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City in Washington, United States

  • 1,558PODCASTS
  • 5,225EPISODES
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  • Nov 29, 2021LATEST
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Best podcasts about tacoma

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Latest podcast episodes about tacoma

the vogel twins
45 - Traveling to spread peace with Kwabi Amoah-Forson

the vogel twins

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 37:17


Our guest is Kwabi Amoah-Forson is a humanitarian from Tacoma, WA. Through various humanitarian campaigns he has helped others in need in his community. He also works to educate others on what peace really means and create dialogue for the subject. ⁠ ⁠ Tune in to hear how you can be a part of the Peace Bus Journey!⁠

Talkin' Taco Time
Talkin' Taco Time: Aramis Johnson of Enumclaw

Talkin' Taco Time

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021


We’re back with Enumclaw frontman Aramis Johnson talkin’ visiting the other Taco Time on the road, soda vs. pop and the Rainier of other cities (including Tacoma). Then Randy takes us behind the scenes of his new TTNW Superfan commercials. … Continue reading →

The Fabulous Peltoncast: Seattle Sports and More
Talkin' Taco Time: Aramis Johnson of Enumclaw

The Fabulous Peltoncast: Seattle Sports and More

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021


We’re back with Enumclaw frontman Aramis Johnson talkin’ visiting the other Taco Time on the road, soda vs. pop and the Rainier of other cities (including Tacoma). Then Randy takes us behind the scenes of his new TTNW Superfan commercials. … Continue reading →

Olympia Oddities
The Tube Sock Murders

Olympia Oddities

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 16:27


Today we tell you about a bizarre series of murders that occurred in Lewis and Pierce counties in Washington. Couples were leaving to go on camping trips, only to never return home. After the shocking discovery of 2 dead couples and a bizarre signature left over from the killer, investigators were left wondering exactly what kind of killer they were dealing with. The mystery took another wild turn when another camping-bound couple went missing but somehow their 2 year old daughter was found 30 miles away, wandering in front of a K-mart store alone.  Ft. revoking the title of bad-ass, the Toe Sock Killer?, and a special announcement about another show we'll be doing in addition to this one! Sources: Wikipedia - Mineral, Washington murders, Ellensburg Daily Record - Are Cases Tied?, The Spokesman Review - Woman's Body Discovered, Eugene Register Guard - Officer's Baffled Over Couples Disappearance, The Spokesman Review- Remains those of Tacoma man missing since 1985, The Olympian - Mystery Lingers: Discovery of trappers skull adds clue to couples 1985 disappearance --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/olympiaoddities/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/olympiaoddities/support

Fringe Radio Network
Bigfoot Terror in the Woods - Tacoma Monster and Government Alien Report

Fringe Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 59:33


In cryptids in the news and other oddities, Kevin dives into the review of the initial seven page report from the US Intelligence Agency on Unidentified Aerial Phenomena. Bill goes to Tacoma Washington reviewing the gruesome remains of a deadly encounter with the hairy man. And some great listener mail from many of you so please join us! Thank you for listening! www.bigfootterrorinthewoods.com

The TrailChasers Podcast
Ep 202: Tommy Harrell and Ironman 4x4 Install

The TrailChasers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 112:46


Tommy Harrell @shorthood95 joins us to talk about his trip across the country in his heavily modified JK Wrangler then we recap the installation of the @ironman4x4america suspension system on @mtnmn04 #nissanfrontier

The Ian Furness Show
Brandon Funston answers your fantasy football questions for Thanksgiving weekend

The Ian Furness Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 8:43


The Emerald Queen Casino brings us Brandon Funston each Thursday at 2pm to help you, the listener, win your fantasy matchups! The beautiful, brand new Emerald Queen Casino, located on I-5 in Tacoma is Now Open! Come check it out today

Hacks & Wonks
REBROADCAST: Conversation with Justice G. Helen Whitener

Hacks & Wonks

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 33:51


Justice G. Helen Whitener is a fascinating person. Her life story, her path to the Washington State Supreme Court, and her extensive experience in law in our state, and lived experience as a Black, immigrant, LGBT and disabled person is worth listening to and learning from. In this re-broadcast, Crystal and Justice Whitener get into why representation matters and the purpose of the law. A full text transcript of the show is available below and at officialhacksandwonks.com.  Find the host, Crystal Fincher, on Twitter at @finchfrii.   References Claiming your identity by understanding your self-worth, TEDxPortofSpain talk by Justice G. Helen Whitener: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=57FMau29O_g&list=PL3vudArV4R9e5USALmWYa4v38zP_2nviP    Transcript Crystal Fincher: [00:00:00] Welcome to Hacks and Wonks. I'm your host, Crystal Fincher. On this show, we don't just talk politics and policy, but also how they affect our lives and shape our communities. As we dive into the backstories behind what we read in the news, we bring voices to the table that we don't hear from often enough. Well today on Hacks and Wonks, we are very thrilled to be speaking with Justice Helen Whitener today. And Justice Whitener currently serves on the Washington State Supreme Court. She was appointed this past April by overnor Inslee and is running to finish the term of her predecessor which is a term that will last two remaining years. So prior to this, Justice Whitener served as a judge on the Board of Industrial Insurance Appeals for two years, followed by five years of service on the Pierce County Superior Court, beginning in 2015. Thank you so much for joining us Justice Whitener.  Justice Whitener: [00:01:04] Thank you so much for having me.  Crystal Fincher: [00:01:06] So I just wanted to start out and get an understanding of how - what your role was - what your path was to the State Supreme Court. How did you get there? What is your background?  Justice Whitener: [00:01:20] Well, my background is very varied. I started in law school, working for the Attorney General's office. I worked for the Department of Corrections, it was called back then. And then it became the Criminal Justice Division. From there, I got to Pierce County working for the Attorney General's office in their DSHS division, and I did dependencies and those types of cases out at Remann Hall here in Pierce County. By the time I graduated law school, I had 25 trials under my belt - and that's jury trials, because I also worked as a City of Tacoma prosecutor, Rule 9 prosecutor we call them - when you're in school and you're under the supervision of an attorney.  So by the time I graduated, I had over 25 trials under my belt. I then had a job waiting for me with the City of Tacoma prosecutor's office. But unfortunately there was a hiring freeze that year, so I had to find a job and I found one at the City of Olympia prosecutor's office, but it was a part-time job. So while I was working there - I stayed there for about six months - my supervisor there, who's now a judge in Thurston County, Kalo Wilcox - she had contacted the prosecutor out of Island County prosecutor's office on my behalf. I interviewed with him over the phone, got the job, and literally was driving from Renton, where I resided at the time, to Island County - two and a half hours each way. I decided that was too much, so I moved to Island County and I stayed there for a little over a year working at the prosecutor's office. While there, one of the attorneys I worked against in Pierce County - he was a public defender - contacted me and we were chatting and he said, Where are you? And I said, I'm out in Island County - I'm a prosecutor here. And he said, Are you interested in coming back to Pierce County? But I'd need to do public defense - I'd never done defense work, so I jumped at the opportunity. One, I wanted to come back where my roots were, and two - do defense work, public defense work. Came back, worked there for over two and a half years. I was doing a murder case with one of their top public defenders, Dino Sepe. And we were doing this murder case together. I was then recruited by the prosecutors we were up against - one is now a judge and he is - what is his name? It slips me right now, but it was against him and one of the top prosecutors there, Dawn Farina, and Jerry Costello - that's, that's who the judge is now, but he was a prosecutor then. And I actually went back to prosecution after that murder trial was completed, right here in Pierce County. So I've worked in Pierce County and it's really interesting, Crystal. I have been a prosecutor, a public defender, as well as a private defense counsel, but I've also been a judicial officer on all the trial level courts. So that's Municipal Court, District Court, and Superior Court. Because when I finished at the prosecutor's office - I stayed there for over two years, I believe - I then started my own firm and it was a solo practice for a few years. And then I took on two partners and it became Whitener Rainey Writt, and we handled Class A felonies - actually all levels of criminal matters, as well as some civil cases. And then we also had an appellate attorney. She was the writ in the practice and she was a law professor out of Seattle U Law School, who joined the practice. So I did that for eight years, but while I was doing that, I also pro-tem as a judge - and that is someone who sits in for a sitting judge when the judge takes leave. I was a pro-tem judge on the Municipal Court here in Tacoma, the City of Tacoma Municipal Court, as well as the Pierce County District Courts. So I have the unusual background of having been a prosecutor, defense attorney, and a judicial officer on all three trial level courts here. And then in 2015, the Governor appointed me to the Superior Court, as you've stated.  Crystal Fincher: [00:05:55] Well, and that varied experience seems unusual for any kind of justice related to State Supreme Court, the national Supreme Court. Is that unique to have that much and that varied type of experience, coming to the bench? And how do you think that makes a difference in your approach versus others?  Justice Whitener: [00:06:21] I think it is unique. You have judges and justices who have done one side, and you may have a judge -  I don't think we have any justices - that have done both sides. But what is truly unusual is to have done all three, on all three level trial level courts, which is what I have. And I think the unique perspective it gives me is I have a very intimate knowledge of the trial level courts and what the courts face on a daily basis, having gone through it on both sides, as well as sitting on the bench in those courts as well. And yes, it is unusual, but I think being an immigrant that's probably..  Crystal Fincher: [00:07:06]   Well, and it will probably do well right now just to - most people don't have a lot of exposure to the State Supreme Court or to a lot of courts - except for at the Supreme Court level, hearing that there was a major case decided - but they may only catch the headline and not know the details or understand what's really involved with being a justice. So what are you responsible for? What is the job of a justice like on a daily basis?  Justice Whitener: [00:07:36] Now I can answer that question, but I will preface it with this. My ascent to the Supreme Court is truly unusual because we're faced with COVID right now. And the pandemic has caused the workings of the court to be a little different. So when I got appointed, I got appointed in a virtual world. So I have not sat on the bench with my colleagues yet, yet I've sat through a term and I'm getting ready actually, we just started the second term. So I literally will be going through one year of being a Supreme Court justice, and never sat on the bench with my colleagues. We hold oral arguments in a virtual world. So my experience right now may be a little unusual and maybe very different than what is considered normal. But in regards to cases, we handle - just about any case comes to the Supreme Court, can come, is whether or not we accept it for review, it has to meet certain criteria. And I'll give you an example. If there is a decision on the law court, the court of appeals - the first intermediary court before you get to the Supreme Court - but it's the court between the trial court and the Supreme Court. If a case is heard in Division One - there are three divisions - and they come down with a decision one particular way. And then in Division Three, a very similar case with very similar issues comes before Division Three, and they come down a different way as far as interpreting the Supreme Court's decision that everyone should be following. Then the court will take that up because it's clear there's a conflict between how the court on the appellate level is interpreting a Supreme Court opinion. That's one very simple example. Another set of cases we hear are personal restraint petitions. In criminal matters, the defendant, after conviction, has a number of remedies available to him or her, but once they've exhausted all those remedies, they still have an opportunity to request a review by the Supreme Court. But then again, they have to meet certain criterias - it has to be done within a year on a number of those cases, if you're going to do a collateral attack of your underlying conviction. So that's another type of case that we hear, but we hear literally just about any type of case that can come before the court - is whether or not it is worthy of review. Is it going to have substantial public import or public interest? Is it going to affect a large section of the community that we are serving? Those types of things. Is it something that is worthy of review - is the easiest way to conceptualize what it is the Supreme Court will look at. So many cases come before us wanting review, but not many get review because they are not meeting the criteria that is necessary for review.  Crystal Fincher: [00:10:52] That makes sense and in those discussions, I'm assuming that there are discussions between you and the other justices, do your backgrounds - does your professional experience, lived experience inform how you process what is important, what may be significant, how something affects a lot of people. How do your experiences, and I guess, how do the justices themselves help inform what kinds of cases get chosen or the approach to that?  Justice Whitener: [00:11:32] So that's a wonderful question because yes, we get a number of cases, but judges and justices are human beings. We have our backgrounds that we bring to the table - not just our legal backgrounds - but our lived and lived, as you indicated, background. And when we sit and assess a case, we are doing that through our lens, whatever lens that is, we bring to the table. So, and that's your experiences as well. So being a Black woman may be relevant in some instance, depending on the case or the issue before the court. Being an immigrant may be relevant and it may be an experience others don't have - which in this case they don't, because I was born an immigrant. I was born in Trinidad and Tobago, so I am an immigrant. I'm not an immigrant descent. So my perspective may be a little different. LGBT - being someone who is not of the mainstream sexual orientation may my lens may be different from some of my colleagues . Identifying as disabled - depending on the case, I may be seeing it through accommodation eyes, whereas they may not because they don't have that experience. So I think our experiences, whether it's even on the Supreme Court or even on the lower trial level courts or the appellate courts, is relevant in regards to assessing cases that come before the court - because our experiences are different, which means the way a decision may impact a particular subset of the population may be relevant on a particular issue regarding the particular facts that come before the court. So I think it's extremely important.  What's wonderful about the Washington State Supreme Court is it is the most diverse court in the United States. When I joined, we became the most diverse court. I don't think it was just because I joined, but I think I had a little bit to do with it. So we have five white individuals - four of them women, one white male. That's unusual because normally the Supreme Court benches are heavily white male. Then we have one Latino male, one male of color. We have one Asian/Mexican 'cause she's biracial and Supreme Court justice. And she's also openly gay. So she brings that experience to the table. We then have one, and the only, Native American Supreme Court justice in the country. And then you get me, the first black female, the fourth immigrant born, the second LGBT, but the only black LGBT judge in the entire state. So the discussions that we have and the depth of the discussion and, and the amount of citizenry we can cover is amazing. And we really work through the cases, trying to make sure we don't leave anyone behind. And what's important as well too, is economics - none of us, or not all of us, were born with a golden spoon, or however they say it. We have gone through struggles, different types of struggles economically, at different points in our lives and some more recent than others. So that is also very important to the discussion because we always try to make sure that we're not leaving anyone out in the decision as much as we can. Because of course, sometimes you just can't cover everyone under the law. But the law was meant to embrace and cover all of its citizenry and that's something we really try to do. And I'm really proud of my colleagues when I got there and saw that's how they approach things. Crystal Fincher: [00:15:55] You're listening to Hacks and Wonks with your host Crystal Fincher on KVRU 105.7 FM. And I appreciate you talking about the composition of this court and the diversity of the court. And I watched the announcement of your appointment live - and a number of people I know did - and there were certainly lots of excited group chats and posts and you know, My goodness, I'm watching a Black woman be appointed and oh my goodness, a new LGBT member! Just excitement across the board. And I've seen similar excitement, like you talk about, having the only Native American justice in the country. And LGBTQ representation. And how important that is to people or why it feels meaningful - I think you talked about - it gives people hope that there will be - that the court will become more accessible, that the court will become more fair , that the law will serve and consider and account for more people, more types of people, the entire community, and ... Justice Whitener: [00:17:10] It builds the trust and confidence in the institution. Having representation at the table when these serious discussions and issues are being addressed, builds trust and confidence in the judiciary, in the legal system. I remember when I was a litigator walking into a courtroom and I'm the only Black person in the courtroom. Or I'm the only woman in the courtroom. Or my client is the only person of color. The jury pool not reflecting who we are. So it really builds confidence in the judiciary and in the decision. Not everybody is going to always get what they want. That is not what the law is about. But the law is about trying to bring well-reasoned decisions based in the law and taking into account real-life experiences so that the decision has useful meaning to its citizenry. That's truly important.  Crystal Fincher: [00:18:18] It's critically important. And so I guess, where do you feel like we're at right now in terms of everyone being served fairly and equally by the law, and what can be done to improve where we're at right now?  Justice Whitener: [00:18:39] Well, it's not working and it hasn't been working for years. And it probably won't work for everyone for a while. The hope - and that is the end goal - is to be the court or the legal system that truly encapsulates everyone. That is not the reality. And the Supreme Court, after the killing of George Floyd, put out a letter to the community. I don't know if you are aware of that and the letter.  Crystal Fincher: [00:19:17] I am aware of it. And it was - I know a lot of people were surprised and heartened by it. It was unique.  Justice Whitener: [00:19:25] Yes, it was. And it was well thought out, but what was really important for people to get from that letter - is that all nine justices signed it. Didn't have to - all nine justices signed it. And when we sign something, it says, We believe in it, we support it, and we're putting our badge, our signature, on it. And that is what I think resonated with everyone in the legal community of the judges in other states, who have been trying to get their judiciary to acknowledge, that there is an inequality in how people are treated in our legal system. And unfortunately it has taken recent incidences on our media - different mediums - for our population to see it. People have been saying it for years, but to have it be acknowledged in such a vivid way was shocking. And that is what the law is about - when you see something like that occurring, it is time for change, because it's a systemic issue that has not been resolved with whatever mechanisms we were using before. So now is the time - and the legal system has really jumped on this. I actually, to be honest, was surprised at how much the legal community jumped on this. Because they realize - those who did not work within the trial system, the trial level courts - I think they were surprised at some of the things that had been occurring in the trial level courts. And it is causing the legal system to take a hard look at itself because this is how one subset, and there are many subsets, but this is how one subset - Black people - have been treated in the legal system that has been validated for everyone to see. The question became, What are you going to do about it? You have a responsibility to act. This was not a time to be silent. This was not a time to be complacent. This was a time to act. And the court acted. Well, what we did not envision is the legal community was waiting for that and they are now acting. They're now assessing the system. And hopefully we will have some changes take place and it will not just be for Black people. When people try to make this a Black people thing, that is very disturbing to me. This is a people problem. Unfortunately, it took a Black man losing his life - and Black men and women losing their lives - and this being shown on such a high medium - social media click - oop, everybody's seeing it. It took that scenario to have change, or have the discussion occur. But any change that occurs is going to be helping everyone, because unfortunately Black people, we have been at the bottom of the bucket. So if you help us, you're only making it better for you. So that's the kind of change that I see happening. That's the change I've always wanted to see, even when I was a litigator, but I realize now, as I moved up in my profession, my voice became stronger because I've always been very vocal and visible. My voice became stronger and now I can actually participate in - at the big people table, so to speak. And not only just have a say, but have their ear, because it's one thing to sit at the table - and I've been at many tables where you're talking and ain't nobody hearing, or somebody takes what you just said, reconfigure it, and it sounds like it's just something that just came out of their mouth and you're sitting there going, Am I the only one seeing that they just kinda stole what I just said, but now they're hearing it, whereas when I said it, they weren't.  And that has happened to many women as we move up and we're in this room with a lot of men, unfortunately - that's what they like to do. That is changing, you know? So as I move up, I realize my voice is not just being heard anymore. They're actually listening and trying to understand - and I'm doing the same too. 'Cause I'm learning a lot about differences as well, because I'm - in an odd way, I've always tried to see similarities. So for me, this is unique because I'm now seeing differences. And I think that's a good thing for me.  Crystal Fincher: [00:24:41] Absolutely. And you're doing this - you talked about your - you are doing the work of justice right now. And also, you are running a campaign and you're going to be on the ballot in November. And so what's that like? And how is your campaign going?  Justice Whitener: [00:25:05] Well, running a campaign in a virtual world is different. I've ran one campaign before and that was 2012, but in 2020, in this virtual world, that's different. In 2015 I was up for election - I didn't get an opponent. 2016 - didn't get an opponent. I got out there and I connected with the community anyway, 'cause it's just something I like to do. But this year that's different and I'm having to reach out through Zoom and virtual platforms. And to be honest, that's the correct thing to do right now. It is just too deadly of a virus to take a chance, not just on myself and my family, but on others. So it's been difficult, but I'm connecting. And I'm connecting in a way that I've always connected, which is - if this is the platform, Justice Whitener, formerly Judge Whitener - I'm going to be there, we're going to chat, let's have a discussion. And I love talking about the law. This race is a little different, not just because it's the virtual world, but I have an opponent. Remember I didn't get one in 2015 or 2016, so that's different. What's unique as well is my opponent was recently sworn in as an attorney, just when I got appointed to the Supreme Court. So he has never practiced law as an attorney, which means he's never practiced law because to do so without being certified by the bar is illegal, so he has never practiced law. He just passed the bar - in April, he got sworn in - in February, I think he passed the bar. He graduated law school, I think, 20 years ago when I - I graduated in '98 - he graduated, I think in '99 and failed, and then decided to go into education. Why he decided to run now is anybody's guess, but our Constitution actually does not prohibit him from running. To run for an appellate level position, you have to have at least five years of being an attorney. For the Supreme Court, you don't. So it is very important to me, this election cycle, that I inform people of what could happen if I don't prevail. You could have someone sitting on the Supreme Court who has never practiced law, and that can make it rather difficult for the other individuals, but most importantly, what can happen to our law. And I'm very vested in the law - and to make sure that it's held in high esteem, that it should. So campaigning this year is a little different - that's an understatement.  Crystal Fincher: [00:27:58] Well, and it certainly is different. If people do want more information about you, they can head over to justicehelenwhitener.com and learn all about your campaign and read more about you. But you bring up a really interesting point about your opponent and that he hadn't practiced law, hadn't been a lawyer before this campaign, and the surprising bit of information that being a State Supreme Court justice actually does not require that, even though other levels do. And especially at a time right now when, I think a lot of people are looking at the people who we are electing and placing in positions of power, and looking at the difference between those who came with experience and a resumé that people were able to look at, and judge the value of similar work, and use that to inform how future work might be. And then looking at people who were elected, who did not have experience , and also seemed to make a decision out of the blue to run, and the consequences of that. That knowledge actually does count and experience actually does count. Lots of things can be knowledge and lots of things can be experience, but it is important to understand the role that you're taking. And so, having none is certainly at the very extreme of the end, but also, as you talked about in the beginning, you are actually on the other extreme - of lived experience and professional experience and the variety of experience , and how that is able to help you see more of the community, more of the impacts and effects of the law , and how important that is. Justice Whitener: [00:29:55] Yes, the law is very difficult. The intricacies of applying the law - it takes experience. If I had just gotten out of law school and tried for the Supreme Court and got onto the Supreme Court, I don't think I would be able to do the job, one. And even if I was to try to do the job, I would be a burden on the system because I would not be pulling my own weight. It really does take experience. It's like going to medical school or going - getting a pilots license - just because you have the license does not mean to say you can fly a commercial flight without an experienced pilot at your side. All professions have that learning curve to get to the highest position. So people can look at that and make whatever decision they like, but also think of the impact it can have on your life. Because most cases that are heard in the State come through the trial level court - family law cases, criminal cases, civil cases, and I've handled all of them - they're complex cases. Asbestos cases with 15 co-defendants - I've handled those. And then when those things go up to the high court for final resolution - because the lower courts may have made a mistake here or there, that's not something you learn overnight. That's not something you get in a textbook at law school either. It really comes from experience. So we'll see what happens in November.  Crystal Fincher: [00:31:45] Well, I appreciate the time that you've taken to speak with us today. I could listen to you forever, but unfortunately, we've come upon the time for this show today. So thank you so much for being willing to serve, thank you for all the work that you've done in the community and on the bench, even the virtual bench. And just am excited to see how this campaign unfolds and to see how this new term turns out. Thank you very much, Justice Whitener.  Justice Whitener: [00:32:14] Thank you, Crystal. Thank you for giving me the space where my voice can be heard. I appreciate you. Crystal Fincher: [00:32:26] Thank you for listening to Hacks and Wonks. Thank you to KVRU 105.7 FM in Seattle where we record this show. Our chief audio engineer is Maurice Jones Jr. And our producer is Lisl Stadler. If you want more Hacks and Wonks content, go to officialhacksandwonks.com, subscribe to Hacks and Wonks on your favorite podcatcher, or follow me on Twitter @finchfrii. Catch you on the other side.

Real Men Connect with Dr. Joe Martin | Marriage | Parenting | Leadership | Ministry
Sheroes of the Bible Our Daughters Need to Know (EP:610)

Real Men Connect with Dr. Joe Martin | Marriage | Parenting | Leadership | Ministry

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 58:23


Lauren Nelson is the author of Sheroes of the Bible, that was initially self-published and later picked up by Morgan James Publishing.  Lauren is married to her husband Kyle, who is the Pastor at River Church, and she's the mother of two beautiful children, a son and a daughter.  She and her family reside in Tacoma, WA. If you would like to find out more about Lauren, you can visit her website at https://Laurenlnelson.com or follow her in IG: @sheroesofthbible or Facebook @sheroesofthebible. ---------------------    If you want to help us transform the lives of even MORE MEN for God's glory, please take a minute to leave us a helpful REVIEW on iTunes: http://www.rmcpodcast.com and SHARE this podcast with any young man (or men) you're mentoring or discipling. And make sure you don't miss an interview episode by signing up for our Man-to-Man eNewsletter at http://www.RealMenConnect.com, and grab your FREE copy of the Real Men Victory Tracker.  Are you stuck? Want to go to the next level in your marriage, career, business, or ministry?  Then maybe it's time you got a coach. ALL CHAMPIONS have one. Let me coach you to help you strengthen your faith, improve your marriage, spiritually lead your family, achieve more, balance your time, grow your ministry, or even stop an addiction. Click here for details: http://www.RMCfree.com   Also join us on: Join the Real Men 300: http://www.RealMen300.com Facebook Group: http://www.realmenuniversity.com/ YouTube: http://www.RealMenTraining.com Facebook: @realdrjoemartin Instagram: @realdrjoemartin Twitter: @professormartin

Crime Stories with Nancy Grace
Suspect With Distinctive Facial Scarring Wanted in Tacoma Tot Teekah Lewis Disappearance

Crime Stories with Nancy Grace

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 35:50


Two-year-old Teekah Lewis disappeared from a local bowling alley in Tacoma, Washington. She was there with her family: her mom, aunts, uncles, friends were all there bowling in lanes 7 and 8. It was league night at Frontier Lanes bowling alley, so there were tons of people there. But amidst all her family, Teekah seemingly vanished into thin air while just 10 feet away from her mother, Theresa Lewis. While family and friends bowled, the little girl played at the wheel of a video arcade game. Theresa Lewis says she looked away from her baby girl for less than a minute, and when she looked back, she was gone. A witness comes forward describing a man with facial scarring as a potential suspect.Joining Nancy Grace today:Theresa Lewis - Victim's MotherDale Carson - Criminal Defense Attorney (Jacksonville), Former FBI Agent, Former Police Officer, Author: "Arrest-Proof Yourself"Dr. Bethany Marshall - Psychoanalyst, www.drbethanymarshall.com, New Netflix show: 'Bling Empire' Dan Scott - Former Los Angeles County Sheriff's Sergeant, 26 years with Special Victims Bureau Specializing in Child Abuse Olivia LaVoice - Crime reporter for Q13FOX (Seattle)TIPLINE: Tacoma Police Crime Tips Crime Tips (253) 591-5959 or Crime Stoppers 1-800-222-TIPS (8477)See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Don't Take Bullsh*t From F*ckers
Episode 107 - I Think I Hate Advice

Don't Take Bullsh*t From F*ckers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 43:09


This week on Don't Take Bullsh*t From F*ckers with Greg Behrendt and Kane Holloway, Kane hits you with a classic show opening, Greg has ended up with an angry face, the show gets a question from a male listener and he wants to know if he's a f*cker because he's not as in love with his girlfriend as she is with him, The Bachelor feels dated, Kane hates the "I love you more" game, Greg and our listeners have some new Kane style date ideas, Kane's arch nemesis writes into the show, and Greg loves soft foods and hates people. Also, What Does This Meme?, Kane hates a meme the second it comes out of his mouth, Greg thinks Kane's Michael J character is over, Greg is laughing in his high school hallway, our listeners let us know how they found the show, and Kane doesn't want to be the one to kill Greg. Greg and Kane are doing stand up in Pittsburgh and Tacoma respectively, a listener who feels like giving up on dating after trying everything needs advice, and in Reddit Remix, it's "I found a porn video of a job candidate and I don't know if I should report it to my boss." Get the invite link to our free live Zoom podcast taping on Saturday, December 18th at noon PST here Join the DTBFF Discord here You can find video versions of the podcast, bonus episodes, and much more at our Patreon!  Get your DTBFF and Always Be Blocking shirts, notebooks, masks, pillows, stickers, magnets, and Greg Behrendt's Kane Holloway pins on RedBubble  Leave a voicemail for the show at 323-379-5544 Email the show with your questions and comments at dtbffpodcast@gmail.com Follow the show, Greg, Kane, and Pat on Instagram at dtbffpodcast, itsgreggers, kaneholloway and dtbffproducerpat Get a free meditation and info on coaching from Greg at Gregorybehrendt.com Find this podcast and many amazing others at allthingscomedy.com See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Nerd Farmer Podcast
Congressional and Legislative Redistricting Across Washington State – Kamau Chege, WA Community Alliance – #147

Nerd Farmer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 57:29


Over on Crossing Division, Evelyn has covered redistricting in Tacoma, in particular the 27th legislative district. In this conversation, we were planning to look at the whole state, including a conversation about the Congressional District...

The Just Riding Along Show
Just Riding Along Show- Episode 17, The Giving Tree

The Just Riding Along Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 65:03


Does anyone actually read these descriptions? Kenny kicks off the show, Matt rants about obscure brake bleeding knowledge, Kenny rants about TRP Brakes, Andrea talks jobs, and Matt does redneck stuff (surprise!) New shit we probably hate- that tukt derailleur with all the pulleys, counterpunch bar accessories, and ti cleats Listener questions- dusty brake failures, kennE-bikes, Andrea says why your Tacoma is dumb, the hardest mechanical process to master as a professional, and MOST IMPORTANTLY, what is Kenny's favorite dish at Fazoli's? Support the Podcast! JRA PatreonJRA PayPal

Literary Guise
Special Episode: Frank Herbert's "Dune" and a trip to his hometown!

Literary Guise

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 23:50


We take Literary Guise on the road for the first time, visiting the Dune Peninsula in author Frank Herbert's hometown of Tacoma, Washington. We'll talk a bit about the themes in Dune, examine its commentary on masculinity, and review some great blue collar cocktail lounges along the way. Let us know what you think of this special format! We've already got some future trips planned, so let us know if there's a literary locale in your hometown (along with at least two decent cocktail bars) and we might be coming to your neck of the woods soon!

Bird Banter
The Bird Banter Podcast #116 with Charlie Wright

Bird Banter

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 47:05


On this episode Charlie and I talk about his early birding years, his time on remote Alaskan Islands and on research vessels, and his local birding especially at a new Tacoma hotspot Dune Peninsula Park.  Charlie was an early adopter and volunteer reviewer for eBird and is the data reviewer for COASST.  I'm really excited to have Charlie as a guest and think you'll enjoy hearing his story. Thanks for listening.  As always read more about the episode on the BirdBanter.com blog post.  Good birding and good day. 

KUOW Newsroom
Tacoma liquid gas plant gets go-ahead from state pollution board

KUOW Newsroom

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 1:03


A controversial liquified natural gas plant on the Tacoma waterfront has gotten the final go-ahead from the state's Pollution Control Hearings Board.

KUOW Newsroom
A LNG plant on the Tacoma waterfront got the green light from a panel of judges today

KUOW Newsroom

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 0:53


The Pollution Control Hearings Board gave its final go-ahead for the controversial plant.

Talking Out Your Glass podcast
Sonja Blomdahl: Queen of Symmetry

Talking Out Your Glass podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 59:18


Strong. Calm. Serene. So are the vessels of Sonja Blomdahl. In an industrial neighborhood near Seattle's Lake Union, the artist turned loose her vivid colors into the unsuspecting gray of her spacious cinderblock and cement studio. If a Scandinavian flavor is detected in the hue of her celestial orbs, it is by chance as she credits rainy Seattle as her primary inspiration. But Blomdahl is in fact of Swedish descent, leaving some collectors of her work to wonder if the Scandinavian sense of style and design is in her blood.  After graduating from Massachusetts College of Art with a BFA in ceramics, Blomdahl studied at Orrefors Glass School in Sweden for six months, providing her with a solid background in efficiently handling her material. Upon arrival at the glass factory in 1976, she had $300 in her pocket. When her apprenticeship was over and in need of cash, Blomdahl went to work as a cleaning woman in a Swedish hospital to finance trips to Italy and the British Isles. Back in Massachusetts, she blew glass in a New Hampshire studio for nine months until Dan Dailey, a former teacher at Mass Art, invited her to be his teaching assistant at Pilchuck.  Three weeks at Pilchuck in the summer of 1978 proved to be a pivotal time in Blomdahl's career, for it was there that she viewed the Italian master Checco Ongaro demonstrate the double bubble or incalmo technique. She honed this process over the next two years while working at the Glass Eye Studio in Seattle and teaching glassblowing at Pratt Fine Arts Center. After her first exhibition at Traver in 1981, Blomdahl stopped working at the Glass Eye, bought a three-month Euro Rail pass and traveled around Europe. There, she had the opportunity to produce new work in Ann Wolff's studio in Sweden – a wonderful experience that further entrenched Blomdahl's desire to establish her own hotshop. She shipped the work made there back to Seattle and had a second sell-out show at Traver, allowing her to build a studio in 1982, where she worked for the next 25 years. Currently on view in Venice and American Studio Glass, curated by Tina Oldknow and William Warmus, Blomdahl's work was the focus of solo exhibitions at the Montgomery Museum of Fine Art, Montgomery, Alabama; Martha's Vineyard Glassworks, West Tisbury, Massachusetts; and the William Traver Gallery, Tacoma, Washington. Permanent installations and collections include American Craft Museum, New York, New York; Clinton Presidential Library and Museum, Little Rock, Arkansas; Museum of Decorative Art, Prague, Czech Republic; Corning Museum of Glass, Corning, New York; and Kitazawa Contemporary Glass Museum, Kitazawa, Japan, to name a few. She has held teaching positions at Pratt Fine Arts Center, Haystack Mountain School of Crafts in Deer Isle, Maine, and the Appalachian Center in Smithville, Tennessee.  Blomdahl's focus has been the vessel. She states: “In the vessel, I find the form to be of primary importance. It holds the space. In a sense, the vessel is a history of my breath: It contains the volume within. If I have done things correctly, the profile of the piece is a continuous curve; the shape is full, and the opening confident. Color is often the joy in making a piece. I want the colors to glow and react with each other. The clear band between the colors acts as an optic lens; it moves the color around and allows you to see into the piece. The relationship between form, color, proportion, and process intrigued me.”  

Snail Trail 4x4
247: Bed Racks and Dual Case Explosions

Snail Trail 4x4

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 102:31


Toyota Dual Cases, Transfercase, & Adventure Rack Systems!! Join Jimmy and Tyler, on today's explosive episode where Jimmy installs an Adventure Rack Systems bed rack on a Tacoma, and Tyler figures out what it looks like when a claymore goes off in your crawl box! WE ARE GIVING AWAY A WINCH! All you have to do to enter is leave us a review on iTunes/Apple Podcasts! Once we reach 500 reviews, we will do the drawing from those 500 reviews! At 300, 350, 400, and 450 reviews, we will do give aways for some fun swag packs! So get your reviews in! Congrats to PEDDY1111 for winning the 300 swag-away! CALL US AND LEAVE US A VOICEMAIL!!!! We want to hear from you even more!!! You can call and say whatever you like! Ask a question, leave feedback, correct some information about welding, say how much you hate your jeep and wish you had a Toyota! We will air them all, live, on the podcast! +01-916-345-4744. If you have any negative feedback, you can call our negative feedback hotline, 408-800-5169. Episode 247 is brought to you by all of our peeps over at patreon.com! Make sure to stop by and see all of the great perks you get for supporting SnailTrail4x4! Discount Codes, Monthly Give-Aways, Gift Boxes, the SnailTrail4x4 Community, and the ST4x4 Treasure Hunt! Thank you to all of those that support us! We wouldn't be able to do it without you guys (and gals!)! Congratulations to Ben Hayward for winning the DeltaVS HD Tool Carrier! from September's give away! Make sure to check out the GearWrench KoH Experience Contest!! This is definitely one you don't want to miss! And don't forget to send us a picture of your receipts as well! We will be working with GearWrench to give away 10 awesome new tools to 10 lucky winners. Just email a copy of your receipt to Jimmy@snailtrail4x4.com or Tyler@snailtrail4x4.com October's Patreon Giveaway is with us! Snail Trail 4x4! We are giving away 2 Patron Gift Boxes! Every April and October we turn $60 into $100 of goodies. This October is Jimmy's box and has a fun theme to it! Make sure you get signed up on the Patreon Gift Box Tier if you want to be included for April 2022's box. The gift box tier will only be open Oct1 through Oct31 to get in! Congrats to Taylor and Tim for winning October's Giveaway! November's Patreon Giveaway is with Stellarbuilt! We are giving away a Factor55 ProLink in the limited edition OD Green thanks to Dmitry from Stellarbuilt. If you need anything done on your Toyota vehicles from the frame down, definitely hit up Dmitry and see what Stellarbuilt can do for you! Make sure you are signed up for the give away by November 30th! Listener Discount Codes: MORRFlate - snailtrail to get 15% off MORRFlate Multi Tire Inflation Deflation™ KitsSidetracked Offroad - snailtrail4x4 (lowercase)to get 15% off lights and recovery gearLasfit - SnailTrail4x4&lasfit (Cap "S" and "T") to get 10% custom LEDs Laminx Protective Films - Use Link to get 20% off all productsExplorationReady.com - SNAILTRAILPOD (uppercase) to get 20% off 4x4 First Aid Kits!Freedom Ropes - SNAILTRAIL (uppercase) to get 10% offMobArmor - Snailtrail4x4 for 15% offKhordz Mugz - Snailtrail4x4 for 15% off Find us over on YouTube, Instagram, and Facebook! If you enjoy the SnailTrail4x4 Off Road Podcast, then check out these other awesome off-roading podcasts too! Wheeling Wine and WhiskeyMike and Max's Off Road PodcastThe Total Off Road PodcastThe 4x4 Podcast Show Music: Divider and Outtro Meizong - Kumban

The Ian Furness Show
Brandon Funston is here to answer all of your fantasy football questions

The Ian Furness Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 16:48


The Emerald Queen Casino brings us Brandon Funston each Thursday at 2pm to help you, the listener, win your fantasy matchups! The beautiful, brand new Emerald Queen Casino, located on I-5 in Tacoma is Now Open! Come check it out today

The TrailChasers Podcast
Ep 201: Interfacing with Robots

The TrailChasers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 68:51


We chat about some upcoming release of the Trailchasers store on the trainchasers.net website and our Patreon page. Then Matt discusses how he is going to deal with the robots when they take over service jobs from teenagers.

NoBraking
Austin Hironaka

NoBraking

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 47:51


Austin Hironaka from Hiro's Hotrods is our latest guest a native from the Pacific Northwest, Hironaka was raised in Tacoma but post graduation found himself traveling the world as a professional snowboarder. However while looking for his next magazine cover or film Hironaka was always thinking about his next car project. Hiro's Hotrods combines his passion for both his love for Japanese cars and the knowledge of customizing classic cars passed down to him from his old man Moe.

Take Me With You Podcast
(Ep. 159) South Sound & Olympic Peninsula: Wish You Were Here!

Take Me With You Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 36:40


We are in a series where we revisit all of the Wish You Were Heres that have been shared on our podcast, this time broken down by location. This week we're revisiting locations from the South Sound & Olympic Peninsula in Washington State. 3:35 Debbie Doolittle's Petting Zoo, Tacoma, WA 8:55 ZooLights, Tacoma, WA & WildLights, Seattle, WA 12:10 Museum of Glass, Tacoma, WA 18:00 The Hoh Rainforest, Forks, WA 19:50 Lake Crescent, Clallam County, WA  22:30 Troll Haven, WA 29:30 Silver City Brewery, Silverdale, WA 31:00 Olympic Game Farm, Sequim, WA  33:20 Hurricane Ridge, Olympic National Park, WA  Follow us on Twitter & Instagram: @tmwypodcast  Leave us a voicemail (or text message): (406)763-8699  Email: tmwypodcast@gmail.com 

True Crime Chronicles
In Broad Daylight | 126

True Crime Chronicles

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 29:49


In May of 1935, nine-year-old George Weyerhaeuser, the heir to a lumber fortune, was taken off the street in broad daylight three blocks form his home in Tacoma, Wash. The kidnapping sparked what the New York Times called "the greatest manhunt in the history of the Northwest." Tim Pham, an anchor and reporter with KREM 2 News, shares his reporting on the story, including a conversation with Bryan Johnston, author of "Deep in the Woods: The 1935 Kidnapping of Nine-Year-Old George Weyerhaeuser, Heir to America's Mightiest Timber Dynasty." Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Umpire Pants
Episode 220: My Husband's a Dumbshit, He ate a Bunch of Hotdogs

Umpire Pants

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 41:19


We come out slow and sloppy with an electricity joke. BLACK STALLION SPOILERS are a potential here, because Mary is getting the Black Stallion from the library, and has Nate Bargatze tickets coming up, so she's got things to look forward to! What movies are better than the books they're based on? Bill says Jaws and The Godfather. Mary regrets reading Lord of the Rings. Superman talk. Mary got more Rant and Raves in the paper and we see if we can figure out which one is hers. Mary is taking a jewelry class and made some rings! We have some Tacoma jokes from the Seattle Joke Book! Mary has some Reviews of Cooking Recipes! Bill recounts helping a stranded teenager last summer, and helping a drunk guy on a bike years ago. We do some Recipes from First Graders! And Mary shocks us all by ending the show with an extra early Umpire Pants Out!

Evidence Locker True Crime
161: The Kidnapping of George Weyerhaeuser | USA

Evidence Locker True Crime

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 38:16


When a lumber baron's 9-year-old son was kidnapped on his way home from school in Tacoma, Washington in 1935, the news gripped the entire nation. The Lindbergh kidnapping was still fresh in the collective memory, and everyone held their breaths, hoping that young George Weyerhaeuser would be found alive and well. This is a story with interesting characters, and puzzling details and intrigue. Join us next week when we interview author Bryan Johnston about his book, Deep into the Woods – a deep delve into the Weyerhaeuser Kidnapping. Special thanks: Bryan Johnston Sponsor:  Best Fiends - A world on your Mobile. Engage your brain with fun puzzles and collect tons of cute characters. Download Best Fiends FREE on the Apple App Store or Google Play For pictures and more information, join us on Facebook Want to support our podcast? Visit our page at Patreon For a full list of resources and credits visit Evidence Locker Website For all sponsor discount codes, visit this page Created & Produced by Sonya Lowe Narrated by Noel Vinson Music: “Nordic Medieval” by Marcus Bressler Background track: Doblado Studios: https://www.youtube.com/c/DobladoStudios This True Crime Podcast was researched using open source or archive materials.

TFL Talkin' Trucks
Ep. 93: These Are The Most Overhyped & The Most Underappreciated Trucks You Can Buy!

TFL Talkin' Trucks

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 57:55


Welcome back to TFL Talkin' Trucks! Andre and Nathan discuss some of the most overhyped trucks out there, as well as those that don't get the appreciation we think they deserve.

KEXP Song of the Day
Talaya. - Sola Fide + No Way (feat. Brandon Marsalis & Crissy P)

KEXP Song of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 5:26


Talaya. - "Sola Fide + No Way (feat. Brandon Marsalis & Crissy P)" from the 2021 album Existential Soul on Talaya's Music. “Sola Fide + No Way” is an exemplification in song of a whole new crop of young, self-taught, self-made artists that is currently rising in the Seattle area. The hypnotic track off of Talaya's debut full-length Existential Soul sees the R&B soul songstress team up with rappers Brandon Marsalis of Tacoma and Kent-based Crissy P for a sophisticated and spiritual quest to find the light. An audio engineer by day, Talaya first gained recognition for her vocal prowess at 2020's Sound Off! The 21-and-under competition has been the symbolic birthplace of artists like Naked Giants, Dave B, Emma Lee Toyoda, and Travis Thompson and is seen as one of the main opportunities that young artists in the Northwest can get exposure. Crissy P also falls into that category, as a finalist in 2019's competition and now an activist using his insightful voice on his 2020 debut full-length The East Coordinate to amplify the causes close to his heart.  “Is you Christian all the way?” Marsalis ponders on “Sola Fide +No Way,” questioning the intentions behind performative religion. Reflection is big for the 24-year-old artist, who beautifully articulates the big questions in life on his 2019 album Ouroboros. While none of these artists have yet lived a quarter century on this planet, their ability to express larger-than-life concepts bodes very well for the next generation. Read the full post on KEXP.org Support the show: https://www.kexp.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Tom and Curley Show
Hour 3: Tacoma schools considers replacing snow days with remote learning

The Tom and Curley Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 29:57


5PM - Tacoma schools considers replacing snow days with remote learning // Colts QB Carson Wentz Will Skip His Child's Birth if it Happens on Game Day // Know-It-All Quiz // Your Letters + Letter of the Day See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Ian Furness Show
Brandon Funston - What OBJ landing with the Rams means from a fantasy standpoint, plus answers to all of your fantasy football questions

The Ian Furness Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 16:56


The Emerald Queen Casino brings us Brandon Funston each Thursday at 2pm to help you, the listener, win your fantasy matchups! The beautiful, brand new Emerald Queen Casino, located on I-5 in Tacoma is Now Open! Come check it out today

The Gee and Ursula Show
Hour 2: Keep the snow days!

The Gee and Ursula Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 33:55


THREE THINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW // GUEST: Matt Driscol from the Tacoma News Tribune l on why schools still need snow days (Tacoma schools are surveying parents) // SCENARIOS See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The TrailChasers Podcast
Ep 200: SEMA Day 3 and New Frontier

The TrailChasers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 163:56


We give our final thoughts on #semashow, play the interviews from Day 3 with @optimabatteries @bajaforged @lge_ctsmotorsports @toyotausa @xtrusionoverland @mcleod_racing and talk about Jose's transition to a new #frontier

What a Hell of a Way to Die
Your Honor, The Regulations Annoyed Me

What a Hell of a Way to Die

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 60:06


We get to the point at 17:51! This week, we discuss adventures in soundproofing, how to de-Ba'ath-ify yourself from the effects of the military making you react emotionally, Veterans' Day, the 5-year anniversary of this podcast, and much more. However, we also focus specifically on a story about a metallurgist in Tacoma who faked the test results of decades' worth of Navy metal castings for submarines because she thought the test standards were ‘stupid.' It's the most relatable thing we've ever heard--read the story here: https://www.military.com/daily-news/2021/11/09/metallurgist-admits-faking-steel-test-results-navy-subs.html   For week's bonus, Francis speaks with Task and Purpose reporter Hayley Britzky (@halbritz) about brigades in the 82nd Airborne trying out this new thing called 'exercise science' and 'nutrition science' and 'perhaps not destroying soldiers' bodies with terrible exercise routines that have been out of date for 40 years.' Get it on Patreon here: https://www.patreon.com/posts/58342578   *SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT* We now have a storefront to sell the patches, buttons, and magnets that we also give out as flair for our $10 tier. Buy some sweet gear here:  https://www.hellofawaytodie.com/shop We have a YouTube channel now -- subscribe here and get sweet videos from us in which we yell in our cars like true veterans: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwlHZpNTz-h6aTeQiJrEDKw You can follow the show on Twitter here: @HellOfAWay Follow Nate here: @inthesedeserts Follow Francis here: @ArmyStrang

Elevate Health
Homelessness is Solvable

Elevate Health

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 39:41


Many U.S. communities, including Tacoma and other cities in Western Washington, are facing an explosion in homelessness. But Gerrit Nyland, a social services supervisor tasked with ending homelessness in Pierce County, says what many don't realize is that roughly one-third of the unsheltered in the South Puget Sound are children, while many others are “working poor” families whose lives have been disrupted by job loss, unexpected injury, illness, or just bad luck. Links: Tacoma Pierce County Coalition to End Homelessness Tacoma Rescue Mission Nativity House Associated Ministries Elevate Health --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/elevate-health/message

Solvable Mysteries Podcast
Cleo Smith Found! #120

Solvable Mysteries Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 91:29


Missing Cleo smith found! Tacoma mass shooting updates. Houston ‘House of Horrors'. The head of NASA says UFO's probably exists!On today's show Juras and Glenn introduce the new show format that will become part of the new ways Solvable Mysteries Podcast brings news, true crime stories and other mysteries to our audience.  These include us reviewing the good news about kidnapped toddler Cleo Smith in Australia, and what went right in that case.  We also review the disturbing case of child abuse and murder in Houston, where a family of children were found living with a dead sibling rotting in the house for possibly more than a year.  We also review the case of a mass shooting in Tacoma, as well as some good news regarding UFO investigations from the head of NASA, Bill Nelson.#cleosmith #cleosmithfound #cleosmithupdate #cleosmithlatest #tacomamassshooting #houstonhouseofhorrorsPlease Subscribe to our YouTube channel to make sure you don't miss new episodes of the Solvable Mysteries Podcast, we upload on a weekly basis.

Inside Outside
Ep. 272 - Dave Parker, Author of Trajectory: Startup on Ideation to Product Market Fit

Inside Outside

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 36:41


On this week's episode of Inside Outside Innovation, we sit down with Dave Parker, five-time founder, and author of the new book Trajectory: Startup. Dave and I talk about a range of topics for helping founders go from ideation to product market fit. And this conversation was part of our IO Live Series recorded during Startup Week Lincoln. Let's get started. Inside Outside Innovation is the podcast to help new innovators navigate what's next. I'm your host, Brian Ardinger, Founder of InsideOutside.io. Each week, we'll give you a front row seat to what it takes to learn, grow, and thrive in today's world of accelerating change and uncertainty. Join us as we explore, engage and experiment with the best and the brightest innovators, entrepreneurs, and pioneering businesses. It's time to get started. Interview Transcript with Dave Parker, Five-time founder and Author of Trajectory StartupBrian Ardinger: I wanted to thank our sponsors for this event. We are part of the Techstars Startup Week here in Lincoln. So, we wanted to give a shout out to them and Startup LNK for making this all possible.Also Inside Outside is sponsored by the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation. As many of you may know about the Kauffman Foundation, they run 1 Million Cups and a variety of other things, but they're a private, non-partisan foundation based in Kansas City. They seek to build inclusive prosperity through entrepreneurship- led economic development. So, we're super excited to have them as partners with us here. And you can find out more about them at kaufman.org or follow them on Twitter at Kaufman FDN on Facebook or Twitter. So, thank you again to the sponsors. Thank you, Dave, for coming on, we had set this up when your book was coming out and I said Hey, I've got the perfect time to do this during startup week. When we might have some startup founders who may be having some questions. You and I met eight or nine years ago through Up Global. We were with Startup America. And you were based in Seattle. You also helped found Code Fellows and you're a five-time founder, so you've got a lot of experience in this particular space. Eight years ago, the startup ecosystem, and what it was like was a little bit different than is today. So, what has been the biggest trends or things that you've seen that it's changed over the course of the few years that we've known each other? Dave Parker: Well, let me go a little further back. I started my first company in 98 in Seattle. And believe it or not bill gates and Jeff Bezos weren't really giving back to the startup community at that time. Oh, wait, they haven't yet. I mean, Bill gives back to like global change the world stuff. Right. But the idea there was, wow there's a bunch of us doing this startup thing, but there's not really anybody to give much advice. So, we did a peer cohort. Which was my first thing. And after a while I was like, wow, we need to level up our city. All of us tend to think of the next city bigger than us as like, oh, we want to be more like, Seattle doesn't want to be like Vancouver, Canada. We want to be like San Francisco. Where Portland's like, well, we want to be more like Seattle.Because I grew up in Portland and then moved here to go to college and never went back. First startup in 1988. Built a software distribution company called license online. The company went from zero to 32 million in sales in 4 years. Which was ridiculously fast. And we went from 3 employees to 150 and in four years. And then we sold the company in 2002.So then in 98 to 2002, if you remember back there, there was a tech bubble in there and there was 9/ 11 in there. So, it was an interesting time. Wasn't a great time to sell a company now, too. But got it sold anyway. And that was my first startup. First of five. Three of them sold. Two of them failed. One in a rather epic crater fashion. Which is funny. Because it was after the first one, that actually worked. So, you know, people were like, I wouldn't do this again. And they're like working on the next one? I'm like obviously got a serial glutton for punishment. So, 16 exits total. So as a founder board member advisor. So, my day job is helping companies and founders sell their companies. Which allows me to my 20% time to work on community building and giving back.Which kind of got me to Startup Weekend and Up Global. Up Global was the merger of Startup America and Startup Weekend. And we did about 1,265 events worldwide, my last full year there, before we sold to Techstars. Including launching Startup Week globally. And we launched it in 26 cities globally, the second year. I ran it in Seattle.Andrew Hyde started it in Boulder. And we ran it in six cities, the first year. And 26 cities the second year. So, startup communities stuff is awesome. And I love it. It's, as you know, though, it doesn't pay, so you have to have a day job. You have to have a side hustle, so you can keep your community building job, right. Or vice versa.Brian Ardinger: Exactly. Yeah. I think we're nine years here at the Startup Week in Lincoln. We got grandfathered in when Techstars made it a global deal. But we found it very helpful to have these conversations, even if it's just once a year to get people connected and reengaged with why it's important to have a startup and why a startup ecosystem is so important in your own backyard.So, you've got a great book out called Trajectory Startup. I would encourage you to take a look at this. There's a lot of books about startups out there. What made you say, I want to take a different take in this and give back to the community by writing a book about startups Dave Parker: Two big things about the book gap that I saw in the marketplace is one, I mean, you, you know, Brian, you've been around Startup Weekend. I'd see people coming out of Startup Weekend and they're like, woo. I met my co-founder, Charles. We're going to leave at eight and then go start our start up. And I'm like, yikes. Like, there are some things you can know before you leave your day job and your benefits and all those things, which allow you to really look at what do I want to know so I can de-risk this as the first semester, right. So, I got to do the market research and competitive analysis and look how big the market is and like, and how do I do that? The book's really focused on, the original title was Six Month Startup. And then I started delivering it in different formats and I'm like that doesn't work for the brand. So, it became Trajectory Series. But the program now is focused on a five-month program that takes you from ideation to revenue. And the idea there is, if you can't get to revenue in six months, it's probably not a great idea. There are exceptions to that rule. Like if you're a B2B or B2B enterprise and you need to build a really robust product, like that's an exception. Or biotech. Or you're doing B to C and you're competing with clubhouse and you're really about growth of users, right? You won't get to revenue in six months. But in general, you should be able to validate or invalidate your idea in six months was the goal. The second thing that came out of it, I kind of backed into was somebody came to me during my time at Startup Weekend. And they're like, hey, can I have your financial model?I'm like, well, yes, you can have it. But yours is a business consumer marketplace and mine's a business- to- business subscription. And those are fundamentally different. I mean, we use the same lingo. And as you know, in startup land, we have our own language, which is knowing how to work the system for sure.But the key there was how many templates would there be. So, I reached out to Crunchbase at the time and the CEO of Crunchbase and said, hey, can you give me a list of every seed funded company in the last 18 months globally. Ends up being twenty-six hundred and fifty-four companies. So hired a team. My son who was in college at the time was my project manager.And we basically looked at all twenty-six hundred and fifty-four websites and where they didn't have a pricing model or a revenue model, that was obvious, I reached out to them and said, Hey CEO, I'm doing this research project on revenue models. How do you monetize? So, we ended up breaking down 2,600 companies into the logical revenue models and there were 14. And that was it.So, I would say the most unique part of the content of the book is really the breakdown of the 14 revenue models that are successful in tech. And how you monetize them. So, the basic unit economics of what are the key metrics and KPIs of each of the 14 revenue models. Consequently, I became super geeky about pricing and revenue.When somebody now gets to give a pitch and they're like, hey, we're doing a blah, blah, blah. I'm like, oh, you're a marketplace that monetizes this way. And people are like, how did you know that? And I'm like, it's actually not a secret. There's 14 just like pick from the list. Right. So, I think for first time founders, the question then becomes what you're building I hope is unique, but how you monetize it is almost never unique. The Ewing Marion Kauffman FoundationSponsor Voice: The Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation is a private, nonpartisan foundation based in Kansas City, Missouri, that seeks to build inclusive prosperity through a prepared workforce and entrepreneur-focused economic development. The Foundation uses its $3 billion in assets to change conditions, address root causes, and break down systemic barriers so that all people – regardless of race, gender, or geography – have the opportunity to achieve economic stability, mobility, and prosperity. For more  information, visit www.kauffman.org and connect with us at www.twitter.com/kauffmanfdn and www.facebook.com/kauffmanfdn. Brian Ardinger: That's an important point, because I think a lot of times we think about the features or the problem we're solving, but we don't necessarily think about the business model itself and you don't have a business without a business model. So, that's so critical to think even at the earliest stages. It may pivot. It may change based on what you find in the marketplace, but at least going in with here's our initial assumption of how we might make money. And the model that we need to... Dave Parker: And that, let me break down the business model in three parts for you, because I think one of the things that all of us look at and we're like, oh, it's in our business model. Kind of like this. It's a black box and it's a secret thing. And one of the things I discovered in the process was here are the components of the business model. So, think about it as a Venn diagram. The top circle is really creating value and how you create value is your product, your service, and your team. And those are the costs associated with creating a product or a service.So, if you're in a service business, if you and I were lawyers, God forbid. We would bill out on an hourly basis. We'd have a pay rate and a bill rate, and that differential would create gross margins. It's a service business. In a product business it's a little harder to predict because we build the software once and we have thousands of users. So, it's not like, oh, every time we build it, we have to create a new and separate version, right. But the cost of building that product, whether it's the six engineers in six months or three years, depending on what it is, is a cost associated with creating value. The value created is the product or the service. There's a cost associated with creating a value. Circle Number Two is the cost of delivering value. And that is your pricing. Because that's a variable, right. That I can adjust. It's my revenue model. How I monetize. It's my marketing and my sales. I fixed the cost to build. I have now fixed the cost to sell. And there's lots of variables in there. There's lots of marketing things you can test. There are a few sales models, not a lot. Marketing is the most creative, and obviously it can be the most expensive in some ways too. And then what you have leftovers, the third bubble which is your top line revenue and your gross margin and hopefully net profit. Those are outcomes. You don't get to control those. You get to control your cost to build it, and you get to control your cost to sell it and the price. But when you think about it, that way, you're like, oh, there's only so many variables I get to be in control of. And since those are the ones that you control of, then I'm a strong advocate of like, know what the levers are you can pull. I talk to a lot of founders and some of the research was interesting. It basically showed that most founding teams don't change their price at all in the first three years. Which is when you think about it kind of crazy. But us as founders, were like, oh, I know all the product detriments and you know, it was kind of like, I would liken it to, if you said, hey, show me a picture of your son, Brandon, I'd be like, oh, I can show you a three-year-old picture of Brandon.He's a super cute kid. He's 28 today. Plays lead guitar in a metal band. Tatted up and you know, with sleeves and gages in his ears. It would be true, but I just want it to be accurate. Right. And I think that as founders, one of the challenges we have is how do I continue to reprice my product as a product feature set goes.So, one of the things I always recommend to founders is having a pricing council, you do once a quarter. Not that you're going to change price every quarter, but you are, you should really think about it. Brian Ardinger: Well, and you can also do tests around it as well. I remember a story, Eric Ries was talking about. He was working in a corporate environment, but they were saying like, this is the price. And he said, well, have you ever tested it? Do you know if you can go higher? And they said, no, no, because you know we know our customers and blah, blah. And he said, well, why don't we just run a test? And let's, you know, throw out a different price and see what happens. So, they ran the test. And it worked. And they said, well, why don't we do it again? Let's bump up the price again. And they ran a test and it worked again. And they realized like all these years they were leaving all this money on the table, so to speak. Because they had never even tested it. They never test to see if they could extract more value out. Dave Parker: There was a company in Seattle and I'm blanking on the name, that I was trying to see if they pull up real quick. So, they were doing a competitor for PowerPoint. It would look at contextually what the content was, and it would make the image suggestions for you. When they launched the product, the product is all the same price, and they came back at one point, and they just doubled it. And they had zero churn. Right. Which makes you think like, oh my God, how long ago could we have done that? Like nobody left. Everybody's like, yeah, makes sense. Like it would have paid more for it all along.Brian Ardinger: So, what are the most common questions that you get from founders at the earliest stages? What are most founders struggling with when they come to you? Dave Parker: When we think about the go to market strategy is definitely a question. So, I'm a product person or I'm an engineer and I'm new to like go to market. There's still a little bit of that theory of like, well, if I get on Tech Crunch, I'll just go viral. And the answer is, no, it doesn't work that way. Right. I mean, it would be awesome if it did. And we see some examples of companies going viral and there's a misattribution Brian of like, well, I'm going to go to market like Clubhouse.I'm like you're B2B and only B to C companies get a chance to go viral. Like B2B companies get good word of mouth maybe but going viral is math. Right. There's probably three big things in startups that are mysteries, but when you peel them back, they're actually not a mystery. It's just math. Going viral means it's called a K factor.So, if you have a K Factor of greater than two, I'll give you this base formula. Every customer I buy, I generate two additional paid customers. So, if you think about WhatsApp right or clubhouse, the answer is I'm in a business model there that actually doesn't require a business model. So, I call it new media.And what you're trying to do is grow your customer base so fast that at some point you'll monetize it through advertising. Not a surprise. Facebook, WhatsApp, et cetera. At some point you'll monetize it through advertising. So Clubhouse, you're starting to see some of those things, Tik TOK with pre roll. And people apply that revenue model or lack of revenue model to like a B2B business and B2B companies don't go viral.There's been two examples of things that went close, right? So Slack super close to viral. Interestingly enough, Slack before their pivot was a gaming platform. The game sucked but the communication platform was great. So that's one example of a B2B company kind of going viral, but it's really just group invitations.And the second one was LinkedIn for a very short period of time, about nine months, early, early on. And they built a tool that allows you to upload your entire contact database. And for that nine-month window, they went viral for every paid customer, they got more than two. So that's what viral means. The second one is traction or product market fit.And one of the things you'll hear from investors all the time. And I work as a venture capitalist now for a fund out of Atlanta. People are like, well, when you get traction, come see us again. Which is really the VC patting you on the head and saying, you're really cute. Like, let me know how it goes. And most first-time founders are walk away from those and go like, oh, that was an awesome meeting.And I'm like, actually, no, it wasn't, you're going to get ghosted. This is just like, they just swipe left or right. Or I don't know, I don't use dating apps. So whichever way they swipe, they swipe. Wrong way. Traction and product market fit is just math as well. Right. So, when people are like, oh, it's a mystery. Like we'll know it when we see it. I'm like a VC saying it's like porn, like that's crazy. Right. But product market fit is really not a mystery, it's math. So, when I think about the method Product Market Fit, there are early indicators of Product Market fit and there's trailing indicators. And the trailing indicators are easy. Churn. Surveys of, hey, if you didn't get use our product, what would it be like and how much disappointed would you be? And lack of customer retention through either contracts going down in value versus contracts going up in value. Those are lagging indicators. The early indicators are really things around like, is the traffic at the top of your site going up, right? Are the number of people downloading your app? Is that going up? Is the time to close going down? Is the conversion from demo to customer going up? And is my average contract value going up? When I put those five factors together. Right? So, closing ratios are improving. Traffic is improving. Demos are improving. Time to close is going down. And average contract value is going up.It's like the miracle of compound interest. If you don't have any of those indicators moving the right way, maybe you have product market fit, but it's too early to tell. If you do have those indicators coming together, then the answer is right, good on you, man. This is, this is exciting. And as an investor, that's where I get excited about writing the check. Because I'm like... Brian Ardinger: Because you know your money is going towards the fueling of that growth versus building something or guessing. Dave Parker: It's the early shift between risk capital and growth capital. And typically, what I see in the early stages are people like, well, we're not spending any money, we're just doing organic growth. And that's okay. But the big question is, okay, how do you scale it with paid growth so that organic growth can go fast. Oh, I'm just doing it through my network today. So I think about it as 10, 100, 1000 customer rule, right?The first 10 customers as the founder, you're going to go hand-to-hand combat. Go get them yourself. The first hundred, you probably can't do that. You're going to need to hire a salesperson or two. And you need to get good at making them, your value proposition clear. You need to get good at getting your pricing, right.But that's when you start to scale and as the first investor for you as the founder, that's good news, right? Because it's starting to scale past what I would call the Binary Risk Stage. Right? It's a zero or one it's going to succeed. Right. And angels will invest in you because we like you, right? I'm like, oh, writes you a check for $10,000 and you know, maybe be a board advisor, right, as an angel. When I'm ready to check for the fund, our average check is $650,000. I'm looking for like numbers and math. Right. And I can help the founders see it. But typically, what happens in venture is if a VC sees the math before you do, they're going to get a really good deal because they're going to put a check in and go like, Ooh, we saw the math before the founder did. And I'm not good at that. So, when I talk with founders, I'm like, here's the math you should be looking for. And one of the funds I used to work for, it was like, why are you telling them that? And I'm like, because I think better trained founders is always a good thing. So, if you're geeky about math and numbers and unit economics, you'll love the book.If you're new to that. And don't know, you're like Dave, you're speaking a foreign language and I recognize it is English. You'll learn the lingo with the book as well. Brian Ardinger: Well, I do think that's vitally important. Especially as you go out and want to go that more venture capital type of route, because these are the things you have to be able to talk to and understand and know, like you said, the levers and that, that you have to pull to make that work. The other question I want to talk about is early-stage solo founders. One of the biggest things they've got to figure out is how to build that team and the culture and things along those lines. What kind of advice or insights have you seen at the early stage of how do I build that team create it.Dave Parker: I'm going to give you a little contrarian advice. It frustrates me at times when people pontificate around stuff that they don't actually know. So you'll hear VCs often say culture matters is the most important thing. What they mean by that is personality. When you have a two-person founding team or a three person founding team, you don't actually have culture.Like there are few repeat entrepreneurs or people come from organizational development, or maybe you're in the services business. And you're like, we're going to build our company on a services culture, and that we really understand. If you're building a product, your first milestone is product market fit. Because if you get the culture wrong, you can fix it. But if you don't get product market fit, your culture doesn't matter. You don't have a company. Right? Right. So, the first milestone is product market fit. So, in VC you say, oh, culture really matters. What they're really talking about in a three-person startup is do they like you from a personality standpoint or are you an ass?Right? So, cause if the answer is, I don't think you'll listen to feedback, I'm probably not going to write a check. If I'm like the average investment for me as an angel is probably eight years to exit. So, if I don't like you, I'm probably not going to write a check. Right. So, there's, the things I'm looking for there from a personality profile type tends to be, then there's totally from views, right?There's the Introvert view, right? Bill gates did okay. Jeff Bezos, I don't think it was really an extrovert. But people will over-index on charisma or salesmanship when the answer is maybe, right. So ultimately, I kind of look at it first and say, is this the right founder? Is it Founder Market Fit? Are they the right people to solve this problem or not?So, I remember with Mitsui when I was there at one point. I was with a big fund out of Silicon Valley for three years. We got invited to invest in this deal, that was like spin the bottle where 70% of the attendees were girls and 30% were boys. And it was like late teenagers, early twenties. I'm like, we can't invest in this. This is just creepy. We're a bunch of old guys by comparison. It's just weird. Like, wait, this is the wrong investor fit for us. So, I'm looking at the founders and going, are they the right founders for this market and for this product first off. Brian Ardinger: And I think that's an important point for the founders to understand is like not every angel or not every fund is the right fit for you. And it's not necessarily, they don't like you or don't think it's great or whatever, sometimes it's an industry that they don't invest it. Dave Parker: For sure, like the fund that I'm supporting out of Atlanta, is called the Fearless Fund. So Fearless Fund is two African American women were the founders of the fund. They launched the fund with a $5 million exploratory fund. For all the wrong reasons. It blew up, right George Floyd, et cetera. And they're going to close on $30 million. We invest exclusively in black and brown women. And when they recruited me on it, I was like, oh, hell yeah, this is like, so on-mission right. Because 3.1% of all venture capital over the last 20 years is went to white dudes named Dave. Now I just want to pinpoint Jims are worse than the Daves. They got 3.4%. 2.8% went to all women. 0.8% went to people of color. Like if I could spend the next chapter of my life helping to level that playing field, I'm in. Like, it's kind of a no brainer. But if you came to us and said, hey, I'm a black and brown woman, but I'm based in London.We would be like, sorry, I can't do it. It doesn't matter how good your ideas because we have what's called an LP Agreement. An LPA. The LPA says we invest in these things, US-based companies, black and brown women founders. And if you're not in that mix, it doesn't matter how good your idea is. And people tend to take it personally. They're like, I can't believe you told me. No, my idea is brilliant. And I'm like, you're not in our thesis. Right. And if you're not in our thesis, we can't invest in it. So, know that that's pretty common for a lot of venture capital funds. Some VCs are opportunistic by definition and the answer is they can invest in a very broad category and angels can invest in the stuff that they love. Right. I like you as a founder. And I think it's a cool idea. I give it a shot. Brian Ardinger: Yeah. At Nelnet where I do some investing, obviously on our venture capital side, we are a lot more opportunistic or we'll take different bets based on community or other things, rather than things that are always in our sweet spots, so to speak. So corporate venture is a lot different as well. So, it pays to understand who has the money. Why do they want to invest for sure? What are they looking for? Dave Parker: One of the chapters, I break down what the investor profiles are and why they invest. So, if you think about this as an enterprise sales process, if you, as a founder are out raising money, the question is, is like what stage appropriate capital. Right? So as a corporate VC, you're probably not investing in early risk stage capital. But you're investing in markets you want to keep an eye on usually. Because you're like, oh, that's a super interesting development. Let's put some money over there and see how that works and we'll follow on with it. Brian Ardinger: So, Andrew has a question in the chat. He says, I work with very early-stage VC funding, pre prototype presales. I've noticed this new trend where companies are being trained in their pitch to propose who they might be acquired by in the coming years. Do you feel this as a legitimate trend and if not, how we advise founders to prepare for acquisition? Dave Parker: So, I've done 16 exits. So, I definitely have an opinion on this one. I would say the first thing you need to focus on is like focus on building a great product and a great company. Right? And then your acquisition thing becomes a lot easier to discuss. Like I will say my general default is I like products and companies that have logical upmarket buyers.Right. So there's like, oh, it makes sense that they've and people like, oh, Google's going to buy me. I'm like, actually you can, there's a Wikipedia page. Every acquisition that Google has ever made. And in most cases I will tell you, they're not going to buy you. Now, I know aspirational, you want them to buy you and that's super cool. But there's a big difference between oh, Microsoft will buy us or it's like, actually, no. Right. So, we're selling a company right now. They're doing about $10 million runway and run rate and revenue. And at one point I was talking with the CEO and he's like, Salesforce will buy us. I'm like, no Salesforce, isn't going to buy you. You have to be way over 10 million in revenue to have Salesforce actually be interested.So, they bought Slack for, you know, something incredible in the billions of dollars. But they have to do an acquisition that moves the needle in the billions, not in the oh, it's 10 or 20 million. Right. It doesn't mean you're a bad company, it just means you have limited buyer set. So, from a founder perspective, I think if they're asking you the question there may or may not be the right investor because we don't typically look to flip deals.I know I'm going to be in the deal 7 to 10 years. But I do like where there's a logical upmarket buyer who has a track record of doing acquisitions. So, I would say it's a bit of a Catch 22. By contrast, I will tell you I've been on the board of the company for 17 almost 18 years. That we're the largest player in our space. Which means the company today is a great, you know, kicks off great dividends. We do really well with it, but there's no easy exit for it because we're the biggest player in that kind of niche market. Which gets you back to the market sizing and why you want to go after a market, that's a much bigger market than a niche market for sure. Brian Ardinger: Andrew says. Thanks. Great insight. Thank you for that. Question around what are some of the trends that you're seeing and what are you excited about when it comes to startups?Dave Parker: I think one of the ones that I'm aspirationally looking for, and I can't get myself to get off the bench and go do myself, is I think there's going to be a shift in the social platforms, not just solely based on the fact that watching Facebook stab themselves has been awkward. But the idea of platforms that empower the creatives and creators is super interesting to me.Like when I look at Sub Stack and things like that, it's like the revenue models are still flipped. Where it's too much of the money, goes to the platform and not enough money goes to the creator. So, I think there's probably a really interesting opportunity that says, hey, how do you flip that model, where the creators make most of the money and the platforms making less.You know, obviously Facebook's the extreme version of that. But Tik TOK is a good example of, hey, somebody gets on to try to monetize something and finds that they made quite a bit. I think we'll see more platforms develop that empower the creatives. Creative class. I think that's super exciting. Brian Ardinger: That's interesting too. The whole no-code low-code movement has really changed over the last five years where again five or six years ago, you, at some point had to have a development team or a, or a developer on your team to start building product. And nowadays I tell most founders, there's probably enough out there with low-code no-code tools that you can at least get your MVP some early insight without having to have that developer co-founder on board. Dave Parker: Yeah, I think that's super exciting as well. It's one of the categories we're following. And I think low-code no-code is the equivalent of what AWS was to buying servers. So, I've raised $12 million and exited $85 million. In my first startup, we had to buy servers and racks and build them ourselves and put them in a, an Exodus Data Center.And people were like Exodus, what was that? It was one of the biggest epic fails of all time. And when AWS came along and they didn't have to, I could just turn up a virtual server. I didn't have to order something from Dell. It fundamentally changed the cost of doing a startup. Low-code no-code I think will be the same. And my cost of actually doing it.Now, I still have to learn how to do that. But from a founder perspective, I can learn how to do that in months and not years. And then not have to build the development team. So, using Bubble or Air Table, for sure. Monday, I would say is the expensive version of Bubble or Air Table by comparison, from a founder perspective.Brian Ardinger: What I like about it is it allows for greater customer discovery and experimentation around your product earlier to get that feedback, to see if you're on the right stage and figure out what features you do need to build or scale or optimize. Dave Parker: Yeah. Yeah, that one's great. I think in a revenue model side, one of the things we're seeing is in the marketplace components. As we're seeing marketplace shift from transaction fees only to subscription fees, plus transaction fees. I would tell you watching revenue models over the last seven years, ish, total, there's been a few changes in them. One, if you remember Groupon, there's thousands of competitors to it because at a fundamental level, I would say revenue models aren't, they're not defensive. Revenue models, so think of they're very public domain. So even Google and pay-per-click copied that model from Yahoo. Lost the lawsuit against them. Yahoo had bought a company from Idea Lab who'd had actually patented the pay-per-click model. Yahoo ended up being a great holding company for Alibaba and Google stock, right at the end of the day.Revenue models are defensible, but if you look at all the copycats of Groupon, you see, most of those went away. Groupon is still alive in a public company, but they traded 0.49 times trailing 12 revenue. So, if you take the market cap of the company divided by sales, I would say that it's 50 cents on the dollar. Right. So as far as what they trade at. Now, compare that to a subscription business. Well, maybe the next step up would be you and I do a consulting business for a million dollars. That company is worth roughly a million dollars. It's worth one times revenues. So, because if you remember Groupon booked the top line sales of what they sold you for that certificate, but they really only made the margin on the, you know, the 10 or 15% on the margin of it.So, if you and I had a consulting company for a million dollars, it'd be worth roughly a million dollars. If we did a million-dollar subscription company, it would be worth somewhere between 12 and $15 million. And one of the new models that really came out in the last five years was the idea of a metered service company.So Twilio is a great example, AWS, if it was pulled out of Amazon is a pay as you go model. It is predominantly is B2B, but those companies traded really 35 times, right? So, if you think about, okay, if I'm going to do a startup, which revenue model should I use, I would tell you to think about again, if you're going to go back to Andrew's question about the exit multiple, I would be interested in less than who's going to buy it. More interested in the revenue model and the multiple of sales. So, I'd be like go for a metered service company for sure, or subscription at very least. Brian Ardinger: I wanted to ask around the topic of founders. It's obviously a very lonely, difficult journey at the very early stage. Do you have any advice for early-stage founders to how to get better connected and deal with the mental challenges of building a company?Dave Parker: Yeah. Great question. It was probably my most read blog post ever is I wrote about my personal battle with depression. And then I hit publish and I thought, what the hell? What did I do? What was I thinking? And I got more positive comments on it than I could have imagined. Brad Feld, who used to be on my board, as you know. Brad sent me a note with one word, and it just said brave. I think that the challenge there from a founder perspective is, you know, you're always trying to be positive. You're trying to, I was trying to be upbeat. If it's motivate the team or motivate investors. And so consequently leads to a lot of isolation.And I think that's one of the things that, like, one of the things we're doing here in Seattle is we run a cohort program for founders. We don't take any equity. There's no cash. They don't pay for it. And it's really about us up leveling the community of founders 25 to 30 founders twice a year, which is our math.And we're really helping them navigate the ecosystem, here in Seattle in six months instead of 18 months, which improve their odds of success. But also connecting them with other founders. Because other people are asking the same questions you're asking. They're not competitive. They're going through the same challenges.And by putting them in community, it serves one of those two purposes. One is we want to help them navigate the ecosystem, but we also want to help them connect with other founders like them at the same stage, which we think has two benefits. One is personal connection and not being in isolation for sure.And second is really helping them think about reinvesting in the community over time. So, if you think about classically, it was the PayPal mafia and then reinvested in each other. So, Reed Hoffman and Elon Musk and Peter Thiel, et cetera. And then it's now become the Uber mafia, right? All the people that were at Uber that are now launching other companies that are reinvesting in each other. We've never had that in Seattle. And most cities don't. It's one of the biggest gaps. So that's our secondary benefit is we think if we have them in community and at five years, but when we launched this as a program, which through the Washington Technology Industry Association. And I went back to the CEO. I'm like, this is a ten-year plan. Right. I'm like you can't judge it at three years or four years. And we're coming into our fourth year right now. And I'd say it's worked out better than we thought. But as I told him, I'm like, you don't get actually judge on it for 10 years. We've had some exits; we've had a bunch of fundraising. Our teams do it a lot faster than other teams. So, it's become a program. People are like, I want to get in. So, we just actually, Brian took it and put it into an document for a national scale-up grant for the Department of Commerce, with the State of Washington. So, we actually have those documents set up now. If somebody wanted to take it to Nebraska and say, Hey, we want to replicate all of this programming.We've opened source all the programming, we've open sourced, the narrative doc and the fundraising docs. So, somebody could turn around and say like, okay, we're going to go launch this program here as a, as a copycat with, with pride. Like we want you to knock it off. Brian Ardinger: Well, that's interesting. That may be an interesting model to explore now with COVID and the whole virtual remote angle of it. Or even in communities like Lincoln, where again, just by the pure numbers, we're not going to have thousands of founders. So how do you scale that? Dave Parker: For sure. And we're basically taking a program we were running in Seattle now and run it in Kent, Washington and Yakima. And Vancouver, Washington, and Tacoma. And we're trying to provide it from an access perspective. Like we want to make sure that we provide people with access that didn't have access to that before.But also, with a path to funding, because if you give people access to programming, but no, they can't ship an MVP at the end because they don't have any money. That's still a problem. So, we're trying to address that problem next. But the grant was a $750,000 grant over three years. Which means we'll kind of be able to take the show on the road and obviously virtual too. I think the nice thing about if there's a positive outcome of the whole COVID thing is place matters a lot less than it used to.Like the good news is I don't have to get on a plane to come be on stage with you. I'd like to be. That'd be kind of fun, because we could go have a beer afterwards and have dinner. But that that'll happen too. But I think from an efficiency standpoint, I've been doing programs for the Middle East, like six or seven cities in the middle east over the last two years. And I fly out Thursday night to Abu Dhabi for four days. And I'm like, it's kind of a fast turn for Abu Dhabi. Could do it just virtually. And be fine. More InformationBrian Ardinger: I wanted to thank you again for coming on. Here's Dave's book Trajectory Startup. Pick it up at any place you buy books. I'm going to put it in a call to action. He also is giving away some free stuff on his website. So let me share that right now. You can download his free resource guide on 14 successful Tech Revenue Models to check that. And then I also, again, I want to thank all our sponsors for bringing this today. And I encourage folks to also sign up for Inside Outside.io. Our newsletter and our podcast, where we bring these types of things whenever we can. So that's the link to that. Thanks for coming out. Thanks for all the audience for being here. Thanks for the great questions and looking forward to doing this again, at some point. And maybe having you come and see us in real life. So, I appreciate your time. And thank you again, Dave. If people want to find out more about yourself or your book, what's the best way to do that?Dave Parker: Yeah, they can find all the information is on my blog, DKparker.com. If you don't want to buy the book, you just have to figure out how to navigate all the blog posts in order. But that should be, you know, there's only 180 blog posts there. So DKparker.com, you can find the book and more information. The 14 revenue models.You can also find me on social media. I'm at Dave Parker CA for Seattle, when you find, you know, LinkedIn, Twitter. I'm not on Facebook anymore. I just finally had to just say, no. I'm still on Instagram because I want to see what my kids are doing. But Daisy, my dog has more followers on Instagram than I do at this point. But so yeah, you can find me on social media, and you can find me on DK parker.com. Brian Ardinger: Excellent. Well, thank you again, Dave. We're looking forward to having future conversations. And go out and have fun everyone at Startup Week Lincoln, and we'll see you around the neighborhood. Thanks very much for coming out.That's it for another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. If you want to learn more about our team, our content, our services, check out InsideOutside.io or follow us on Twitter @theIOpodcast or @Ardinger. Until next time, go out and innovate.FREE INNOVATION NEWSLETTER & TOOLSGet the latest episodes of the Inside Outside Innovation podcast, in addition to thought leadership in the form of blogs, innovation resources, videos, and invitations to exclusive events. SUBSCRIBE HEREYou can also search every Inside Outside Innovation Podcast by Topic and Company.  For more innovations resources, check out IO's Innovation Article Database, Innovation Tools Database, Innovation Book Database, and Innovation Video Database.  As an Amazon Associate, we earn from qualifying purchases.

GotMead Live Radio Show
11-9-21 Rohan Meadery – Wendy Rohan and Rosie Haines – Mead is big in Texas

GotMead Live Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 125:10


11-9-21 Tonight we're headed to Texas to talk with Wendy Rohan and Rosie Haines at Rohan Wines and Meads in La Grange, situated between La Grange, Round Top and Fayetteville in south central Texas. Rohan Meadery is at Blissful Folly Farm. The farm is home to Rohan Wines and Meads, Blissful Folly hard ciders and La Grange Brewing Co. All the beer, wine, mead & cider is made on site and served at the tap room on the farm. Wendy & John Rohan started with the meadery first in 2009, then slowly built the business and added different items over the last 12 years. The farm is a working farm with guinea fowl, chickens, ducks, a 2 acre vineyard, fruit trees, bees, goats, sheep & donkeys. The couple practices sustainable farming methods, and the farm is bee friendly certified. Wendy & John were avid homebrewers in the 90s and both have background in the sciences. They make their meads on the principle that the freshest ingredients, locally- sourced when possible, will have the best end result. To that end, over 90% of the honey used in their meads is Texas wildflower or huajilla honey & much of the fruit used is organic. Rosie Hanes came on board as production manager and mead maker in the summer of 2020. She brings a wealth of homebrewing experience, and creative ideas that have resulted in some unique and amazing offerings this past year. Rohan Meadery makes over 15 styles of meads; some are seasonal, others available year-round. This player will show the most recent show, and when we're live, will play the live feed. If you are calling in, please turn off the player sound, so we don't get feedback.[break] [break]Click here to see a playable list of all our episodes! Sponsor: Honnibrook Craft Meadery. Rated the very best winery in Colorado! Visit our state-of-the-art meadery and tasting room south of downtown Castle Rock, Colorado, in a converted man cave. Mention the Got Mead Podcast this month for a free draft taster!  Google H-O-N-N-I Brook for hours and directions. They love visitors!  www.honnibrook.com If you want to ask your mead making questions, you can call us at 803-443-MEAD (6323) or send us a question via email, or via Twitter @GotmeadNow and we'll tackle it online! 9PM EDT/6PM PDT Join us on live chat during the show Bring your questions and your mead, and let's talk mead! You can call us at 803-443-MEAD (6323), or Skype us at meadwench (please friend me first and say you're a listener, I get tons of Skype spam), or tweet to @gotmeadnow. Upcoming Shows November 23 - Steve at Experimeads Show links and notes Let There Be Melomels by Rob Ratliff The Big Book of Mead Recipes by Rob Ratliff Upcoming Events Nov 11 - WildFlyer Mead Co, Navasota, TX - Mead and Read - Book Club Nov 12 - Copenhagen Mead Company, Copenhagen, Denmark - Sparkling Elderflower Mead Launch Nov 13 - The Bee Store, Lake Ridge, VA - Honey and Hops Brewworks mead tasting Nov 13 - Deseret Hive Supply, Ogden, UT - Basic Mead Making class Nov 18 - Keys' Meads, Florida Keys - Mead and Greet - Author signings Nov 19 - Haley's Honey Mead, Fredericksburg, VA - Paint and Mead Nov 20 - Kvlt Mead, Tacoma, WA - Deconsecration Mead Release Nov 21 - Moonjoy Meadery, Lenoir, NC - Mead and Mindfulness Nov 26 - Antelope Ridge Mead, Colorado Springs, CO - Mead Black Friday Nov 28 - Viking Alchemist Meadery, Smyrna, GA - Mead and Metal Artists Market Dec 4 - Wandering Bard Meadery, Greenville, SC - Advanced Mead Making Class Dec 4 - Batch Mead, Temecula, CA - Viking Night - mead, hard cider and a souvenir horn You can buy mead online at https://shopmeads.com Got an event you'd like us to mention on GotMead Live? Send us an email at gotmead@gotmead.com and tell us about it!

KUOW Newsroom
People living in large households in Tacoma can soon sign up for housing relief

KUOW Newsroom

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 0:46


The Buzz Adams Show Podcast
If the Tacoma is Rockin' Don't Come A Knockin'

The Buzz Adams Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 122:21


Today, we all have thoughts on that viral video from the UTEP tailgate involving a Tacoma truck. The international bridges are opening today and Nico the Troll gives us updates. Lisa has all the info on that tragedy at Astroworld fest.

Exploring Washington State
Linda Zophi: Booking Music for Bite of Seattle and Taste of Tacoma. Festival Stories and more.

Exploring Washington State

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 75:59


Linda Zophi is our guest for this episode. Linda began working for a Seattle area booking agency in 1980. Eventually she opened her own booking agency and began booking musical talent for the Bite of Seattle and the Taste of Tacoma two iconic Puget Sound annual events.Thanks for tuning into this episode of the Exploring Washington State Podcast! If the information in our conversations and interviews are enjoyable and valuable to you, please head over to iTunes, subscribe to the show, and leave us an honest review. Your reviews and feedback will not only help us continue to deliver great, helpful content, but it will also help us reach even more amazing listeners just like you! If you want to read about some of the many amazing places to explore in Washington State, you should just pack your bags and go! Explore Washington State is the perfect place for inspiration.    Check it out today.   Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/ExploringWash)

insideABODE
AbodeLife: Let's Talk About Homelessness | Tacoma Rescue Mission Director & Chaplain

insideABODE

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 39:40


In this weeks' episode of insideABODE, Dave sits down with the Tacoma Rescue Mission Executive Director Duke Paulsen, and Tacoma Rescue Mission Chaplain Lonnie Arnold. Lonnie also is Director for the Racial Reconciliation Network, and brings 20 years of experience as a police officer in King County. In this discussion Duke and Lonnie give us insight into homelessness from their point of view, and perspectives they see on the ground. Check out this insightful discussion! Have any topics you would like us to cover? Contact Dave Jones at davidjones@windermere.com and drop a note! Or visit www.windermereabode.com for more content and houses! Visit the Tacoma Rescue Mission --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/windermereabode/message

This Date in Weather History
1940: The Collapse of the Tacoma Narrows bridge

This Date in Weather History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 4:32


The first Tacoma Narrows bridge was locally known as “Galloping Gertie,” since its slender design lacked stabilizing girders, causing it to twist and bounce in the wind. The bridge opened on July 1, 1940, after 29 months of construction and $18 million invested. On the first day of operations, 2,053 crossed the bridge after an inaugural parade of vehicles led by Gov. Clarence D. Martin and Tacoma Mayor Harry P. Cain. But Gertie's life would be short-lived. A little over four months later, on Nov. 7 of the same year, the bridge collapsed during a massive windstorm. The high winds struck the Tacoma-Narrows Bridge at a critical angle and caused vibrations to set up, which eventually collapsed the bridge. Maximum wind speed, 31 mph in downtown Tacoma; probably higher over Puget Sound. The Tacoma Narrows Bridge, with a main span of 2,800 feet was the third-longest suspension bridge in the world at that time, Because planners expected fairly light traffic volumes, the bridge was designed with two lanes, and it was just 39 feet wide. This was quite narrow, especially in comparison with its length. With only the 8-foot-deep plate girders providing additional depth, the bridge's roadway section was also shallow. The decision to use such shallow and narrow girders proved to be the original Tacoma Narrows Bridge's undoing. With such minimal girders, the deck of the bridge was insufficiently rigid and was easily moved about by winds; from the start, the bridge became infamous for its movement. A mild to moderate wind could cause alternate halves of the center span to visibly rise and fall several feet over four- to five-second intervals. This flexibility was experienced by the builders and workmen during construction, which led some of the workers to christen the bridge "Galloping Gertie". The nickname soon stuck, and even the public felt these motions on the day that the bridge opened on July 1, 1940. The failure of the bridge occurred when a never-before-seen twisting mode occurred, from winds at 40 miles per hour. This is a so-called torsional vibration mode, whereby when the left side of the roadway went down, the right side would rise, and vice versa simply put the two halves of the bridge twisted in opposite directions, with the center line of the road remaining motionless. This vibration was caused by aeroelastic flutter. Fluttering is a physical phenomenon in which a structure becomes coupled in an unstable oscillation driven by the wind. Eventually, the amplitude of the motion produced by the fluttering increased beyond the strength of a vital part, in this case the suspender cables. As several cables failed, the weight of the deck transferred to the adjacent cables, which became overloaded and broke in turn until almost all of the central deck fell into the water below the span. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Drivers Only
Taco No Mas

Drivers Only

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 49:27


Joe sold the Tacoma!

The Ian Furness Show
Brandon Funston, The Athletic's fantasy football expert, answers your fantasy questions

The Ian Furness Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 17:50


The Emerald Queen Casino brings us Brandon Funston each Thursday at 2pm to help you, the listener, win your fantasy matchups! The beautiful, brand new Emerald Queen Casino, located on I-5 in Tacoma is Now Open! Come check it out today

The TrailChasers Podcast
Ep 199: Interviews from SEMA Day 1

The TrailChasers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 135:48


We were at the #semashow and had the chance to interview @hitchhotel, @ivdynamics, @lancecamper, @truckhero, @nismo, Offroad Motorsports Youth Foundation, @projectxoffroad, @quadratec, @team.wild.grace Thank you to all of you for taking the time to talk with us.

The Covexit.com Podcast
Vaccines Injuries - Victims' Testimonies - Senator Ron Johnson's media event in Washington, DC

The Covexit.com Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 66:19


This podcast episode features highlights of a media event held on November 2 2021 in Washington, DC, about vaccines safety and mandates. You will hear testimonies of real people, explaining their experience with vaccine injuries, either as a victim or as a parent of a victim. What you will hear is not easy to hear. It is dramatic, it is tragic, yet it is highly informative. And those people are not "rare" cases. There are thousands and thousands of such victims in the US and all over the world. You will hear:- Cody Flint, airline pilot from Cleveland, MS who accumulated 10,000 hours of flight time diagnosed with left and right perilymphatic fistula, Eustachian tube dysfunction, and elevated intracranial pressure following Pfizer vaccination.- Ernest Ramirez, father from Austin, TX whose only son collapsed playing basketball and passed away from myocarditis following Pfizer vaccination.- Kyle Werner, professional mountain bike racer from Boise, ID diagnosed with pericarditis following vaccination.- Doug Cameron, farm operations manager from Idaho, permanently paralyzed following vaccination.- Suzanna Newell, triathlete from Saint Paul, MN diagnosed with an autoimmune disease and reliant on a walker or cane to walk following vaccination - Kelly Ann Rodriguez, young mother from Tacoma, WA reliant on walker following vaccination.- Stephanie, the mother of Maddie de Garay, a 12-year old Pfizer clinical trial participant from Cincinnati, OH confined to wheelchair and feeding tube- Brianne Dressen, Astra Zeneca clinical trial participant from Utah, co-founded react19.org, a patient advocacy organization dedicated to increasing awareness of adverse events.- Dr. Joel Wallskog, orthopedic surgeon from Mequon, WI diagnosed with transverse myelitis following Moderna vaccination. - Shaun Barcavage, FNP-BC, a Research Nurse PractionnerOur next episode will feature other highlights from the same event, but this time focusing on expert testimonies.

Living Indubiously
#32 - Sean The Shaman

Living Indubiously

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 65:37


In episode #32 Evton sits down with Sean The Shaman, Tacoma based Hip Hop and Reggae artist to talk about all sorts of things including their fortuitous meeting and cosmic connection, synchronicity, numerology, finding meaning in hardships, mysticism, channeling music and finding your path. Sean The Shaman will be releasing his first single "Love Is Free"  on 11/3/21 available on all major platforms.https://www.seantheshaman.com/https://www.instagram.com/seantheshamanhttps://www.facebook.com/SeanTheShaman/www.indubiousmusic.comFacebook: www.facebook.com/indubiousmusicSpotify: https://open.spotify.com/artist/77su9uR4crZ4HOOnCibJwFInstagram: www.instagram.com/indubious  

The Jason Rantz Show
Hour 3- Vote this weekend

The Jason Rantz Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 39:52


The Monologue: Seattle citizens look forward to a new mayor. The Interview: Steve Haverly on his run for Tacoma mayor. The Monologue: USPS does not care about your packages. The Interview: Dr. Janette Nesheiwat (FOX News medical contributor) on vaccines for kids. Is it safe and necessary? Yes, probably but talk to your doctor. LongForm: Dr. Frederick Rivara (UW Medicine) argues repealing the bike helmet law is wrong, yet still manages to scold Rantz. The Quick Hit: A 10-year-old gives an emotional interview after meeting Tom Brady. The Last Rantz: VOTE VOTE VOTE. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Jason Rantz Show
Hour 2 - Tacoma Safe

The Jason Rantz Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 38:42


What's Trending: Reykdal announces information on teacher's vaccination status, there is a pushback coming from restaurants on the proof of vaccine, and a man gets taped to a chair aboard an American Airlines flight. Big Local: SeaTac Airport construction is finally done. Angela Connelly, Tacoma Safe Co-Founder, explains why so many citizens are suddenly pushing back with demands to improve community safety. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The TrailChasers Podcast
Ep 198: Offroad Expo Interviews

The TrailChasers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 155:33


This week is a collection of our recordings from #offroadexpo in Ontario on Oct 9/10, 2021. We talk to @airdown_offroad @blakewilkey257 @coryelliott @dutydriven @fly_off_road @mcrey_mx @ruffstussspecialties @terracrew @trails411