to save 10% off anything store-wide. Free Shipping on USA orders over $99 + Free Shipping with promo code NOOBSPEARO at ! #ad #manscapedpod | Simple, Effective, Dependable Wooden Spearguns. Use the Code NOOB to save $30 on any speargun:) use the code SPEARO to get 20% off any course and the code NOOBSPEARO to get 40% off any and all courses! Use the code NOOBSPEARO to save $25 on the full Penetrator Spearfishing Fin Range . 28-day Freediving Transformation (CODE: NOOB28 for 15% off) | Equalization Masterclass – Roadmap to Frenzel | Free Courses | Freediving Safety Course | How to Take a 25-30% Bigger Breath! | The 5 minute Freediver | Break the 10 Meter Barrier – Use the code NOOBSPEARO to save $ | Wickedly tough and well thought out gear! Check out their | ‘Spearo Dad' | ‘Girls with Gills' | ‘Jobfish Tribute' | Fishing Trips () Subscribe to the best spearfishing magazine in the world. International subscription available! . Listen to 99 Tips to Get Better at Spearfishing

Without A Country
Ep. 97: The Revolution May Have Started

Without A Country

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 134:21


Corinne Fisher and Shayne smith prepare for the coming revolution! Shayne does his homework and gives us a track by track review of Taylor Swift's 1989, we talk about "Minor Attracted Persons" formerly known as pedophiles, Kyle Rittenhouse is free and we have a lot to say about that, Trump is an honorary taekwondo master, Kevin Spacey owes people some serious money, books are being burned again, and so much more! Air Date: 11/23/21Support Our Sponsors!RockAuto.comYoDelta.comBlueChew.comRenaming Pedophilehttps://www.google.com/amp/s/torontosun.com/news/world/woke-watch-prof-says-lets-ditch-the-term-pedophile-for-minor-attracted-person/wcm/d6c50f5c-02f7-4ef5-9346-c76965b5f9b7/amp/Article Rogan Shared About Hating Groupshttps://www.psypost.org/2021/11/new-psychology-research-indicates-hatred-toward-collective-entities-inspires-meaning-in-life-62128/ampKyle Rittenhouse x BLMhttps://www.foxnews.com/politics/blm-disses-kyle-rittenhouse-supports-movementTrump (this one can literally just be a mention)https://metro.co.uk/2021/11/23/donald-trump-awarded-honorary-black-belt-vows-to-wear-taekwondo-suit-15647819/Kevin Spaceyhttps://variety.com/2021/tv/news/house-of-cards-kevin-spacey-arbitration-1235117425/MAIN STORIESCONWaukesha Christmas Parade Shootinghttps://www.foxnews.com/us/milwaukee-blm-activist-christmas-parade-attack-revolution-waukeshaLIBhttps://www.nytimes.com/2021/11/22/us/wisconsin-waukesha-parade.htmlBanning BooksLIBhttps://www.vice.com/en/article/jgm8nk/parents-banning-books-in-schoolsCONhttps://thehill.com/changing-america/respect/diversity-inclusion/582726-missouri-school-district-backtracks-ban-on-lgbtqSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Utah's Morning News
Shopping started long before Black Friday this year

Utah's Morning News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 11:13


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

JeffMara Paranormal Podcast
After His NDE He Started Photographing Entities In Smoke

JeffMara Paranormal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 59:25


Podcast guest 321 is Jock Spackman. Jock has had a near death experience where he fully understood the concept of no time and he has been creating art based on that concept ever since. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/jeffrey-s-reynolds/support

The She's The Owner Podcast
Episode 154 - Shit I wish I knew before I started

The She's The Owner Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 12:59


Female Startup Club
Dancer turned entrepreneur, Nude Barre Founder Erin Carpenter started her company with $3,000 of her savings. Now Serena Williams is an investor.

Female Startup Club

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 43:32


Today on the show we're learning from Erin Carpenter - the dancer turned entrepreneur behind Nude Barre. She bootstrapped this business for a good 10 years before things really started get veryyy interesting. We talk about that 10 year grind to overnight success. The investment she got from Serena Williams and 1 thing to remember about affiliates. Nude Barre is a high-performing bodywear brand redefining the concept of nude. Nude Barre carries the widest shade range on the market, leading the conversation around inclusivity and authentic representation in fashion today and was born from the firsthand frustrations and colorism that Erin experienced. Growing up as a Black woman and dancer, she experienced years of hardships finding hosiery that matched her skin tone, often spending hours dyeing her tights and “pancakeing” her shoes to meet the industry's requirement of “nude” undergarments.LINKS WE MENTION:Nude Barre's Instagram Erin's InstagramFemale Startup Club's InstagramDoone's InstagramIn partnership with Klaviyo, the best email marketing tool for ecommerce businesses.Female Startup Club's YouTubeFemale Startup Club's Private Facebook GroupSay hello to Doone: hello@femalestartupclub.comWebsite: Serena Ventures by Serena WilliamsPodcast: How I Built This with Guy Raz

Big Girl Money
87. 10 Things We Wish We Knew Before We Started Our Careers (LIVE) with Comcast

Big Girl Money

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 59:56


This episode is a recording of our live podcast with Comcast! We utilized our past podcast guests and network to come up with a list of 10 things we wish we had known before we started our careers (1:30 - 28:18). And you won't want to miss our Q&A at the end (28:18 - 59:55). If you're looking to shake up your next conference or professional development event contact us at www.biggirlmoney.com/contact.

Kevin McCullough Radio
20211124 - Back To Where It All Started For Health And Wellness Night!

Kevin McCullough Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 47:55


20211124 - Back To Where It All Started For Health And Wellness Night! by Kevin McCullough Radio

Greater Than Code
260: Fixing Broken Tech Interviews with Ian Douglas

Greater Than Code

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 64:32


01:01 - Ian's Superpower: Curiosity & Life-Long Learning * Discovering Computers * Sharing Knowledge 06:27 - Streaming and Mentorship: Becoming “The Career Development Guy” * The Turing School of Software and Design (https://turing.edu/) * techinterview.guide (https://techinterview.guide/) * twitch.tv/iandouglas736 (https://www.twitch.tv/iandouglas736) 12:01 - Tech Interviews (Are Broken) * techinterview.guide (https://techinterview.guide/) * Daily Email Series (https://techinterview.guide/daily-email-series/) * Tech vs Behavior Questions 16:43 - How do I even get a first job in the tech industry? * Tech Careers = Like Choose Your Own Adventure Book * Highlight What You Have: YOU ARE * Apply Anyway 24:25 - Interview Processes Don't Align with Skills Needed * FAANG Company (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Big_Tech) Influence * LeetCode-Style Interviews (https://leetcode.com/explore/interview/card/top-interview-questions-medium/) * Dynamic Programing Problems (https://medium.com/techie-delight/top-10-dynamic-programming-problems-5da486eeb360) * People Can Learn 35:06 - Fixing Tech Interviews: Overhauling the Process * Idea: “Open Source Hiring Manifesto” Initiative * Analyzing Interviewing Experiences; Collect Antipatterns * Community/Candidate Input * Company Feedback (Stop Ghosting! Build Trust!) * Language Mapping Reflections: Mandy: Peoples' tech journeys are like a Choose Your Own Adventure book. Keep acquiring skills over life-long learning. Arty: The importance of 1-on-1 genuine connections. Real change happens in the context of a relationship. Ian: Having these discussions, collaborating, and saying, “what if?” This episode was brought to you by @therubyrep (https://twitter.com/therubyrep) of DevReps, LLC (http://www.devreps.com/). To pledge your support and to join our awesome Slack community, visit patreon.com/greaterthancode (https://www.patreon.com/greaterthancode) To make a one-time donation so that we can continue to bring you more content and transcripts like this, please do so at paypal.me/devreps (https://www.paypal.me/devreps). You will also get an invitation to our Slack community this way as well. Transcript: ARTY: Hi, everyone. Welcome to Episode 260 of Greater Than Code. I am Arty Starr and I'm here with my fabulous co-host, Mandy Moore. MANDY: Thank you, Arty. And I'm here with our guest today, Ian Douglas. Ian has been in the tech industry for over 25 years and suggested we cue the Jurassic Park theme song for his introduction. Much of his career has been spent in early startups planning out architecture and helping everywhere and anywhere like a “Swiss army knife” engineer. He's currently livestreaming twice a week around the topic of tech industry interview preparation, and loves being involved in developer education. Welcome to the show, Ian. IAN: Thanks for having me. It's great to be here. MANDY: Awesome. So we like to start the show with our famous question: what is your superpower and how did you acquire it? IAN: Probably curiosity. I've always been kind of a very curious mindset of wanting to know how things work. Even as a little kid, I would tear things apart just to see how something worked. My parents would be like, “Okay, great. Put it back together.” I'm like, “I don't know how to put it back together.” So [chuckles] they would come home and I would just have stuff disassembled all over the house and yeah, we threw a lot of stuff out that way. But it was just a curiosity of how things work around me and that led into computer programming, learning how computers worked and that just made the light bulb go off in my mind as a little kid of, I get to tell this computer how to do something, it's always going to do it. And that just led of course, into the tech industry where you sign up for a career in the tech industry, you're signing up for lifelong learning and there's no shortage of trying to satiate that curiosity. I think it's just a never-ending journey, which is fantastic. ARTY: When did you first discover computers? What was that experience like for you? IAN: I was 8 years old. I think it was summer, or fall of 1982. I believe my dad came home with a Commodore 64. My dad was always kind of a gadget nut. Anything new and interesting on the market, he would find an excuse to buy and so he, brought home this Commodore 64 thinking family computer, but once he plunked it down in front of me, it sort of became mine. I didn't want to share. I grew up in Northern Canada way, way up in the Northwest territories and in the wintertime, we had two things to do. We could go play hockey, or we'd stay indoors and not freeze. So I spent a lot of time indoors when I wasn't playing hockey—played a lot of hockey as a kid. But when I was home, I was basically on this Commodore 64 all the time, playing games and learning how the computer itself worked and learning how the programming language of it worked. Thankfully, the computer was something I had never took apart. Otherwise, it would have been a pile of junk, but just spending a lot of time just learning all the ins and outs. Back then, the idea was you could load the software and then you type a run command and it would actually execute the program. But if you type a list, it would actually show you all the source code of the program as well and that raised my curiosity, like what is all this symbols and what all these words mean? In the back of the Commodore 64 book, it had several chapters about the basic programming language. So I started picking apart all these games and trying to learn how they worked and then well, what would happen if I change this instruction to that and started learning how to sort of hack my games, usually break the game completely. But trying to hack it a little bit; what if I got like an extra ship, an extra level, or what if I change the health of my character, or something along those lines? And it kind of snowballed from there, honestly. It was just this fascination of, oh, cool, I get to look at this thing. I get to change it. I get to apply it. And then of course, back in the day, you would go to a bookstore and you'd have these magazines with just pages and pages and pages of source code and you'd go home and you type it all in expecting something really cool. At the end of it, you run it and it's something bland like, oh, you just made a spreadsheet application. It's like, “Oh, I wanted a game.” Like, “Shucks.” [laughter] But as a little kid, that kind of thing wasn't very enticing, but I'm sure as an adult, it's like, oh cool, now I have a spreadsheet to track budgeting, or whatever at home. It was this whole notion of open source and just sharing knowledge and that really stuck with me, too and so, as I would try to satiate this innate curiosity in myself and learn something, I would go teach it to a friend and it's like, “Hey, hey, let me show you what I just did. I learned how to play this thing on the piano,” or “I learned how to sing this song,” or “I learned how to use a magnifying glass to cook an ant on the sidewalk.” [chuckles] Whatever I learned, I always wanted to turn around and teach it to somebody else. I would get sometimes more excitement and joy out of watching somebody else do it because I taught them than the fact that I was able to learn that and do it myself. And so, after a while it was working on the computer became kind of a, oh yeah, okay, I can work on the computer, I can do the thing. But if I could turn around and show somebody else how to do that and then watch them explore and you watch that light bulb go off over their head, then it's like, oh, they're going to go do something cool with that. Just the anticipation of how are they going to go use that knowledge, that really stuck with me my whole life. In high school doing little bits of tutoring here and there. I was a paid tutor in college. Once I got out of college and got into the workplace, again, just learning on my own and then turning around and teaching others led into running my own web development business where I was teaching some friends how to do web development because I was taking on so much work that I had to subcontract it the somebody where I wasn't going to meet deadlines and so, I subcontracted them. That meant that I got to pay my friends to help me work this business. And so, that kind of kicked off and then I started learning well, how to servers work and how does the internet work and how do I run an email server on all this stuff? So just never-ending stream of knowledge going on in the internet and then just turning around and sharing that knowledge and keeping that community side of things building up over time. MANDY: Very cool. So in your bio, it said you're streaming now so I'm guessing that's a big part of what you do today with the streaming. So what are you streaming? IAN: So let's see, back in 2014, I started getting involved in mentorship with a local code school here in Denver called The Turing School of Software and Design. It's the 7-month code program and they were looking for someone that could help just mentor students. They were teaching Ruby on Rails at the time. So I got involved with them. I was working in Ruby at SendGrid at the time where I was working, who was later acquired by Twilio. And I'm like, “Yeah, I got some extra time. I can help some people out.” I like giving back and I like the idea of tutoring and teaching. I started that mentorship and it quickly turned into hey, do any of our mentors know anything about resumes and the hiring and interviewing and things like that. And by that point, I had been the lead engineer. I had done hiring. I hired several dozen engineers at SendGrid, or helped hire several dozen people at SendGrid. And I'm like, “Yeah, I've looked at hundreds and thousands of resumes.” Like, “What can I help with?” So I quickly became the career development guy to help them out and over time, the school started developing their career development curriculum and I like to think I had a hand in developing some of that. 3 years later, they're like, “You just want a job here? Like you're helping so many students, you just want to come on staff?” And so, I joined them as an instructor, taught the backend program, had a blast, did that for almost 4 full years. And then when I left Turing in June of 2021, I thought, “Well, I still want to be able to share this knowledge,” and so, I took all these notes that I had been writing and I basically put it all onto a website called techinterview.guide. When I finished teaching, I'm like, “Well, I still miss sharing that knowledge with people,” and I thought, “How else can I get that knowledge out there in a way that is scalable and manageable by one human being?” And I thought, “Well, I'll just kind of see what other people are doing.” Fumbled around on YouTube, watched some YouTube videos, watched people doing livestreaming on LinkedIn, livestreaming on Facebook, livestreaming on YouTube and trying to think could I do that? Nah, I don't know if I could do that. A friend of mine named Jonan Scheffler, he currently works at New Relic, he does a live stream. So I was hanging out on his stream one night and it was just so much fun seeing people interact and chat and how they engage the people in the chat and answering questions for them. I'm like, “I wonder if I could do that.” The curiosity took over from there and you can imagine where that went; went way down some rabbit holes on how to set up a streaming computer. Started streaming and found out that I wasn't very good at audio routing, [chuckles] recording things, and marketing, all that kind of stuff. But I kind of fumbled my way through it and Jonan was very generous with his time to help me straighten some things out and it kind of took off from there. So I thought, “Well, now I've got a platform where I can share this career development advice having been in the industry now for 25 years. Now, I've been director of engineering. I'm currently the director of engineering learning at a company. I've got an education background now as an instructor for several years. I've been doing tons of mentoring.” I love to give back and I love to help other people learn a thing that's going to help improve their life. I think of it like a ripple effect, like I'm not going to go out and change the world, but I can change your world and that ripple effect is going to change somebody else's world and that's going to change somebody else's world. So that's how I see my part in all of this play out. I'm not looking to be the biggest name in anything. I'm just one person with a voice and I'm happy to share my ideas and my perspectives, but I'm also happy to have people on my stream that can share their ideas and perspectives as well. I think it's important to hear a lot of perspectives, especially when it comes to things like job hunt, interview prep, and how to build a resume. You're going to see so much conflicting advice out there like, “This is the way you should do it,” and someone else will be like, “No, this is the way you should do it.” Meanwhile, I'm on the sidelines going, “You can do it all of that way.” Just listen to everybody's advice and figure out how you want to build your resume and then that's your resume. It doesn't have to look like the way I want it, or the way that someone else wants it; it can look how you want it to look. This is just our advice kind of collectively. So the livestream took off from there and I've got only a couple of hundred followers, or so on Twitch, but it's been a lot of fun just engaging with chat and people are submitting questions to me all the time. So I do a lot of Q&A sessions, like ask me anything sessions and it's just been a ton of fun. ARTY: That's awesome. I love the idea of focusing on one person and how you can make a difference in that one person's life and how those differences can ripple outward. That one-on-one connection, I feel like if we try and just broadcast and forget about the individuals, it's easy for the message and stuff to just get lost in ether waves and not actually make that connection with one person. Ultimately, it's all those ones that add up to the many. IAN: Definitely. Yeah. ARTY: So can you tell us a little bit more about the Tech Interview Guide and what your philosophy is regarding tech interviews? IAN: The tech interview process in – well, I mean, just the interview process in general in the tech industry is pretty broken. It lends itself very well to people who come from position and privilege that they can afford expensive universities and have oodles and oodles of free time to go study algorithms for months and months and months to go jump through a whole bunch of hoops for companies that want four, or five, six rounds of interviews to try to determine whether you're the right fit for the company and it's super broken. There are a lot of companies out there that are trying to change things a little bit and I applaud them. It's going to be a tough journey, for sure. Trying to convince companies like hey, this is not working out well for us as candidates trying to apply for jobs. As a company, though I understand because I've been a hiring manager that you need to be able to trust the people that you're hiring. You need to trust that they can actually do the job. Unfortunately, a lot of the tech interview process does not adequately mimic what the day-to-day responsibility of that job is going to be. So the whole philosophy of me doing the Tech Interview Guide is just an education of, “Hey, here's my perspective on what you're likely to face as a technical interview. These are the different stages that you'll typically see.” I have a lot of notes on there about how to build a resume, how to build a cover letter, thoughts on building a really big resume and then how to trim it down to one page to go apply for a particular job. How to write a cover letter that's customized to the business to really position yourself as the best candidate for that role. And then some chapters that I have yet to write are going to be things like how do you negotiate once you get an offer, like what are some negotiation tips. I've shared some of them live on the stream and I've shared a growing amount of information as I learn from other people as well, then I'll turn around and I'll share that on the stream. The content that's actually on the website right now is probably 3, 4 years old, some of it at least and so, I'm constantly going back in and I'm trying to revamp that material a little bit to kind of be as modern as possible. I used to want to go a self-publish route where I actually made a book. Several of my friends have actually gone through the process of actually making a book and getting it published. I'm like, “Oh, I want to do that, too. My friends are doing that. I could do that, too,” and I got looking into it. It's like, okay, it's an expensive, really time-consuming process and by the time I get that book on a shelf somewhere, a lot of the information is going to be out of date because a lot of things in the tech industry change all the time. So I decided I would just self-publish an online book where I can just go in and I can just constantly refresh the information and people can go find whatever my current perspective is by going to the website. And then as part of the website, I also have a daily email series that people can sign up for. I'm about to split it into four mailing lists. But right now, it's a single mailing list where I'm presenting technical questions and behavioral questions that you're likely to get asked as a web developer getting into the business. But I don't spend time in the email telling you how to answer the question; what I do instead is I share from the interviewer's perspective. This is why I'm asking you this question. This is what I hope to hear. This is what's important for me to hear in your answer. Because there's so many resources out there already that are trying to tell you how to craft the perfect answer, where I'm trying to explain this is why this question is important to us in the first place. So I'm taking a little bit different perspective on how I present that information and to date I've sent out, I don't know, something like 80,000 emails over a couple of years to folks that have signed up for that, which has been really tremendous to see. I get a lot of good feedback from that. But again, that information it doesn't always age well and interview processes change. I'm actually going through the process right now in the month of November to rewrite a lot of that information, but then also break out into multiple lists and so, where right now it's kind of a combination of a little bit of technical questions, a little bit of behavioral questions, a little bit of procedural, like what is an interview and so on. Now I'm actually going to break them out into separate lists of this list is all just technical questions and this list is all just behavioral questions and this list is going to be general process and then the process of going through the interview and how to do research and so on. And then the last one is just general questions and answers and a lot of that is stemmed from the questions that people have submitted to me that I answered on the live stream. So it all kind of packages up together. MANDY: That's really cool. I'd like to get into some of the meat of the material that you're putting out here. IAN: Yeah. MANDY: So as far as what are some of the biggest questions that you get on your street? IAN: Probably the most popular question I get—because a lot of the people that come by the stream and find the daily email list are new in the industry and they're trying to find that first job. And so by far, the number one question is, how do I even get a job in the industry right now? I have no experience. I've got some amount of education, whether it's an actual CS degree, or something similar to a CS degree, or they've gone through a bootcamp of some kind. How do I even get that first job? How do I position myself? How do I differentiate myself? How do I even get a phone call from a company? That's a lot of what's broken in the industry. Everybody in the industry right now wants people with experience, or they're saying like, “Oh, this is a “entry-level role,” but you must have 3 to 4 years' experience.” It's like, well, it's not entry level if you're asking for experience; it can't be both. All they're really doing is they're calling it an entry-level role so they don't have to pay you as much. But if they want 3-, or 4-years' experience, then you should be paying somebody who has 3-, or 4-years' experience. So the people writing these job posts are off their rocker a little bit, but that's by far, the number one question I get is how do I even get that first job. Once you get that first job and you get a year, year and a half, 2 years' experience, it's much easier to get that second job, or third job. It's not like oh, I'm going to quit my job today and have a new job tomorrow. But the time to get that next job is usually much, much shorter than getting this first job. I know people that have gone months and months, or nearly a year just constantly trying to apply, getting ghosted, like not getting any contact whatsoever from companies where they're sending in resumes and trying to apply for these jobs. Again, it's just a big indication of what's really broken in our industry that I think could be improved. I think that there's a lot of room for improvement there. MANDY: So what do you tell them? What's your answer for that? How do they get their first job? How do you get your first job? IAN: That's a [chuckles] good question. And I hate to fall back on the it depends answer. It really does depend on the kind of career that you want to have. I tell people often in my coaching that the tech industry is really a choose your own adventure kind of book. Like, once you get that job a little bit better, what you want your next job to be and so, you get to choose. If you get your first job as a QA developer, or you get that first job as a technical writer, or you get that first job doing software development, or you get that first job in dev ops and then decide, you don't want to do that anymore, that's fine. You can position yourself to go get a job doing some other kind of technical job that doesn't have to be what your previous job was. Now, once you have that experience, though recruiters are going to be calling you and saying, “Hey, you had a QA role. I've also got a QA role,” and you just have to stand firm and say, “No, that's not the direction I'm taking my career anymore. I want to head in this direction. So I'm going to apply for a company where they're looking for people with that kind of direction.” It really comes down to how do you show the company what you bring to the company and how you're going to make the company better, how are you going to make the team better, what skill, experience, and background are you bringing to that job. A lot of people, when they apply for the job, they talk about what they don't have. Like, “Oh, I'm an entry level developer,” or “I only went to a bootcamp,” or “I don't know very much about some aspect of development like I don't know, test driven development,” or “I don't really understand object-oriented programming,” or “I don't know anything about Docker, but I want to apply for this job.” Well, now you're highlighting what you don't have and to get that first job, you have to highlight what you do have. So I often tell people on your resume, on your LinkedIn, don't call yourself a junior developer. Don't call yourself an entry level. Don't say you're aspiring to be. You are. You are a developer. If you have studied software development, you can write software, you're a software developer. Make that your own title and let the company figure out what level you are. So just call yourself a developer and start applying for those jobs. The other advice that I tend to give people is you don't have to feel like you meet a 100% of the requirements in any job posts. As a hiring manager, when I read those job posts often, it's like, this is my birthday wish list. I hope I can find this mythical unicorn that has all of these traits [laughter] and skills and characteristics and that person doesn't exist. In fact, if I ever got a resume where they claim to have all that stuff, I would immediately probably throw the resume in the bin because they're probably lying, because either they have all those skills and they're about to hit me up for double the salary, or they're just straight up lying that they really don't have all those skills. As a hiring manager, those are things that we have to discern over time as we're evaluating people and talking with them and so on. But I would say if you meet like 30 to 40% of those skills, you could probably still apply. The challenge then is when you get that phone call, how do you convince them that you're worth taking a shot, that you're worth them taking the risk of hiring you, helping train you up in the skills that you don't have. But on those calls, you still need to present this is what I do bring to the company. I'm bringing energy, I'm bringing passion, and I'm bringing other experience and background and perspectives on things, hopefully from – just increasing the diversity in tech, just as an example. You're coming from a background, or a walk of life that maybe we don't currently have on the team and that's great for us and great for our team because you're going to open our eyes to things that we might not have thought of. So I think apply anyway. If they're asking for a couple of years' experience and you don't have it, apply anyway. If they're asking for programming languages you don't know, apply anyway. The languages you do know, a lot of that skill is going to transfer into a new language anyway. And I think a lot of companies are really missing out on the malleability and how they can shape an entry-level developer into the kind of developer and kind of engineer that they want to have on the team. Now you use that person as an example and say, “Now we've trained them with the process that we want, with the language and the tools that we want. They know the company goals.” We've trained them. We've built them up. We've invested in them and now everybody else we hire, we're going to hold to that standard and say, “If we're going to hire from outside, this is what we want,” and if we hire someone who doesn't have that level of skill, we're going to bring them up to that skill. I think a lot of companies are missing out on that whole aspect of hiring, that is they can take a chance on somebody who's got the people skills and the collaboration skills and that background and the experiences of life and not necessarily the technical skills and just train them on the technical skills. I went on a rant on this on LinkedIn the other day, where I was saying the return on investment. If a company is spending months and months and months trying to hire somebody, that's expensive. You're paying a recruiter, you're paying engineers, you're paying managers to screen all these people, interview all these people, and you're not quite finding that 100% skill match. Well, what if you just hired somebody months ago, spend $5,000 training them on the skills they didn't have, and now you're months ahead of the game. You could have saved yourself so much money so much time. You would have had an engineer on the team now. And I think a lot of companies are kind of missing that point. Sorry, I know I get very soapbox-y on some of the stuff. ARTY: I think it's important just highlighting these dynamics and stuff that are broken in our industry and all of the hoops and challenges that come with trying to get a job. You mentioned a couple of things on the other side of one, is that the interview processes themselves don't align to what it is we actually need skill-wise day-to-day. What are the things that you think are driving the creation of interviews that don't align with the day-to-day stuff? Like what factors are bringing those things so far out of alignment? IAN: That's a great question. I would say I have my suspicions. So don't take this as gospel truth, but from my own perspective, this is what I think. The big, big tech companies out there, like the big FAANG companies, they have a very specific target in mind of the kind of engineers that they want on their team. They have studied very deep data structures and algorithms, the systems thinking and the system design, and all this stuff. Like, they've got that knowledge, they've got that background because those big companies need that level of knowledge for things like scaling to billions of users, highly performant, and resilient systems. Where the typical startup and typical small and mid-sized company, they don't typically need that. But those kinds of companies look at FAANG companies and go, “We want to be like them. Therefore, we must interview like them and we must ask the same questions that they ask.” I think this has this cascading effect where when FAANG companies do interviews in a particular way, we see that again, with this ripple effect idea and we see that ripple down in the industry. Back in the early 2000s, mid 2000s—well, I guess right around the time when Google was getting started—they were asking a lot of really oddball kinds of questions. Like how many golf balls fit in a school bus and those were their interview challenges. It's like, how do you actually go through the calculation of how many golf balls would fit in a school bus and after a while, I think by 2009, they published an article saying, “Yeah, we're going to stop asking those questions. We weren't getting good signals. Everybody's breaking down those problems the same way and it wasn't really helpful.” Well, leading up to that point, everyone else was like, “Oh, those are cool questions. We're going to ask those questions, too,” and then when Google published that paper, everyone else was like, “Yeah, those questions are dumb. We're not going to ask those questions either.” And then they started getting into what we now see as like the LeetCode, HackerRank type of technical challenges being asked within interviews. I think that there's a time and place for some of that, but I think that the types of challenges that they're asking candidates to do should still be aligned with what the company does. One criticism that I've got. For example, I was looking at a technical challenge from one particular company that they asked this one particular problem and it was using a data structure called Heap. It was, find a quantity of location points closest to a target. So you're given a list of latitude, longitude values, and you have to find the five latitude and longitude points that are closest to a target. It's like, okay and so, I'm thinking through the challenge, how would I solve that if I had to solve it? But then I got thinking that company has nothing to do with latitude and longitude. That company has nothing to do with geospatial work of any kind. Why are they even asking that problem? Like, it's so completely misaligned that anybody they interview, that's the first thing that's going to go through their mind as a candidate is like, “Why are they asking me this kind of question?” Like, “This has nothing to do with the job. It had nothing to do with the role. I don't study global positioning and things like that. I know what latitude and longitude are, but I've never done any kind of math to try to figure out what those things would be and how you would detect differences between them.” Like, I could kind of guess with simple math, but unless you've studied that stuff, it's not going to be this, “Oh yeah, sure, no problem. It's this formula, whatever.” We shouldn't have to expect that candidates coming to a business are going to have that a, formula memorized, especially when that's not what your company does. And a lot of companies are like, “Oh, we're got to interview somebody. Quick, go to LeetCode and find a problem to ask them.” All you're going to do is you're going to bias your interview process towards people that have studied those problems on LeetCode and you're not actually going to find people that can actually solve your day-to-day challenges that your company is actually facing. ARTY: And instead, you're selecting for people that are really good at things that you don't even need. [chuckles] It's like, all right! It totally skews who you end up hiring toward people that aren't even necessarily competent in the skills that they actually need day-to-day. Like you mentioned FAANG companies need these particular skills. I don't even think that for resilience, to be able to build these sort of systems, and even on super hardcore systems, it's very seldom that you end up writing algorithmic type code. Usually, most of the things that you deal with in scaling and working with other humans and stuff, it's a function of design and being able to organize things in conceptual ways that make sense so that you can deconstruct a complex, fuzzy problem into little pieces that make sense and can fit together like a jigsaw puzzle. I have a very visual geometric way of thinking, which I find actually is a core ability that makes me good at code because I can imagine it visually laid out and think about the dependencies between things as like tensors between geographically located little code bubbles, if you will. IAN: Sure. ARTY: Being able to think that way, it's fundamentally different than solving algorithm stuff. But that deconstruction capability of just problem breakdown, being able to break down problems, being able to organize things in ways that make sense, being able to communicate those concepts and come up with abstractions that are easy enough for other people on your team to understand, ideally, those are the kinds of engineers we want on the teams. Our interview processes ought to select for those day-to-day skills of things that are the common bread and butter. [chuckles] IAN: I agree. ARTY: What we need to succeed on a day-to-day basis. IAN: Yeah. We need the people skills more than we need the hard technical skills sometimes. I think if our interview process could somehow tap into that and focus more on how do you collaborate, how do you do code reviews, how do you evaluate someone else's code for quality, how do you make the tradeoff between readability and optimization—because those are typically very polarized, opposite ends of the scale—how do you function on a team, or do you prefer to go heads down and just kind of be by yourself and just tackle tasks on your own? I believe that there's a time and place for that, too and there are personality types where you prefer to go heads down and just have peace and quiet and just get your work done and there's nothing wrong with that. But I think if we can somehow tap into the collaborative process as part of the interview, I think it's going to open a lot of companies up to like, “Oh, this person's actually going to be a really great team member. They don't quite have this level of knowledge in database systems that we hope they'd have, but that's fine. We'll just send them on this one-week database training class that happens in a week, or two and now they'll be trained.” [overtalk] MANDY: Do they want to learn? IAN: Right. Do they want to learn? Are they eager to learn? Because if they don't want to learn, then that's a whole other thing, too. But again, that's something that you can screen for. Like, “Tell me what you're learning on the side, or “What kinds of concepts do you want to learn?” Or “In this role, we need you to learn this thing. Is that even of interest to you?” Of course, everyone's going to lie and say, “Yeah,” because they want the paycheck. But I think you can still narrow it down a little bit more what area of training does this person need. So we can just hire good people on the team and now our team is full of good people and collaborative, team-based folks that are willing to work together to solve problems together and then worry about the technical skills as a secondary thing. MANDY: Yeah. I firmly believe anybody can learn anything, if they want to. I mean, that's how I've gotten here. IAN: Yeah, for sure. Same with me. I'm mostly self-taught. I studied computer engineering in college, so I can tell you how all the little microchips in your computer work. I did that for the first 4 years of my career and then I threw all that out the window and I taught myself web development and taught myself how the internet works. And then every job I had, that innate curiosity in me is like, “Oh, I wonder how e-commerce works.” Well, I went and got an e-commerce job, it's like, okay, well now I wonder how education works and I got into the education sector. Now, I wonder how you know this, or that works and so, I got into financial systems and I got into whatever and it just kind of blew my mind. I was like, “Wow, this is how all these things kind of talk to each other,” and that for me was just fascinating, and then turning around and sharing that knowledge with other people. But some people are just very fixed mindset and they want to learn one thing, they want to do that thing, and that's all they know. But I think, like we kind of talked about early in the podcast, you sign up for a career in this industry and you're signing up for lifelong learning. There's no shortage to things that you can go learn, but you have to be willing to do it. MID-ROLL: Rarely does a day pass where a ransomware attack, data breach, or state sponsored espionage hits the news. It's hard to keep up with all this and also to know if you're protected. Don't worry, Kaspersky's got you covered. Each week their team looks at the latest news, stories, and topics you might have missed during the week on the Transatlantic Cable Podcast. Mixing in-depth discussion, expert guests from around the world, a pinch of humor, and all with an easy to consume style - be sure you check them out today. ARTY: What kind of things could we do to potentially influence the way hiring is done and these practices with unicorn skilled searches and just the dysfunctional aspects on the hiring side? Because you're teaching all these tech interview skills for what to expect in the system and how to navigate that and succeed, even though it's broken. But what can we do to influence the broken itself and help improve these things? IAN: That's a great question. Breaking it from the inside out is a good start. I think if we can collectively get enough people together within these, especially the bigger companies and say like, “Hey, collectively, as an industry, we need to do interviewing differently.” And then again, see that ripple effect of oh, well, the FAANG companies are doing it that way so we're going to do it that way, too. But I don't think that's going to be a fast change by any stretch. I think there are always going to be some types of roles where you do have to have a very dedicated, very deep knowledge of system internals and how to optimize things, and pure algorithmic types of thinking. I think those kinds of jobs are always going to be out there and so, there's no fully getting away from something like a LeetCode challenge style interview. But I think that for a lot of small, mid-sized, even some large-sized companies, they don't have to do interviewing that way. But I think we can all stand on our soapbox and yell and scream, “Do it differently, do it differently,” and it's not going to make any impact at all because those companies are watching other companies for how they're doing it. So I think gradually, over time, we can just start to do things differently within our own company. And I think for example, if the company that I was working at, if we completely overhauled our interview process that even if we don't hire somebody, if someone can walk away from that going, “Wow, that was a cool interview experience. I've got to tell my friends about this.” That's the experience that we want when you walk away from the company if we don't end up hiring. If we hire you, it's great. But even if we don't hire you, I want to make sure that you've still got a really cool interview experience that you enjoyed the process, that it didn't just feel like another, “Okay, well, I could have just grind on LeetCode for three months to get through that interview.” I don't ever want my interviews to feel like that. So I think as more of us come to this understanding of it's okay to do it differently and then collectively start talking about how could we do it differently—and there are companies out there that are doing it differently, by the way. I'm not saying everyone in the industry is doing all these LeetCode style interviews. There are definitely companies out there that are doing things differently and I applaud them for doing that. And I think as awful as it was to have the pandemic shut everything down to early 2020, where no hiring happened, or not a lot of hiring happened over the summer, it did give a lot of companies pause and go, “Well, hey, since we're not hiring, since we got nobody in the backlog, let's examine this whole interview process and let's see if this is really what we want as a company.” And some companies did. They took the time, they took several months and they were like, “You know what, let's burn this whole thing down and start over” as far as their interview process goes. Some of them completely reinvented what their interview process was and turned it into a really great process for candidates to go through. So even if they don't get the job, they still walk away going, “Wow, that was neat.” I think if enough of us start doing that to where candidates then can say, “You know what, I would really prefer not to go through five, or six rounds of interviews” because that's tiring and knowing that what you're kind of what you're in for, with all the LeetCode problems and panel after panel after panel. Like, nobody wants to sit through that. I think if enough candidates stand up for themselves and say, “You know what, I'm looking for a company that has an easier process. So I'm not even going to bother applying.” I think there are enough companies out there that are desperately trying to hire that if they start getting the feedback of like you know what, people don't want to interview with us because our process is lousy. They're going to change the process, but it's going to take time. Unfortunately, it's going to drag out because companies can be stubborn and candidates are also going to be stubborn and it's not going to change quickly. But I think as companies take the step to change their process and enough candidates also step up to say, “Nah, you know what, I was going to apply there,” or “Maybe I got through the first couple of rounds, but you're telling me there's like three more rounds to go through? Nah, I'm not going to bother.” Companies are now starting to see candidates ghost them and walk away from the interview process because they just don't want to be bothered. I think that's a good signal for a company to take a step back and go, “Okay, we need to change our process to make it better so the people do want to apply and enjoy that interview process as they come through.” But it's going to take a while to get there. ARTY: Makes me think about we were talking early on about open source and the power of open source. I wonder with this particular challenge, if you set up a open source hiring manifesto, perhaps of we're going to collaborate on figuring out how to make hiring better. Well, what does that mean? What is it we're aiming for? We took some time to actually clarify these are the things we ought to be aiming for with our hiring process and those are hard problems to figure out. How do we create this alignment between what it is we need to be able to do to be successful day-to-day versus what it is we're selecting for with our interview process? Those things are totally out of whack. I think we're at a point, at least in our industry, where it's generally accepted that how we do interviewing and hiring in these broken things—I think it's generally accepted that it's broken—so that perhaps it's actually a good opportunity right now to start an initiative like that, where we can start collaborating and putting our knowledge together on how we ought to go about doing things better. Even just by starting something, building a community around it, getting some companies together that are working on trying to improve their own hiring processes and learning together and willing to share their knowledge about things that are working better, such that everybody in the industry ultimately benefits from us getting better at these kinds of things. As you said, being able to have an interview process that even if you don't get the job, it's not a miserable experience for everyone involved. [chuckles] Like there's no reason for that. IAN: Yeah. MANDY: That's how we – I mean, what you just explained, Arty isn't that how we got code of conducts? Everybody's sitting down and being like, “Okay, this is broken. Conferences are broken. What are we going to all do together?” So now why don't we just do the same thing? I really like that idea of starting an open source initiative on interviewing. Like have these big FAANG companies be like, “I had a really great interview with such and such company.” Well, then it all spirals from there. I think that's super, super exciting. ARTY: Yeah. And what is it that made this experience great? You could just have people analyze their interview experiences that they did have, describe well, what are the things that made this great, that made this work and likewise, you could collect anti-patterns. Some of the things that you talked about of like, are we interviewing for geolocation skills when that actually has absolutely nothing to do with our business? We could collect these things as these funky anti-patterns of things so that people could recognize those things easier in there because it's always hard to see yourself. It's hard to see yourself swinging. IAN: An interesting idea along those lines is what if companies said like, “Hey, we want the community to help us fix our interview process. This is who we are, this is what our business does. What kinds of questions do you think we should be asking?” And I think that the community would definitely rally behind that and go, “Oh, well, you're an e-commerce platform so you should be asking people about shopping cart implementations and data security around credit cards and have the interview process be about what the company actually does.” I think that that would be an interesting thing to ask the community like, “What do you think we should be asking in these interviews?” Not that you're going to turn around and go, “Okay, that's exactly what we're going to do,” but I think it'll give a lot of companies ideas on yeah, okay, maybe we could do a take-home assignment where you build a little shopping cart and you submit that to us. We'll evaluate how you did, or what you changed, or we're going to give you some code to start with and we're going to ask you to fix a bug in it, or something like, I think that there's a bigger movement now, especially here in Canada, in the US of doing take-home assignments. But I think at the same time, there are pros and cons of doing take-home assignments versus the on-site technical challenges. But what if we gave the candidate a choice as part of that interview process, too and say, “Hey, cool. We want to interview you. Let's get through the phone screen and now that you've done the phone screen, we want to give you the option of, do you want to do a small take-home assignment and then do a couple of on-site technical challenges? Do you want to do a larger take-home and maybe fewer on-site technical challenges?” I think there's always going to be some level of “Okay, we need to see you code in front of us to really make sure that you're the one that wrote that code.” I got burned on that back in 2012 where I thought somebody wrote some code and they didn't. They had a friend write it as their take-home assignment and so, I brought them in for the interview and I'm like, “Cool, I want you to fix this bug,” and they had no idea what to do. They hadn't even looked at the code that their friend wrote for them it's like, why would you do that? So I think that there's always going to be some amount of risk and trust that needs to take place between the candidates and the companies. But then on the flip side of that, if it doesn't work out, I really wish companies would be better about giving feedback to people instead of just ghosting them, or like, “Oh, you didn't and pass that round. So we're just not even going to call you back and tell you no. We're just not ever just going to call.” The whole ghosting thing is, by far, the number one complaint in the tech industry right now is like, “I applied and I didn't even get a thanks for your resume. I got nothing,” or maybe you get some automated reply going, “We'll keep you in mind if you're a match for something.” But again, those apple looking at tracking systems are biased because the developers building them and the people reading the resumes are going to have their own inherent bias in the search terms and the things that they're looking for and so on. So there's bias all over the place that's going to be really hard to get rid of. But I think if companies were to take a first step and say like, “Okay, we're going to talk to the community about what they would like to see the interview process be,” and start having more of those conversations. And then I think as we see companies step up and make those changes, those are going to be the kinds of companies where people are going to rally behind them and go, “I really want to work there because that interview process is pretty cool.” And that means the company is – well, it doesn't guarantee the company's going to be cool, but it shows that they care about the people that are going to work there. If people know that the company is going to care about you as an employee, you're far more likely to want to work there. You're far more likely to be loyal and stay there for a long term as opposed to like oh, I just need to collect a paycheck for a year to get a little bit of experience and then job hop and go get a better title, better pay. So I think it can come down to company loyalty and stuff, too. MANDY: Yeah. Word of mouth travels fast in this industry. IAN: Absolutely. MANDY: And to bring up the code of conduct thing and now people are saying, “If straight up this conference doesn't have a code of conduct, I'm not going.” IAN: Yeah. I agree. It'll be interesting to see how something like this tech interview overhaul open source idea could pick up momentum and what kinds of companies would get behind it and go, “Hey, we think our interview process is pretty good already, but we're still going to be a part of this and watch other companies step up to.” When I talked earlier about that ripple effect where Google, for example, stopped asking how many golf balls fit in a school bus kind of thing and everyone else is like, “Yeah, those questions are dumb.” We actually saw this summer, Facebook and Amazon publicly say, “We're no longer going to ask dynamic programming problems in our interviews.” It's going to be interesting to see how long that takes to ripple out into the industry and go, “Yeah, we're not going to ask DP problems either,” because again, people want to be those big companies. They want to be billion- and trillion-dollar companies, too and so, they think they have to do everything the same way and that's not always the case. But there's also something broken in the system, too with hiring. It's not just the interview process itself, but it's also just the lack of training. I've been guilty of this myself, where I've got an interview with somebody and I've got back-to-back meetings. So I just pull someone on my team and be like, “Hey, Arty, can you come interview this person?” And you're like, “I've never interviewed before. I guess, I'll go to LeetCode and find a problem to give them.” You're walking in there just as nervous as the candidate is and you're just throwing some technical challenge at them, or you're giving them the technical challenge that you've done most recently, because you know the answer to it and you're like, “Okay, well, I guess they did all right on it. They passed,” or “I think they didn't do well.” But then companies aren't giving that feedback to people either. There's this thinking in the industry of oh, if we give them feedback, they're going to sue us and they're going to say it's discriminatory and they're going to sue us. Aline Lerner from interviewing.io did some research with her team and literally nobody in recent memory has been sued for giving feedback to candidates. If anything, I think that it would build trust between companies and the candidates to say, “Hey, this is what you did. Well, this is what we thought you did okay on. We weren't happy with the performance of the code that you wrote so we're not moving forward,” and now you know exactly what to go improve. I was talking to somebody who was interviewing at Amazon lately and they said, “Yeah, the recruiter at Amazon said that I would go through all these steps,” and they had like five, or six interviews, or something to go through. And they're like, “Yeah, and they told me at the end of it, we're not going to give you any feedback, but we will give you a yes, or no.” It's like so if I get a no, I don't even find out what I didn't do well. I don't know anything about how to improve to want to go apply there in the future. You're just going to tell me no and not tell me why? Why would I want to reapply there in the future if you're not going to tell me how I'm going to get better? I'm just going to do the same thing again and again. I'm going to be that little toy that just bangs into the wall and doesn't learn to steer away from the wall and go in a different direction. If you're not going to give me any feedback, I'm just going to keep banging my head against this wall of trying to apply for a job and you're not telling me why I'm not getting it. It's not helpful to the candidate and that's not helpful to the industry either. It starts affecting mental health and it starts affecting other things and I think it erodes a lot of trust between companies and candidates as well. ARTY: Yeah. The experience of just going through trying to get a job and going through the rejection, it's an emotional experience, an emotionally challenging experience. Of all things that affect our feels a lot, it's like that feeling of social rejection. So being able to have just healthier relationships and figuring out how to see another person as a human, help figure out how you can help guide and support them continuing on their journey so that the experience of the interview doesn't hurt so much even when the relationship doesn't work out, if we could get better at those kinds of things. There's all these things that if we got better at, it would help everybody. IAN: I agree. ARTY: And I think that's why a open source initiative kind of thing maybe make sense because this is one of those areas that if we got better at this as an industry, it would help everybody. It's worth putting time in to learn and figure out how we can do better and if we all get better at it and stuff, there's just so many benefits and stuff from getting better at doing this. Another thing I was thinking about. You were mentioning the language thing of how easy it is to map skills that we learned from one language over to another language, such that even if you don't know the language that they're coding in at a particular job, you should apply anyway. [chuckles] I wonder if we had some data around how long it takes somebody to ramp up on a new language when they already know similar-ish languages. If we had data points on those sort of things that we're like, “Okay, well, how long did it actually take you?” Because of the absence of that information, people just assume well, the only way we can move forward is if we have the unicorn skills. Maybe if it became common knowledge, that it really only takes say, a couple months to become relatively proficient so that you can be productive on the team in another language that you've never worked in before. Maybe if that was a common knowledge thing, that people wouldn't worry about it so much, that you wouldn't see these unicorn recruiting efforts and stuff. People would be more inclined to look for more multipurpose general software engineering kinds of skills that map to whatever language that you're are doing. That people will feel more comfortable applying to jobs and going, “Oh, cool. I get the opportunity to learn a new language! So I know that I may be struggling a bit for a couple months with this, but I know I'll get it and then I can feel confident knowing that it's okay to learn my way through those things.” I feel if maybe we just started collecting some data points around ramp up time on those kind of things, put a database together to collect people's experiences around certain kind of things, that maybe those kinds of things would help everyone to just make better decisions that weren't so goofy and out of alignment with reality. IAN: Yeah, and there are lots of cheat sheets out there like, I'm trying to remember the name of it. I used to have it bookmarked. But you could literally pull up two programming languages side by side in the same browser window and see oh, if this is how you do it in JavaScript, this is how you do it on Python, or if this is how you write this code in C++, here's how you do it in Java. It gives you a one-to-one correlation for dozens, or hundreds of different kinds of blocks of code. That's really all you need to get started and like you said, it will take time to come proficient to where you don't have to have that thing up on your screen all the time. But at the same time, I think the company could invest and say, “You know what, take a week and just pour everything you've got into learning C Sharp because that's the skill we want you to have for this job.” It's like, okay, if you are telling me you trust me and you're making me the job offer and you're going to pay me this salary and I get to work in tech, but I don't happen to have that skill, but you're willing to me in that skill, why would I not take that job? You're going to help me learn and grow. You're offering me that job with a salary. Those are all great signals to send. Again, I think that a lot of companies are missing out and they're like, “No, we're not going to hire that person. We're just going to hold out until we find the next person that's a little bit better.” I think that that's where some things really drop off in the process, for sure is companies hold out too long and next thing they know, months have gone by and they've wasted tons of money when they could have just hired somebody a long time ago and just trained them. I think the idea of an open source collective on something like this is pretty interesting. At the same time, it would be a little subjective on “how quickly could someone ramp up on a, or onboard on a particular technology.” Because everybody has different learning styles and unless you're finding somebody to curate – like if you're a Ruby programmer and you're trying to learn Python, this is the de facto resource that you need to look at. I think it could be a little bit subjective, but I think that there's still some opportunity there to get community input on what should the interview process be? How long should it really be? How many rounds of interviews should there be from, both the candidates experience as well as the company experience and say, as a business, this is why we have you doing these kinds of things. That's really what I've been to teach as part of the Tech Interview Guide and the daily email series is from my perspective in the business, this is why. This is why I have you do a certain number of rounds, or this is why I give you this kind of technical challenge, or this is why I'm asking you this kind of question. Because I'm trying to find these signals about you that tell me that you're someone that I can trust to bring on my team. It's a tough system when not many people are willing to talk about it because I think a lot of people are worried that others are going to try to game the system and go, “Oh, well, now that I know everything about your interview process, I know how to cheat my way through it and now you're going to give me that job and I really don't know what I'm doing.” But I think that at the same time, companies can also have the higher, slow fire, fast mentality of like, “All right, you're not cutting it.” Like you're out right away and just rehire for that position. Again, if you're willing to trust and willing to extend that offer to begin with. If it doesn't work out, it doesn't work out. It's a business decision; it's not a personal thing. But it's still devastating to the person when they don't get the job, or if they get fired right away because they're not pulling their weight, but if they're cheating their way through it, then they get what they deserve to. MANDY: Awesome. Well, I think that's a great place to put a pin in this discussion. It is definitely not a great place to end it. I think we should head over to our reflection segment. For me, there were so many things I wrote down. I loved that you said that people's tech journey is like a choose your own adventure. You can learn one thing and then find yourself over here and then the next thing you know, you find yourself over here. But you've picked up all these skills along the way and that's the most important thing is that as you go along this journey, you keep acquiring these skills that ultimately will make you the best programmer that you can be. Also, I really like that you also said something about it being a lifelong learning. Tech is lifelong learning and not just the technical skills. It's the people skills. It's the behavioral skills. Those are the important skills. Those skills are what ultimately it comes down to being in this industry is, do you have the desire to learn? Do you have the desire to grow? I think that should be one of the most important things that companies are aware of when they are talking to candidates that it's not about can this person do a Fibonacci sequence. It's can they learn, are they a capable person? Are they going to show up? Are they going to be a good person to have in the office? Are they going to be a light? Are they going to be supportive? Are they going to be caring? That's the ultimate. That right there for me is the ultimate and thank you for all that insight. ARTY: Well, I really, really loved your story, Ian at the very beginning of just curiosity and how you started your journey, getting into programming and then ended up finding ways to give back and getting really excited about seeing people's light bulbs go off and how much joy you got from those experiences, connecting with another individual and making that happen. I know we've gotten on this long tangent of pretty abstract, big topics of just like, here's the brokenness in the industry and what are some strategies that we can solve these large-scale problems. But I think you said some really important things back of just the importance of these one-on-one connections and the real change happens in the context of a relationship. Although, we're thinking about these big things. To actually make those changes, to actually make that difference, it happens in our local context. It happens in our companies. It happens with the people that we interact with on a one-on-one basis and have a genuine relationship with. If we want to create change, it happens with those little ripples. It happens with affecting that one relationship and that person going and having their own ripple effects. We all have the power to influence these things through the relationships with the individuals around us. IAN: I think my big takeaway here is we have been chatting for an hour and just how easy it is to have conversation about hey, what if we did this? How quickly it can just turn into hey, as a community, what if? And just the willingness of people being in the community, wanting to make the community better,

The Remote Real Estate Investor
How Mariusz started with 10K and became a millionaire with microcap stocks

The Remote Real Estate Investor

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 34:53


Mariusz Skonieczny is the founder of MicroCap Explosions. He is also the author of 11 books on the subject of investing. He graduated Indiana University in 2003 with a finance degree. From 2003 to 2008, he was in the residential and comercial real estate industry as an apprasier and broker. During the 2008/2009 financial crisis, he left the industry to focus exclusively on stock market investing. In 2009, he started with  $10,000. By 2019, his account reached $1 million or 100x since the beginning. By the end of 2021, it reached $7 million. In this episode, Mariusz tells us about his journey, his process and how you can employ this powerful investment strategy.  --- Transcript Before we jump into the episode, here's a quick disclaimer about our content. The Remote Real Estate Investor podcast is for informational purposes only, and is not intended as investment advice. The views, opinions and strategies of both the hosts and the guests are their own and should not be considered as guidance from Roofstock. Make sure to always run your own numbers, make your own independent decisions and seek investment advice from licensed professionals. Hey, everyone,   Michael: Welcome to another episode of The Remote Real Estate Investor. I'm Michael Albaum. And today with me, I have Mariusz from Micro Cap Explosions. And he's gonna be talking to us today about how he utilized micro cap stocks to become a millionaire. And what are some things that we as everyday individual investors can look out for to do the same. So let's get into it.   Hey, Mariusz, thank you so much for taking the time and joining me today. I really appreciate you coming on.   Mariusz: Yeah, thank you very much Michael.   Michael: My pleasure. So you've got kind of a unique background and have done quite a lot of things both in real estate and the stock market. So for all the listeners who don't know who you are, can you give us a little bit of a background on? Where did you come from? And what have you done in the real estate and stock market sectors?   Mariusz: Okay, so yeah, it's a little unique. I, I am a full time investor right now full time micro cap investor focused on small companies. So mostly in the stock market, on the secondary exchanges, which I will get into more in a minute. But I started off in real estate. Yes. So I graduated college in 2003. And that was around the time where the Poor Dad Rich Dad books were coming out. And so he kind of got me interested in real estate, I read them and I was like, Yeah, I want to be financially free. But of course, I didn't have any money. So I figured what the best way to start in real estate, it's to kind of learn how to value real estate. Okay.   So I became a real estate appraiser. And I did this residential appraising and then I moved up to commercial real estate and I appraised apartments, office industrial, mobile, home parks, you know, anything associated with income producing properties. And then at some point, I went into the broker side, so I worked in a group under in Marcus Miller chap that sold apartments in the Midwest. And so I worked there a little bit. And then, but during this entire time that I was doing real estate, I was also investing in the stock market, learning about Warren Buffett, and, and when the financial crisis hit in 2008 2009, I, I said to my boss, I'm leaving, I want to go full time into the stock market, because I see opportunities. And, and I didn't really have the passion for real estate the way I did for, for the stock market investing. So I just, you know, left the industry, but there's so many similarities between between them, but that's kind of like, you know, a little shot this summary.   So, from 2009, literally, January 1 2009. That's what I entered the stock market. And so now it's like 12-13 years. So I started it with 10,000. At that point, that was actually from a sale of an apartment. I had a and then so over this 12 year period, that 10,000 I turned it into six, 7 million now over this, you know, 12 year period?   Michael: Holy smokes, have you calculated what that return is, in terms of percentage, it's insane.   Mariusz: You know, I don't really I don't really calculate the percentages, because in the in the hedge fund world, financial world, everybody likes to say, Oh, I do this much. This much return per year, per month, you know, I don't really look at it. I don't compare myself to the market. Because when I do compare myself to the market, that's when you do stupid things like, oh, you know, I need to keep or how did I do this month? It's just like, forget it. I don't care. I really, people are really surprised that I don't look at the market in general and how I do and I really don't I have no idea what the S&P is doing, how much did How would you know what was in the other quarter? Because I am much more patient, I am much better investor, if I just focus on myself my ideas, you know, and if I beat the market, one quarter, or it doesn't matter to me is so yeah. So I couldn't even tell you. I just know, you know, what I started and what I have, and, you know, I don't look at it like that.   Michael: Oh, that's awesome. What a unique perspective. And so you were mentioning that you are a micro cap investor. Can you explain to our listeners what that is?   Mariusz: Okay, when everybody talks about the stock market, they talk about NASDAQ, s&p 500 New York Stock Exchange just CNBC, you turn it on, Apple Tesla Gamestop right. those popular names, that's what they think of the stock market. But people don't realize that there are many, many different exchanges out there, not just NASDAQ, not just New York Stock Exchange. And there are secondary exchanges that cater to maybe smaller companies or venture companies. And, for example, OTC markets in the US, it's not even an exchange, or TSX Venture, Toronto Stock Exchange venture or Canadian stock exchange, or AIM in London, those exchanges a cater to smaller companies that wouldn't qualify to be on NASDAQ, or maybe companies that are international and they want to access North America.   But their secondary exchanges and not many people pay attention to them. And when you're talking about smaller companies, anything between like 100 million market cap? They are they are hated and frowned upon by the financial industry. There are penny stocks don't touch them. They're risky. And that. So those companies don't get a lot of attention. And, and to be fair, I would say yeah, 80 to 90% of these companies trading at these exchanges, I wouldn't touch either because you know, they might be looking for gold or trying to find a cure for this or that or, you know, cannabis or you name it. Yeah, I wouldn't touch those companies.   But among those 10 to 20 of percent of the companies, there are some real, really interesting companies there might be up and coming. But they have they have revenues, they have real customers, but nobody's paying attention to them. Nobody is paying attention to them. And I can take my time, study them, figure out what's going on. And maybe they are on the way to to NASDAQ maybe they are in three years going to upload or whatever, why can get them when nobody's paying attention. And then when they do come on NASDAQ, you know, they're gonna get repriced and I feel like being in that space. I feel like I am, you know, playing a game that's easy to win. Because think about, and it's not that I want to be in the game, I am there because I have very little competition, because what's my competition? Retail, retail investors or institutions? Right? These are the two entities, right?   Well, what's retail doing? Well, they're chasing Tesla, GameStop, Bitcoin, right? Apple, Microsoft, I mean, that's where they're, they're chasing that they're busy. Institutions. Well, institutions are in the game of gathering assets under management, because they get paid a percentage of what they manage. So in order for them to make money, they have to manage lots, lots, lots and lots of money, billions. And if you manage billions, what are you going to go and find this tiny little thing? $10 million? Market cap? No, because you would have to find like, 1000s of those companies, and there is not 1000s Of those, there's maybe a handful of interesting opportunities, but you too big, you're too fat, you have to go after the big ones. So that, so retail is out, institutions are out. And like who is there? Yeah, some mom and pop investors or some micro cap investors, but there's not a lot of them. So right away from the start, I am playing a game where there's barely any competition.   And if I do the, if I play the game, right, if I choose the right companies, if I do the right work, and then then, you know, my chances of winning the game are very high compared to playing where everyone else is playing. What kind of advantage do I have investing in Microsoft when there's 60? Other analysts looking at it? Zero. Can I get on the phone and get to see on the phone? Absolutely no chance. But with the smaller companies, so many times? They don't they don't have any analyst coverage, zero, absolutely zero. And then I can pick up the phone and the CEO will answer the phone. And it will help me and answer the questions that I need answered.   Michael: And so when you're picking up the phone and calling these people, what kind of questions are you answering? I mean, can you give us an idea or someone who's interested in kind of following in your footsteps? What kind of due diligence what kind of research is helpful to do if someone doesn't even know where to begin? If someone's ever invested in as Tesla, you know, how could they go after one of these micro cap companies?   Mariusz: Okay, so first thing, what I'll do is, let's say I'm interested, and that's what I did with, I'll go through every company on the exchange, I'll go like recently, I went to the Canadian stock exchange, and there's only there's only like four 700 companies listed on Canadian Stock Exchange. And, and when I say Canadian stock exchange, people think oh, it's Canadian companies. No, it's not Canadian companies. It's most of the companies like they serve you, us. They have stores or clients in the US, they just trade on Canadian Stock Exchange because the listing fees are so low compared to NASDAQ and they are at the development stage or where they are. They would rather pay $250,000 to be listed there now versus going on NASDAQ and spending million or two, so it's but they might be US companies.   And so I went through every company 700 one by one. And because like I said, 8080 to 90% are something that I'm not interested. So if it's mining or oil and gas, like, No, thank you, or if it's cannabis, no, thank you, or we're gonna find a cure for cancer. Yeah, right? No, no, thank you. So I go go through them, you know, one by one and eliminate the ones that I know I'm not interested. And then from from that 700, I narrowed it down to maybe like 50. And then from that 50, I'm like, okay, these are real companies that have real products, real customers. And then let's say I have, you know, narrowed down to five or, or two.   So, so then at that point, I'm like, Okay, I like these companies. Now, I want to know, what they are about. So of course, I'm going to read what's publicly available. But that's not enough, in my opinion, with the smaller companies, because let's face it smaller, they are riskier, right? So if the industry says it's toxic, and this and that, okay, they're riskier, so I need to do more work. So after reading the public information on these companies, I will get on the phone, and I will call the customers, I will call the customers and say, Hey, why are you using this company? You know, what kind of problems? Is this product solving for you? How does it compare to the competitors, so I'll find out firsthand from the customers why they are using this product.   Now, if the product is good, and the feedback is great, then I know, okay, therefore real, therefore real. And now I understand what's going on. And of course, I will call the management, I will usually talk to the CEO, at few board members, current or past directors, I'll try to go to LinkedIn to find some employees, former employees are good, because they'll tell you all the dirt that you know. So you know, after you, you get on the phone, and you talk to us individuals, you really start to learn the story of is this company really special? Is there something there that I should get involved in? And this is the kind of research that we'll do on these companies?   Michael: That makes total sense? And how do you find out who their customers are and get their contact information? I mean, what does that look like?   Mariusz: Well sometimes it's easier than others, because usually, sometimes they will list in the description of the business, they will list what kind of customers they have. Or sometimes you just know who the customers are, because you can Google them. Or maybe there's not that many players. So it's, you know, there's ways but it's not always the same way. Like for example, recently, I was looking at a company that is in the business of providing software for governmental agencies, to help them manage like health safety for restaurants. So, you know, think of government agency that has to make sure that all the restaurants comply with the regulations?   Well, it's not that hard to get a list of health inspection agencies in the United States. And you just, you know, call one by one and see who who answers the phone.   Michael: Interesting. And then when you're calling the company members themselves, board member CEO, what does that script look like? You say, Hey, I'm a potential investor, I'm interested in buying your stock. What does that look like?   Mariusz: That's pretty much it. You I call them up and I say, Hey, I'm looking at your company. This looks interesting. You know, tell me about it. Me sell me on the idea. Tell me how you got involved in the company. What's your story? You know, is there anything I'm missing here? And any usually, usually successful people, you might think that they're busy, too busy to talk to you, but they're kind of lonely. Like, they're just out there running the company, and someone calls them out of blue. Like, they'll talk to you. And yeah, like, I barely had anyone that didn't want to talk to me, and they'll talk and talk and talk. And then the next thing, you know, you have their cell phone number. So when you have questions, you can just call them and, and you know, it's about like establishing the relationship.   You, you first. It's amazing what you can learn, especially with the small companies. And I'm not saying like you're trying to get some kind of insider information. You're not, you're just trying to learn about it. But come on, you're having a conversation, right? Like, I don't know what you can tell me. He doesn't know what he can tell me. You always learn more than you should.   Michael: Yeah, yeah. No, I that's what I found in my past career. Working as a fire protection engineer, if you ask open ended questions, it's amazing what people will share with you, especially if it's a good conversation, if it's a good working relationship. You're so right. And I think that people don't give other people enough credit for what they might share. So that's, that's a really interesting tip.   Mariusz: Yeah. And you know, when you read about when you read about companies on paper, that they, you know, they tell you what the lawyers allowed them to tell you. And but when you actually phoned somebody up, and you really get to understand the strategy, they're thinking, Where are they going, why are they doing this? It's just, it puts the whole picture together the whole thesis, but by doing those kinds of work,   Michael: It makes total sense. But submersion. Do you square with the fact that you have your own opinions, biases, and then if you're getting the CEO on the phone, I would imagine that most CEOs are convicted, and are semi convincing that their business idea is a great one, and it's going somewhere, Otherwise, they wouldn't be the CEO. So how do you square those two with each other?   Mariusz: So So that's, that's why I'm talking with either individuals, like, you know, the directors or, or the customers, or, or even the competitors. Because like, recently, for example, I call I call this I didn't term this, but it's called a scuttlebutt research by talking to the individuals that so, so we have this company that recently came out on my public channel, Globex, Globex. And what they have is a is a private email and messaging application that like, doesn't do any data mining, no big tech hosted in Switzerland. So you know, everything against, you know, data mining. And so, when I first started researching this company, I sent out an email to my group at micro cap explosions, which is the website that I run.   And I said, Hey, you know, I don't know much about this space, but some of you guys might be in this space. So help me and also, my girlfriend's brother is a security expert. So so I figured I would get some feedback. And oh, my goodness, 20 people give me feedback, any, and you couldn't have two people agree on the same thing. Especially when you get two techies in a room talking about open source is better or closed source is better, or this is like, Oh, my goodness. But that's what you deal with as an investor is like, you get all of these feedbacks, good, bad average. And then you have to decide on your own, from all that feedback from the CEO selling on the company, from this guy telling you this is horrible from this guy telling you it might succeed, you have to make a choice, you have to make a call.   And then from that, what I realized that at some point is like, Okay, I'm not, there's no way I can figure out if the technology is the best, or this or that there's no way. But what I can't figure out is whether people are going to buy the product, and what is going on through the head of the people that are buying the product. And if they're gonna buy the product, if the if it solves their problem. That's all that matters. Because the critics do not generate revenues. It's a customer to generate revenue. So it's like, if nine people are complaining and don't like it, but one that one buys it, will all I have all all the company has to do is find those ones, right? And then and then everything will be fine.   Michael: That's such a great insight. That's such a great insight. So how does someone get started in this if they have a full time job, because they can go invest in REITs passively, they can go invest in the stock market passively. But it sounds like this, there's a little bit more legwork a little bit more research involved. So how does one get started doing this kind of work?   Mariusz: Well, I would say, I would say study businesses. That's number one. Because I'm not really, I don't really care what the company trades. As long as the business is good, the business is going to do well. So study businesses, figure out what businesses work, what is a good business? What is an average business, what is a better business? And start with that. Because if you go, if you go to the secondary exchanges, like you said, if you pick up the phone, every single CEO will sell you, and you will think is the great idea every time. It's like, you know, watching a commercial and buying everything that you see on TV.   So you kind of have to know, you know, you have to know what is good, what has potential, and, you know, probably should probably have some mistakes be under your belt too. But yeah, it definitely, this kind of investing definitely is more, it takes more work, but it's more rewarding at the same time. So like if the best way to passively do it. I'm gonna, you know, plug myself in here is you know, my website microcapexplosions.com. I mean, I share that research with my people. So, so they, they get the benefit of my research. And you know, of course they pay me for it. But if you want to do it on your own, you know, study businesses and then go to these secondary exchanges and study to come look at the companies one by one, don't screen. Forget about screening, just look at them one by one, it's like 700 of them, you can look at 700 companies when 90 90% of them are junk and you're just gonna throw them away just after looking at them. So it doesn't take that long, but But it's definitely worth it if you if you want to put in the work.   Michael: Okay. And of that 80 and 90% that you think is junk. I mean, I know you mentioned cannabis oil and gas mining. Are there other sectors that are definite non starters for you or are ones that you think specifically Yes, these are these are you No, always gonna be a go for you.   Mariusz: Well, I like I like to look at, I like to own companies that are there are decent. So in other words, what are good businesses? Well, businesses that have recurring revenues, they're better than the non recurring revenues, because on January you don't start from scratch. So that's that. I like businesses that have some kind of switching costs once a client signs up. They know it's a little bit painful to switch. I like businesses that just kind of like Warren Buffett talks about with Moats. So they have some kind of brand, brand awareness, and maybe that brand is getting better and better and better. Or maybe they have what's called the network effect, as more people use the service more others want to use it like like auctions, you know, you go to auctions, when a lot of people are using the auction, you want to sell it in action when there's a lot of buyers, so, and I like also businesses that are not capital intensive. So in order to grow revenues, it doesn't cost that much.   So that's one of the things that turned me off from real estate is that it's so capital intensive. If you have a four unit apartment building, and you want to grow that revenue, well, you have to buy another apartment building or you have to add units. Yes, you can raise price, of course, you can raise price, but there is limit to it as so it's capital intensive. And yes, you can leverage and borrow and all that. But it's capital intensive. And if you compare it to the company that I talked about Globex, for example, which has an email, messaging, communication, well, they have a server in Switzerland, okay. It doesn't matter, they can have 100,000 people on it or a million people. It doesn't you, they don't have to get another server when they get a million more users. They just, you know, they might at some point need another server, but it's very scalable. And it doesn't cost that much to grow revenues.   So so these are the kinds of businesses that I look for. So I've done it for so long that when I look at a business, I can tell right away, well, is it recurring? Is it a good business? Is it a is it an average or decent business? And so yeah,   Michael: Makes total sense. And you mentioned that real estate is so capital intensive, and I agree, it oftentimes can be, do you see the two asset classes, stock market and real estate as totally separate and mutually exclusive? Or are you finding that it's easy enough to invest in both of them simultaneously?   Mariusz: I'm actually, so I started off in real estate, then I went to the stock market. And now I'm looking back at real estate again, because it has a place in somebody's portfolio, you know, I would like to have I like mobile home parks. And actually, next week, I'm going to California to look at some mobile home parks. Because I would like to create a revenue stream, take some of my profits that I made in the stock market and put it into more like real assets that can generate some income.   And so so it has a place but I think where people go, you know, wrong with this constant debate. And actually, in my first book that I wrote, why are we so clueless about the stock market? There's a chapter real estate versus stocks, which is better? And the answer is there is not that one is better, because stock market is just a vehicle to own own particular businesses. And real estate is also a vehicle to own a business. If you own an apartment building, that's your business, your tenants are your clients, you have expenses, that's your business, and you own it privately. Okay.   Now, in the stock market, you can also own real estate publicly, right, like REITs, you can do that you don't have the same control. But it's the same thing. So people focus so much on it. And I say, it doesn't matter if it's public, or non public focus on the business, you can lose money in real estate, if the tenants don't pay you, especially when you have a lot of debt. So don't think you've saved there. Just focus on good properties, whether it is to flip them or to renovate them, or so many people use different strategies in real estate. So you know, focus on what you do focus on the business and the stock market. There's no such thing as stock market is bad. There's some companies that I wouldn't touch and others I would so I focus on what's good, and not about, you know, how it's being owned. It's just a vehicle.   And, you know, I find it funny, going back to a little bit this whole discussion with micro cap stocks, you know, how the industry is like, stay away, it's, it's a penny stock. So picture, picture owning 100 unit apartment building, or 50, or whatever, you have an apartment building, and it's worth, you know, $2 million, or let's say $10 million. Okay, so, there's so many people out there that have their entire life savings, their entire retirement, owning apartment buildings, that's their retirement, that's their entire life worth of work. That's okay. That's okay to own a $10 million apartment building or portfolio of apartment buildings. But if you put that apartment building into public vehicle that's trading on an exchange now $10 million that's toxic because it's microcap. Now you can't touch it, because you're gonna go bankrupt. Lalala is the same thing.   So how can you say that, you know, $10 million worth of assets in a private ownership, that's a smart thing to do. But if you own a $10 million in a public market through a stock now, that's a penny stock, you're an idiot, you shouldn't touch it. See how crazy and ridiculous this is?   Michael: Yeah. But could it be argued that the penny stock or the stock at really any stock could go to zero versus the real estate? Can I mean, in theory could never actually get to zero?   Mariusz: Well, I mean, if a business fails, you can go to zero. And if your if your tenants stopped paying you guess what the real estate is gonna be there. But your ownership, your equity can go to zero, because the bank can take it away. So don't think you're safe. Just because, you know, a building is still there. Are you going to be the one owning it?   Michael: Right? Now makes total sense. Makes total sense. Mariusz, I'm curious, can you share with us some of your your big wins that you've had in the micro cap, stock picking world? Since you've been? got started?   Mariusz: Yeah, so I'll share with you a big win. And I'll share with you what I'm currently doing for hopefully a future win. So the biggest one I had was a company called Oracle, where I, I bought it for four cents. And today, it's almost $3. And I still hold the shares. So almost 100 times I put like, I think 80,000 into it. And today, it's like six or 7 million just that one position. And I still hold the shares. And so it's kind of interesting, because it has Similarities to real estate, because Oracle is a is a company that owns a copper project. Okay, so it's a real estate. It's, it's, it's a copper project located in Mexico.   And now with all this electric cars, everybody's you know, the developing world is, you know, getting more developed. And so we're consuming more copper, and there's not a lot of copper out there, or the copper supply is not keeping up with the demand. So I found this company in 2017. And what was interesting about it was a special situation because in 2000, that property is called Santa Tomas Copper Project was sold from a gentleman, Mexican gentleman to a crook, the crook bought it for 10 million back then, and never paid for the property. So the Mexican guy wanted to get the property back. But it was it was complicated because it was like in three different jurisdictions Bahamas, Mexico and the United States.   So that company said to him, You know what, we'll we'll get you your property back, we'll pay for the lawyers will win you the property back but in return, we will earn 50% interest in the property. So it took them like 10 years to win the lawsuit. So they won the lawsuit in in Bahamas. And when I got involved, they already won the lawsuit in Bahamas, but they still had to kind of finish the lawsuit and have everything correctly the title registered in Mexico. And and then what was happening in Arizona was that it was crazy because the two parties that were fighting with each other Oracle, Oracle had ownership interest in both parties. Like I kid you not they own both parties. And but what was happening in Arizona was that they were kind of in receivership of that other party. So they were foreclosing on that interest.   And so, so I was looking at a lawsuit and you know, I don't speak Spanish but I speak English. So in Arizona, I was buying the legal documents directly from the courthouse as the court as the lawsuit was going on. So I was like getting documents right away faster than the company faster than the lawyers because the moment is showed up I already got on the phone and I bought the document. So I saw that they were like winning every single step every single step the other party said something to the judge was like nope, you don't know what you're talking about wrong wrong wrong. So I didn't even have the legal experience. But I could tell that like there's no way they were going to lose so So I bought all these shares and of course they won the lawsuit they foreclosed on the property they registered the property in Mexico and and and and nobody was paying attention like I was the only one buying the legal documents the only one studying this it was on the company was trading on TSX Venture so you know toxic exchange know what no one was gonna touch it. They institutions didn't want to look into it because they don't get involved in the legals.   Okay. Well, I got involved and I studied it and it was it was easy. It was simple. And then I even wrote like a 20 page analysis on my website and I was uploading the documents for everybody who wanted to see too See it. So the long story short is, you know, the stock goes up like 100 times, you know, we, in total, the people that were following me, I would say they made like $300 million. Today, today, I get gifts, all kinds of gifts people send me thank you change my life and all this. But it was an example of it of a of a situation where nobody wanted to look at there was no competition, it was so easy, so easy to see when you actually rolled up your sleeves and did some work.   So that was an example of a success. And I still own the shares, because I still think they're going to go much, much higher from here, because now now the situation is a little different, the title is registered. Now they, they are kind of confirming the historical results that were on this property. Because this was not some kind of little dinky property. This was a property that was massive copper deposit that was even used as examples of a good depositing geological books. So I knew I was dealing with something major. But you know, when I was buying the shares, the market cap, or the value of the company was $3 million. I looked at it, and I already knew back then I said, this is worth half a billion dollars. And today, it's even worth more because copper is hot. Everybody's talking about electrification. So not I mean, now it's probably gonna sell for a billion or 2 billion. Who knows? But that's an example of a success story.   Michael: Wow. And how long did the process take from when you bought it at four cents for the stock to get up to $3 a share?   Mariusz: Well, from 2017 to two now. So actually, what was interesting is that it kind of took a dip, because of COVID. So it was like it was on its way to $1. And then the COVID came and it crashed. Because everything crashed, it crashed to like 20 cents. And then the moment COVID COVID recovered and, and copper recovered, it went from like 20 cents to, to over over three bucks. It went to as high as 3.66. And now it pulled back to like 2.60. But, you know, on my watch on my watch, it was almost 100 times, but it was more than 100 times because the lowest stock was was one penny. So it did go to $3. That's like 300 times, but I wasn't I wasn't involved when it was at one penny. I was involved when it was like four.   So So yeah, so that I mean, it's incredible story, but it just shows you that these opportunities exist. And it's kind of like a real estate example, because it's a real estate. It's a property, okay, it's not an apartment, but it's a property.   Michael: Awesome. So now I love your story Mariusz, and I want to let you get out of here. But before I do any final words of wisdom recommendations that you want to share with folks who are listening?   Mariusz: I would just say, Look, just think independently. Think for yourself. Yeah, I know, it's nice to be invested alongside with what everybody else is talking about. But the biggest money is made when you just think for yourself. I always use the example of if you're selling a house, would you like? Or if you buying a house? Would you like to be buying it when there's 100 Other people bidding with you? Or would you be the only one buying it? Right? It's it's obvious and when you're selling your house? When you selling a house? Would you like a lot of people looking at your house? Or would you like one person looking at your house? Again, obvious answer.   So then why do we like up investment opportunities or stocks only when everybody else is looking at them? Flip it. Think for yourself, look for yourself. Buy it when they're not watching and then sell it when they're watching.   Michael: Right, right. Oh, that's so good. That's so good. And if people want to get ahold you want to reach out to you want to learn more about what you're doing in my company's general what's the best way for them to get in touch?   Mariusz: Just visit my website microcap.explosions.com. You will find a link to my YouTube channel to my email. That's the best way to get ahold of me.   Michael: Amazing. Rich, thank you so much for taking the time. I really appreciate you coming on and we'll definitely chat soon.   Mariusz: Yeah, thanks a lot.   All right, everyone. That was our episode a big big big thank you to Mariusz, I will definitely be going online to check out his website micro cap explosions. You enjoyed the episode. Leave us a rating or review wherever it is you get your podcasts. And as always look forward to seeing you on the next one. Happy investing

UpOnly with Cobie & Ledger
Haralabos Voulgaris on owning Bitcoin and the value of self sovereignty

UpOnly with Cobie & Ledger

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 129:17


LinksHaralabob TwitterShow PartnerThis episode is presented by FTX. Trade on an awesome mobile interface fee-free, and still get all the great portfolio tracking features you know and love: https://uponly.tv/ftxShow NotesBetting– Big betters work hard to conceal how and where they are betting– You don't just roll up to MGM and place huge bets usually– You do it through a bot that places bets on different websites instead– Then hope they pay out lol– Got rugged heavy in 2009 for like 7 figures then the guy made off to Panama or wherever– Books will refuse really good gamblers, but will accept “fish” as long as they sign that they aren't addicted lolCrypto– First saw it on Wired magazine when Bitcoin was around $1– Didn't jump in at first– Started using Bitcoin in 2012 to get paid– Ledger: “Did the process in how you thought about gambling transfer over to crypto?”– Hara: “Yes I think the fact it was governed by math”– Could insulate yourself from idiotic government policies and ideologies– Gotta think about how the dollar gets manipulated since Bitcoin will remain constant– Hara thinks at some point people will decide to increase the supply of Bitcoin– This is a flaming hot take sir – I respect it– We're gonna be old bags of dust and these kids are just gonna be living in the metaverse– It is so native and built into these kids– Ledger: “We're just gonna go away its gonna be like the blow off top of humanity”Metaverse– Cobie: “How do you think about NFTs?”– Hara likes 2017 era NFTs– Loves CryptoPunks – all about the narrative and the story– Likes the old stuff, some of the new stuff is just super out there– More of a Bitcoin maximalist even though Hara finds Bitcoin Maximalism super toxicBitcoin Maxis– A lot of them might've gotten burnt in 2017 and now just think everything is a scam– Calling anything that isn't Bitcoin is a shitcoin means that mentally there is something wrong with you– Cobie: “Part of the toxic maxis is that they missed out, then they join a cult and they have friends now and chant the same words and chant shitcoins and say “Udi you're wrong!” and then go somewhere else”– Hara: “The bullish case for me is when nations put Bitcoin on their balance sheet – they aren't gonna put Ethereum or Solana on there”Next Steps– Ledger: “What's next in your life?”Hara: “I think its about sovereignty”– Has always been an individual, wants to be protected instead of looking for gains– Crypto is the #1 way to preserver your wealth– Goal before was always to buy a basketball team (need about $1B) but once he got close he was like “idk i don't really wanna sell my Bitcoin for a basketball team” lolllllBasketball and NFTs– Ledger: “How's it feel to see these guys getting into NFTs? Does that worry you about where we are in the cycle?”– Not at all– Thinks that's not indicative of a top, we are nowhere even close to euphoria– People are out here protesting racism and other things– Thinks people might/ should be protesting the dollar, is surprised its not bigger yet– Hara likes the penguins! LFG– Hasn't bought NFTs in a long time– These athletes aren't buying punks cause they're always looking for a deal!Twitter NFT Integration– Cobie: “How is this going to go down with the furies”– Ledger doesn't get why these are so controversial– Hara wants to create an NFT project for all these furies– Ledger: “They already exist they're called FLUFs – I can give you a good deal on some if you want”– *Cobie and Hara making fun of FLUFs– Ledger: “Y'all just aren't gonna make it”Constitution DAO– Hara didn't do it, didn't get it– Thought it woulda been cool to get in then like burn it– Ledger: “That's a really good way to get regulators to pay attention to crypto” lolForks– People trade on FOMO so hard– Like there's some random ass ohm fork people ape into– ETH can get myspaced, all of this stuff can probably get replaced– Bitcoin can never get replaced– Bitcoin Diamond and Gold and Cash and all that stuff just no chance at allThe Flippening– If ETH gets to like 0.08 I'm probably a net seller of ETH– I don't like to say ahead of time because its so hard to know the context for the move– It probably signals a time to be cautious even when people are dancing in the streetsChat QuestionsSports world guys we need?– Steven A Smith– NFTs are the gateway drug of cryptoAnon account?– NoBitcoin volcano bond?– Interesting, can just buy El Salvador bond or Bitcoin though, don't need this although it is cool and interesting– Saylor will end with fireworks either way*The Winklevoss are the only people to ever refuse coming on UpOnly. What an outrageous decision.If you're 25 with 100k what do you do?– Would do crypto, trying to build something, tracking different wallets– Prob not Bitcoin would do something more aggressive, L2s, track engagement, wouldn't do leverageFINAL ALPHA– Hara: “Success = responsibility. Think about what is truly valuable and finite which is your time. Be mindful of your time and what you want to accomplish.”Notes by KevinMusic by GiovanniPickle

Podcast – The Burning Truth
Trump Deranged Leftist Started 4 Massive California Fires – Monday, Nov. 22 – Hour 3

Podcast – The Burning Truth

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 23:00


__ Follow Casey on Facebook, Twitter, & Snapchat @CaseyTheHost__  Hour 3 Trump-Deranged Calif. Sociology Prof. Indicted for Starting 4 Massive Forest Fires CDC: Vials contain no trace of virus that causes smallpox And … nobody believes them. The post Trump Deranged Leftist Started 4 Massive California Fires – Monday, Nov. 22 – Hour 3 appeared first on The Burning Truth.

The Consumer VC: Venture Capital I B2C Startups I Commerce | Early-Stage Investing
Denise Woodard (Partake Foods) - How Her Daughter Inspired Denise to Leave Her Well Paying Job and Create A Cookie Everyone Can Eat, How She Started in Retail from Day One, and Impact of COVID

The Consumer VC: Venture Capital I B2C Startups I Commerce | Early-Stage Investing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 35:52


Presenter: Burkland Associates helps you build the right systems that can keep up with your growth and can handle all the finance, accounting, tax and hiring services that consumer startups need to scale. For more information head to burklandassociates.com Presenter: Skillful runs online, immersive programs that help people launch and accelerate their careers in business roles in tech - Strategy & Ops, Product, Strategic Finance and Growth. Early bird applications for the Core Sprint are now open - use the exclusive code EARLYBIRD2021 if you apply before Dec 1 Click Here to Apply to the Next Cohort Thank you Charlie Hanna for the intro to our guest today, Denise Woodard CEO and founder of Partake Foods. Partake Foods is produces super delicious cookies are made with real, healthy, and safe ingredients that everyone can enjoy gluten-free, vegan, non-GMO and free of the top 14 allergens, our super delicious cookies are made with real, healthy, and safe ingredients that everyone can enjoy. We discuss the origin story of Partake and inspiration from Denise's daughter, that decision of leaving Coca-Cola, how she managed to get into grocery stores and raise capital. A few questions I ask Denise Why did you decide to leave big corporate CPG and your job at Coke in order to start Partake Foods? How did you approach experimenting with ingredients, tastetesting and finding the right formula? How did you go about building your supply chain? What were some of your learnings working for Coke that helped you build Partake Foods? Once you had your product what channels did you start off with? When did you realize you were on to something? When and why did you decide to raise venture capital?What was your fundraising strategy Once you got into retail, what was the strategy to expand? How did COVID affect Partake Foods? Since you grew and are growing so fast, how do you think about leadership and building/hiring a team? What's the future of Partake Foods? What's next on the horizon? What's one thing that you would change about venture capital and fundraising? What's one book that inspired you personally and one book that inspired you professionally? What's the best piece of advice that you've received? What's one piece of advice that you have for founders?

Million Dollar Mastermind with Larry Weidel
Episode 354: Decide Early on If You Really Want to be Financially Independent with CEO of WeeCare Jessica Chang

Million Dollar Mastermind with Larry Weidel

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 19:45


In 2017 Jessica Chang spent her time developing her app WeeCare. Since then, she has been featured in the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, PBS Newshour, NPR, and more. She's done some unbelievable things in the childcare arena and has even helped companies to realize the importance of helping or providing their employees with childcare. • Started as an investment banker. • Big advantage if you start your company with the goal of being profitable ASAP. • Don't avoid a big downsize in your company if you have unproductive divisions. https://weecare.co TIME-STAMPED SHOW NOTES: [3:19] Finance gives you financial independence. [7:27] 20 things at once. [14:29] You have to look out for yourself.

Construct Your Life With Austin Linney
290 Amber Adams: How I Started Real Estate At Young Age

Construct Your Life With Austin Linney

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 24:19


Amber Adams: How I Started Real Estate At Young Age Meet Amber, is a Real Estate Agent with the Zolin Group at Stunning Homes Realty, she primarily works throughout the East Valley with both buyer and seller clients. Her team also has an investment side, 34 Holdings, that can help with creative financing, fix ‘n' flips and so much more! Currently, she is also attending Arizona State University and pursuing a bachelor's degree in Supply Chain Management at the W.P. Carey School of Business. Previously, she served as the Arizona DECA State President. This position allowed her to foster positive working relationships, host statewide conferences and develop my leadership skills. She was fortunate enough to be employed with Topgolf in the guest services and marketing departments from 2018-2020. These positions afforded her the opportunity to participate in local campaigns and outreach efforts that targeted the core audience, in turn ensuring guest satisfaction.   What You Will Discover:  [3:02] The Decision To Go Off On Your Own And Do Your Own Thing [6:41] Most Amount Of Learning Happens Out Of Your Comfort Zone [8:52] Partnership With People To Help In Finding The Deal [16:07] Putting Value On Social Capital For Success [22:19] Affirmations Are So Powerful [25:12] Success Takes Intention And Commitment   Relevant Links:  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ambersellsaz/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100048799457965 LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/amberadams1/   #podcast

Women Developing Brilliance
What I Wish I Knew When I First Started Out

Women Developing Brilliance

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 12:13


I've been an entrepreneur since 1991— so this year marks my 30th year anniversary!!Learn the #1 thing that I wish I invested in right in the beginning — It would've saved a ton of struggle and a whole lot of doubt.If you're reading this, know that you have everything inside of you that you will ever need. You have all the answers, wisdom, beauty, glory, and grace.

Heart to Heart Podcast
How I Started Charging 4 Figures

Heart to Heart Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 22:49


In today's episode Jo shares how she was able to start charging 4-figures. Tune in to hear the lessons she learned & action steps you can take to begin valuing yourself more, too. Check out our new course, Sales Queen!! joandco.teachable.com/p/sales-queen  You can sign up between Nov. 22 - Dec. 3 Classes begin Nov. 29 & you'll have access to everything inside the course for life!

Timcast IRL
Timcast IRL #413 - BLM Activist Says "The Revolution Has Started" Of Waukesha w/Rekieta Law & Kash Patel

Timcast IRL

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 130:12


Tim, Ian, Luke, and Lydia sit down with lawyer Nick Rekieta and recovering lawyer and former government official Kash Patel to discuss the recent events in Waukesha and the BLM activist who theorized that it may be related to the organization, how CNN journalists must deal with their insanely biased reporting, how the NYT is dealing with the judges' order to stop publishing Project Veritas' private communications, the Denver attorney filing a civil action case against Kyle Rittenhouse, whether Kyle should sue the prosecutor on civil rights grounds, and the groundbreaking interview of Kyle that showed him voicing his support for the BLM movement. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

NO MORE EXCUSES! WAKE UP!
EP:27 Topic Money: Shawn Perry from sharing consultation services: Had multiple major life events that changed her life. By walking in her Faith Shawn started her credit restoration business.

NO MORE EXCUSES! WAKE UP!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 58:47


 On this episode of No More Excuses Wake Up! Introducing Shawn Perry from Sharing Consultation Services. Shawn Perry, a native of Newark, NJ who currently resides in South Jersey. A wife, mother, worshiper, and domestic violence advocate who loves to inspire and empower people during their everyday walks of life. During her 20 years of working in the Human Services field, she had the privilege of becoming a Behaviorist for the last 7 years and was granted the opportunity to pursue and receive a Master's degree in both Counseling and Behavior Analysis. Through the various skills that she has acquired over the years, she is able to teach people to navigate through various life challenges through the use of practical behavioral strategies.Because she is a solution-driven person, in June of 2020, Shawn stepped out on faith and started her journey of entrepreneurship by becoming a Board-Certified Credit Consultant and started her credit restoration business where she works with people all over the country to become financially literate and financially free.KEY TAKEAWAYWHAT PEOPLE SAY AND THINK ABOUT YOU SHOULD NOT MATTERKNOW WHO YOU ARE. BE AUTHENTIC AND PEOPLE WILL COME From this episode you will learn:  ·        Shawn is a survivor from a fatal health condition·         Shawn has a credit restoration business·        Authorized users·        What made Shawn start her own credit restoration business·    How Shawn faith lead her to her destiny·        The importance of not becoming a credit serial applier   Three things to know about Shawn1. Loving2. Loyal3. Worshipper  Shawn word/s of Affirmation I am confidenceI can do all things I am fearfully and wonderfully madeI am empowered Connect with Shawn at:Website:www.sharingconsultation.servicesInstagram:www.instagram.com/shawn_empowersu/Facebook: www.facebook.com/sharininc                    MY PERSONAL FINANCIAL MANTRA   BUDGET  PAY DEBT  SAVE  INVEST  AND LIVE     On each episode of No More Excuses. Wake Up! We will be talking about Money, Entrepreneurship & Life Skills that were not taught.            You can download my free budgeting spreadsheet at www.stenellthemoneytherapist.com while you are there watch my video as I portray Muhammad Ali showing you how I kick down closed doors.              Book a 3-month 1-1 personal or business coaching call with mehttps://stenellthemoneytherapist.as.me/consultation                  Learn more about me and my agencies:                           www.stenellmyersenterprises.com      If you would like to be on No More Excuses. Wake Up! Podcast, please email me at contact@stenellthemoneytherapist.com    Have a question? Want to share a topic you think I should discuss? Email me your questions and suggestions atcontact@stenellthemoneytherapist.com                               Connect with me atwww.stenellthemoneytherapist.com

The Smart Marketer Podcast
Ep. 81, How I Accidentally (Kinda) Started An Animal Shelter, With Molly Pittman

The Smart Marketer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 13:27


Amid this insanely busy week of the year (Thanksgiving/Black Friday), we are taking a ‘Not Business' moment to step back and share some exciting (and compelling) developments in the personal life of our host, Molly Pittman. Listen in to hear 1) How Molly's life-long dreams are unfolding and 2) How she and her partner are making room to make a difference. YOUR ENGAGEMENT MATTERS!  Thank you to our listeners for all the 5-Star Reviews and meaningful messages you've sent this year - the Podcast has gone above and beyond what we expected, and we have YOU to thank for that. It makes a difference when you follow us (and leave a review) on Apple Podcasts (https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-smart-marketer-podcast/id1522629407) or subscribe wherever you listen to podcasts.  We'd also love it if you repost this episode to your social media, share your favorite episodes with friends, and be sure to tag us in your next post, #WeOutHere. Have questions? Please send us an email at support@smartmarketer.com, and don't forget to… Serve the World Unselfishly and Profit Links: Smart Marketer (Black Friday Sale) https://smartmarketer.com/black-friday/ Make a direct donation to Kentucky “Saving Them Together.” By Venmo, @KSTT-rescue or  PayPal, Rescue@KentuckySavingThemTogether.org

Cat & Cloud Podcast
Life Is What You Make It

Cat & Cloud Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 39:25


What were you brought up to believe is possible? What do you think is possible now? It's incredible what doors open and how much more you end up seeing, when you learn something new. Or do something for the right reasons. This week Chris and Jared go on a few tangents: reflecting on the year, creating things with a vision, and feeling free when those creations take time. The Cat & Cloud Podcast: Chris Baca and Jared Truby, two of the founders of Cat & Cloud coffee share their insights of leadership and owning a small business, through the lens of the specialty coffee industry. It's not just about whats in the cup, but the intention behind how it was put there. With new episodes weekly, listen in as there's always little nuggets of wisdom. Where to listen Apple Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/cat-cloud-podcast/id1021859870 Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/1Ca5vz73UcyAHCAYmWKpl5?si=d8whB74aRjmgU-ld_0qZfQ&dl_branch=1 Watch here on youtube! https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLKAafL6q_RiChNcnVZh3_uW0fKBJ6gImB If you want even more insights from Chris and Jared, consider becoming a member over on Patreon. each week get even more, as well as exclusive access to a likeminded community, with plenty of benefits to come. It's just the price of a latte a month, and we think there is a lot of value in that. So check it out. https://www.patreon.com/catandcloud The usual suspects. Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/catcloudcoffee/ Cat & Cloud: https://catandcloud.com/ Your hosts: Baca's Blog: https://www.realchrisbaca.com/ Jared's Website: https://www.jaredtruby.com/ Your editor: justphred We are Cat & Cloud Coffee. Started by three friends trying to pursue their passions, with Integrity and intentionally, and it's our mission to inspire connection, by creating memorable experiences. We're a small independent business and this is our story. Enjoy!

Murder In America
45: EP. 45 - Let's Talk! How We Started, ASTROWORLD & The Candyman Killer

Murder In America

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 98:11


Join us for a special non-scripted episode of the show where Courtney and Colin discuss the story of how MURDER IN AMERICA came to be, a detailed minute-by-minute analysis of the events that took place at the ASTROWORLD festival, and various updates from the true crime world including the Candyman, Dean Corll and the Walker County Jane Doe. - It's time for the HOLIDAYS!! Stay cool, clean AND stylish with MANSCAPED!! (Get 20% off your order AND free shipping when you use code "MIA" at checkout!!) Manscaped.com - Improve YOUR mental health by using BETTERHELP! We believe in this service and we're VERY happy to partner with them. Betterhelp.com/MIA - Seriously y'all. Once you use QUIP to improve your dental hygiene, you will BE HOOKED! And don't forget to use our link to get your first refill FREE! Quip.com/MIAMERICA -

World News with BK
Podcast#275: UK suicide bombing, Rittenhouse acquittal, 80 year old man rectal insertion surgery

World News with BK

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 152:04


Podcasting in Paris! Started out with that idiot suicide bomber in Liverpool, England who tried to blow up a hospital, then updated that coup in Sudan. Plus Burkina Faso police massacre, Kyle Rittenhouse acquitted, Russian occult murder, Chinese tennis player reappears, Russia advances in Ukraine, Beto runs for Texas governor, and an 80 year old man needs to have surgery to remove a pestle that he jammed into his anus for sexual pleasure. Music: Desireless/"Voyage Voyage"

Ohio Mysteries
Ep. 158 - What started the Collinwood school fire?

Ohio Mysteries

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 31:23


In 1908, the worst school fire in American history killed 172 children, two teachers and a rescuer at Lake View Elementary in the Cleveland suburb of Collinwood. But what - or who - was to blame? www.ohiomysteries.com feedback@ohiomysteries.com www.patreon.com/ohiomysteries www.twitter.com/mysteriesohio www.facebook.com/ohiomysteries Music: Boy in a Churchyard, by Mark Zonakis. Find more at https://markzonakis.com/music Audionautix- The Great Unknown The Great Phospher- Daniel Birch

StumbleWell Podcast
EP 043 // He quit his job and started a short story podcast ✍

StumbleWell Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 46:54


This StumbleWell podcast was recorded back in June of 2021. After much pushing, Mr. Hallease has officially stepped away from nursing and is now writing full-time. In this episode, we're talking about the process of him leaving nursing and also how our parents responded. We also touch on how this is even possible financially (Adobe Creative Residency) and the inherent privileges that come along with making a big decision like this one. It's interesting to fit into the "people who quit during the pandemic" statistic, especially in this season of "I don't dream of labor." It's been an interesting 2021, to say the least, thanks for sticking with us through it all, and hopefully, we'll have more episodes coming your way soon. Check out the How Does This End? Podcast →Apple Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/how-does-this-end/id1591757387 →Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/7zCnZPLpoQveIoJlcrMQ0i?si=4945345cec7841a2 →Google Podcasts: https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cHM6Ly9hbmNob3IuZm0vcy82ZjQyZDFmNC9wb2RjYXN0L3Jzcw →Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/s?fid=660898 SUBSCRIBE! https://www.youtube.com/hallease?sub_confirmation=1 FOLLOW US! StumbleWell - http://www.instagram.com/stumble.well Hallease - http://www.instagram.com/hallease.mp4 SUPPORT! https://www.patreon.com/hallease https://www.teespring.com/stores/hallease Hey everyone, welcome to #StumbleWell a video #CouplesPodcast featuring Hallease and her husband -- Mr. Hallease. We discuss different aspects of marriage, society, science, technology and of course -- culture. Thanks for stopping by and we hope you subscribe to the channel. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/stumblewell/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stumblewell/support

Simblified
Google & Real - Time bullying

Simblified

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 63:46


What goes on behind the scenes to bring you an ad when you visit a website? And how does Google control every touch point? Some litigators in the US got together to file an antitrust motion against Google, and in the process simplified all of real time buying for ads. Chuck, Naren, and Tony got together to marvel at this well-oiled machine. References: Antitrust filing against Google: https://storage.courtlistener.com/recap/gov.uscourts.nysd.564903/gov.uscourts.nysd.564903.152.0.pdf Simblified Ep 207: Who took a cookie from the cookie jar https://shows.ivmpodcasts.com/show/simblified-RkZ1HPJY375OLhFt/episode/simblified-ep-207-who-took-a-cookie-from-the-cookie-jar-gw8d-I3eLYdNNfK75WKYo?startTime=0 Add one part news, one part bad jokes, one part Wikipedia research, one part cult references from spending too much time on the internet, one part Wodehouse quotes, and one part quality puns, and you get Simblified. A weekly podcast to help you appear smarter, to an audience that knows no less! Your four hosts - Chuck, Naren, Srikeit and Tony attempt to deconstruct topics with humour (conditions apply). Fans of the show have described it as "fun conversations with relatable folks", "irreverent humour", "the funniest thing to come out of Malad West" and "if I give you a good review will you please let me go". Started in 2016 as a creative outlet, Simblified now has over 200 episodes, including some live ones, and some with guests who are much smarter than the hosts. Welcome to the world of Simblified! You can contact the hosts on: Chuck: twitter.com/chuck_gopal / instagram.com/chuckofalltrades Naren: twitter.com/shenoyn / instagram.com/shenoynv Tony: twitter.com/notytony / instagram.com/notytony Srikeit: twitter.com/srikeit / instagram.com/srikeit

the only one in the room podcast
SUNDAY EDITION: Zibby Owens Is The Only Book Lover In The Room Who Started A Publishing Company

the only one in the room podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 35:39


Zibby Owens is the creator and host of the award-winning podcast Moms Don't Have Time to Read Books. Zibby, named “NYC's Most Powerful Book-fluencer” by New York magazine's Vulture, conducts warm, inquisitive conversations with authors, making her daily show a top literary podcast as selected by Oprah.com in 2019 and 2020. Zibby is the Co-Founder and CEO of Zibby Books, a publishing home for fiction and memoir. She's also the CEO of Moms Don't Have Time To, a media company with multiple podcasts, publications, communities, the Zibby Awards, and two anthologies, Moms Don't Have Time To: A Quarantine Anthology, and Moms Don't Have Time to Have Kids: A Timeless Anthology. Visit: www.zibbyowens.com  Listen: Moms Don't Have Time to Read Books Sign up for Zibby's newsletter here Instagram: @zibbyowens  Facebook: @momsdonthavetimetoreadbooks Special thanks to our sponsors: Away: We love our new sponsor AWAY, the modern lifestyle brand that creates thoughtful products for every traveler and every kind of trip. Start YOUR 100-day trial and shop the entire Away line-up of travel essentials, including their best-selling suitcases, at AWAYTravel.com/theonlyone. Best Fiends: Join us and the millions of Americans who are already playing this game. Download Best Fiends for FREE on The Apple APP store or Google Play. That's friends without the R, Best Fiends. Voyage et Cie: Voyage et Cie's curator Melanie Apple has cultivated a passion for notable moments using the sense of smell. Voyage et Cie is the ultimate luxury blend of travel, fragrance, and design. Each original fragrance is created by Melanie, 100% organic and natural which will transport you on a journey. Visit https://www.voyageetcie.com/ and enter the code: theonlyone to get your 10% off your purchase! Cute Booty Lounge: Cute Booty Lounge is made by women and for women. There's a cute booty style for everyone! Cute Booty Lounge has you covered...Embrace Your Body, Love Your Booty! Head to Cutebooty.com or click the link here to order yours, but don't forget to enter the code theonlybooty to get 15% off your first order! Join our Patreon: Become an Only One In The Room patron by joining us on Patreon! Starting at only $5.00 per month, you'll get bonus content, access to outtakes that the general public will NEVER see, extremely cool merch, and depending on what tier you get, monthly hang time with Scott and Laura. Join our Patreon today at https://www.patreon.com/theonlyonepodcast Be sure not to miss our weekly full episodes on Tuesdays, Scott Talks on Wednesdays and our brand new series On My Nightstand on Fridays by subscribing to the show wherever you listen to podcasts.  Join our Only One In The Room Facebook Group if you'd like to ask a question of any of our upcoming guests for this series.  Also visit the website www.theonlyonepod.com for the latest from our host Laura Cathcart Robbins like featured articles and more. We love hearing from you in the comments on iTunes and while you're there don't forget to rate us, subscribe and share the show! All of us at The Only One In The Room wish you safety and wellness during this challenging time. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Wooh Woop
EP 67: I Know We've Been Gone But The NBA Season Has Started Out Strong

Wooh Woop

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 47:32


The Wooh Woop podcast might've took an hiatus but the NBA season hasn't. On this episode we discuss the current standings, surprises & disappointments, how the new rule change has affected players across the league and other worthy topics. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

After the Encore
The Alternative Is... | Travis Shettel

After the Encore

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 77:25


Travis has been playing music for about 30 years. Piano lessons started at 6 until the instrument became uncool at the age of 11. Then it was classical guitar, which wasn't loud enough. Then it was bass, which was fun for a while, but proved to be difficult to use as a writing instrument. Finally, Travis found his way to the electric guitar (keys have been given a second chance) and the creation of hundreds of songs since the mid 90's. He is probably most well known for his time as lead singer, guitarist, and songwriter of the Boston-based band, Piebald. Started in 1994, PIebald released 5 albums, and toured constantly until the “last shows” in 2008. - http://www.masqueradeatlanta.com/attraction/travis-shettel-piebald/ I was stoked to get the opportunity to interview Travis for this podcast. The Alt music scene in the mid-00's really shaped my perspective of my youth and my worldview overall. Several of these songs are still anthems for me after all these years. Travis and I dig into all that and more! In After the Encore Volume 7: The Alternative Is... We explore the world of music through the lens of the artists who helped shape a musical revolution for so many. What lessons still resonate today, and what has changed in the near twenty years since then? Tune in to find out how these artists answer the questions essential to the essence of the podcast: 1. What does music mean to you? 2. How do you quantify success? 3. And what happens after the music fades? Be sure to catch Piebald's upcoming tour dates: 12/14 - Hamden, CT 12/15 - Lancaster, PA 12/16 - Northampton, MA 12/17 - Portsmouth, NH 12/19 - Ardmore, PA 12/20 - Brooklyn, NY 12/21 - Cambridge, MA For more details and to purchase tickets be sure to go to: Piebald.com After the Encore is a long-form, career retrospective podcast that takes you behind the music of some of your favorite artists. After the Encore is also a "2020 Music Podcast of the Year" award nominee over at PodcastAwards.com The official Spotify playlist for Volume 7 can be found here: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/5eLT9a8UEUKPmLkIMcPqBA?si=266b2e103cb54f69 'After the Encore' is powered by Roberts Media Group. For more programming and advertisement opportunities, please visit www.robertsmediagroup.co --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/after-the-encore/message

Foundations of Amateur Radio
The Rebirth of Homebrew

Foundations of Amateur Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 4:31


Foundations of Amateur Radio On the 12th of December 1961, before I was born, before my parents met, the first amateur radio satellite was launched by Project OSCAR. It was a 10 kilo box, launched as the first private non-government spacecraft. OSCAR 1 was the first piggyback satellite, launched as a secondary payload taking the space of a ballast weight and managed to be heard by over 570 amateurs across 28 countries during the 22 days it was in orbit. It was launched just over four years after Sputnik 1 and was built entirely by amateurs for radio amateurs. In the sixty years since we've come a long way. Today high school students are building and launching CubeSats and several groups have built satellites for less than a $1,000. OSCAR 76, the so-called "$50SAT" cost $250 in parts. It operated in orbit for 20 months. Fees for launching a 10cm cubed satellite are around $60,000 and reducing by the year. If that sounds like a lot of money for the amateur community, consider that the budget for operating VK0EK, the DXpedition to Heard Island in 2016 was $550,000. Operation lasted 21 days. I'm mentioning all this in the context of homebrew. Not the alcoholic version of homebrew, the radio amateur version, where you build stuff for your personal enjoyment and education. For some amateurs that itch is scratched by designing and building a valve based power amplifier, for others it means building a wooden Morse key. For the members of OSCAR it's satellites. For me the itch has always been software. Sitting in my bedroom in the early 1980's, eyeballs glued to the black and white TV that was connected to my very own Commodore VIC-20 was how I got properly bitten by that bug, after having been introduced to the Apple II at my high school. I'm a curios person. Have always been. In my work I generally go after the new and novel and then discover six months down the track that my clients benefit from my weird sideways excursion into something or other. Right now my latest diversion is the FPGA, a Field Programmable Gate Array. Started watching a new series by Digi-Key about how to use them and the experience is exhilarating. One way to simply describe an FPGA is to think of it as a way to create a virtual circuit board that can be reprogrammed in the field. You don't have to go out and design a chip for a specific purpose and deal with errors, upgrades and supply chain issues, instead you use a virtual circuit and reprogram as needed. If you're not sure how powerful this is, you can program an FPGA to behave like a Motorola 65C02 microprocessor, or as a RISC CPU, or well over 200 other open source processor designs, including the 64-bit UltraSPARC T1 microprocessor. I'm mentioning this because while I have a vintage HP606A valve based signal generator that I'm working on restoring to fully working. Homebrew for me involves all that the world has to offer. I don't get excited about solder and my hands and eyes are really not steady enough to manage small circuit designs, but tapping keys on a keyboard, that's something I've been doing for a long time. Another thing I like about this whole upgraded view of homebrew is that we as radio amateurs are already familiar with building blocks. We likely don't design a power supply from scratch, or an amplifier, or the VFO circuit. Why improve something that has stood the test of time? In my virtual world, I too can use those building blocks. In FPGA land I can select any number of implementations of a Fourier Transform and test them all to see which one suits my purpose best. In case you're wondering. My Pluto SDR is looking great as a 2m and 70cm beacon, transmitting on both bands simultaneously. It too has an FPGA on board and I'm not afraid to get my keyboard dirty trying to tease out how to best make use of that. What homebrew adventures have you been up to? I'm Onno VK6FLAB

Spirituality And Magick Podcast
Naty One D and D Podcast Episode 8- So Anyway They Started Blasting

Spirituality And Magick Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 134:53


Episode 8 of our d and d podcast! Crazy battle developments! Interesting decisions!

Real Estate Investing With Jay Conner, The Private Money Authority
How Brad Blazar Started His Real Estate Business with Jay Conner, The Private Money Authority

Real Estate Investing With Jay Conner, The Private Money Authority

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 2:34


Brad Blazar is a highly sought-after speaker on the subject of raising capital Today, Brad Blazar talks about how he raised $2 Billion dollars in private money. Additionally, he has closed the largest mega-million dollar transactions for multiple leading real estate companies - $9M, $7.5M, $5M for SmartStop Self Storage, and national operator of self-storage assets in addition to $11M for USAllianz. At present, he mentors others around the world as part of a global coaching business on how to raise funds from high net worth investors to build, buy, and scale a business - or fund a special project like real estate. As a real estate investor himself, he has purchased, rehabbed, and renovated dozens of properties and invests as co-GP or GP in multi-family today. As the author of two books, his first book On The Wings of Eagles - Learn to Soar in Life quickly became a top-rated #1 read for entrepreneurs in addition to hosting the 2nd highest ranked podcast Beast Nation to help you cope with COVID-19 As a philanthropist, Brad donates a portion of his business revenue to MD Anderson Cancer Research and feels more needs to be done to fuel cancer research. An avid speaker, coach, and entrepreneur, Brad is passionate about helping others step into their bigger future. For more valuable information click on this link and watch the complete episode: https://youtu.be/K4Z6KmjI3rQ - “How Brad Blazar Raised $2 Billion In Private Money with Jay Conner, The Private Money Authority” Real Estate Cashflow Conference: https://www.jayconner.com/learnrealestate/ Free Webinar: http://bit.ly/jaymoneypodcast Jay Conner is a proven real estate investment leader. Without using his own money or credit, Jay maximizes creative methods to buy and sell properties with profits averaging $64,000 per deal. What is Real Estate Investing? Live Cashflow Conference https://youtu.be/QyeBbDOF4wo The Conner Marketing Group Inc.P.O. Box 1276, Morehead City, NC USA 28557 P 252-808-2927F 252-240-2504 Channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCZfl6O7pRhyX5R-rRuSnK6w https://www.youtube.com/c/RealEstateInvestingWithJayConner RSS Feed http://realestateinvestingdeals.mypodcastworld.com/rss2.xml Google Play https://play.google.com/music/listen#/ps/Ihrzsai7jo7awj2e7nhhwfsv47y iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/ca/podcast/real-estate-investing-minus-bank-flipping-houses-foreclosure/id1377723034 Watch on ROKU: Roku https://my.roku.com/add/realestateinvestingRoku https://my.roku.com/add/realestateinvesting Watch on Amazon Prime: https://www.amazon.com/How-Locate-Real-Estate-Deals/dp/B07M9WNZR6/ref=sr_1_3

Kingdom Influencing Podcast
Don‘t Quit Part 2- Finished What You Started

Kingdom Influencing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 18:18


The Don't Quit Series discusses patterns of behavior associated with Christian Living. It helps to lay pragmatic and theological roadmaps for surviving the times we live in. It also motivates the listener to endure the trials of life; because, there is a promise and a crown waiting for them.

Speculate with Us
Fight Vaccine Mandates with Bob Love

Speculate with Us

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 80:54


Jennifer Ethan and Mark invite Bob Love, of Young Americans of Liberty, to sit down and speculate on everything from vaccine mandates to free markets. Send your thoughts and feedback to speculatewithuspod@gmail.comAdd us on all the socials @speculatewithusShow your support for Young Americans for liberty at the links below.​Young Americans for Liberty is a non – profit political activist group that identifies, trains, educates and mobilizes students on college campuses around the nation. Started out as students for Ron Paul during his 2008 presidential campaign. In Michigan, YAL is identifying two schools that are forcing vaccines on their students without easy options for exemption. In response to mandates around the nation, YAL has launched Student Rights Campaigns to combat these mandates. In these SRCs, YAL collects petition signatures and identifies students on campus impacted by these mandates. After collecting signatures, YAL delivers the signatures to the university president. If there is no policy change, YAL enters the courtroom to overturn the policy. Grand Valley State University in Allendale, Michigan has forced their students after promising not to enforce mandates. Signatures do not have to be from students or families, anyone can sign! The link to petition against GVSU is https://yaliberty.tfaforms.net/f/studentrightsreform?petid=7013c000001RBLN Oakland University in Auburn Hills, Michigan is enforcing vaccination policy with prejudice. We have identified students that were removed from on campus housing after helping others form religious exemptions. Another student was removed from his music performance classes for not being vaccinated as “unvaccinated students present a risk to vaccinated individuals while singing”. The link to petition OU is yaliberty.org/freeOU. Follow Bob on social media! Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/blove0426/Twitter: @Robert_Love70Instagram: @Robert_Love70

Optimal Living Daily: Personal Development & Minimalism
2170: 6 Things I Wish I Knew The Day I Started Berklee by Derek Sivers on Creating Value & Focused Productivity

Optimal Living Daily: Personal Development & Minimalism

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 11:59


Derek Sivers shares 6 things he wishes he knew the day he started Berklee Episode 2170: 6 Things I Wish I Knew The Day I Started Berklee by Derek Sivers on Creating Value & Focused Productivity Originally a professional musician and circus clown, Derek Sivers created CD Baby in 1998. It became the largest seller of independent music online, with $100M in sales for 150,000 musicians. In 2008, Derek sold CD Baby for $22M, giving the proceeds to a charitable trust for music education. He is a frequent speaker at the TED Conference, with over 5 million views of his talks. Since 2011 he has published 34 books, including “Anything You Want” which shot to #1 on all of its Amazon categories. The original post is located here: https://sive.rs/berklee  Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com Interested in advertising on the show? Visit https://www.advertisecast.com/OptimalLivingDaily Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Kingdom Influencing Podcast
Don”t Quit - Part 2- Finished what You Started

Kingdom Influencing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 18:37


The Don't Quit Series discusses patterns of behavior associated with Christian Living. It helps to lay pragmatic and theological roadmaps for surviving the times we live in. It also motivates the listener to endure the trials of life; because, there is a promise and a crown waiting for them.  

BC&B
"Oh! We've started?!"

BC&B

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 87:43


Join in as we visit once again with JJ Smith, the Alba Android. Get caught up as Mr. Smith goes to Air Force One... JJ is a bus driving, railfan and trekker. A proud Yorkshireman (along with Sean Bean, Sir Patrick Stewart and Brian Blessed), living in Edinburgh, Scotland. JJ is a Lieutenant (JG) on the USS Alba, a Scottish based, but globally crewed, chapter of Starfleet International http://sfi.org , http://ussalba.com You can listen to JJ on Spock the Week Podcast, follow him on Twitter and support his work by becoming a Patron at Patreon.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/digresscast/message

Help and Hope Happen Here
Nancy Goodman will talk about her Non Profit KIDS V CANCER, which she started just 1 day after her son Jacob passed away from Medulloblastoma in 2009. Nancy will also speak about her successful initiatives that have been adopted on Capitol Hill

Help and Hope Happen Here

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 49:06


Just 1 day after her son Jacob passed away from Medulloblastoma in 2009, Nancy Goodman started the Non Profit KIDS V CANCER.  Nancy will discuss this non profit, whose objective it is to find new methods and medicines to help in the fight against Pediatric Cancer. Nancy is one of the leading advocates on Capitol Hill for these kids, and her advocacy has produced a number of initiatives along with legislation that has produced successful results and promises to produce even more successful results as time goes on.

Bash Bros Podcast
Back Where We Started?

Bash Bros Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 64:21


Crimson Vow's Eternal Night is upon us but what does that mean for Standard? Does the old saying "The more things change, the more they stay the same" ring true or is this new set the breath of fresh air we need? WE'VE GOT SLEEVES NOW! Check them out here! https://mtgproshop.com/bash-bros-merch/ Interested in supporting the show? Leave a review on iTunes, Spotify, Stitcher, and here on Podbean! Or visit our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/bashbrospodcast Follow us at: https://twitter.com/bashbrospodcast Brian: https://twitter.com/BraunDuinIt Brad: https://twitter.com/fffreakmtg Corey: https://twitter.com/CoreyBaumeister

GetStuckOnSports.com
Get Stuck on Sports Podcasts #179 - Football Semi Final Preview and Hockey Season has Officially Started

GetStuckOnSports.com

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 63:22


Dennis and Brady preview both the Marine City vs Portland and Ubly vs Beal City semi final matchups in football, and hockey season is now officially underway with Northern kicking it off last night!

Working Capital The Real Estate Podcast
House Hacking Strategy with Craig Curelop | EP79

Working Capital The Real Estate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 39:53


Craig Curelop is a Real Estate Agent and Investor. He is an Author of The House Hacking Strategy: How to Use Your Home to Achieve Financial Independence and Co-host of FI Team podcast. In this episode we talked about: - Craig's Bio & Background - House Hacking Strategy - Expansion of Craig's Real Estate Portfolio since 2017 - Working at BiggerPockets  - Real Estate Investing Strategies  - Writing a Real estate Book - Sourcing Deals - View On Current Market Environment - Short Term Rental Market Outlook - Financing Deals - The Advice to People who Consider Making a Career in Real Estate - Building a Team  - Mentorship, Resources and Lessons learned Useful links: https://thefiteam.podbean.com https://www.instagram.com/thefiguy/?hl=en Transcriptions:  Jesse (0s): Welcome to the working capital real estate podcast. My name is Jesper galley. And on this show, we discuss all things real estate with investors and experts in a variety of industries that impact real estate. Whether you're looking at your first investment or raising your first fund, join me and let's build that portfolio one square foot at a time. Ladies and gentlemen, my name is Jesper galley and you're listening to working capital the real estate podcast. Our special guest today is Craig . Craig is a real estate agent and investor. He is author of the host hacking strategy and co-host of FII team podcast, Craig, how's it going,   Craig (37s): Jesse? So good to be here today. I'm doing great. How   Jesse (40s): Are you? I'm doing awesome, man. I can't complain we're on the tail tail end or just, just pass Halloween. So I, for those that can't see us right now, we've got a couple of mustache here, but I feel like yours is for a Movember   Craig (53s): Mine's is just for life and his life. The lady, the lady loves the mustache, so we   Jesse (58s): Keep it. That's amazing. So it's just a lifestyle choice.   Craig (1m 1s): It's a lifestyle choice. Yeah, man. It's been like a year. I think it's, I'm almost, I'm approaching my one year mustache anniversary, so I love it. There should be a, there should be a celebration for that.   Jesse (1m 10s): Oh, I said we were just chatting. I have mine on, I meant to shave it off. I was afraid of mercury for Halloween and now I, and now we're in November, so I don't know what to do, dude. You   Craig (1m 18s): Look good. You should keep it.   Jesse (1m 21s): I appreciate it, man. Are you joining us today from, from Denver?   Craig (1m 25s): Yeah, I am here in Denver. Yeah. Been here four and a half years.   Jesse (1m 30s): Sweet. Well, thanks. Thanks so much for coming on the show. Really appreciate it. I think we'll have a great episode here. Talk a little bit about your background in real estate and love to get into house hacking and the book. But before we do, maybe what we could do is talk a little bit about how you got into real estate and bring us up to speed of what you're doing these days.   Craig (1m 52s): Yeah. So I got into real estate because a lot of people like a lot of people, I hated my job. And so I was actually working like a venture capital type role in Silicon valley, which sounds super sexy and super cool. And I was hanging out with mark, like I was hanging out with mark Zuckerberg and Elon Musk and all that, but that wasn't, that's not really the case. Right. I'm actually just like buried in spreadsheets, working hundreds of hours a week is what it felt like. And really just getting paid like an abysmal amount on an hourly rate. And I just kinda came to this conclusion that there's no way I wanted to do this for the rest of my life and what, like, what's the way to out.   What's an early way to retire. How do I achieve financial independence? And that's what kind of real estate came to mind through a lot of iterations I went through, I tried to do start my own startups, which was just horrible, horrible stuff. And then I was like, I don't need to be mark Zuckerberg or Steve jobs or anything like that. Right. I can just be a real estate investor. And so I found bigger pockets pretty quickly after this deciding I wanted to get into real estate just was absorbing absorb, absorb information for about six months. And then I was like, okay, I got to get out of Silicon valley. Cause I just can't afford anything here.   It doesn't seem like this whole house hacking thing really works in Silicon valley. So I actually moved to Denver, got a job at bigger pockets, which was like a dream come true. Started surrounding myself with real estate investors and people that were doing things that I wanted to do. And, you know, got my first property in that was April, 2017 or actually started June, 2017. I got my first property   Jesse (3m 21s): Right on. And that first property was that a, was that a house hacking proper property. And, and I guess before you answer that, maybe for listeners just to update people that don't know how sacking would, is it?   Craig (3m 33s): Yeah. So how's hacking is the idea that you buy a one to four unit property with a low percent down, typically three to 5% down. You have to live in it for a year. So if it's a single family house, you're living in a room, if it's a two to four unit, you're living in a unit and you rent out the parts that you're not living in, so that the rent covers your mortgage and you're able to live for free or at least drastically reduce your housing expense. And because your housing expenses probably your largest expense, you're actually able to save a lot more money. So you can go ahead and buy the next investment.   And so that's what I did on that first property. I purchased a duplex. This was before anybody really knew about the rent by the room strategies before that was popular. So the only way to house at this time in my head was to buy a duplex live in one side, rent out the other. So it was an uptown duplex. I lived in the bottom, rented out the top and I wasn't quite covered my mortgage. And I was like determined to cover my mortgage. It would have been a great house either way, but I was determined to cover my mortgage. So I Airbnb it out my bedroom and put up this like cardboard box room divider thing, slept on a futon and made that where I slept for one year.   And that was my 24 year old hustle self.   Jesse (4m 47s): So that, that is a pure house hack right there. So in terms of the, the uptown, was it already, was it already converted to the ability to have a walkout? What did that?   Craig (4m 58s): Yeah, it was totally turnkey. And so with house hacking, I firmly believe, and I stand by this. I was like this to the grave. Is that a turnkey property? That in by Turkey, I just mean the rehab is totally completed for you is much better than doing a rehab when you're doing the house. Heck because with house hacking, right, the, the magic is buying one every single year on the year and your year does not start until you close on that first property. And so let's say you close today's November 1st, let's say close today, November 1st.   I can't buy another one until November 1st of next year, but if I'm doing a rehab, that means I am spending more money. I am not getting money from my tenants. And that may push me back if I have to save another 20 or 30 grand to get the house hack on November 1st. So who cares if I have an extra 30,000 of equity in my house, which I can't use, I need 30,000 in my pocket, which I can go buy the next house for.   Jesse (5m 52s): And the one year is that, is that a financing thing? Is that just a strategic thing?   Craig (5m 57s): Yeah, that's a financing thing. So in order to get those low down payment loans, the three to 5%   Jesse (6m 1s): Down the bank says, you need to live there for at least one year. So yeah. Yeah. I find, I find too, there's a, depending on kind of the weather American Canadian, depending on which state you're in, I know that the ability to move in or displace a tenant oftentimes has a one-year horizon on it that they want you living there for one year. But to your point, yeah. In terms of finance, I think most areas you're going to get that lower financing. When you can say that you're personally moving into the, to the property in terms of the, so, so you start with, you start with that property, how, and that was a 2017, you   Craig (6m 37s): Said 2017.   Jesse (6m 38s): So from 2017 to where we're at right now, a couple of things have changed in the market. You know, some minor things in terms of how you kind of grew the portfolio. If you have from then to now, what does that look like?   Craig (6m 52s): Yeah. So the growth at first, it's really slow because you just don't have a lot of money, right? Like, you know, I remember on that first one, I pretty much depleted almost my entire savings and maybe had like 10 grand left and I needed to save up another 20 or so grand and get the next house hack. And you know, at that time I was maybe saving $2,000 a month. So it was like gonna take me probably a whole year to save up for the next house. Heck. So what I was doing, you know, I call it the lull period in between house hacks where there's really not much you can do. I mean, if you want to be a real estate hustler and start wholesaling and flipping, you could get into that, but I wasn't really interested in those things.   So I just doubled down at my work. I was working at BiggerPockets at the time, doubled down on my work there. I actually asked Scott who Scott trench to see yogurt buckets, basically, how can I make more money here? And I was able to, he actually gave me an opportunity and we created a pathway together to where I could make more money at my, at my W2 job. I was doing Airbnb arbitrage. I was throwing out my car. I was basically just figuring out any possible way that I can make some more money because I want to hit financial independence as early as possible, like so badly because I hated that feeling of being stuck.   Jesse (8m 4s): Yeah. Yeah. It's great. It's looking for different or different streams of income. And for those that don't know, like Turo Turo is great. It's a, it's basically an Airbnb for your card and I'm pretty sure they're in every major market, but so it sounds like, it sounds like for you, it wasn't so much the flipping and the fact that you're going to run a business, you wanted more so passive income and, and longer term, longer term growth.   Craig (8m 25s): That's right. Yeah. I was, I mean, maybe I was scared honestly. Like I didn't want to handle hard money. I was in Denver. Right. So buying a house for 400 grand hard money on that, it's going to be like 50 grand. And I was like only about 20 grand. Right. And then you still got to put 20% down. So it became such a high effort thing that like, I wouldn't be able to do that and have my W2 job. And I really loved my W2 job at the time. Like I was hanging out at BiggerPockets, we were talking real estate network was growing. I had a lot of opportunity at BiggerPockets.   So I was like, just, that is my number one focus. So   Jesse (8m 59s): At the time, what were you doing at BiggerPockets?   Craig (9m 2s): So I was their finance guy. So I say the finance guy, because I was the only person on the finance team at the time. And so basically like doing all their books, running the numbers, making reports for management and stuff to look at. So I, at one point I knew pretty much every number that BiggerPockets had, but unfortunately I don't have that anymore. So my numbers are probably three years expired.   Jesse (9m 26s): Okay. Fair enough. And you've moved at sounds like you've moved from BiggerPockets to another W2 job or are you investing full time?   Craig (9m 35s): No, so yeah, I knew that BiggerPockets is going to be my last w two jobs. And so my, yeah, so I figured pockets. I basically had done three house hacks. So over the course of about three years, I did three house hacks and I felt like I was financially independent, but I wasn't sure. And so the way I test it was I took a zero paycheck and maxed out my 401k. So like my entire paycheck for three months was going to my 401k and I figured, Hey, if at the end of three months, my checking account is higher. I'm financially free.   And if not, well, then I'm pretty darn close. And I just, I just maxed out my 401k. And so lo and behold, it was a lot bigger and I was like, I can, I think I can make it on my own. And so pretty much a month after that, at the end of January of 2020, I quit BiggerPockets and went full-time as a real estate agent, helping people, coach guide and mentor people, helping coach guide and mentor those who want to house hack.   Jesse (10m 32s): Fair enough. So in terms of the, the host hacking itself, so you, you move on to that anniversary, you move in purchasing another property. How sack of that property, what are you doing with the former property in terms of whether you're selling refinancing? What does that look like?   Craig (10m 46s): I don't do anything. I just move out and I put someone else in my place. So just rent it out. I did refinance my first two properties because interest rates were so low this past year in 2021. And so it made a lot of sense. I think I reduced my monthly payment by like, like a total of a thousand dollars over the course of two properties. So easy way to boost your cashflow. And so, so yeah,   Jesse (11m 9s): Yeah, absolutely. Absolutely. But in terms of the, cause the Denver market, it's not the cheapest market in the world. So in terms of you were still able to cashflow, even when you're, you're moving out of these properties with, with the down payment as low as it was.   Craig (11m 24s): Oh yeah. So on that first property, my, my mortgage payment before I refinanced was 22, 2300, I was getting 1650 for the upstairs and 1300 for the downstairs. So my rent was 29 50 and my mortgage payment was about 2300. So six 50 over the mortgage, of course there's reserves and all that kind of stuff, but it was a newer property. So there wasn't a whole lot of maintenance and stuff. It wasn't a great location, so not a whole lot of vacancy. And you know, maybe you put reserves for two or $300 a month and it's still cashflows $300.   And it's in a great area. It's appreciated like probably 200 over 200 grand now in just a few years. So like great property now, since I've refinanced it and rents have gone up this year in 2021, you know, it's, I think I'm making a little over $3,000 on the rent and my mortgage payment is only like 1700 or maybe 1800. And so, you know, now it's closer to a thousand dollars of cashflow on the property and then yeah, same, same thing, same thing as it goes like each one, probably each property that I have in Denver cashflows about a thousand dollars a month.   Jesse (12m 33s): That's great. So being the numbers guy, when you look at these properties specifically on the host hacking side of things, is there an approach that you take that might differ from, from other investors or other investments?   Craig (12m 46s): Yeah. So when you're house hacking, you want to fit, you want to have multiple strategies that you can do, or at least I like having multiple strategies. And what I mean by that is, you know, if you've got a duplex, can you rent it out? Each unit like traditionally and still cashflow, it may not be your best cashflow, but can you still do it? Can you Airbnb it? Can you rent it by the room? How does the layout work? Can you, you know, in a single family house, can you split the upstairs and the downstairs or, you know, the left side from the right side and make two different units out of it. And so properties like that are the ones that we really like.   I pretty much in Denver now, I pretty much only buy single family houses that we could easily convert it to duplexes just based on the layout. And that way, you know, you're getting the house at a single family price in a single family type neighborhood. He renting it out as two separate units that are actually would get you higher rent than you would have to duplex because it's in a nicer area, it's a nicer house. And so the numbers work really well in places like,   Jesse (13m 41s): Yeah, no, that makes sense. And you kind of moved into, I guess, writing with the house hacking strategy. How did that come about? What was that process like?   Craig (13m 52s): Yeah. So writing has, you know, the miracle morning. I do. Yeah. Great. But yeah. Great. So amazing. Both of you haven't read that book. You need to read it a life-changing book, but ever since I started doing that, I started to write every morning and I think he had Ellen Rogers who wrote the book meant means like journaling, but I just enjoy actually just like writing content in the morning. And so basically I write every morning and I was writing blog after blog, after blog for bigger pockets. I think I have probably close to 60 blog posts on bigger pockets. And so they asked me, Hey, do you want to write this book on how second you can?   I was like, hell yeah, I do. And so I, you know, basically instead of writing the blog post every morning, I would just take a stab and write a piece of the book every morning. And after about a hundred days, I had a first draft of a book. And then, you know, for a few months later after the edits and stuff like that, it got published. And that was definitely a, an inflection point in my life.   Jesse (14m 43s): Yeah. I'm always fascinated as listeners probably know of the, the process, the, the, the writing process. We had Chad Carson, coach Carson on the show, by the time you're listening to this, that episode probably has aired. He was talking about the same thing. It was basically from blog to multiple blogs to book. It seems like a strategy that a lot of writers, especially in our space use, as well as, you know, on the other side of, for the individuals that maybe writing isn't isn't their passion, or it's just something that's that doesn't come easily easily to them.   I found that some, some people put content out audio and then basically transcript the audio and then kind of edit from there. But yeah, it's, it sounds like you were the former on that.   Craig (15m 24s): Yeah, no, I, I genuinely like to like touch the keyboard, which is weird, I guess, but like, I like to like make that thing go and yeah, it doesn't take long, you know, if you can just sit yourself, I mean, there's a word counter right on the bottom left, like a Microsoft word document. So I would just be like, I'm not, I'm not leaving this computer until a thousand words richer or whatever you want to call it.   Jesse (15m 43s): And for those that are interested, we'll put a link up for where you can reach out and where you can get the book. But in terms of the, the framework of the book, did you, I mean, obviously you, you wrote through blogs, but in terms of the framework itself, did that change from when you initially wrote it and you know, how did you approach that?   Craig (16m 1s): Yeah. So when you're running a book, it's all about the outline. Like you should spend half the time of half the total time writing the book on the outline, because that is the most important part. If you got the outline, good, the book will just write itself. Right. And so it's almost like almost, you just keep expanding, expanding its spending on the outline until it becomes the book and then you have to go back and, and make it flow. And so really it was just a mixture of yeah. Having a solid outline. Also, I took a lot of my blog posts and just kind of repurposed them a little bit for the book because I mean, a lot of my information is out in the world somewhere.   That's the great thing about a book, because you can even sit into one little thing. And so, and so, yeah, I mean, that was pretty much the process, you know, outline, outline, outline. And then after I had a thorough outline and I went over it with bigger pockets, I just, just started writing a thousand words a day. Every day. You had a, before you had a book.   Jesse (16m 55s): No, that makes sense. So in terms of the, you know, one of the biggest things right now that we're seeing in our market is it continues to be a lot of capital chasing fewer and fewer deals. And it just seems that deals are harder and harder to find where, you know, it's usually one or the other. And in times where there's a lot of deals out there, it's usually financing is harder to find. So in this environment, for those, whether they're looking for longer term properties or looking specifically to do house hacking, what's your approach for sourcing deals and you know, what do you tell clients and investors that you coach?   Craig (17m 28s): And so we get almost all of our deals on MLS and how second is kind of a different beast, right? And the reason for that is you don't need to get a property, super undervalued, add value to it and refinance it, right? The magic is just like slowly collecting rental properties with a low percent down. So you can buy a $600,000 property here in Denver and you're putting 5% down. That's 30 grand, right? And so you've gotten this, you have this property for 30 grand. You have to make the deal work by creatively trying to figure out ways, right? So we've got a lot of people that like to Airbnb, a lot of people that do rent by the room, we've we teach people how to do these split things that, that I like to do.   And those almost always cashflow, right? It may not be a thousand dollars a month at first, but over time, rents are going to increase. You're going to be paying more of your mortgage payment down. Maybe you can refinance to a lower rate. You can take off your PMI and you figure out ways to increase your cashflow over the course of five, seven years. And you know, that that's, the play is the long-term buy and hold. So that's why the MLS works is because again, we don't, we're not trying to like add a whole bunch of value and refinance it, deployed money back out. We're just okay with letting the $30,000 in and keeping it in there.   Jesse (18m 38s): Yeah. And it kind of sounds similar to what we do on the commercial real estate side. We always find that the owner occupier is the one that can pay the highest price for the, for the property because of the, the economies that they have, or the fact that because they're operating out of there. So I guess in a similar way, the person that is house hacking, maybe, you know, not that you're going to pay more than you should, but you probably can be more competitive than somebody that's purely going in there to rent it out.   Craig (19m 2s): Yep, exactly. Right. You can, you can. Yeah, exactly. You can pay more because again, like you're going to be thinking about your competition because the, the, the market's competitive. Right. And if your competition is a lot of it is like home buyers, it's probably more so than house hackers. And so as a house hacker, you can pay more because you're already offsetting your mortgage payment with rents. And so sure, like, what's the difference of like a $50,000 difference is like $250 on your mortgage. Right. It's significant, but it shouldn't be life-changing.   And that $250, you're going to make that back in a month with appreciation. Right. So like, it doesn't even like the price almost doesn't even matter, but make sure you run the numbers and it makes sense, but like with how exactly, I've just never heard anybody lose. Like, and I know a lot of house hackers.   Jesse (19m 50s): Yeah. No, it makes sense. I mean, especially that you're in the property, are there properties that you basically try to avoid or properties that, you know, comparing two properties, say one, like you said, that needs, needs renovations or needs capital improvements. Do you try to avoid those? And, and also just kind of on the same, on the same wavelength when it comes to properties that, you know, you can put a walkout in that doesn't currently have one that would be perfect and create a house hacking property. Is that something you also would look at when you're, when you're looking at properties?   Craig (20m 23s): Yeah. So we like to look at, so creating a walkout can be very hard if the house, like, you know, if the basement isn't already at like our level. So we try to find a house where the stairs to go, like stairs to go from the main level to downstairs is right by maybe a back door or garage door. So you can just kind of wall off where, you know, the backdoor meets the upstairs. And then the, so then just, so when you walk in the back door, it's just, you go down the steps.   And so that those lamps are the ones that we really like, and there's a ton of them in Denver. So that's what tends to really work. I think you had another question, but I forgot what you asked   Jesse (21m 4s): In terms of the, just other capital improvements. Are there, are there certain properties that you, you try to avoid when it comes to, you know, when it comes to spending a certain amount of money to get it to where you need it to be? Okay.   Craig (21m 16s): Yeah. So again, I like the layout to be, like I said, right where the, the less amount of work I have to do the better. So if I have to like dig a separate entrance, like that's a lot of work, expensive egress windows can be very expensive and they've gone up in price in my market when I was putting them in like a couple of years ago, it was 3,500. Now it's close to $5,000 for a regressed window. And so if, if egos windows are already in there, that is really helpful. If there's some sort of plumbing fucked up to the downstairs, we can hook up a kitchen fairly easily.   That's really nice. And so, yeah, those are all the things that I kind of look for. There's nothing that I, I like nothing in particular that I wouldn't do, but if it's like, not even like it, but I wouldn't like force a house to make it a house hack. If the layout doesn't work and all that, like, there's, there's plenty of houses where the way it does work.   Jesse (22m 5s): Yeah. Fair enough. So just shifting gears in terms of where we're at in the market right now, I know that, you know, as you mentioned, you, you write a bunch of blogs. I've seen different posts that you've had. I'm curious to get your thoughts on the current market environment that we're in. Obviously, you know, there's been lockdowns for a few years, almost two years now, if not, yeah. Over we're coming into it right now to two years in terms of how that's affected, if it has at all, the way that you're viewing the real estate market. And is it informing decisions that you're making today?   Craig (22m 37s): Yeah, that's a good question. So, so COVID was probably the best thing that ever happened to me from a, it from a financial standpoint, which maybe I'm, I think I'm one of the few, because when everything's shut down in April and may of 2020 is right. When I basically started my real estate agent business and no one was doing showings. Right. And it was super competitive before that, but no one was doing showings and Denver never really shut it down. Like they never made it. So you couldn't schedule it. Like there were some markets where you couldn't schedule it Denver, you can still schedule it.   And I was talking to like my buyers and I was like, well, no one else is looking right now showing percentages, showing times like showing rate is down 88%. So I swear we're probably the only ones even looking and the seller wants to sell and you want to buy, so if you're cool with it, like I'm cool with it. Let's just go and it will be, you know, six feet apart wear the mask, whatever, like, you know, and, and so we did that and we were for like a few months there, every offer that we were putting out there was getting accepted and it was at asking price. And it was like, it was even below asking price, which was like beautiful for them, for the buyers.   Obviously that was only a short window. And then as things started to heat up again towards the end of last summer, and then all through winter 20, 20, 20, 21, and throughout 2021, things got started really heating up and getting really, really competitive. And that's where house hacking comes into play. Right. Because it's like, Hey, not only were the price is going up, but rents were also going up as well. But we were saying like, okay, let's just analyze the deal, right? Like it's listed for 500,000, can you pay five 50 for it? Like, this is what your mortgage payment would be.   This is what you'll get in rent. You're still going to be making over a thousand dollars a month, like who cares what the listing price is and how much over we have to go. Then the only downside was the appraisal gap coverage, right. Where, you know, for the listeners that may not know is if the appraisal is, comes in lower than the purchase price, someone's got to make up that difference in cash buyer or seller or combination of the two. We kind of had a, a way around that as well. And so should I get into that or please do so, so one thing that we did a lot of was we would set the inspection.   So we would set the inspection for maybe seven to 10 days out. So let's say, you know, you're under contract on November. First inspection would be November 10th. We would then immediately call the lender and get a rush appraisal to be done like that same, the same week. So we're reporting this on a Monday, the appraisal would be backed by Friday before the inspection deadline. If the appraisal comes back super low, we can still back out because of the inspection. So we were able to fully waive the appraisal while still having to be able to back out on the inspection. And that was a strategy that I think a lot of, well, maybe we were the only ones to do it, but I'm sure we're not the only ones to do that strategy, but that worked really well for us in terms of getting deals in our contracts, getting deals done and making sure both parties were very happy.   Jesse (25m 33s): No, fair enough. And in terms of the short-term rental space. So I think you've, you've written blogs on this in terms of that area of the business, you know, how has, how do you see that market given everything that's transpired over the past year and a half, two years? And do you think, do you think it's a S it's a space that is going to be coming back? If it has an already   Craig (25m 55s): It's already come back and it's tough. It's like, it's doubled since, but it was, so I had a whole bunch of short term rentals. I was one of the scared ones that shut, shut everything down and turn into long-term rentals during COVID. And I think a lot of people did that. So the supply and demand just wasn't there. So then as more and more Airbnbs came on and we started air, like our clients started being, they were just crushing. It they're like, dude, I like you told me I was going to make like 3000 a month. I'm making 5,000 a month, like, like the are conservative numbers. Like they were blowing our numbers out of the water, which was great.   Like, I would much rather have people be happier in that regard. But, you know, as, as, as, as far as where it's going to go, like, I don't have a crystal ball. I don't know. That's why I always say like, Airbnb can be your plan a right. And that could be the way you make your most money, but like, make sure you have a plan B that also cashflows, even if it's only a hundred bucks over the mortgage, just so you can hold it, hold it through this recession or whatever, because, you know, when, when, whenever this recession hits that we're going to have at some point, right? Like the first thing that's going to go is recreational travel business travel is probably going to be a lot less, especially with zoom and all of these things that have come to fruition through COVID and there's going to be a lot less reasons for people to travel and want to travel.   And so if the Airbnb, I mean, at the end of the day, Airbnb hasn't even gone. Hasn't even made it through a recession yet the company Airbnb. Right. So we don't even know how they would handle it. So just to have that, have that like backup plan, I think it's super important.   Jesse (27m 24s): Yeah. In terms of the actual financing of deals, obviously you're doing a particular strategy and niche when it comes to the house hacking, but generally speaking, do you have a, a certain methodology or philosophy about how you handle the debt side of your business?   Craig (27m 41s): So I, I personally am trying to get as many, as many Fannie Freddie loans as I possibly can, because we all know that's the cheapest and that's the best kind of debt you can have. I think you're allowed to have up to 10 Fannie Freddie type loans. Once you've maxed out at your 10, you know, then you have to start thinking about other creative ways. And so right now, I think I'm at like seven or eight, I'm going to probably be at 10 by early next year, but I'm fine with that.   Like, I kind of just want to exhaust my 10 because now I'm going into like more commercial real estate investing, triple net, lease side stuff and all that. And that's where I see the future of my real estate investing going. But yeah,   Jesse (28m 24s): No, that makes sense. I want to kind of shift a little bit to something we talked about at the beginning. So your W2 job, or, you know, your, your normal kind of day to day job. You're not dissimilar to a lot of people that we have on the show that make the jump into full-time investment for people that are looking to get into real estate or people that are into real estate. And they're coming up to what, you know, you had an inflection point, you know, what do you, what, what would you say to those individuals in terms of actually kind of leaving the, the day job and you know, what seems like a pretty, and it is a scary, scary move, you know, what, what are your thoughts on that?   Craig (28m 59s): I mean, it's uncomfortable doing so, right. But think about it this way is that your worst case scenario is the scenario you're in right now, right? Your worst case scenario is as you quit, you maybe lose $5,000 on an experiment of trying to, you know, do something for yourself. And then you have to go back and get another job. Right? Like that that's really a hardest. And so if you can kind of just like, look at it as an experiment and look at it, like nothing is permanent, just because you say you quit, it doesn't mean you have to quit forever.   Right. And also, I like the idea that, yeah, you've got enough rental property, passive income to support at least your basic living expenses so that you have enough runway. So that it's, it's not, you know, it's not an issue, you know? Yeah. So   Jesse (29m 44s): For you, it wasn't, it wasn't like a burn, the boats thing where you just absolutely, you know, drop it and say, I'm going to start buying real estate. It was buy real estate, figure out what that number is to make it, make it at least somewhat more comfortable to make, to do that transition. Do I have that right?   Craig (29m 59s): Yeah. Yep. Is that right? Right. I mean, I think for me, I had like $3,000 of passive income and I was like, I'm a single dude. Like I can live off of that as long as I say frugal. And then once you become your entrepreneurial self, you can make a million times more than you ever could have W2. And that will just funnel you're, you know, getting more financially independent or, you know, more fat financially independent, or however you want to call it.   Jesse (30m 22s): No. Fair enough. So in terms of the, you know, you mentioned you, you did get licensed, so as a licensed realtor, you kind of moved into that space, the fit team. Is that, is that on the investing side or is that the, is that on the broker agenda things?   Craig (30m 36s): Yeah, so I ended up being like so busy last year that I either had to quit or start a team. So we started a team. We, we got a team about 1520 agents now that are all house hackers, all investors, at least on the investment side. And so we help coach guide, mentor people through that process of house hacking. We've got pretty much everything you need in terms of, you know, relationships with vendors, leases, calculators, like we'll walk you through the entire process if you need us to just because that process is so scary to like the first person putting their, like 30 of the $40,000, they've saved up for their whole life into one house.   It makes you feel better when you've got a whole team of people with, you know, hundreds of deals under their belt, kind of guiding you through that.   Jesse (31m 23s): Yeah, for sure. And I mean, in terms of the team itself, the, the team that you built out and the coaching that you have, was that something that happened, it seems like you, you had the demand. So you built out the team for those that are building their own team w with real estate, whether it's sourcing real estate, trying to get property managers, what are your recommendations? Kind of some of the stuff that you've found that were helpful to you when you were starting out and you're buying these first few properties,   Craig (31m 52s): I I'd say like, just document your systems as best as you can. Loom is something that I use a lot. So I'm sure people know about it by now, it's a screen recording thing. It's a plug-in on Chrome and anything you do that is repetitive, you should be looming it. Right. And you save it somewhere so that someone else can do it. Right. So, so these days I'm doing very few. I really don't do any showings. I really don't do any contract writing. I've got the team that does that and they can ramp up so easily without asking me hardly any questions, because I literally have videos and videos and templates and samples of all of that.   Right. So we can onboard a new agent pretty quickly and they're up and running very quickly. And the questions they asked me are like high level questions that they should be asking me. And so I can stay kind of in my 20%, which is know content creation coming on, podcasts like this, right. Doing stuff like that to just to just grow the, grow the brand.   Jesse (32m 46s): Yeah. That's great. I love the loom. And it's funny now, like two years or a year and a half after everything, that's, that's really been going on in the world. It's nice that we have zoom, loom, Skype, where you can actually, you know, when you're hiring something, somebody just the other day, my partner and I were like, okay, we can give instructions to this person. Or we could just record the call, the onboarding call. And then, you know, they, he, or she has a reference.   Craig (33m 7s): Yeah. It's, it's so amazing. Like, and I think it's way easier. Like the old fashioned, like paper trail documents, like your type every step-by-step. We have a little bit of that, but the loons are just so much easier and so much better too. Like it's a picture is worth a thousand words. Right. So video's worth like a million.   Jesse (33m 24s): Yeah, no, a hundred percent. A 100%. And then you ha it's, it's more dynamic, right? Yeah. You can have somebody in real time asking you questions and then solve it, solve it right there. Awesome. Well, we have, we've got four questions that we ask every guest that comes on the show and want to be mindful of the time here. But before we get to that, in terms of the coaching that you have for people to reach out we're where can they find find you? And, you know, what's the best route for them to, to take on.   Craig (33m 51s): Yeah. So, you know, we've got our podcast, the fight team podcast is actually being rebranded here shortly. So we're going to come up with a new name, so be on the lookout for that. And then, you know, if you're, if you're in the Denver area or you need a real estate investor from the real estate, Adrian, the fight team.com is where you can find us. And I'm also on Instagram. If you want to just kind of check out my stuff at the fire guy.   Jesse (34m 12s): Absolutely. We'll put a link to everything in the show notes, but yeah, let's go to the final four here. If you're, if you're ready to go, I'll send them your way. Let's do it. Okay. What's something, you know, now in your career, it can be real estate or business that you wish you knew when you first started out.   Craig (34m 30s): I wish I knew the who, not how concept have you heard of, you know, that mother basically. Yeah. That whole thing of why stay in, what do you do best in stay in your zone of what you do best at anything. You don't do good. Hire someone to do it for you. Cause they're not only going to do it better, quicker and probably cheaper, but it's going to also grow your business much faster and you're going to be happier.   Jesse (34m 56s): Yeah. I can't, I can't recommend that book enough when we were at the BP con BiggerPockets conference in new Orleans, I was think Dan Sullivan is the author awesome book. It's it really is. It really changes the way you look at things because for so long, we're taught, you know, if you, if you get somebody to collaborate with you, if you give somebody a task that you're, you know, you're cheating in school. Right. But really the idea of find, find out who's the best person to do that. And it should be, should it be taking up your bandwidth or not? Yep. Love that.   Awesome. All right. Number two here. What is a, a book that you seem to constantly be recommending and we'll put the who not, how on put that aside for a second or podcast that you, that you keep recommending?   Craig (35m 40s): I guess the miracle morning doesn't count either. Cause he already mentioned that one, definitely the miracle morning and who knows how or applied my tattoo a podcast, obviously there's a bigger pockets podcast. That one is kind of a no brainer. Can I just depends on where you are in your journey. But I think like for, for fundamental business books, miracle morning changed my life. Who knows how it changed my life. And also the E-Myth is, is really, really good if you're thinking about growing a business and long people wanting to step away someday.   Jesse (36m 9s): That's great. We'll put links up to those as well. In terms of people that are getting into the industry, people that are, whether it's through brokerage or looking from the investor's lens, what would you tell them in today's market? And just generally your thoughts on mentorship?   Craig (36m 27s): My thoughts. So, so in terms of the market today, I think like you have to just like keep buying no matter what the market's doing, because timing the market is like been known to be fail failure right now, known to fail. So just dollar cost, average it by one a year with the course of 10 years and you'll buy it the highest you'll buy it. The lowest in terms of mentorship and stuff. I think you really, I hate that term mentor. I hate when someone asks me to be their mentor, I kinda just wanna be your friend, right? Like I'll be friends with almost anybody, as long as you're, we've got the same values, the same morals, and we're kind of on the same page.   So just like go to meetups and just start talking to people, right. And then follow up with them and grab a coffee with them and grab dinner with them and go on a hike with them. And before you know it you're, you've got a friend and maybe they're more experienced than you. Then they become your mentor. Right. They're going to naturally just give you advice. They're going to want to help you. And so that's like my favorite way to mentorship is just becoming friends with people that are both above you. So you can be the mentee and below you. So you can be the mentor.   Jesse (37m 25s): That makes sense. All right. The last one, Craig, first car make and model.   Craig (37m 30s): Oh man. He tried to get to my bank accounts. It's a 2002 Dodge. Intrepid was my first car   Jesse (37m 38s): Right on. And I said, that's not the one you put on Turo.   Craig (37m 41s): No, no. The one I put on Turo was a Toyota Prius, which got smashed up. But yeah, that's a fun, fun story. Maybe we'll dive into it real quick. I think I lost you on the yeah.   Jesse (37m 57s): Okay. Yeah, no, you can get into it. Cause I know you put a, you put a blog out as well about, about just different income streams I think. And Turo was a Toro was definitely one of them I believe.   Craig (38m 8s): Yeah. So yeah, back in the day, Touro was a street, was an income stream that I had to kind of while I was at bigger pockets and I could fight to work. And so basically I, I was proud of myself. I read, never split the difference by Chris Boston negotiating book. And I was able to negotiate the price of that car from 12,500 down to 10,000. So I bought the car for 10,000. I Ubered it for awhile. I toll road for awhile. The car probably made me about $10,000 over the course of two years. And then someone crashed on Turo. The Touro com whatever the company has, some insurance policy where they actually paid me out like 11,500 for it.   I ended up like getting more than I ever paid for it initially after, you know, however many miles later. And then I bought a crappy car for like 50, for like five grand and kept the six grand and invested in real estate. So   Jesse (38m 57s): There you go. Always, always on the move. Awesome. All right. Well, we'll put links up to, to everything that we talked about here. And just for those that, you know, I know you have a presence on Instagram as well. Could you just let us know the handle for that as well?   Craig (39m 11s): Yup. It's a, the fire guy. So like the financial independence guy.   Jesse (39m 17s): Awesome. My guest today has been Craig Kurloff Craig. Thanks for being part of working capital.   Craig (39m 21s): Thanks for having me on Jesse. Appreciate you.   Jesse (39m 31s): Thank you so much for listening to working capital the real estate podcast. I'm your host, Jesse for galley. If you liked the episode, head on to iTunes and leave us a five star review and share on social media, it really helps us out. If you have any questions, feel free to reach out to me on Instagram, Jesse for galley, F R a G a L E, have a good one. Take care.  

Locked On Today
The Phoenix Suns Have Started off the Season Blazing Hot

Locked On Today

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 21:41


The Phoenix Suns picked right back up where they left off 2020 and look poised to compete for the West crown, once again. The Los Angeles Angels signed Noah Syndergaard in an attempt to strengthen a lackluster pitching staff. The College Football Playoff needs fixing and Jay Crawford believes the NFL is an easy example as to how to do it. Also, the Golden State Warriors dominated the Brooklyn Nets so much that Steph Curry received MVP chants...in Brooklyn, the Florida Panthers got back on the winning track by beating the New York Islanders, the Cleveland Cavaliers are looking at some time without rookie phenom Evan Mobley, and two Duke University men's basketball players got into some trouble. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

REFERRALS PODCAST
217 When He Started This Project People Laughed At Him with Michael J Maher and John Israel

REFERRALS PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 43:41


Episode: 217 Title: When He Started This Project They Laughed at Him Host: Michael J. Maher Guest: John Israel Description: In 2016 John Israel started a social experiment around human connection by writing 5 handwritten notes per day for a year. So, what happened? Lots of things happened, but mostly the Mr. Thank You movement and tedX talk. Listen in as Michael and John discuss the power of an act of gratitude and how a note has the power to change everything. (7L) Referral Strategies and Podcast Topics: Notevember, Power Notes, Gratitude Special Offer: Join our new Referral Mastery Academy and get instant access to class plus fresh and new LIVE classes taught monthly! Register at www.ReferralMasteryAcademy.com

The Content Fix
You started with a vision, now let's move it forward with a mission statement

The Content Fix

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 15:55


A mission statement explains how you are going to deliver the vision for your business. Some people think it's not important to have one or that's it's just a vanity statement to show you've done your strategy work. But a carefully considered mission statement actually helps you focus and drive a business towards the future. In this episode you'll find out what the difference is between a vision statement and a mission statement and how to use three simple questions to help create your own.

The Bledsoe Show
Censorship is F'ing Retarded

The Bledsoe Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 106:02


00:00.56 mikebledsoe That's how you already canceled you're bulletproof. 00:01.76 Max Shank It's okay I already canceled myself so well, it's like I found I was putting so much of my identity into this illusion that I had masterfully crafted. On the internet I was like the dark night of fitness I was professional I was like once in a while a little bit funny I used all the big fancy words and I only showed people the exact slice of my life I wanted them to see and I was really good at it too and then I was like man this is a. Probably probably not good long term like this whole this whole reality that we've created where people think oh, that's just that's just max all the time I'm just out there. You know going on vacations and lifting huge things all the time and it's not really.. It's not really very honest. So of course I think we all do to fit in I think that's kind of normal and the best friends you have are the ones you don't have to fake around and truthfully. 00:57.30 mikebledsoe Or you are censoring yourself. It sounds like. 01:15.83 Max Shank I don't really hang out with too many people that I have to um, fake it around which is why I say some horrible things that are also really funny like if you've ever played the game would you rather? that's a really, that's a really good 1 Are you played would you rather. 01:20.66 mikebledsoe Four. 01:30.62 mikebledsoe No. 01:34.00 Max Shank So here's it's a hypothetical game. So for example, would you rather have sex with a goat and have no 1 know about it or have a video of you having sex with a goat that's totally fake, but everyone thinks you did. 01:47.44 mikebledsoe Oh that's a good 1 Yeah ah I'm gonna censor myself on that 1 actually I'm I'm having a hard time because yeah I think I might be on the same page as you on that 1 Ah. 01:56.14 Max Shank I would have sex with the goat. 02:04.99 Max Shank Is because there's still such a social stigma against bestiality right now we're not really enlightened about that. 02:07.50 mikebledsoe Yeah, it's and. 02:13.34 mikebledsoe Ah, well, it's interesting. What you're discussing is self-censorship is ah I hear people say they want to be more Authentic. You know I talk to a lot of people who want to express themselves on the internet and because I think people witnessed me do it and then they're like how do you do it I Want to do it too. And and and I'm definitely somebody Who's who's got a history of censoring myself less So these days than and earlier. But I think people deep down they desire not needing a sensor sensor themselves. They they want to. They want to be widely accepted by everybody but they think that the only way that can happen and it's probably true. The only way you can be popular with everybody is to censor yourself depending on the audience you're talking to and the person you're talking to. 03:03.58 Max Shank It is the most important thing to fit in with the group that you're a part of to fit in with the tribe I mean little kids go Rob seven eleven s and murder people so they can be part of a gang people say things that they don't mean people lie I mean I was a kid once I used to lie. 03:16.69 mikebledsoe Yep. 03:22.26 mikebledsoe Oh yeah. 03:22.93 Max Shank Did you ever lie I was great at it I had like think I had like 50 grandparents die as far as teachers knew growing up. Oh I decided I didn't do my homework a grandparents diet or something like that you know like when your're kid and you find out that lying is a. 03:29.54 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah, yeah. 03:42.50 Max Shank Like a ten second uncomfortable experience that can save you like weeks of trouble. Potentially it's it's natural that you would do it and if you're talking about how to like fit in better. Oh my god of course we all do that. 03:49.94 mikebledsoe Yeah. 03:57.67 mikebledsoe Yeah, but would you say that everyone on of about everyone. But I think that everyone gets to a point at some point in their life where they don't want to have to censor themselves anymore and I think that they. When they are at that point the language they use to describe what they desire is they want to be free I Want to be free to express myself and ah and what ends up happening is when someone starts exploring how much they want to express themselves. Find out that they're the only ones that are censoring themselves based on wanting to be accepted by the tribe and the likeability and so I've witnessed a lot of people including myself go through this process where a slowly saying fuck it I don't give a fuck What people think. I'm going to be more honest and then watching watching the polarization happen where some people get become more distant from me the more honest I am and other people getting a lot closer because of how honest I am and it's a it's a filter and it's and it's. 04:57.20 Max Shank And. 05:02.56 Max Shank Well, it's just filter. It's a good thing. It's like panning for gold. 05:09.20 mikebledsoe And it's really served me in a way where I experience my experience of my life is ah very enhanced. It's it's unreal at times. Um, and my sister she came to my birthday party a few weeks ago. And she got to witness my community and she was blown away. She didn't realize that people could be like that. But it really is a result of censoring myself less and attracting those people who and then giving permission to other people. Censor themselves less because I think you and I both say things that in. Probably me more publicly but say things that people turn their heads at and go well that's a crazy thing to say I've never heard anyone say that before or put it that way. Um, and I think I think it gives people permission to go oh if he can do it I can do it too. 05:58.42 Max Shank Totally and. Well and there's something to be said about a frictionless experience like if you're in a situation where I guess what I'm saying is it's easy to put other people at ease with the way that you communicate. Like you don't have to draw attention to things that are like if you see someone who's really overweight. You don't have to draw attention to their fatness. You don't have to just speak whatever you instinctually think so we're always choosing what to say as if. 06:32.71 mikebledsoe Um, yeah, it doesn't mean doesn't mean that. 06:40.10 Max Shank It's important or not important. 06:40.61 mikebledsoe Well I would say it's um, yeah, censorship is a form of filter but it's not the only version of Filter. There's There's the the filter of of ah of response you're being responsible with your words and how people receive them. And so it wouldn't behoove me to go out there and tell everybody exactly what I think and the way that I want to say it now. What I do is I say things say what I believe and what I think in a way in which I know it can be received because there's no point and if I'm just saying. You know if I'm just dropping the truth. Ah the way that I want to be heard and understood I'm just going to sound like a crazy person. 07:27.50 Max Shank Well, you just touched on something that I was thinking which is a good communicator doesn't just communicate the information as simply as possible. He considers who the audience is so it will resonate with them the best. So. 07:40.68 mikebledsoe A. 07:46.26 Max Shank The examples that you use or the language you use I mean you and I both understand the the power of communication and getting a resonant message if you and I were writing an exercise program. For 20 year old men or 50 year old women. The program itself might actually look the same but the way that we present that offer would be monumentally different or at least it should be monumentally different. So it's not just about. 08:18.78 mikebledsoe A. 08:23.98 Max Shank Oh I'm like speaking my truth. It's like well why are you talking at all unless you care about the message being received. 08:30.28 mikebledsoe Yeah, well that but that makes me think of like like ah it it it requiring you to have good communication to get your point across in a way that they can receive it is that is ah a good sense. That's good. Ah. Leadership. That's good communication to have good leadership. You have to have good communication and what I think we're witnessing in our society right now is um, it's laziness I see that that censorship when when censorship is being heavily used. It's ah it's a form of laziness. And it's also um, on that note, what we were just saying too is you have to fit it to your audience. So what ends up happening is the larger the audience the harder it is to be good at communicating with that audience. So we we take the United states of America and there's 3 hundred and fifty million people. You now have to create ah get to communicate the narrative in a way that that impacts all 3 hundred million people is that even lowest common and nomin and is that possible and so. 09:35.80 Max Shank Lowest common denominator. 09:42.63 mikebledsoe And then that's why I mean lowest common denominator is the exact reason why any time the average per we look at what's happening with Mainstream I go they're going right? What's left. They're going left. What's right? Okay, what's going on here because when there's being to the low and lower. Low is coming denominator if you want to be average. That's the that's the perfect advice to take that's the perfect information to consume and to believe if you want to be above average. You have to go the other way and that that can be very uncomfortable but to me I look at the difference between good leadership and and. And poor leadership is that ability to communicate effectively and I just see a lot of laziness and when people say do this because I said so is like okay, you just lost it. 10:29.41 Max Shank Well and the other side of that is that you could say it's not laziness. It's just efficiency because you have to trust like. For example, if I get a plumber over at my house. And I don't know anything about plumbing I have to trust that he's going to do a good job and there is an incentive for him to do good job and maybe there's a contract that says if the pipe explodes he's on the hook for it. So I don't blame people for seeking answers outside themselves because it is way more efficient. However, while it is more efficient. It is also so I think about it in terms of concentration of Power. So if you concentrate power into a single point you can get more penetration which means you can do things much faster like a dictatorship but the trick with concentration. Is. You also give leave yourself open to the fast track for concentration Camps. So it's It's ah it's just exactly so. 11:29.88 mikebledsoe Yeah,, but there's also single single points of Failure. So if you if you concentrate your supply chain and everything's going through 1 2 3 ports or something like that. It only takes 1 person to do something Dumb. And the entire population suffers. 11:51.40 Max Shank Investing is a good example too. You know you have your investment portfolio say you have a million dollars or something like that. Do you put equal amounts into 10 companies equal amounts into 1 hundred companies or do you put it all into 1 company and. If you put it all into 1 company and that 1 just happens to do the best you have made the most that you can possibly make. But if it goes to zero. You've also lost everything so it's a real. It's it's tricky with with concentration of power and I think that's really what this all comes back to. Thomas soul I always go back to because he said what we do is not important. It's who decides what we do who decides? what information should be censored and what information should not be censored and that's that's a worthwhile conversation to have um. I think when it comes to the overarching idea of what is the role of government I like the phrase. The role is not to protect people. It is to protect freedom from coercion. Essentially so we're trying to keep people free. To pursue happiness right? Life liberty and pursuit of happiness that doesn't mean you buy food for everybody. It means that you prevent stealing and coercion and fraud and things like that. 13:18.38 mikebledsoe I think I think it's referred to as negative rights is that the the government and ah you know most people in the world and and Americans are included in this unfortunately the assumption is that they have no rights and all rights are granted by the government and. 13:23.60 Max Shank Ah. 13:36.86 Max Shank It's just the opposite. 13:38.60 mikebledsoe And a place if you're looking at from perspective. What's called well I didn't even hear this term until recently and they go oh yeah, negative rights I go okay that actually makes sense and that is you have the right? you have the right to do anything you want as long as you don't impede on someone else's rights and. Ah, the government's there just to ensure that we don't trample over each other's shit and that means not inhibiting. Someone's pursuit of life liberty happiness upholding um ah property rights essentially so the government is it. It was it was there to protect you know in the very beginning. 14:11.97 Max Shank It's really all it's for. 14:16.80 mikebledsoe Started off with people that knew how to fight and had weapons would protect farmers and they made deals with the farmers so they wouldn't get robbed by these thieves and then they demanded you know a five percent of their rations and then of course that's now if you're an american that's up to 30 something percent. Um, are your rations for to pay for your protection. Um, so it's ah that the benefit that the government gets from from censorship but I see is it's ah just a maintenance of power. So if you're if your job. If you're that person that comes in and says I'm going to protect you and ah and then there becomes there's potential competition for protection then ah you know they've got to do whatever they can do to squash that because they don't they don't want competition for being able to. Ah, protect your property and your life. 15:11.39 Max Shank Right? So kind of tying it back into censorship which is the core discussion today. What are the advantages ofor censorship. How is it good for everybody. 15:23.52 mikebledsoe Yeah, so I went online and I did a search and so I found I found 8 that's right fucking? Well you know that's why I use. Ah, that's why I use a duck duck go. 15:30.23 Max Shank And and somebody chose what results that you were able to see from that search. 15:42.12 mikebledsoe With a vpn so I actually so I take steps personally to reduce how much censorship I'm experiencing from Google That's true. That's true. Yeah. 15:49.21 Max Shank Sometimes the results aren't as good though. That's the problem right now. Sometimes they aren't as good and I I try it with both because I do the same thing. 16:00.83 mikebledsoe Yeah I agree. Ah yeah, so these these are I'll go through the list. Ah 1 is hate speech censorship allows us to reduce hate speech number 2 is protect children which is the ah to me is the number 1 excuse for censorship that. Anytime censorships gets questioned. It's like the last stand you know when you used to? yeah we mean privacy. Oh yeah, yeah, but I think that people want privacy from the government. So. It's kind of like if they're the ones censoring that's people are more likely to. 16:21.90 Max Shank Or privacy. Yeah. 16:35.20 mikebledsoe Give their information to Facebook and they are to government. 16:35.28 Max Shank Oh but what I'm saying is if you convince everybody that it's for the sake of protecting kids from getting raped that they have to look through your phone every day then some people will be okay with that is pretty high level persuasion. It's always kids. 16:45.50 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah, so yeah. 16:53.69 Max Shank Always you know, take away the guns cause of the children take away your privacy because of the children take away free speech because of the children won't somebody think of the children. There's a there's a sign in my neighborhood quick tangent that says drive like your kids live here. 17:01.42 mikebledsoe Right? I Wonder how the kids. 17:12.51 mikebledsoe Um, yeah. 17:12.68 Max Shank You know there is There's a road to speed limit sign. But there's this extra sign that someone has put out that says drive like your kids here and what I want to do is put up my own sign that says teach your kids. What a road is oh. 17:30.14 mikebledsoe Ah I. 17:30.83 Max Shank Like what like oh my god that's just ridiculous I understand the concept some helicopter Mom is like worry that their kid will run out in the street. But really if her little kid runs out in the street and it's it's too young to know the difference then she's a bad mom. And if it's old enough to know the difference but she doesn't communicate that then she's also a bad mom. So. Either way, it's that parent's fault just like if you see a fat kid. That's not the kid's faultest. Parent's fault 17:53.83 mikebledsoe Yeah, well. Yeah I want to get in I want to get in the who's who's responsible because I think responsibility is is a good way to ah segue this and into some some actionables by end of this show but I want to hit this the rest of this list so hate speech protect children. Reduce conflict in society which I'm not sure that's actually working ah security to a country's government. Actually what was what was on the internet was security. What was it. Ah. 18:41.54 mikebledsoe Ah, yeah to a country's profile censorship can provide another level of security to a country's profile. Um, which to me again, it's they're not trying to censor and that's basically censoring sensitive. Government documents from being exposed like a wikileaks type of conversation. So Um I I like to point out that a lot of people confuse. Ah your country with your government and these 2 things are separate um and it's interesting to run into a blog where they. And make that collapse distinction ipe. Oh yeah, what was it. 19:18.00 Max Shank Mark Twain had a quote about that a man should be loyal to his country all the time and loyal to his government when they deserve it. 19:28.79 mikebledsoe Yeah, beautiful Mark twain 1 of my favorite authors. Um I p I p for artists and inventors so intellectual property copyright so you can't rip off someone else's work. Ah. 19:32.53 Max Shank No, it's funny guy. 19:40.96 Max Shank And then. 19:45.53 mikebledsoe By the way I think I p the idea of I p is not that old I think it's about 1 hundred years old or something like that. Well at least the modern day I p um because we can copy shit now whereas before it wasn't an issue. Um. 19:50.38 Max Shank Are. 20:04.20 mikebledsoe Stop false content. That's 1 that's probably the most popular 1 that's out right now fake news ah improve quality of information. Basically they said improve ah their exact words for like. 20:07.30 Max Shank Fake news. 20:23.40 mikebledsoe Improve a person's knowledge that 1 kind of made me chuckle. Um and and reduce identity Theft. So All these things sound good at face value Hate speech. Protect children reduce conflict in society security to a country's government I P for artists inventors stop False Content. You want just break each 1 of these down. 20:46.80 Max Shank Sure we could I mean Hate Speech is funny because who who decides where's the line. 20:52.36 mikebledsoe Why I think when you jump right to the end max I think I think that um I mean all this all this comes down to who decides on all these topics is and just so you were saying about Thomas so so soul 21:01.16 Max Shank That's what I do. Um, yeah. Soul Oh My God He's the man you should watch ah the out never mind I'll tell you later it's He's good though. 21:11.96 mikebledsoe Haven't read a ship before I have to check it out. Ah so. 21:20.27 mikebledsoe Cool. Ah yeah, it's like who who decides and I think that ah people tend to treat people who are in office as some type of superior being that knows better than them. And I get talking to people about this and the way they talk about it I'm going Wow You really believe that there are people who I I understand there are these people who are experts but ah the people that you've decided to trust are just people who happen to be in office or were appointed by people who were in office. And're not necessarily. They're the best policy makers. They're the best at creating policy which is making rules for other people to follow, but they're not the best that really anything else. They're really good at control. Oh yeah. 22:06.66 Max Shank I Disagree I Disagree I think they I think you can either do good or you can do well and I think the people who can do well who can play the game who can be charismatic sociopaths who are hungry for more power and willing to distribute it. Are the ones who are in Charge. Definitely not the people who are best at making policies that are effective in improving. Oh well I mean yeah, that's. 22:31.36 mikebledsoe Well I'm not saying good policies I'm just saying ah the creation of policies is about control. 22:41.25 Max Shank True and what I'm saying is the people who hold those positions of power aren't even necessarily the ones who are writing those policies. It's just the ones who are the most power hungry who then hire like lawyers and there's lobbying and stuff like that. So when we ask. Who decides? That's 1 of the big problems mean lobbying is a crazy bad problem right? and we don't have time. We don't have time if I mean if you look at how that works you would. It's almost enough to blow your brains out and be like this is game over like how did this happen. 23:06.95 mikebledsoe Insane. 23:16.84 mikebledsoe Oh. 23:19.32 Max Shank But ah now as far as who decides it's always the people who are the most power hungryngry because by definition they're going to have the biggest incentive to get that power because if you're in that situation. It's painful to not have. That level of power and everything comes back from pain being the primary motivator hunger desire pain all Synonyms. So. It's no surprise that the biggest incentive actually is to maintain that authority and the other. Authority is basically just you must trust me Blindly and it goes back to our 2 common rhetorical fallacies or logical fallacies which are appeal to authority and ad homism attack and they're the 2 arguments. Totally disregard the argument and instead focus on the arguer and this is this is where we get into why it's efficient to just trust somebody else like hey doctor science you you make my health decisions for me. 24:19.55 mikebledsoe Yeah. 24:33.62 Max Shank Is load off my mind so much easier I can understand the desire to do that and it's also so much faster to just write somebody off Oh that guy that guy max he's fucking Crazy. Don't listen to him don't even listen to anything he says he's just a. Crazy Conspiracy Theorist Nut Job Jerk I don't know you get it. 24:57.35 mikebledsoe Yeah, amazing thing about ah I've also got a list of which I want to hit I started a list of basically overt and covert censorship and the the labeling of things is. 25:07.40 Max Shank Ah. 25:15.47 Max Shank Um, how about essential how about essential. 25:16.61 mikebledsoe Ah, very interesting right? Yeah yeah, it's yeah I'd say I'm putting down labeling as censorship I Hate speech. 25:34.25 Max Shank What about it? Ah no, it's not nice, but I don't know people basically will dig their own grave by being hateful. 25:35.72 mikebledsoe Is there anything wrong with it. 25:50.63 mikebledsoe Yeah, that's a very wise place to sit from what about for the fools out there. 25:58.30 Max Shank But for well I don't hate the fools I like fools. Um, once again I don't think there's a problem with ignorance. Nothing wrong with that I'm ignorant about most things arrogance which is like I know what's best for you. 26:00.49 mikebledsoe Um. 26:17.34 Max Shank Instead of I know what's best for me. That's rather problematic and yeah I don't understand the the need or even the definition of hate Speech like could I could I call you a homo but not a fag Just for example. 26:29.38 mikebledsoe Um, well, um, yeah. 26:36.69 Max Shank I like homos frankly I think they're a really exuberant bunch. It seems like they almost ah get a. It seems like they crack the code. You know what? I mean like they get like the mail. 26:50.90 mikebledsoe Oh yeah. 26:55.29 Max Shank Sexual energy. But they also get the feminine like exuberance and they seem a little bit more liberated like it seems like pretty fun Actually I'm not sexually attracted to dudes. But if I were I would have had it would be so easy. 27:03.58 mikebledsoe Yeah. 27:09.79 mikebledsoe You be so good at it. Yeah, so it's um, well I'm reading this book right now the cuddling of the american mind and 1 of the things they talk about is ah they talk about this view that that. 27:13.70 Max Shank And be such a good homo. 27:29.43 mikebledsoe Words are violence and that you know if you so yeah, yeah, well this is this is what's going on in up and they're looking specifically at colleges and academics in academic settings where people are being. 27:32.11 Max Shank Sounds like a collapse distinction. 27:46.61 mikebledsoe Are invited to come speak and then people basically come out and say that this person is causing violence because they're saying something that causes an emotional trigger inside of them so there is this. Ah, there's this thing where people believe that. Ah, how. 27:55.47 Max Shank Ah. 28:06.15 mikebledsoe How they interpret your intention is your intention you're doing this to hurt me. It's like well I'm just speaking words and and so people have have confused ah emotional pain with physical injury. 28:23.11 Max Shank I Think people should be forced to wrestle and do a little boxing growing up so they can understand the distinction between physical violence and I don't actually think that but there's definitely a common nominator in people I've met at least. 28:23.12 mikebledsoe These these are 2 different things. 28:42.00 Max Shank Those who have some experience with martial arts boxing Jujitsu Judo something like that seem to have a much more realistic perception of the world. They seem to have less of this. Fear based lashing out for things that other people just say there's a big difference. Well and don't didn't we like blame Grand Theft Auto for for violence or something like that. 29:04.90 mikebledsoe Yeah, cause they're they're more in touch with cause and effect. 29:18.68 mikebledsoe Oh yeah. 29:20.81 Max Shank Haven't heard about like the hooker murder epidemic that resulted from that probably still way more people die as a result of alcohol but we try to we try to Cherry pick these things and I don't know we're always like fighting each other for a new reason you know the whole. 29:28.49 mikebledsoe Yeah. 29:38.98 Max Shank Idea of hate speech is where do you draw the line like let people say what they want let people um self- select their friend group. You know if if you say ah you know anyone with red hair should be ah shunned from Society. That's that's your opinion. Probably you won't be really popular with red-haired people. But it's like who cares. 30:01.57 mikebledsoe yeah yeah I had this conversation. Um I've had this conversation with my girlfriend a couple times which is like you know she I I ah I'm a fan of freedom so much that sometimes hurt like she's like having to catch up with me. 30:18.33 Max Shank Her her. 30:18.79 mikebledsoe And understanding how how it works and you know and she goes Well, what do you think about like people being able to discriminate on you know who's allowed in their store or not or or ah should someone be able to get fired just because of you know their race and I'm like yeah. I mean people are suing companies for getting fired so but they don't really actually want to work there but you want to work for somebody who's racist but like I think these policies that put people together that would normally not get along. 30:45.10 Max Shank But I. 30:56.15 mikebledsoe Doesn't cause them to actually get along. It's basically forcing people to interact who would who would normally voluntary in voluntarily not interact which could be an argument for reduction in total violence if people just go look you guys are gonna stay over there because I have this worldview and I'm going to stay over here because I have this worldview. 30:56.47 Max Shank The. 31:15.89 mikebledsoe Then Ah, we'd have a lot more peace but I think that. 31:19.40 Max Shank It's like the chess club and the bat the baseball club don't really hang out. 31:21.27 mikebledsoe Right? And so like this this idea that like because that government caused segregation and then all of a sudden ah government becomes the cause for integration and it's in both cases it causes violence. And so I think if you just let people if the government was responsible for segregation which it was and then they just said you know what we're not going to cut no more rules around Segregation Society would a piece of peacefully integrated I believe a lot more quickly and peacefully. Then what we witnessed. Ah, it was extremely violent because it went it just swung from 1 side of the pendulum to another inside of this idea that the government is in ultimate control over who we interact with. 32:11.84 Max Shank Well, and ultimately you can't have a conditional statement for every eventuality back to the whole computer science thing of if this then this if this than this you would just have an even bigger. Book of rules and really the only thing we should be concerned with is coercion right? like it doesn't matter if um, you are a racist like think how hard it is to be a racist you got to carry that hate with you every day. Or or even worse just imagine if you were a pedophile that would be probably like the worst luck of the draw ever and as long as that person doesn't act on that. That's probably just like okay you know what I mean like even. In India for example and I'm just using this example because it's the 1 that is the most inflammatory but in India you have arranged marriage between 30 year old dudes and 12 year old girls all the time that's common practice. But this idea that. We should um basically like minority report people for what they say is problematic like if someone feels a certain way. That's not a crime if someone coerces another person then it is a crime and I think. Extending the jurisdiction. Beyond coercion is a real mistake and that's where you get this more like hive mind Mentality. You get an over concentration of power and no question. There are advantages. To a concentration of power but they're also extreme disadvantages just the same if you are going to put all your eggs in 1 Basket. You know I just remember this video of Mussolini giving a speech and he just raised his fists in the air and goes 1 country 1 decision and everyone's like. Yeah they're so excited that they don't have to make any decisions anymore because he's gonna do all that hard work for him and that is a natural sentiment. We. We want to get we want to get more for less. We don't want to do anything. It's very natural. So. 34:32.56 mikebledsoe Well I think I. 34:41.50 Max Shank We want to be as efficient as possible, but there's a huge cost to that you are putting yourself at risk of total loss rather than diversifying that power along all the people. That's why it's so important to vote with your dollars. 34:57.84 mikebledsoe Yeah, did you listen to that you listen to that rogan I don't listen to a lot of rogan but every once in a while something comes on my radar that that North korean woman. Did you listen that whole episode. Yeah, ah 1 of the things that really struck me with that was. 35:00.85 Max Shank It's an it's a self-correting. 35:08.69 Max Shank Um, yeah I did. 35:17.63 mikebledsoe And think we even talked about this now that I'm thinking about it is she said that when she was exposed to freedom. She had a hard time she if she there was too many choices. There are so many choices to make that within five minutes she had become physically fatigued and mentally for. 35:29.81 Max Shank Yeah. 35:37.53 mikebledsoe Fatigue from being exposed to choice because she didn't have any because Kim jong un was making all the decisions for her. Ah her entire life. So as a 13 year old is just oh what do you want to eat well how many options do I have oh a dozen. 35:45.14 Max Shank Right. 35:55.76 Max Shank What What do you want to watch on Tv tonight you can pick from any of these four hundred thousand view options. Yes to it's too many choices. So that's kind of that's the positive side of distributing those choices. 35:55.97 mikebledsoe Okay, this is this really got difficult. 36:01.89 mikebledsoe Oh my God I can't watch Tv because of that. 36:15.90 Max Shank Like part of the reason family units have often worked so well in the past is because you have what's called comparative advantage. You know the lady um will just alienate all the ladies now too. You know back in the day. The lady would take care of the house and. As a homeowner myself I think that's a super important job taking care of a house is is its own job. Especially if you have kids around women are naturally better at nesting and nurturing the guy goes out. He just focuses on 1 thing which is going. And bringing home the bacon whether he's a farmer or a hunter or ah, a businessman of some kind so divvying up the responsibilities based on ability is super beneficial. So it's natural that you would want to. Get the people who are best at what they do to do the job for you. 37:16.58 mikebledsoe Agreeing. Ah, one last note I want to make on the hate speech is 1 of the things that I've noticed is well yeah, um I think if you say something racist is is the number 1 thing. 37:21.91 Max Shank I Still don't even know what that means was it mean naughty words. 37:33.30 Max Shank Shut up Pinky Shut up pinky. 37:33.28 mikebledsoe Or homophobic or something like that. What's that? yeah so that what? um, well yeah, but well my ah my buddy danny who's from Wahaca he's mexican and they. 37:40.87 Max Shank Um, we're hardly white. Definitely definitely Pink. There. 37:53.17 mikebledsoe He's like I don't know why we're called colored people and you're white you guys change colors all the time you get red you get white. You get like you like you're always changing colors like I'm the same color all the time you're the colored people. Ah but the the thing that's made me. Ah, anytime. 38:01.53 Max Shank Like moon. Yeah. 38:12.60 mikebledsoe Somebody in the last couple of years you know racism has been such ah a prominent conversation in the last couple years is people go oh that person's racist and I go well why? and then ah ah, a lot. Ah a lot of times. There's not a specific instance. They just. 38:24.32 Max Shank It's an ad hom attack. So easy. 38:29.98 mikebledsoe It's become the common narrative that that person's racist and then they'll take words out of context for instance like Trump people say Trump's racist. 38:31.37 Max Shank Um, but the. Or how about any of the many things that I've said on this podcast. There are enough 5 to ten second clips on here that could have me pilloried. Ah. 38:43.51 mikebledsoe And so it's people will go Oh there's there's there's like plot for Trump For instance I'm not a Trump fan didn't vote for him. So ah, that makes me good. Well this is There's my caveat to the this my argument here. 38:53.72 Max Shank That makes you good to to most of the listeners. 39:02.65 mikebledsoe Which is I Also don't think he's racist I don't think he's so many of the things that the media made him out to be and ah and because he did a lot of things that if you look at it policy wise he did a lot of things for the black community if you look at it ah at black and white. On paper. He did more than Barack Obama did for the black community and yet he got painted a racist because who the fuck really knows why that that he was. He's unpopular amongst the elites. That's that's what makes me curious about that guy. Again I'm not a big fan I'm not a Q Andon Person. Ah and it has been interesting to watch people go really pro Trump as much as you know is when they I just feel like there's a big opportunity that was missed and that people are they just shift. Who they think should be the Authority instead of realizing that it's that the authority is ah is a artificial construct. But ah. 40:05.98 Max Shank It's. 40:11.45 Max Shank It's all a means of disqualifying the argument of the individual or hyperqualify hey you know trust Doctor science ah fuck this racist pedophile guy I mean if I ever. 40:17.11 mikebledsoe Oop. 40:22.54 mikebledsoe Um, yeah. 40:26.32 Max Shank Started if I was ever in a race for office I would never discuss the policy of my opponent I Would only say I can't believe that I have to run against such a racist pedophile with a dog fighting ring in his basement I Don't think the American people. Want to have a racist pedophile dog abuser in office am I right? people I would never I would never I would never talk about policy people don't care I would only attack the worst things this guy could do ever. 40:56.98 mikebledsoe Well I mean that this is what happened the narrative in the last election was the Democrats are pedophiles and the republicans are a racist. It's pretty much like that it was just if you really take a step back. You go? Oh yeah, that was. 41:07.92 Max Shank Um, it's just name. It's just name calling. Yeah. 41:16.80 mikebledsoe That was except the only thing was was it was alternative media that was pumping up the pedophilia conversation. It was mainstream media that was pumping up the racist conversation up. Yeah Abc Nbc cnn. 41:24.10 Max Shank Well, what's mainstream just the big the big names. What's funny if you look at the amount of actual viewers now and the amount of traffic people like Joe Rogan actually have way more. Ah. 41:39.25 mikebledsoe Joe Rogan has more gets more downloads than I think all the major news agencies have combined. 41:46.95 Max Shank Well I was talking to a good friend of mine and even he agrees because very mainstream guy you know watching all the different news stations and he's like you know Joe Rogan We agreed has just built up so much credibility because he has done so many hours and so many hours where. 42:06.62 mikebledsoe Um, no yeah I wouldn't want to fight the man. 42:06.69 Max Shank He's not arrogant and I mean maybe about fighting sometimes but he does know a lot about fighting too. No no, no, no, no, no, definitely not I Just mean about like knowing about styles of fighting like he knows so much and sometimes you're like oh really? okay. 42:20.21 mikebledsoe Right? right. 42:26.70 Max Shank But he doesn't Lie. He doesn't try to hide Anything. He's very open about everything so he's actually built up this crazy credibility and that's something super powerful and I'm sure he has some awareness. The clout that he has developed but that's got to be such a ah scary thing at the same time knowing Yeah, it's amazing I Hope he wins. Yeah yeah I Hope he wins. 42:44.50 mikebledsoe Oh I'm sure. Well you hear he's ah he's suing Cnn Yeah I Hope he gets a lot of money out of them. Yeah, but of course Cnn just has a budget for that kind of shit. So. 43:02.20 Max Shank Um, well it's probably being funded by our taxpayer dollars and money that is printed out of thin air I mean you look at the way that well you look at the way that. 43:09.48 mikebledsoe Well pharmaceutical companies I mean yeah, the money the money's going the money's going from them printing it off to the pharmaceutical companies to the news media. That's that's the line of information. That's how the information is flowing right now. And you can tell because Pfizer is fucking advertising like crazy I I can find a super clip where someone put together that super clip which is basically how much Pfizer is advertising on the news where people are going to get information about. 43:32.50 Max Shank I saw. 43:45.94 mikebledsoe How they're going to live their life basically ah and make decisions and what they believe and then everything is advertised. Do you think that if you were 1 a top Journalist for cnn is there any benefit to you ah talking negatively about vaccinations. That's right. 44:01.19 Max Shank Only if I want to lose my job mike. 44:05.87 mikebledsoe So it's sponsors in a way can be a form of censorship. So if say we say we took on a sponsor and this yeah. 44:14.60 Max Shank Of course flaming hot Cheetos get at us. 44:22.45 mikebledsoe We're never going to talk shit about Cheetos if that happens we're only going to talk about how many cheetahs we had over the weekend. How tasty they were. Oh yeah yeah. yeah 44:26.67 Max Shank We might even invent a fat loss diet based on flaming hot cheetos which would be easy to do I think you could eat a diet of like forty percent of your calories. From flaming hot cheetos and still lose weight as long as everything else was dialed in. 44:40.98 mikebledsoe But ah, something something just jumped into my my awareness here that the conversation we've had so far has actually been very dense even though you know you and I are just having fun but I can imagine somebody says hey you need to listen to this show. Check out this show on censorship that mike and Max did and when they're listening. They might if this is the first time they're exposed to this type of conversation could be getting overwhelmed and going oh shit I don't believe anything and I say that because I've I've been in conversations where before where I can. Watch people physically start to contort their body because they realize how much they don't know they they begin to yeah, they begin to realize and what ends up happening is like you can't unknow what you know ah at ah. 45:23.29 Max Shank Well, it's very uncomfortable. 45:33.67 Max Shank If you drink enough booze you can. 45:35.36 mikebledsoe For certain things. Yeah, it's true. But ah you you can't unknow this shit and people get uncomfortable because it it you begin to realize that 1 hundred percent of the responsibility is on your shoulders when you thought that it was on someone else's Shoulders. And that that responsibility is scary and when you take on the responsibility of developing your own Wisdom. It's a lot of work and going back to your efficiency thing. You know people are become very accustomed to a high amount of. Efficiency and um I mean some could blame capitalism for that and because there's this this level of comfort and not having to think and then all of a sudden we lay something out there. So I I bring that up because I want to acknowledge it for anyone who's listening and just say. You know it's okay, it's okay, you go fuck I don't know what to believe anymore. All the information is false. Um, yeah I mean just and I think that way you got to get to that point is understanding that most of what you think is a lie and yeah. 46:47.75 Max Shank I'll simplify it down if you if you don't mind. Yeah, it's I like to take things to the extremes I don't know if you've noticed that about me. But. 46:50.98 mikebledsoe Please. 46:56.53 mikebledsoe Yeah, I'm not accustomed to that type of lifestyle. 47:01.94 Max Shank You're you're more of a middle ground type of guy. Ah, okay, if you had to choose between believing everything you read and see and believing nothing you believe and see then it would be safer to believe nothing so it's safer to believe nothing. And you can be sure that there's always an intent behind every message that you see to persuasion just to get you to buy to try to cry to laugh. Whatever and my my personal it goes back to once again, computer science which is. So heavily logic based I so I still know like almost nothing about it but the concept of trust but verify and that verify is your responsibility.. It's always your responsibility to verify for yourself and you. 47:58.19 mikebledsoe Yeah, well well, there's there's been Ah, there's been a trick played on the common person and that ah ah, the fact, the fact, the fact checkers. The fact checkers. 48:10.15 Max Shank You can't possibly know. 48:16.16 mikebledsoe Are playing the role of verify people think they're verifying by doing a Google search and seeing fact check in the title and then go. 48:21.97 Max Shank No, no, it's your responsibility to verify. You're right though that is a trap. 48:26.72 mikebledsoe But people people think they are verifying when they do that because people will Google and they go well fact check I'm like really yeah. 48:32.20 Max Shank But that's just that's just trusting another guy like so whenever you're thinking about these things. It's best to try to reduce the number of parties involved. So for example, if there are 3 of us you me and some other guy. And some other guy says hey mike if you give me a hundred bucks now I'll give you a thousand next week and then you're like hu and let me verify that and you ask me and I'm like yeah you can trust him that's like basically the same thing it doesn't change anything right. So you have to keep it always does come back to that responsibility is upon the individual and if you take the responsibility which is your ability to respond also away from the individual then you are opening the door for totalitarianism which. There are advantages and disadvantages. You can move much further much faster I think china has gotten a lot more people out of poverty in the last twenty years than before under a form of totalitarianism. But. 49:46.29 mikebledsoe Ah, totalitarianism combined with capitalism. 49:48.28 Max Shank With that concentration right? That's very good point So we have capitalism combined with we have Crony capitalism. 49:57.96 mikebledsoe A. 49:59.32 Max Shank Unfortunately, which is where you're allowed to lobby and make rules that are not the same for everybody and all these backwards incentives. But my point is there are advantages to concentrating power and there are also huge disadvantages and if you blindly follow something you are opening the door. For a very small minority to call the shots for everybody and that's basically what slavery looks like and you might be a happy little slave but you're still not free or responsible for Yourself. You got to follow the money with all this stuff. That's the best. That's the best. 50:28.64 mikebledsoe Um, yeah, yeah. 50:37.20 Max Shank Paper trail or trail crumbs to find out. What's really going on is how's that money changing hands. And yeah, you know what? I've I've gone through a similar thing just back to what you're saying. It's it's super uncomfortable to realize that. Most of what you taught you were taught was a waste of time and most of the information that's been passed off as news has been flagrant lies with only the intention of making you more dependent and ah obedient. You know by Bye bye trust trust trust. 51:14.63 mikebledsoe But ah, 1 of the things you're talking about you've been talking about you know? Ah, it's trusting someone else creates efficiency but also leaves door open for abuse and 1 of the things that I tell people. 51:15.96 Max Shank Right? It's uncomfortable. But. 51:33.50 mikebledsoe When we start talking about where are you getting your information talking about the verify piece where are you getting your information while I'm getting it from this person. My great and you know say they're talking about something like a virus. It's like yeah I'm not a virologist you know I am not going to know a lot about that I would say that I know a lot about health. 51:35.31 Max Shank My. 51:52.30 Max Shank I would say so I'll verify that you know a lot about health fact I fact checked you? Yeah check mark. 51:52.90 mikebledsoe Which I think is really all you gotta know? Ah, yeah, thank you thank you listen to Max folks. He's smart guy. Yeah fact, check complete. So um, my my thing is when I start talking to people about who I listen to so. Yeah I I don't pretend like I've gone out and obtained all the knowledge and wisdom in the world. But what I do is I listen to wise people and ah and I qualify those people is what's the advice they've given over time which I think people have all our time. Even running that filter people don't really remember their their attention spans pretty fucking short. So what is their track record. That's my first thing when it comes to verifying is is what's their track record. Not not what pieces of paper. They've got not what credentials not what are not what are the letters behind their name. My question is. 52:33.20 Max Shank Everybody man 1 52:42.36 Max Shank Community not. 52:49.12 mikebledsoe What's their track record how sort of I'm listening to somebody about Health I Go What's their health like this is why I listen to Paul Check people go you know? Ah, ah you Know'm I'm gonna listen to this person or this person because they have these credentials and I go yeah but Paul check is is a. Great example of this. Not only has he mastered his own health The dude 60 years old and I'm pretty sure he can outlift me ah and he he ah he moves Well he has you know. 53:16.54 Max Shank Ah, well you you don't really prioritize lifting. But that's true. He could. 53:26.98 mikebledsoe Is sex life is vibrant from what I can tell the way he talks about it anyway. Ah the guy. Ah but all the Paul Trek fans are gonna laugh there. Ah but there. 53:30.98 Max Shank Um, I thought I thought you had participated never mind. 53:45.28 mikebledsoe I think we share a lot of the same audience. Um, but but he's got ah, he's got a track record of helping other people and he's mastered in himself and like who else am I who else has done that at 60 53:46.82 Max Shank I Think it's right What you're saying is right? It's about track record. 53:58.13 Max Shank So he walks the walk. He has a track record that you have seen develop over time and also the other thing that I would add to that is the incentive. 53:59.90 mikebledsoe You know Andy's older and he's got. He's got the wisdom on its side that time. 54:14.37 mikebledsoe A. 54:15.31 Max Shank What's the incentive. So when you're trying to um, decipher a new bit of information and part of it is just reducing the total bits. Otherwise you're going to be bombarded with a fire hose but who is to gain from what you're hearing that that is the number 1 question. So take everything else off the table who who gains from this message that you're hearing that is the number 1 thing is incentive and then because that's just about the argument and then the second part is consider the source. So that's where you start seeing. Okay well this person has led me led me the right way for a long time meanwhile the laundry list of lies and misinformation about health from these allegedly trusted entities. Is a mile long I mean how about eggs and it doesn't matter if the intentions are good even intentions. Good bad doesn't matter. It's more about what is the result of those things. So if if you're afraid of fruit because it's got too much sugar. 55:23.79 mikebledsoe What's the outcome does it this kind of goes in and I hate Speech this goes in the hate speech thing because like what people say what they do are different but this where outcome outcome is ah very important here. 55:29.84 Max Shank Yeah, of course like why would we? Well you know for Healthcare like why would we let the people making the decisions about Healthcare have a different plan than they agreed On. That's insanity. That's crazy. They so the people who create policy for Health. Don't use that same plan. Yeah, that's insane. That's insane like where is the Incentive. So. 55:50.00 mikebledsoe That can you repeat that. So the people Oh oh you talk about the medical care. Yeah. 56:06.42 Max Shank Incentive is the number 1 thing considering the source is probably the number 2 thing and then maybe the third thing is just an overall reduction in the amount of bits that you take in and this is tough because Dopamine is all about an external thing. You take in. You're like oh something something from out there to add in to my my self here and it takes you away from potentially creating really valuable projects and the the thing is you don't need to be. Plugged in all the time you don't need to be absorbing every new bit of misinformation out there. In fact, all it does mostly is distract you from what's really important in your life which is nurturing the relationships that you care about or nurturing the projects that you care about. And creating and expressing yourself in different ways and I I really like the simple idea of if you don't express you will feel depressed simple as that and it doesn't matter if you paint or play music or. 57:16.54 mikebledsoe If. 57:23.70 Max Shank Chat with a friend for a few hours or an hour. There are lots of ways to express yourself? Um, but if you're constantly seeking that the feed from outside you're going to become like mentally obese and it's going to be full of toxic bullshit. 57:42.60 mikebledsoe A a. 57:43.54 Max Shank Right? So just to recap its incentive source and then probably reduction would be like the third if I had to pick 3 57:52.27 mikebledsoe I like it. It's a good that's a good ah order to go in you'll you'll ah I think by just applying the first 2 you'll reduce the amount of people you're even looking at or piece information you're you're paying attention to. 58:04.66 Max Shank Oh yeah, people would say that I'm crazy for how little I trust anything I read or see but not nuds. It's true because. 58:12.44 mikebledsoe Um, well I I think that if you've ever gone through the process of questioning what you believe and what you think I think if you've never done that which most people have never sat there and analyzed their own thinking and gone is what I believe actually true. Once you believe once you have had the experience of realizing that most of your thoughts are complete bullshit then you should then understand that everyone else's thoughts are just they probably have the same amount of bullshit running around and most people are just expressing. They're bullshit all the time and the majority of what's flying around is just bullshit. There's very little truth very little truth in there. Totally unintentional. 58:53.92 Max Shank And it's not ah and and it's often not intentional. You know for a long time I I was told the knees should not cross the toes during a squat if you're bending over your back should not bend. 59:10.31 mikebledsoe Yeah, right? yeah. 59:12.36 Max Shank In fact, basically your back should never bend under load is this thing I believed and some people still believe that some people believe the exact opposite of that and and that's okay too. But oh yeah, oh yeah I mean. 59:21.88 mikebledsoe Have you seen this knees over toes guy on Instagram his shit is good and his whole his whole his whole the name of his Instagram is controversial and he's blowing up. It's good. 59:31.36 Max Shank I. Right? It's it's brilliant as brilliant marketing I think it looks mostly sound. Obviously it's not the way that I would approach overall health and fitness. But I think the message is overall good. Which is you're not fragile and it's good to bravely explore these ranges of motion. Um I got did I tell you about the third round monkeys third round monkey rule is perfect for this episode. 59:59.80 mikebledsoe Yeah. 01:00:07.35 mikebledsoe No. 01:00:12.70 Max Shank Its really short. It's not that short, but it's short enough. Yeah, sure. 01:00:13.14 mikebledsoe Do you want to you want to take this show an hour and a half by the typical hour because I I think we have might I've covered like half of what's in my fucking Notebook right now. 01:00:23.80 Max Shank Well, let's let's let it ride but here's an important thing to realize and it's about Mythology. So Third round I have all these that I try to organize stuff. So it's simpler to remember so I have this 1 called Third round monkeys which is about a scientific study. They did. With monkeys in a room with a ladder and a bowl of fruit at the top and so they had like 6 monkeys in there and 1 starts to go up for the fruit and the researchers immediately hose off all the Monkeys. With a fire hose all of them. Not just the 1 who climbed up for it and so then they all stop doing that so they're all just sitting around not going near the ladder because they know they'll get the hose and then they take out half the monkeys and replace them. With new monkeys. So now you have a combined group a and group b 1 of the new monkeys starts climbing up the ladder and 1 of the older ones are the all the older ones start beating it up because they know that if he does that they're all going to get the hose. So then once again, you have this group of like 6 monkeys or so doing nothing then they take away the first monkeys and they add in the third round monkeys same thing. 1 of the new monkeys. Sees a bowl of bananas or fruit or something up there starts going up the ladder and the second round monkeys beat him up mercilessly and so now you have like 6 monkeys not going near the fruit and none of them have seen the fire hose. They don't know why they don't know why they're beating. They're beating these new Monkeys. They just know that if you go up the ladder you get beaten and that's how a lot of information gets transmitted. It's just I was talking with ah my friend victoria. 01:02:31.56 mikebledsoe Bunch of hearsay. 01:02:34.98 Max Shank The other day and we were playing this game called ah fuck that last guy high five that last guy because so many things from the past are amazing. It's incredible and some things. We're just like oh fuck that guy that guy sucks like he really ruined it for everybody else and that's sort of how we have gotten to this point some things you blindly believe but we don't We don't really know why. 01:02:52.94 mikebledsoe E. 01:03:08.53 mikebledsoe Probably most things so lot lot has just been passed down. 01:03:15.45 Max Shank I'm kind of I'm becoming more and more and of of ah, an objectivist but there's a caveat to that because objectivism is like just believing what you can experience firsthand but I also believe there's obvious be way more than that. 01:03:25.25 mikebledsoe Yeah, but also. 01:03:32.18 Max Shank That is beyond my sensory perception. 01:03:33.54 mikebledsoe Well I think I think that the I would say this the way I'm very objective is the way I operate is is I I Really do my best to believe only what I can verify with my own senses and ah everything else. 01:03:52.70 Max Shank Yeah, that's tricky. 01:03:52.13 mikebledsoe Just take with a grain of salt which like maybe maybe and then also you know the way that I think you and I both live our lives is we have done enough reflection to create our ah philosophy and principles in which we live our lives and which means that. I don't have to know that much information you don't have to know that information to make good choices. Ah, and so for instance, the idea of what we see what we witness in nature is what happens anytime we isolate something. We isolate a cell from being able to talk to other cells in the human Body. What happens the cell starts to replicate in a way that causes cancer right? when it can't communicate with the other cells. Yeah it it dies but and and it's. 01:04:40.15 Max Shank Or it dies right? I mean depends on the environment. 01:04:46.35 mikebledsoe And it's attempt to live on it will replicate unhealth in an unhealthy way. Yeah, it'll die or it'll replicate in a cancer way right? has no direction right? It's not getting the right inputs. Um, what's a. 01:04:50.49 Max Shank Um, in in an in a way that is that has no direction. Basically it's like growth without direction bingo. 01:05:05.40 mikebledsoe But guy who described this. He's a really he used to work in cancer and now he he's ah he's 1 these really great docs to listen to. Ah, he's is my name maybe his name will pop into my head here in a minute but ah, ah, but when things are integrated when you integrate something like. A lot of what happens with health is how well things are integrated with each other and in systems support each other and everything is whether the cell or an organ or your joints if you so if you've studied health and you really recognize? oh. And you witness what are the results of isolation and what are this the results of of integration and then you watch that happen socially to what are the results of isolation and what are the results of integration and. Not force integration but just allowing things to integrate naturally. 01:05:58.30 Max Shank No system works in isolation is a phrase for health. 01:06:02.30 mikebledsoe Yeah, and so I don't need to understand all the details of how these people theoretically think this virus works by the way. It's all theory. The basis in which. The virologists are making decisions. It's based on a theory which is called Germ Theory ah that was the 1 Yeah. 01:06:21.75 Max Shank Ah, crap we're gonna get censored now fuck that was it that was the that was the 1 thing you're not allowed to talk about I said fag earlier we were probably gonna be okay with that. It's because those guys can take a joke. 01:06:33.90 mikebledsoe Ah, we definitelin? Yeah, so but ah, you know people people. It's 1 of those things I get in conversation with people I'm like why are you operating from germ theory or are you more familiar with terrain theory. And then people go I don't know what you're talking about I go oh well, do you believe that you know just being exposed to a germ is going to make you sick and like well yeah, that's that's what's happening they go. Okay, then then you're a germ theory person. You don't even know it and yet that's the postulate in which. All these arguments are being made from the idea of isolating yourself. Don't go outside wear a mask stay 6 feet apart. These are all isolated. This isolation makes sense inside of germ theory. But even the person who founded germ theory. Ah, with his name Louis pasture was 1 of the the people who really put germ theory on the map at the end of his life of saying I made a fucking mistake. You know he was the 1 that was in charge of pasteurizing milk. Best of intentions but seti made a mistake so you got this guy that everyone praises for for inventing pasteurization. 01:07:40.77 Max Shank With the best of intentions. 01:07:50.14 Max Shank Ah. 01:07:50.77 mikebledsoe We passed here and yet at the end of his life. He says don't do what I said earlier stay away from it and yet no 1 listens to that. so so um everybody governments medical boards. All these things bought into germ theory and ah. 01:07:56.64 Max Shank What how tricky. 01:08:09.80 mikebledsoe I go back to? Well, what's the result of our medical system operating from ah germ theory. Well what are we produced. We hav

Cat & Cloud Podcast
Very Rich and Very Sad

Cat & Cloud Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 39:48


What does success get you? You worked really hard, and what did you get from it? Or what good comes out of using someone else's hard work? Chris and Jared talk about the world, and how society has its sights set on the wrong thing. Hustling, going fast and making as much money as you can. Rather than making things better, optimizing how things are done and making life a little smother for everyone. Slow is smooth, smooth is fast. Bill Gates has a problem Akimbo: A Podcast from Seth Godin https://podcasts.apple.com/bw/podcast/bill-gates-has-a-problem/id1345042626?i=1000454574379 The Cat & Cloud Podcast: Chris Baca and Jared Truby, two of the founders of Cat & Cloud coffee share their insights of leadership and owning a small business, through the lens of the specialty coffee industry. It's not just about whats in the cup, but the intention behind how it was put there. With new episodes weekly, listen in as there's always little nuggets of wisdom. Where to listen Apple Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/cat-cloud-podcast/id1021859870 Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/1Ca5vz73UcyAHCAYmWKpl5?si=d8whB74aRjmgU-ld_0qZfQ&dl_branch=1 Watch here on youtube! https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLKAafL6q_RiChNcnVZh3_uW0fKBJ6gImB If you want even more insights from Chris and Jared, consider becoming a member over on Patreon. each week get even more, as well as exclusive access to a likeminded community, with plenty of benefits to come. It's just the price of a latte a month, and we think there is a lot of value in that. So check it out. https://www.patreon.com/catandcloud The usual suspects. Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/catcloudcoffee/ Cat & Cloud: https://catandcloud.com/ Your hosts: Baca's Blog: https://www.realchrisbaca.com/ Jared's Website: https://www.jaredtruby.com/ Your editor: justphred We are Cat & Cloud Coffee. Started by three friends trying to pursue their passions, with Integrity and intentionally, and it's our mission to inspire connection, by creating memorable experiences. We're a small independent business and this is our story. Enjoy!