Podcasts about wraps

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  • 1,187PODCASTS
  • 1,631EPISODES
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  • May 9, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about wraps

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Latest podcast episodes about wraps

Pop Culture & Movie News - Let Your Geek SideShow
Farhan Akhtar Joins Ms. Marvel, Thor New Photo - May 9, 2022

Pop Culture & Movie News - Let Your Geek SideShow

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 1:34


Farhan Akhtar Joins Ms. Marvel, Thor New Photo, House of the Dragon Character Posters, GotG Vol. 3 Wraps. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Talk'aran'rhiod: The Wheel of Time Showcast
140: We Wrap The Body That Wraps the Party

Talk'aran'rhiod: The Wheel of Time Showcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 94:37


In this episode (also live-streamed to YouTube!), we celebrate the wrap of principle photography of The Wheel of Time season two, and we do so in style, by inviting Friends of the Show Jon from WotUp! and Omar & Sara from WotSeries.com! We talk casting, theories, hopes, dreams, and sweet, sweet, murals! Rejoice as Sara continues the tradition of wrap party burritos! Get excited about miscounting as Omar predicts 101% of something! Explore possible voter fraud as Jon gets four votes in favor of Gawyn! As always, spoilers abound, as do hen glamour shots!Watch this episode on YouTube: https://youtu.be/Z4BxfAZ_2KMNews: https://www.wotseries.com/2022/05/04/breaking-its-a-wrap-on-season-two-of-the-wheel-of-time/https://twitter.com/Quantumplation/status/1522353388679274498Wot Up! https://www.youtube.com/c/WoTUp | https://twitter.com/WoTUp5WoTSeries: https://www.wotseries.com/ | https://twitter.com/WotTVSeriesPlease show your support by rating/reviewing us. http://getpodcast.reviews/id/1479634263https://www.talkaranrhiod.com/Email: podcast@talkaranrhiod.comTwitter: @arantalkInstagram: talk_aran_rhiodJoin us on Discord: https://dsc.gg/talkaranrhiodMerch: https://www.newcreationsbyjen.com/collections/talkaranrhiodSupport the show

Africa News Tonight  - Voice of America
Africa News Tonight - U.N. SG Guterres Wraps Up Africa Visit; Ethiopia Aid Groups Report Challenges Helping Needy - May 04, 2022

Africa News Tonight - Voice of America

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 25:00


Coming Up on Africa News Tonight: ➡️ U.N. Secretary General Antonio Guterres Wednesday marked the end of his three-African nations trip and two-day visit in Nigeria by meeting with Nigerian leaders and honoring victims of a 2011 Islamist bombing at the Abuja U.N. building; Aid groups in Ethiopia's Tigray region report challenges supplying the needy with food and medicine, regardless of the declared humanitarian cease-fire between Ethiopian forces and Tigrayan rebels. ➡️ For this and more, stay tuned to VOA's Africa News Tonight!

BUNS Podcast
Rhythm n' Wraps: A Look Behind the Scenes

BUNS Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 12:47


Located at 1096 Commonwealth Avenue, just off Boston University's Charles River campus, local restaurant Rhythm n' Wraps serves up an around-the-world concept with vegan comfort food. The establishment's blend of flavorful food and delightful ambience—as set by a playlist of international tunes—draws customers and employees alike, who often happen to be musicians themselves. Rhythm n' Wraps began as a food truck in 2013 serving mainly the crowd at Cambridge and opened its brick-and-mortar restaurant in 2019. The menu, which started out vegetarian, has evolved through the years to become fully vegan. It also caters to customers with various food allergies and intolerances. The diner's offerings are heavily influenced by its employees, who each infuse their cultures into these plant-based creations. Justin Springer, the president of Outside the Box Agency, first worked with Rhythm n' Wraps in a client-agency relationship years ago. Today, he is one of the restaurant's co-owners and partners. Springer talks all things Rhythm n' Wraps: its history, culture, inspiration and future.

Meet St. Louis
Episode 182: Crazy Bowls and Wraps

Meet St. Louis

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 32:24


Crazy Bowls and Wraps has been serving up healthy eats, things like kale and quinoa, way before they were ever trendy. And many people don't realize the fast-casual spot is local to St. Louis. Keith and Gail Kitsis first opened their restaurant in 1994 and they've grown and expanded to 16 locations across the St. Louis metro area. Keith joined us on the podcast along with Kim Reitzner, the director of operations, to talk about building a business in the ever-changing landscape of fast-casual landscape. They credit their attention to detail and bringing options for various lifestyle choices like Whole 30 and Paleo with their success and longevity in the region. Now they hope to bring the concept to other places in the country.

Kalo Lee
Mijn eigen manier koken

Kalo Lee

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 25:41


Please like & abonneer mijn YouTube voor simpele dingetjes! Hey met Kalo! Vanmiddag zat mijn man al vroeg op de bank...lekker dom van mij, ik had niet door dat het F1 dag is

CNBC's
Another Late Friday Fade for the Markets Wraps Up Nasdaq's Worst Month Since 2008 04/29/22

CNBC's "Fast Money"

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 27:17


For the second week in a row, markets sold off into the close on Friday, with the S&P wrapping up the month with a nearly 9% loss, and the Nasdaq dropping more than 13% in April. So how do you set yourself up for the new month? The traders break down the strategy.

That Wasn't In My Textbook
History of HeadWraps Unwrapped

That Wasn't In My Textbook

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 77:14


The history of the African head wrap is one that is steeped in controversy. Long before it was appreciated for its ability to compliment beautiful black hair, it was blamed for its association with slavery, seen as a sign of inferiority, and even outlawed.In this episode, Toya and Paola take us on a journey through time, while explaining the controversial history of headwrapsHere are key things to listen out for:Trace the history of the African head wrap and how its meaning and significance has changed overtimeHow headwrap has shaped black beauty and cultureWhy it was illegal for black women to wear their hair outOur hair is our style, it is our culture and it is also politics.Book mentioned: Headwraps: A Global Journey HardcoverTimestamps[00:05:14] A little bit about Paola[00:07:41] The dictionary definition of headwrap[00:09:02] The history of the headwrap from the beginning of the Royal beginning.[00:22:10] Introducing Paola, Fanm Djanm Paola's brand, how it began, and sustainability initiatives.[00: 26:29] Paola's definition of a headwrap[00:30:20] Where Paola learned about headwraps[00:32:54] Black women are suddenly taking control.[00:37:41] Paola describes how she started her fashion business with a few friends from the ground up.[00:44:12] Why is it necessary to have a personal connection in business?[00:44:44Paola's thoughts/feelings on white women wearing headwraps[00:50:57] Why do we wrap our hair in addition to being an accessory?[00:54:53] Paola's creative process of picking a print or fabric.[01:00:34] Paola's buying and styling tips and tricks for headwraps[01:07:09] Where can you find Paola and how can you support her?[01:09:48] Paola's response to the signature question----------------------------------------------------------Stay In TouchPurchase our new bookmarks. All proceeds go to the podcast.Visit our website. Follow the podcast on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook, watch Youtube episodes, and feel free to donate.To learn more about today guest, Paola Mathé. Visit her Headwrap company Fanm Djanm website. Follow her on Instagram,  Facebook, and Twitter.To learn more about the podcast host Toya, visit ToyaFromHarlem.com. Connect with Toya on Instagram, Twitter, and LinkedInWhere I Get My Information: Headwraps: A Global Journey HardcoverThe History of Headwraps: Then, There, and NowTHE FASCINATING HISTORY OF THE AFRICAN HEAD WRAPThe radical history of the headwrapCall to ActionKindly share my podcast with others. To help this podcast grow please leave 5 stars review and don't forget to subscribe. I would love to hear your comments and thoughts on my Instagram and Facebook pages. Remember to tag me.Research credit: @mellehartley | @drommamedia

Up On Game
Straight Facts Podcast The Crew Is Talking The NFL Draft And Wraps Up Rd 1 Of NBA Playoffs

Up On Game

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 72:43


***SUBSCRIBE TO THE UP ON GAME PRESENTS PODCAST CHANNEL***  https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/up-on-game-presents/id1596136129   We're all but through the first round of the NBA Playoffs as some teams have clinched their spot into the Conference Semi-Finals. The crew breaks down the biggest lessons these series have taught us. We then turn our attention to the NFL Draft and give out some player awards for the draft. What The First Round Taught Us (5:00) The Nets need *somebody* for next season The Playoffs mean pain for the Sixers...physically and literally How much has CJ McCollum changed this Pelicans team? Just how important is Devin Booker to the Suns? NFL Draft Preview (48:00) Who is the player most likely to be taken too early? Who is the most overrated QB? Who is shockingly falling to a later round? #upongame See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Up on Game Presents
Straight Facts Podcast The Crew Is Talking The NFL Draft And Wraps Up Rd 1 Of NBA Playoffs

Up on Game Presents

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 72:43


***SUBSCRIBE TO THE UP ON GAME PRESENTS PODCAST CHANNEL***  https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/up-on-game-presents/id1596136129   We're all but through the first round of the NBA Playoffs as some teams have clinched their spot into the Conference Semi-Finals. The crew breaks down the biggest lessons these series have taught us. We then turn our attention to the NFL Draft and give out some player awards for the draft. What The First Round Taught Us (5:00) The Nets need *somebody* for next season The Playoffs mean pain for the Sixers...physically and literally How much has CJ McCollum changed this Pelicans team? Just how important is Devin Booker to the Suns? NFL Draft Preview (48:00) Who is the player most likely to be taken too early? Who is the most overrated QB? Who is shockingly falling to a later round? #upongame See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Illini Inquirer Podcast
Ep. 443 - J Leman wraps up spring ball: 'Six wins isn't out of the question'

Illini Inquirer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 43:16


Illini Inquirer's Jeremy Werner catches up with All-American LB J Leman following Illinois' spring scrimmage. J gives his thoughts about both sides of the ball, and details what he's most intrigued to see from Year Two under Bret Bielema. The guys also discuss what other Big Ten teams are poised to have strong seasons. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Real Life Real Estate Investing
2022-04-27 Dyches Boddiford Mortgage Wraps

Real Life Real Estate Investing

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022


mortgage wraps dyches boddiford
The Boss Hog of Liberty
251: Bobbi Plummer & Josh Gillmore / Candidate Series Wraps Up

The Boss Hog of Liberty

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 104:53


Episode 251 of Boss Hog of Liberty is out!  Special thanks to our sponsors of the candidate series, Weiland's Flowers, Big Bounce, and the Slick Pickle! Jeremiah Morrell and Dakota Davis are joined by Bobbi Plummer and Josh Gillmore who are running for District 54 Rep. Great conversation about issues including Education, Economic Development, Land Use, Roads, COVID, Cannabis Legalization, and Food and Beverage taxes. Our program is community supported on Patreon. Do your part by chipping into the cause by donating monthly at any level at www.patreon.com/bosshogofliberty and receive even more BONUS coverage and content. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Hawk Central Podcast
Spring Football Wraps Up and More

Hawk Central Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 41:53


Spring Football Wraps Up and More

KCSN: K-State Athletics
K-State Basketball Recruiting Still Hot, Football Wraps Up Spring Practice | 3MAW 4/26

KCSN: K-State Athletics

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 58:48


John Kurtz, Derek Young, and Cole Manbeck break down the recent developments in Kansas State basketball recruiting, talk about some rumors flying around the program, and recap spring football practices from the Wildcats. — Subscribe to the KCSN Daily substack for film reviews, exclusive podcasts, KC Draft guide, discounts and access, giveaways, merch drops and more at https://kcsn.substack.com/subscribe — You can look good while supporting the network by copping some first edition KCSN merch. https://happinameskc.com/team-store/kc-sport-network FOLLOW US ON: Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/KCSportsNetwork Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/kcsports.network/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/KCSportsNetwork Substack - kcsn.substack.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The CyberWire
Swapping small attacks in cyberspace. What Lapsus$ internal chatter reveals. Costa Rica won't pay Conti's ransom. No farms, no future. Locked Shields wraps up.

The CyberWire

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 23:23


Anonymous counts coup with their #OpRussia campaign. Alternative energy suppliers in Europe sustain cyberattacks. What Lapsus$ internal chatter reveals. Costa Rica won't pay Conti's ransom. Rick Howard hits the history books. Our guest is Paul Giorgi of XM Cyber with a look at multi-cloud hopping. Locked Shields wraps up. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news briefing: https://thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/11/79 Selected reading. Ukraine's Postal Service DDOS'd After Printing Moskova Stamps (Gizmodo)  Since declaring cyber war on Russia Anonymous leaked 5.8 TB of Russian data (Security Affairs) European Wind-Energy Sector Hit in Wave of Hacks (Wall Street Journal)  Schneider Electric says no evidence that Incontroller/Pipedream malware exploits vulnerabilities (MarketScreener)  Aid groups helping Ukraine face both cyber and physical threats (CNN)  Leaked Chats Show LAPSUS$ Stole T-Mobile Source Code (KrebsOnSecurity)  Lapsus$ hackers breached T-Mobile's systems and stole its source code (The Verge) Lapsus$ hackers targeted T-Mobile (TechCrunch) FBI Warns of Targeted Cyberattacks on Food Plants Amid Heightened Coverage of Fires (NTD)  Ransomware Attacks on Agricultural Cooperatives Potentially Timed to Critical Seasons (IC3)  Cyberattack causes chaos in Costa Rica government systems (ABC News)  Finland wins NATO cyber defense competition (C4ISRNet)

KGO 810 Podcast
Nikki Medoro - Evergreen San Francisco wraps up, and should you bring your dog to the store?

KGO 810 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 19:44


The first weeklong cannabis event, Evergreen San Francisco, is over, and the Morning Show with Nikki Medoro asks how one of the organizers how it went. Also, there was a dog fight at a Home Depot, and listeners weigh in on if dogs should even be allowed into stores, or do they belong at home? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Headline News
Boao Forum wraps up in Hainan

Headline News

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 4:45


The three-day gathering was held as countries seek ways to get their post COVID-19 economies back on track.

KSL Unrivaled
Utah football wraps up spring football this week

KSL Unrivaled

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 16:01


Alex Kirry and Scott Mitchell are joined by KSL Sports Utah Insider Michelle Bodkin to go over latest on Utah football and what is to be expected with the spring game this weekend. Follow UnRivaled onTwitter,InstagramandFacebook for more. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Ray Appleton
Hour 2 - Congressman Tom McClintock Wraps Up His Conversation With Ray. Task Force Releases Report Concerning Henry Madden Library. Garry Bredefeld Stops By The KMJ Studio To Spend Time With Ray

Ray Appleton

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 37:12


Congressman McClintock sticks around to take some KMJ listener phone calls. A task force reviewing the naming of the Henry Madden Library at Fresno State released a 71-page preliminary report. Mr. Bredefeld comes in to the KMJ studio in oposition and to talk about how After a year and a half of controversy, the City of Fresno considering buying the Tower Theatre for historical preservation. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

South African Border Wars
Episode 54 – Operation Protea wraps up but the Russians and Cubans want revenge

South African Border Wars

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 20:06


Operation Protea was had wrapped up by 2nd September 1981 – Battle Group 10 had reverted to being 61 Mech, while Battle Group 20 was disbanded. As the SADF began to debrief, it was clear that this operation had been a tactical success, and operationally there was much to satisfy the purists who'd dreamed up the new mobile warfare doctrine. The final figure once all the counting was complete was 831 enemy killed, 25 taken prisoner whereas the SADF lost 10 men and 64 wounded. Around 4000 tonnes of military hardware was captured. So it all appeared a major victory for South Africans, except for one infinitely more important area. Strategy. FAPLA was now going to go on the offensive against the SADF whereas before they were responding mainly to UNITA further east. Much more important was the future role of the Cubans and the Russians. Partly because of the embarrassingly high number of casualties from both nations during Protea, Moscow could no longer tip-toe around the fact that it was fighting directly alongside the Angolans. The Cubans were now flying MiGs whereas previously mostly East Germans had been roped in to work with the Angolan Air Force. The Russians were on the ground in Ongiva, and died there. So, what of the future? Well, the documents captured during the operation were going to be very useful in the next few months. It was learned that SWAPOs main command and logistics bases were at Bambi and Chitequera east of Cassinga and Techamutete. This meant another quick raid was being planned to push further north. Operation Daisy would see a much smaller battle group heading 300 kilometers inside Angola, the furthest the SADF would ever advance after Savannah.

Fifa la Vida
#039 Große Ohren, guter Fang

Fifa la Vida

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 72:53


Folge 1 nach der aufrgenden Europapokalwoche. Neben jener und dem Erfolgen von Leipzig und Frankfurt respektive dem Aus der Bayern besprechen wir die neue FUT-Captains-Promo, welche in unseren Augen ein voller Erfolg ist. Spieler wie Marcelo und Chiellini sind prädestziniert für die Promotion. Gut gemacht EA. Später ab Minute 47 beschäftigen wir uns mit Wraps, Einflüssen von Alkohol auf das Gemüt, Sebastians vollzogenem Praktikum, Polizeikontrollen und vielem mehr. Viel Spaß!

SBS World News Radio
First week of campaigning wraps up with Medicare debate

SBS World News Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 17, 2022 5:19


Medicare has emerged as a crucial issue in the 2022 federal election campaign, as the major party leaders play down gaffes and reported gaps in policy.

WBBM Newsradio's 4:30PM News To Go
COPA wraps up probe into cop's fatal shooting of teen

WBBM Newsradio's 4:30PM News To Go

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 8:58


In other top stories: Fundraiser set up for chef who is comatose after being beaten; building that partly collapsed, killing one person, must be torn down, city says; the bees are back in business at Prudential Plaza; and more. 

KUOW Newsroom
Covid sewage data kept under wraps despite possible public health benefits

KUOW Newsroom

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 1:01


Looking for Covid in wastewater can serve as an early warning system for outbreaks -- at least in theory.

CFR On the Record
Academic Webinar: Refugees and Global Migration

CFR On the Record

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022


Anne C. Richard, distinguished fellow and Afghanistan coordination lead at Freedom House, will lead a conversation on refugees and global migration. FASKIANOS: Thank you. Welcome to the final session of the Winter/Spring 2022 CFR Academic Webinar Series. I'm Irina Faskianos, vice president of the National Program and Outreach here at CFR. Today's discussion is on the record, and the video and transcript will be available on our website, CFR.org/academic. As always, CFR takes no institutional positions on matters of policy. We are delighted to have Anne Richard with us today to talk about refugees and global migration. Ms. Richard is a distinguished fellow and Afghanistan coordination lead at Freedom House. She has taught at several universities including Georgetown, University of Virginia, Hamilton College, and the University of Pennsylvania. From 2012 to 2017, Ms. Richard served as an assistant secretary of state for population, refugees, and migration, and before joining the Obama administration she served as vice president of government relations and advocacy for the International Rescue Committee. She has also worked at the Peace Corps headquarters and the U.S. Office of Management and Budget, and is a member of CFR. So, Anne, thank you very much for being with us today. With your background and experience, it would be great if you could talk from your vantage point—give us an overview of the current refugee trends you are—we are seeing around the world, especially vis-à-vis the war in Ukraine, the withdrawal from Afghanistan, et cetera. RICHARD: Thank you so much, Irina, for inviting me today and for always welcoming me back to the Council. And thank you to your team for putting this together. I'm very happy to speak about the global refugee situation, which, unfortunately, has, once again, grown yet larger in a way that is sort of stumping the international community in terms of what can well-meaning governments do, what can foundations and charitable efforts and the United Nations (UN) do to help displaced people. I thought we could start off talking a little bit about definitions and data, and the idea is that I only speak about ten minutes at this beginning part so that we can get to your questions all the more quickly. But for all of us to be on the same wavelength, let's recall that refugees, as a group, have an organization that is supposed to look out for them. The UN High Commissioner for Refugees is the title of the number-one person in the organization, but the entire organization is known by that name, UNHCR, or the UN Refugee Agency. It also has a convention—the 1951 Refugee Convention—that came about after World War II and was very focused on not allowing to happen again what had happened during World War II where victims of the Nazis and, as time went on, people fleeing fascism, people fleeing communism, couldn't get out of their countries and were persecuted because of this. And there's a legal definition that comes out of the convention that different countries have, and the U.S. legal definition matches very much the convention's, which is that refugees have crossed an international border—they're not in their home country anymore—and once they've crossed an international border the sense is that they are depending on the international community to help them and that they're fleeing for specific purposes—their race, their religion, their ethnicity, their membership in a particular social group such as being LGBTQ, or political thought. And if you think back to the Cold War, these were some of the refugees coming out of the former Soviet Union, coming out of Eastern Europe, were people who had spoken out and were in trouble and so had to flee their home countries. So what are the numbers then? And I'm going to refer you to a very useful page on the UN High Commissioner for Refugees website, which is their “Figures at a Glance” presentation, and we're going to reference some of the numbers that are up there now. But those numbers change every year. They change on June 20, which is World Refugee Day. And so every year it hits the headlines that the numbers have gone up, unfortunately, and you can anticipate this if you think in terms of the summer solstice, the longest day of the year. It's usually June 20, 21, 22. So June 20, that first possible day, is every year World Refugee Day. So if you're working on behalf of refugees it's good sometimes to schedule events or anticipate newspaper articles and conversations about refugees ticking up in—at the end of June. So if you were paying attention last June for World Refugee Day, UNHCR would have unveiled a number of 82.4 million refugees around the world, and so this upcoming June what do we anticipate? Well, we anticipate the numbers will go up again and, in fact, yesterday the high commissioner was in Washington, met with Secretary of State Tony Blinken, and they met the press and Filippo Grandi, the current high commissioner, said that he thinks the number is closer to ninety-five to ninety-six million refugees. So, clearly, a couple things have happened since last June. One is that so many people are trying to flee Afghanistan and another is so many people have fled Ukraine. So if we went back to that $82.4 million figure that we know we have details on, we would find that this is the figure of people who are displaced because of conflict or persecution around the world. The ones that count as refugees who have actually crossed an international border is a smaller number. It's 20.7 million people that UNHCR is concerned about and then another close to six million people who are Palestinians in the Middle East whose displacement goes back to 1948, the creation of the statehood of Israel, and upheaval in the Middle East region as Palestinians were shifted to live elsewhere. And so—and they are provided assistance by a different UN agency, UNRWA—UN Relief Works Administration in the Near East—and so if you see a number or you see two sets of numbers for refugees and they're off by about five or six million people, the difference is the Palestinian, that number—whether it's being counted in, which is for worldwide numbers, or out because UNHCR cares for most refugees on Earth but did not have the responsibility for the Palestinians since UNRWA was set up with that specific responsibility. So what's the big difference then between the eighty-two million, now growing to ninety-five million, and this smaller number of refugees? It's internally displaced persons (IDPs). These are people who are displaced by conflict or are displaced by persecution, are running for their lives, but they haven't left their own countries yet. So think of Syrians who, perhaps, are displaced by war and they have crossed their own countries and gone to a safer place within their own country but they haven't crossed that border yet. Others who have crossed into Lebanon or Turkey or Jordan or Iraq or have gone further afield to Egypt, those would be considered refugees. Who's responsible for the IDPs then? Well, legally, their own countries are supposed to take care of them. But in my Syria example, the problem is Syria was bombing its own people in certain areas of the country, and so they were not protecting their own people as they should be. People can be displaced by things other than war and conflict and persecution, of course. More and more we talk about climate displacement, and this is a hot issue that we can talk about later. But who's responsible then when people are displaced by changing climactic conditions and it's their own governments who are supposed to help them? But more and more questions have been raised about, well, should the international community come together and do more for this group of people—for internally displaced persons—especially when their own governments are unwilling or unable to do so? What about migrants? Who are the migrants? Migrants is a much broader term. Everyone I've talked about so far who's crossed a border counts as a migrant. Migrants are just people on the go, and the International Organization for Migration estimates there's about 281 million migrants on Earth today—about 3.6 percent of the world population—and one of the big issues I've pushed is to not see migrants as a dirty word. Unfortunately, it often is described that way—that migratory flows are bad, when, in fact, lots of people are migrants. Students who travel to the U.S. to take classes are migrants to our country. The secretary general of the United Nations, António Guterres, who was himself for eleven years the high commissioner for refugees, he says, I am a migrant, because he's a Portuguese person working in New York City. People hired by Silicon Valley from around the world to work in high-paid jobs, legally in the United States, they are migrants. More concerning are vulnerable migrants, people who are displaced and don't have the wherewithal to, necessarily, protect themselves, take care of themselves, on the march or where they end up, or also if they're seen as traveling without papers, not welcome in the places where they're going, that can be a very, very dangerous situation for them. So be aware that migrants is a really broad all-encompassing term that can include travelers, businesspeople, as well as vulnerable and very poor people who are economic migrants. Finally, immigrants are people who set out and migrate because they intend to live somewhere else, and when we were talking about the Trump administration's policies to reduce the number of refugees coming to the U.S. we also see that immigration to the U.S. also was decreased during that administration as well. So both the refugee program and a lot of the immigration pathways to the U.S. are now being examined and trying to be not just fixed, because a lot of them have needed care for quite some time, but also put back on a growth trajectory. And then asylum seekers are people who get to a country on their own, either they have traveled to a border or they pop up inside a country because they have gotten in legally through some other means such as a visitor visa or business visa, and then they say, I can't go home again. It's too dangerous for me to go home again. Please, may I have asylum? May I be allowed to stay here and be protected in your country? So that's a lot of different terminology. But the more you work on it, the more these terms—you get more familiar using them and understand the differences between them that experts or legal experts use. So ninety-five to ninety-six million people, as we see another eleven million people fleeing Ukraine and of that four million, at least, have crossed the borders into neighboring countries and another seven million are internally displaced, still inside Ukraine but they've gone someplace that they feel is safer than where they were before. When we looked at the eighty million refugees and displaced people, we knew that two-thirds of that number came from just five countries, and one of the important points about that is it shows you what could happen, the good that could be done, if we were able to push through peace negotiations or resolutions of conflict and persecution, if we could just convince good governance and protection of people—minorities, people with different political thought, different religious backgrounds—inside countries. So the number-one country still remains Syria that has lost 6.7 million people to neighboring countries, primarily. Secondly was Venezuela, four million. Third was Afghanistan. The old number from before last August was 2.6 million and some hundreds of thousands have fled since. And the only reason there aren't more fleeing is that they have a really hard time getting out of their country, and we can talk more about that in a moment. The fourth are Rohingya refugees fleeing from Burma, or Myanmar. That's 1.1 million, and the fifth was Southern Sudanese, 2.2 million, who have fled unrest and violence in that country. So we know that we have not enough peace, not enough solutions, and we have too much poverty, too, and dangers. In addition to the Venezuelans, another group that has approached the U.S. from the southern border that were in the paper, especially around election times, is from the Northern Triangle of Central America, so El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras. These are people who could be fleeing because of economic situations and could also be fleeing from criminal violence, gangs, warfare, narcotraffickers. And so if they are fleeing for their lives and approaching our southern border, we are supposed to give them a hearing and consider whether they have a case for asylum, and the—unfortunately, that is not well understood, especially not by folks working at our borders. The Customs and Border Protection folks are more and more focused on, since 9/11, ensuring that bad guys don't come across, that terrorists don't come across, that criminals don't come across. And we heard in the Trump administration conversations about Mexicans as rapists, gang warfare being imported into the U.S. from Central America when, in fact, some of it had been originally exported, and this sense that people from the Middle East were terrorists. And so really harsh language about the types of people who were trying to make it to the U.S. and to get in. Some final thoughts so that we can get to the question and answer. The U.S. government has traditionally been the top donor to refugee and humanitarian efforts around the world. The bureau at the State Department I used to run, the Population, Refugees, and Migration Bureau, was a major donor to the UN High Commissioner for Refugees—UNRWA—the International Committee of the Red Cross, and also the International Organization for Migration, which used to be an independent organization and is now part of the UN since 2016. We were also the number-one resettlement location, the formal program for bringing refugees to the United States, and when I was assistant secretary we brought seventy thousand refugees per year to the United States, invited them to come through a program that took eighteen months to twenty-four months, on average, to get them in because they had to be vetted for security reasons. They had to pass medical tests. Their backgrounds had to be investigated to see that they were who they said they were. And that number went higher in the last year of the Obama administration to eighty-five thousand refugees and, in fact, the Obama administration proposed some very strong additional measures to help refugees. But the Trump administration threw that all into reverse with a completely different set of policies. So the numbers then became reduced every year—fifty-three thousand in the first year of the Trump administration, 22,500 the next year, thirty thousand in 2019, 11,814 in 2020, a similar number in 2021, and slow numbers coming today, this despite bringing so many Afghans through an evacuation exercise last summer. Many of the people who were evacuated were American citizens or green card holders. Afghans who had worked for the U.S. but did not have their formal paperwork yet were brought in under what's called humanitarian parole, and the problem with that program is that it's no guarantee for a longer-term stay in the United States. So there's a bill in Congress right now to address that. A lot of the people who worked on that, especially within the U.S. government, are proud that they've scrambled and brought so many people so quickly—120,000 people brought from Afghanistan. At the same time, those of us who are advocates for refugees would say too many people were left behind and the evacuation should continue, and that's a real concern. In terms of resettlement in the U.S., it's a program run—public-private partnership—and we've never seen so many volunteers and people helping as there are right now, and initiatives to help welcome people to the United States, which is fantastic. I would say the program should be one of humanity, efficiency, and generosity, and that generosity part has been tough to achieve because the government piece of it is kind of stingy. It's kind of a tough love welcome to the United States where the refugees are expected to get jobs and the kids to go to school and the families to support themselves. So let me stop there because I've been just talking too long, I know, and take questions. FASKIANOS: It's fantastic, and thank you for really clarifying the definitions and the numbers. Just a quick question. You said the U.S. government is the top donor. What is the percentage of DVP? I mean, it's pretty— RICHARD: Tiny. Yeah. FASKIANOS: —tiny, right? I think there's this lack of understanding that it may seem like a big number but in our overall budget it's minuscule. So if you could just give us a— RICHARD: Yeah. It's grown in the last few years because of all these crises around the world to ten to twelve million—I mean, ten billion dollars to twelve billion (dollars) between the U.S. Agency for International Development and the State Department, which was bigger. It was around seven or eight billion (dollars) when I was the assistant secretary five, six years ago. But the important part of it was it provided the whole backbone to the international humanitarian system. Governments, some of them, saw Americans sometimes as headaches in terms of we, Americans, telling them what to do or we, Americans, having our own ideas of how to do things or we, Americans, demanding always budget cuts and efficiencies. But the fact is the whole humanitarian enterprise around the world is based on American generosity, especially the big operating agencies like World Food Programme, UNHCR, UNICEF, UN Development Program. FASKIANOS: Great. Thank you. So now we're going to go to all you for your questions. Hands are already up and Q&A written questions. So I'll try to get to everybody as much as I can. I'm going to go—the first question from Rey Koslowski, and if you can unmute yourself and give us your institution that would be fantastic. RICHARD: Hi, Rey. Q: All right. Rey Koslowski, University at Albany. Hi, Anne. Good to see you. I'd like to pick up on the use of humanitarian parole. So, as I understand it, it's being utilized for Afghan evacuees, Afghans, who you mentioned, who didn't—weren't able to get on the flights and were left behind, but also for Ukrainians. You know, President Biden announced a hundred thousand Ukrainians. I mean, a very—we're using other channels but we've had, I believe, three thousand at the U.S.-Mexican border and, I believe, they're being paroled for the most part, right. As I understand it, we're—one DHS letter that I saw said that there were forty-one thousand requests for humanitarian parole for Afghan nationals. But I'm wondering about capacity of the USCIS to handle this, to process this, because, you know, normally, I think, maybe two thousand or so, a couple thousand, are processed, maybe a couple of people who do this, and also in conjunction with the challenges for processing all of the asylum applications. So, as I understand it, back in the fall there was some discussion of hiring a thousand asylum officers—additional asylum officers. I was wondering, what are your thoughts about our capacity to process all of the—the U.S. government's capacity to process the humanitarian parole applications and the asylum applications, and if you have any insights on new hires and how many— RICHARD: Well, you know, Rey, at Freedom House now I'm working on a project to help Afghan human rights defenders and— Q: Right. RICHARD: —the idea is that they can restart their work if we can find a way for them to be safe inside Afghanistan, which is very hard with the Taliban in charge right now, or if in exile they can restart their work. And so we're watching to see where Afghans are allowed to go in the world as they seek sanctuary and the answer is they don't get very far. It's very hard to get out of the country. If they get to Pakistan or Iran, they don't feel safe. They have short-term visas to stay there, and the programs that might bring them further along like resettlement of refugees are—take a much longer time to qualify for and then to spring into action, and so they're stuck. You know, they're afraid of being pushed back into Afghanistan. They're afraid of becoming undocumented and running out of money wherever they are, and so they're in great need of help. The humanitarian parole program sort of—for bringing Afghans into the U.S. sort of understood that our eighteen- to twenty-four-month refugee resettlement program was a life-saving program but it wasn't an emergency program. It didn't work on an urgent basis. It didn't scoop people up and move them overnight, and that's, really, what was called for last August was getting people—large numbers of people—out of harm's way. And so when I was assistant secretary, if we knew someone was in imminent danger we might work with another government. I remember that the Scandinavians were seen as people who were more—who were less risk averse and would take people who hadn't had this vast vetting done but would take small numbers and bring them to safety, whereas the U.S. did things in very large numbers but very slowly. And so this lack of emergency program has really been what's held us back in providing the kind of assistance, I think, people were looking for the Afghans. I was surprised we even brought them into the United States. I thought after 9/11 we'd never see that kind of program of bringing people in with so little time spent on checking. But what they did was they moved up them to the front of the line and checked them very quickly while they were on the move. So it was safe to do but it was unusual, and I think part of that was because the military—the U.S. military—was so supportive of it and U.S. veterans were so supportive of it and we had, for the first time in a while, both the right and the left of the political spectrum supporting this. So the problem with humanitarian parole is I remember it being used, for example, for Haitians who had been injured in the Haitian earthquake and they needed specialized health care—let's say, all their bones were crushed in their legs or something. They could be paroled into the U.S., get that health care that they needed, and then sent home again. So we've not used it for large numbers of people coming in at once. So what refugee advocates are seeking right now from Congress is the passage of the Afghan Adjustment Act, which would give people a more permanent legal status. They would be treated as if they were—had come through the refugee resettlement program and they'd get to stay. So you're right that the numbers being granted humanitarian parole at one time is just not the normal way of doing things. You're also right that the—this is a lot of extra work on people who weren't anticipating it, and more can continue with the hundred thousand Ukrainians who the president has said we will take in. And so the thing is when we have these kind of challenges in the United States one way to deal with it is to spend more money and do a better job, and that seems to be an option for certain challenges we face but not for all challenges we face. With these more humanitarian things, we tend to have tried to do it on the cheap and to also use the charity and partner with charities and churches more than if this were sort of a more business-oriented program. So we need all of the above. We need more government funding for the people who are working the borders and are welcoming people in or are reviewing their backgrounds. We need more assistance from the public, from the private sector, from foundations, because the times demand it. And it's very interesting to me to see Welcome US created last year with three former U.S. presidents—President Bush, President Clinton, President Obama—speaking up about it, saying, please support this, and people from across the political aisle supporting it. I wish that had existed in 2015 when we were grappling with these issues at the time of candidate Trump. So the needs are greater. Absolutely. But that doesn't mean we have to just suffer through and struggle through and have long backups like we do right now. We could be trying to put more resources behind it. FASKIANOS: I'm going to take the next written question from Haley Manigold, who's an IR undergrad student at University of North Florida. We know that the war in Ukraine is going to affect grain and food supplies for the MENA countries. Is there any way you would recommend for Europe and other neighboring regions to manage the refugee flows? RICHARD: The first part of that was about the food issue but then you said— FASKIANOS: Correct, and then this is a pivot to manage the refugee flows. So— RICHARD: Well, the Europeans are treating the Ukrainians unlike any other flow of people that we've seen lately. It goes a little bit back and reminiscent to people fleeing the Balkans during the 1990s. But we saw that with a million people in 2015 walking into Europe from Syria, Pakistan, Afghanistan—mix of economic migrants and real refugees—that Europe, at first, under Angela Merkel's leadership were welcoming to these folks showing up, and then there was a backlash and the walls came up on that route from the Balkans to Germany and to Sweden. And so in the last few years, Europeans have not been seen as champions in allowing—rescuing people who are trying to get to Europe on their own. You know, especially the Mediterranean has been a pretty dismal place where we see Africans from sub-Saharan Africa working their way up to North Africa and trying to get from Libya across the Mediterranean to Europe. These are mostly economic migrants but not solely economic migrants, and they deserve to have a hearing and, instead, they have been terribly mistreated. They get stopped by the Libyan coast guard, the Europeans push boats back, and they are offloaded back into Libya and they are practically imprisoned and mistreated in North Africa. So that's a terribly inhumane way to treat people who are trying to rescue themselves, their families, and find a better life. And another point to the Europeans has been, couldn't you use these young people taking initiative trying to have a better life and work hard and get on with their lives, and the answer is yes. Europe has this sort of aging demographic and could definitely use an infusion of younger workers and talented people coming in. But, instead, they have really pushed to keep people out. So what's happened with Ukrainians? They're seen as a different category. They're seen as neighbors. There's a part of it that is positive, which is a sense that the countries right next door have to help them. Poland, Moldova, other countries, are taking in the Ukrainians. The borders are open. If they get to Poland they can get free train fare to Germany. Germany will take them in, and that's a beautiful thing. And the upsetting thing is the sense that there is undertones of racism, also anti-Islam, where darker-skinned people were not at all welcome and people who are not Christian were not welcome. And so it's probably a mix of all the above, the good and the bad, and it's potentially an opportunity to teach more people about “refugeehood” and why we care and why it affects all of us and what we should do about it and that we should do more. FASKIANOS: Thank you. All right, I'm going to take the next question from Kazi Sazid, who has also raised their hand, so if you could just ask your question yourself and identify yourself. Q: Hello. So I'm Kazi. I'm a student at CUNY Hunter College and I happen to be writing a research paper on Central American and Iraq war refugee crises and how international law hasn't changed the behavior of a state helping them. So my question is, how does confusion and ignorance of migration and refugee terminology by state leaders and the general populace impact the legally ordained rights of refugees such as having identity documents, having the right to education, refoulement, which is not being sent back to a country where they are danger? One example is like Central Americans are termed as illegal immigrants by the right wing but the reality is they are asylum seekers who are worthy of refugee status because gang violence and corruption has destabilized their country and the judicial systems. I think femicide in El Salvador and Honduras is among the highest and—so yeah. RICHARD: Yeah. Thank you for asking the question, and I have a soft spot in my heart for Hunter College. Only one of my grandparents went to college and it was my mother's mother who went to Hunter College and graduated in the late 1920s, and as we know, it's right down the street from the Harold Pratt House, the home of the Council on Foreign Relations. So I think a lot of what you—I agree with a lot of what you've said about—for me it's describing these people who offer so much potential as threats, just because they are trying to help themselves. And instead of feeling that we should support these folks, there's a sense of—even if we don't allow them in our country we could still do things to ease their way and help them find better solutions, but they're described as these waves of people coming this way, headed this way, scary, scary. And if you follow the debates in the United States, I was very alarmed before and during the Trump administration that journalists did not establish that they had a right to make a claim for asylum at the border. Instead, they talked about it as if it were two political policies duking it out, where some people felt we should take more and some people felt we should take less. Well, the issue that was missed, I felt, in a lot of the coverage of the Southern border was the right to asylum, that they had a right to make a claim, that we had signed onto this as the United States and that there was a very good reason that we had signed onto that and it was to make sure people fleeing for their lives get an opportunity to be saved if they're innocent people and not criminals, but innocent people who are threatened, that we'd give them a place of safety. So I agree with you that the lack of understanding about these basic principles, agreements, conventions is something that is not well understood by our society, and certainly the society was not being informed of that by a lot of the messengers describing the situation over the past few years. FASKIANOS: Thank you. So I'm going to take the next question from Lindsey McCormack who is an undergrad at Baruch—oh, sorry, a graduate student at Baruch College. My apologies. Do you see any possibility of the U.S. adopting a protocol for vetting and accepting climate refugees? Have other countries moved in that direction? And maybe you can give us the definition of a climate refugee and what we will in fact be seeing as we see climate change affecting all of us. RICHARD: I don't have a lot to say on this, so I hate to disappoint you, but I will say a couple things because, one, I was on a task force at Refugees International, which is a very good NGO that writes about and reports on refugee situations around the world and shines a light on them. I was part of a task force that came out with a report for the Biden administration on the need to do more for climate migrants, and so that report is available at the Refugees International site and it was being submitted to the Biden administration because the Biden administration had put out an executive order on refugees that included a piece that said we want to do a better job, we want to come up with new, fresh ideas on climate migrants. So I don't know where that stands right now, but I think the other piece of information that I often give out while doing public speaking, especially to students, about this issue is that I feel not enough work has been done on it, and so if a student is very interested in staying in academia and studying deeper into some of these issues, I think climate migration is a field that is ripe for further work. It's timely, it's urgent, and it hasn't been over-covered in the past. I admire several people, several friends who are working on these issues; one is Professor Beth Ferris at Georgetown University who was, in fact, on the secretary general's High Level Panel on Internal Displacement and she made sure that some of these climate issues are raised in very high-level meetings. She was also part of this task force from Refugees International. Another smart person working on this is Amali Tower, a former International Rescue Committee colleague who started a group called Climate Refugees and she's also trying to bring more attention to this; she's kind of very entrepreneurial in trying to do more on that. Not everybody would agree that the term should be climate refugees since “refugees” has so much legal definitions attached to it and the people displaced by climate don't have those kind of protections or understandings built around them yet. But I think it's an area that there definitely needs to be more work done. So I think the basic question was, did I think something good was going to happen anytime soon related to this, and I can't tell because these crazy situations around the world, the war in Ukraine and Taliban in charge in Afghanistan—I mean, that just completely derails the types of exercises that the world needs of thinking through very logically good governance, people coming together making decisions, building something constructive instead of reacting to bad things. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question from raised hand Ali Tarokh. And unmute your—thank you. Q: Yes. OK, I am Ali Tarokh from Northeastern University. I came here in the United States ten years ago as a refugee. And I was in Turkey—I flew Iran to Turkey. I stayed there fourteen, sixteen months. So this is part of—my question is part of my lived experience in Turkey. So one part is humanitarian services, helping refugees move into the third country, OK? The one issue I—it's my personal experience is the UNHCR system, there is many corruptions. This corruption makes lines, OK, produce refugees—because some countries such as Iran and Turkey, they are producing refugees and there is no solution for it, or sometimes they use it as—they use refugees as a weapon. They say, OK, if you don't work with me—Turkey sent a message to EU: If you don't work with me, I open the borders. I open the borders and send the flow of refugees to EU. Even some—even Iran's government. So my question is, how can we in the very base on the ground—the level of the ground—how can we prevent all these corruption or how can we work out with this kind of government, countries that are—I named them the refugee producers. And by the time there is two sides of the refugees—one is just humanitarian services, which is our responsibility, United States playing globally there; and other side it seems refugees issue became like industry. In Turkey, the UNHCR staff, some lawyers/attorneys, they take money from people, they make fake cases for them. Even they ask them: Hey, what country—which country would you like to go, United States, Canada, Scandinavian countries? So what is our strategy? What is our solution to help real refugees or prevent produce refugees? RICHARD: Well, there's several things that are raised by your question. Turkey and, now we see, Russia have both been countries where we have seen instances where they can turn on the flow of refugees and turn it off. And Turkey was watching people walk through Turkey, cross the Mediterranean is very scary, dangerous trip between Turkey and Greece in these rubber boats in 2015, 2016, and then they would make their way onward, and then, because of this big EU-Turkey deal that involved 3 billion euros at the time, all of a sudden, the flow stopped. And then in further negotiations going on and on, Turkey would say things that seemed like it came right from a Godfather movie, like, gee, I'd hate to see that flow start up again; that would be a real shame. And so it was clear it was sort of a threat that if you didn't cooperate it could play this very disruptive role on the edges of Europe and deploying people, as you said, which is so cruel not just to the people who are receiving them but to the individuals themselves that they're not being seen as people who need care but instead as a problem to be deployed in different directions. And we saw that also with Belarus and Poland and now also it may have been part of the thinking of Vladimir Putin that by attacking Ukraine, by going to war with Ukraine that there would be exactly what is happening now, people scattering from Ukraine into Europe and that that would be a way to drive a wedge between European countries and cause a lot of not just heartache but also animosity between these countries. So what the Russians didn't seem to appreciate this time was that there would be so much solidarity to help the Ukrainians, and that has been a bit of a surprise. So you've also talked about corruption, though, and corruption is a problem all over the world for lots of different reasons, in business and it's embedded in some societies in a way that sometimes people make cultural excuses for, but in reality we know it doesn't have to be that way. But it is very hard to uproot and get rid of. So I find this work, the anti-corruption work going on around the world, really interesting and groups like Transparency International are just sort of fascinating as they try to really change the standards and the expectations from—the degree to which corruption is part of societies around the world. So UNHCR has to take great care to not hire people who are going to shake down and victimize refugees, and it's not—there's never a perfect situation, but I know that a lot of work is done to keep an eye on these kinds of programs so that the aid goes to the people who need it and it's not sidetracked to go to bad guys. And the way I've seen it is, for example, if I travel overseas and I go to someplace where refugees are being resettled to the U.S. or they're being interviewed for that, or I go to UNHCR office, there will be big signs up that will say the resettlement program does not cost money. If someone asks you for money, don't pay it; you know, report this. And from time to time, there are mini scandals, but overall, it's remarkable how much corruption is kept out of some of these programs. But it's a never-ending fight. I agree with you in your analysis that this is a problem and in some countries more than others. FASKIANOS: So I'm going to take the next question from Pamela Waldron-Moore, who's the chair of the political science department at Xavier University in New Orleans. There are reports in some news feeds that African refugees from Ukraine are being disallowed entry to some states accepting refugees. I think you did allude to this. Is there evidence of this, and if so, can the UN stop it or alleviate that situation? RICHARD: We saw before the Taliban took over in Afghanistan that some European countries were saying it was time for Afghans to go home again, and the idea that during this war it was safe for Afghans to go back—and especially for Afghans who are discriminated against even in the best of times in Afghanistan, like the Hazara minority. It's just—I found that sort of unbelievable that some countries thought this was the right time to send people back to Afghanistan. And so at the moment there's a weird situation in Afghanistan because it's safer in some ways for the bulk of the people because the active fighting has—in large parts of the country—stopped. But it's deadly dangerous for human rights defenders, women leaders, LBGTQ folks—anyone who tries to stand up to the Taliban—you know, scholars, thinkers, journalists. And so those are the folks that, in smaller numbers, we need to find some kind of way to rescue them and get them to safety while they are still inside Afghanistan or if that's outside Afghanistan and in the region. The borders—the border situations change from time to time. For a while they were saying only people with passports could come out, and for most Afghan families, nobody had a passport or, if they did, it was a head of household had a passport for business or trade. But you wouldn't have had passports for the spouse and the children. And so this has been a real dilemma. We also see a whole series of barriers to people getting out; so first you need a passport, then you need a visa to where you're going, and then you might need a transit visa for a country that you are crossing. And what has come to pass is that people who are trying to help evacuate people from Afghanistan—a smaller and smaller number as the months go on; people are trying to make this happen because it's so hard—that they will only take people out of the country if they feel that their onward travel is already figured out and that they have their visas for their final-destination country. So the actual number that's getting out are tiny. And the people who have gotten out who are in either Pakistan or Iraq are very worried. And they're afraid to be pushed back. They're afraid they will run out of money. They are afraid—I think said this during my talk before—they're afraid that there are people in Pakistan who will turn them in to the Taliban. And so it's always hard to be a refugee, but right now it's really frightening for people who are just trying to get to a safe place. FASKIANOS: And in terms of the discrimination that you referenced for refugees leaving the Ukraine, I mean, there have been some reports of EU—discrimination in European countries not accepting— RICHARD: Well, like African students who are studying in Ukraine— FASKIANOS: Yes. RICHARD: —who were not treated as if they were fleeing a country at war— FASKIANOS: Correct. RICHARD: —but instead were put in a different category and said, you know, go back, go home. FASKIANOS: Yes. RICHARD: Yeah, that's—that is quite blatant— FASKIANOS: And there's— RICHARD: And that was happening at the borders. FASKIANOS: Is there anything the UN can do about that, or is that really at the discretion of the countries—the accepting countries? RICHARD: Well, the—yeah, the UNHCR has these reception centers that they've set up, including between the border of Poland and Ukraine, and I think the other neighboring countries. And so if one can get to the reception center, one could potentially get additional help or be screened into—for special attention for needing some help that maybe a white Christian Ukrainian who spoke more than one language of the region would not need. FASKIANOS: Great. So let's go to Susan Knott, who also wrote her question, but has raised her hand. So Susan, why don't you just ask your question? And please unmute and identify yourself. KNOTT: OK, am I unmuted? FASKIANOS: Yes. KNOTT: OK. I am Susan Knott, University of Utah, Educational Policy and Leadership doctoral program. I am also a practicum intern at ASU, and I'm also a refugee services collaborator. And I'm engaged in a research project creating college and university pathways for refugees to resettle. I'm just wondering what your feel is about the current administration efforts in seeking to establish the pathway model similar to ASU's Education for Humanity Initiative with Bard, and is there helping lead the Refugee Higher Education Access program that serves learners who require additional university-level preparation in order to transition into certificate and degree programs. And I just—I'm not just—and all of this buzz that's going on since all of terrible crises are occurring, I'm not seeing a whole lot that—based on my own experience working with refugee education and training centers at colleges—on the college level, and learning about the Presidents' Alliance on Higher Ed and Immigration. I'm just wondering—and they're saying let's have this be more of a privately funded or partnerships with the university scholarships and private entities. What about a federally-funded university sponsorship program for refugee students given that the numbers or the data is showing that that age group is the largest number of just about every refugee population? RICHARD: That's a really fascinating set of issues. I'm not the expert on them, so I'm going to disappoint you. but I appreciate that you took a little extra time in how you stated your intervention to add a lot of information for this group, which should very much care about this. I get a lot of questions every week about university programs that Afghan students could take advantage of. I don't have a good handle on it, and I'm trying to do that with—I'm overdue for a conversation with Scholars at Risk in New York. Robert Quinn is the executive director of that, I believe. And so I'm glad you raised this and I'm not going to have a lot of extra to say about it. FASKIANOS: Anne, are there—is there—there's a question in the chat in the Q&A about sources for data on U.S. initiatives toward refugees. Where would you direct people to go to get updates on the latest programs, et cetera? RICHARD: Sometimes I'm embarrassed to say the best summaries are done by not-for-profits outside the government than by the government. The best source for data on resettlement of refugees to the U.S. is a website that is funded by the U.S. government called WRAPSNET.org—WRAPS spelled W-R-A-P-S-N-E-T dot-O-R-G. And in double-checking some of the things last summer, I felt that DHS had better descriptions of some of the programs than the State Department did, and that's my bureau that I used to—run, so—but they are responsible for determining who is in and who is out of these different programs, so maybe that's why they do. So there's a lot on the DHS website that's interesting if you are looking for more information. And one of the things the Council does, it has done a number of these special web presentations: one on refugees that I got to help on a couple of years ago, and I think there's one up now on Ukrainians. And this is the type of public education function that the Council does so well I think because they fact-check everything, and so it's very reliable. FASKIANOS: Thank you for that plug. You can find it all on CFR.org—lots of backgrounders, and timelines, and things like that. So we don't have that much time left, so I'm going to roll up two questions—one in the Q&A box and one because of your vast experience. So what role do NGOs play in refugee crises and migration initiatives, particularly in resettlement? And just from your perspective, Anne, you have been in academia, you've worked in the government, you worked at IRC, and now are at Freedom House. And so just—again, what would you share with the group about pursuing a career in this—government, non-government perspectives and, what students should be thinking about as they launch to their next phase in life. RICHARD: Yeah, that we could have a whole ‘nother hour on, right? That's—(laughs)— FASKIANOS: I know, I know. It's unfair to, right, do this at the very end, but— RICHARD: NGOs play really important roles in both the delivery of humanitarian assistance overseas and the help for resettlement in the United States. In the U.S. there are nine national networks of different groups; six are faith-based, three are not. They are non-sectarian, and they do amazing work on shoe-string budgets to—everything from meeting refugees at the airport, taking them to an apartment, showing them how the lights work and the toilet flushes, and coming back the next day, making sure they have an appropriate meal to have, and that the kids get in school, that people who need health care get it, and that adults who are able-bodied get jobs so they can support themselves. The other type of NGO are the human rights NGOs that now I'm doing more with, and I guess if you are thinking about careers in these, you have to ask yourself, you know, are you more of a pragmatic person where the most important thing is to save a life, or are you an idealist where you want to put out standards that are very high and push people to live up to them. Both types of organizations definitely help, but they just have very different ways of working. Another question for students is do you want high job security of a career in the U.S. government—say, as a Foreign Service Officer or as a civil servant where maybe you won't move up very quickly, but you might have great sense of satisfaction that the things you were working on were making a difference because they were being decisively carried out by the U.S. or another government. Or do you prefer the relatively lean, flatter organizations of the NGO world where, as a young person, you can still have a lot of authority, and your views can be seen—can be heard by top layers because you're not that far away from them. And so, NGOs are seen as more nimble, more fast moving, less job security. Having done both I think it really depends on your personality. Working in the government, you have to figure out a way to keep going even when people tell you no. You have figure out—or that it's hard, or that it's too complicated. You have to figure out ways to find the people who are creative, and can make thing happen, and can open doors, and can cut through red tape. In NGOs you can have a lot of influence. I was so surprised first time I was out of the State Department working for the International Rescue Committee one of my colleagues was telling me she just picks up the phone and calls the key guy on Capitol Hill and tells him what the law should be. That would never happen with a junior person in the U.S. government. You have to go through so many layers of bureaucracy, and approvals, and clearances. So, really, it depends on the type of person you are, and how you like to work, and the atmosphere in which you like to work. I can tell you you won't get rich doing this type of work, unfortunately. But you might be able to make a decent living. I certainly have, and so I encourage students to either do this as a career or find ways to volunteer part-time, even if it's tutoring a refugee kid down the block and not in some glamorous overseas location. I think you can get real sense of purpose out of doing this type of work. Thank you, Irina. FASKIANOS: Thank you very much. And I have to say that your careful definitions of the different categories—and really, I think we all need to be more intentional about how we explain, talk about these issues because they are so complex, and there are so many dimensions, and it's easy to make gross generalizations. But the way you laid this out was really, really important for deepening the understanding of this really—the challenge and the—what we're seeing today. So thank you very much. RICHARD: Thank you. Thanks, everybody. FASKIANOS: So thanks to all—yeah, thanks to everybody for your great questions. Again, I apologize; we're three minutes over. I couldn't get to all your questions, so we will just have to continue looking at this issue. We will be announcing the fall Academic Webinar lineup in a month or so in our Academic Bulletin, so you can look for it there. Good luck with your end of the year, closing out your semester. And again, I encourage you to go to CFR.org, ForeignAffairs.com, and ThinkGlobalHealth.org for research analysis on global issues. And you can follow us on Twitter at @CFR_Academic. So again, thank you, Anne Richard. Good luck to you all with finals, and have a good summer. (END)

united states american new york university donald trump canada new york city earth europe education washington leadership americans germany russia joe biden office ms government european management european union russian barack obama ukraine lgbtq risk pennsylvania hands congress afghanistan students african new orleans utah turkey budget nazis mexican iran silicon valley middle east sweden iraq world war ii islam council vladimir putin bush greece venezuela southern immigration poland agency alliance syria united nations secretary pakistan clinton godfather refugees webinars cold war taliban guatemala ukrainian ant presidents lebanon outreach migration ir capitol hill soviet union portuguese angela merkel figures el salvador mediterranean academic population honduras palestinians myanmar ngo afghan georgetown university eastern europe central america haitian belarus georgetown ngos albany state department libya unicef balkans bard scandinavian red cross customs scholars migrants north africa venezuelan peace corps foreign affairs burma asu dhs wraps foreign relations northeastern university mena afghans international development central american moldova higher ed rohingya baruch saharan africa glance irc libyan syrians unhcr lbgtq hunter college north florida xavier university border protection guterres cfr international organizations near east baruch college international rescue committee international committee freedom house transparency international world food programme kazi robert quinn hamilton college uscis world refugee day winter spring unrwa un high commissioner idps hazara foreign service officer northern triangle climate refugees educational policy un refugee agency united nations un dvp global migration filippo grandi state tony blinken refugees international cuny hunter college national program high level panel eu turkey refugee convention internal displacement anne richard
Kalo Lee
Vulling maken voor wraps - Rustgevende kookvideo - Luister mee terwijl je zelf lekker bezig bent

Kalo Lee

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 33:09


Hey you! In deze vlog bak ik kip en garnalen voor bij de wraps. Vandaag heb ik alweer de vriezer een beetje meer leeg! Er is nu veel meer ruimte in de vriezer. Morgen, na de boodschappen bezorging, kunnen er weer twee hele broden extra in de vriezer zonder dat ik het brood van te voren hoef plat te stampen! Zet mij aan terwijl je zelf bezig bent met je eigen dingetjes. Koken, schoonmaken, even zitten en bijkomen, onderweg, tijdens het eten, huiswerk maken, werken. Gedachtes stoppen niet. Ik maak geen recepten / tutorials. Het is andersom, ik film gewoon wat ik doe en ik vertel wat in mij opkomt. Sommigen vinden mijn videos rustgevend en worden er blij van.

Rob Dibble Show
Bob Joyce Wraps Up UCONN Season

Rob Dibble Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 12:55


Bob Joyce joins the RDS Program and wraps up the UCONN season

Gold and Black Radio
April 11: Purdue wraps spring with defensive win

Gold and Black Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 26:00


The defense won Saturday's spring game, putting an end to the Boilermakers' 15 practices, as they start to look toward the fall, when Purdue hopes it can be a contender in the Big Ten West. Our thoughts on the spring, the Ross-Ade renovations, Jeff Brohm's contract and more on Gold and Black Radio. 

WGN - The Dave Plier Podcast
Actor Oliver Hudson wraps 1st season of Fox's ‘Cleaning Lady', moving his family in with mom Goldie Hawn and stepdad Kurt Russell, sibling revelry with his sister Kate Hudson

WGN - The Dave Plier Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 9, 2022


Actor Oliver Hudson talks to WGN Radio's Dave Plier about wrapping up the 1st season of Fox's ‘Cleaning Lady', temporarily moving his family in with mom Goldie Hawn and stepdad Kurt Russell and sibling revelry with his sister Kate Hudson.

Cleveland Baseball Talk Podcast
Guardians storylines as the club wraps training camp

Cleveland Baseball Talk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 20:34


Paul Hoynes and Joe Noga tie up the loose ends from spring training as the Guardians get set to break camp. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Wolverine Podcast
Recruiting Podcast: EJ Holland wraps up 2022 Michigan football class

The Wolverine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 109:05


On this episode of The Wolverine Recruiting Podcast, Michigan recruiting analyst EJ Holland gives us his unfiltered thoughts on the ENTIRE 2022 Michigan football class in this extensive audio breakdown. From lowest to highest per the On3 Consensus, you'll get insight on everyone from Alessandro Lorenzetti to five-star phenom Will Johnson.  Johnson, the lone incoming Michigan product, is easily the team's top 2022 prospect breaking the On3 Consensus at No. 18 overall as the second-best cornerback in the country. The six-three, 190-pound signee also inked a historic, multi-year NIL deal with AFB Hospitality group. It's among the more unprecedented deals in this space considering it's prior to Johnson ever taking the field in Maize and Blue. With the spring game nearly upon us, Holland provides one last look at the group which ranked No. 9 nationally and third in the Big Ten, according to On3. Fifty-nine percent of the class is made of blue-chip prospects with just five percent coming in-state (878 mile avg. distance).  Michigan ended its 2021 campaign with a 12-2 record, ultimately winning its first Big Ten title game under Wolverines coach Jim Harbaugh. Michigan would eventually fall to Georgia in the College Football Playoff, but U-M is still expected to contend for back-to-back conference championships this season. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

JJ On Demand
The Watch List-Obi Wan Kenobi Delayed, The Walking Dead Wraps, Morbius Arrives at The Movies and More

JJ On Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 1:37


To say "Morbius Sucks" is not just a commentary on the plot of this MCU Vampire Anit-Hero movie...apparently it's also a reflection of it's 16% Rotten Tomatoes Score. Ouch. Hard to believe the Walking Dead is done filming for good, are you watching the final season? Lots more to talk about in today's Watch List. JJ Hayes is the morning host on Country 101.3 KFDI in Wichita, KS. Lots of Country Music and local News, Weather, and Traffic.

Locked On Cougars
Aaron Roderick evaluates BYU's offense as spring wraps & BYU hoops working the transfer portal - March 30, 2022

Locked On Cougars

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2022 28:06


The Locked On Cougars Podcast for Wednesday, March 30, 2022 Wednesday's show began with the comments BYU offensive coordinator Aaron Roderick made as the Cougars near the end of spring camp and he's fairly pleased it seems Attention then shifted to the latest with the BYU men's basketball program and how they are doing in recruiting athletes in the NCAA Transfer Portal at the moment Finally, Alex Barcello will be back on the court Friday in New Orleans, BYU baseball downed Washington State, and Brayden Woodall took home a big award Support Us By Supporting Our Locked On Podcast Network Sponsors!  Built Bar - Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to BuiltBar.com and use promo code “LOCKEDON15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline - BetOnline.net has you covered this season with more props, odds and lines than ever before. BetOnline – Where The Game Starts! Rock Auto - Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. StatHero - StatHero is reshaping the way the way you play fantasy sports. Dozens of house based games to play daily. No sharks, no funky props, just your skill vs the lineups you choose. Sign-up today at StatHero.com/LockedOn Athletic Greens - Athletic Greens is going to give you a FREE 1 year supply of immune-supporting Vitamin D AND 5 FREE travel packs with your first purchase. All you have to do is visit athleticgreens.com/COLLEGE Follow the Locked On Cougars podcast on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter to stay up-to-date with the latest with regards to the podcast and BYU sports news. Please remember to subscribe, rate and review the show. Also, please consider subscribing to the Yawk Talk Newsletter that Jake writes and is delivered directly to your email inbox. If you are interested in advertising with Locked On Cougars or the Locked On Podcast Network, please email us at LockedOnBYU@gmail.com or contact us here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Rush Hour Melbourne Catch Up - 105.1 Triple M Melbourne - James Brayshaw and Billy Brownless
Damian Barrett wraps Round 2, RIP Taylor Hawkins, Billy Gets Cramp - The Rush Hour podcast - Monday 28th March 2022

The Rush Hour Melbourne Catch Up - 105.1 Triple M Melbourne - James Brayshaw and Billy Brownless

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 28, 2022 56:11


Billy's All Sports Report, Damian Barrett wraps up AFL Round 2, Rosie's Entertainment Report - Slapgate!, Shaq is coming to Australia, Billy's 5 at 5:05, where have you spewed unusual?, British India's Matty O pays tribute to Taylor Hawkins, Billy's Joke See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Smoking and Drinking in Space!
Ep. 182 - The Expanse (Season 4)

Smoking and Drinking in Space!

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 25, 2022 64:27


This week the guys delve into the first Amazon produced season of the sci-fi series that set a new bar, it's Season 4 of The Expanse. Picard Season 3 Wraps - https://trekmovie.com/2022/03/08/star-trek-picard-wraps-production-on-season-3-and-the-series/ Quantum Leap Revival - https://variety.com/2022/tv/news/quantum-leap-pilot-nbc-cast-1235200006/ Dune Part 2 - https://variety.com/2022/film/news/dune-part-2-casts-florence-pugh-as-princess-irulan-1235199192/ Visit Creative Brain Candy for more great shows and other creative works at https://creativebraincandy.com Join the SaDiS Discord server at https://smokinganddrinkinginspace.com/discord Become a patreon supporter at https://smokinganddrinkinginspace.com/patreon

Locked On Cougars
BYU Football wraps up Week 4 of spring camp & BYU Pro Day is here - March 25, 2022

Locked On Cougars

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 25, 2022 31:26


The Locked On Cougars Podcast for Friday, March 25, 2022 The BYU football program wrapped up Week 4 of spring ball on Thursday and Jake Hatch shared his thoughts and feelings on where they stand with three practice to go Jake then talked about Pro Day taking place today for five former Cougars hoping to realize their NFL dreams and explains that BYU may be just getting started with an NFL pipeline Finally, the show wrapped up with BYU baseball's big win over Gonzaga and a season-ending injury as well as a look at the schedule for other BYU teams in action this weekend Support Us By Supporting Our Locked On Podcast Network Sponsors!  Built Bar - Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to BuiltBar.com and use promo code “LOCKEDON15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline - BetOnline.net has you covered this season with more props, odds and lines than ever before. BetOnline – Where The Game Starts! Rock Auto - Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. StatHero - StatHero is reshaping the way the way you play fantasy sports. Dozens of house based games to play daily. No sharks, no funky props, just your skill vs the lineups you choose. Sign-up today at StatHero.com/LockedOn Follow the Locked On Cougars podcast on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter to stay up-to-date with the latest with regards to the podcast and BYU sports news. Please remember to subscribe, rate and review the show. Also, please consider subscribing to the Yawk Talk Newsletter that Jake writes and is delivered directly to your email inbox. If you are interested in advertising with Locked On Cougars or the Locked On Podcast Network, please email us at LockedOnBYU@gmail.com or contact us here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

SOUNDS LIKE RADIO
Johnny Dollar Wraps Up Molly K Matter in Library of Sound Vol 86e

SOUNDS LIKE RADIO

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 25, 2022 16:30


It's Friday and that means we get to hear Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar solve the case of the Molly K Matter from March 14, 1955. Hear how Johnny works it out in this final Molly K chapter from our week long special from the Library of Sound here with Volume 86e.

The Fut Fix
Fut Fantasy, Birthday Wraps and an Ode to Fut Fanatic

The Fut Fix

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2022 63:44


Tyler & Andrew recap the FUT Birthday promo last week, including some major upgrades. FUT Fantasy is here with a new format as well as a 3 Min half fut friendly! Also, the guys have a farewell to the Fut (Fifa) Fanatics Podcast. Thanks for all of the memories to Ben, John, Alex and Simon.

D-Lo & KC
Fri 3-18 Hour 4 "Breaking Kings News Wraps Up the Week!"

D-Lo & KC

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 19, 2022 54:29


Breaking news from the Sacramento Kings dominated the final hour on Friday! The team announced that Richaun Holmes will miss the rest of the season due to personal reasons. Kenny and James break down what that news means to the team and to Richaun. 

Get Real With Rick Dancer
Get Real With Rick Dancer & Friends: Oregon Legislature Wraps Up, Constitution Party candidate for Governor Speaks, Faith Hope and Charity Vineyards

Get Real With Rick Dancer

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 8, 2022 43:48


The 2022 Legislative Session comes to an end. Bill Lundun recaps bills that passed, and those that died. and A Covid-19 death caused by business and activity shutdowns. Plus we'll hear from the Oregon Constitution Party candidate for Governor of Oregon Paul Romero and we give you a bit of Faith, Hope and Charity from a winery by the same name in Central Oregon.

The SB Nation NFL Show
NFL Daily Kickoff, Monday- Aaron Rodgers has deals in place when he decides + NFL Combine wraps up

The SB Nation NFL Show

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 7, 2022 5:39


In today's episode, Mike Florio says Aaron Rodgers has deals in place with three teams if he wants to leave the Packers, the Combine goes out with a bang, and the Chiefs could lose a major defensive piece to free agency. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Money Pit Home Improvement Podcast
Garage Door Do-Overs | Simple Trick to Calc Home Care Costs | Stainless Steel Appliance Wraps | Your Q & A | Ep #2185

The Money Pit Home Improvement Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 7, 2022 39:26


SHOW NOTES: One of the biggest security holes in any home is the garage door. Find out how to make sure your garage door is set up to keep your home safe from intruders, and safe for kid going in and out too! Your house is your biggest investment. But how much should you set aside for home repair and maintenance? Learn a simple formula to help you know what to budget. Stainless steel appliances can be beautiful but costly. We share a DIY trick to get that same stainless steel look for less. Plus, answers to your home improvement questions: Kelly in South Dakota is having trouble getting an oil stain off cement floor. Mike from Iowa has a problem with how his bathroom vents into his attic. Jane in Pennsylvania needs help finding covers for base board heating Dave from Ohio has uninsulated drywall seams that pop and crack in the winter. Robin in Oregon is having a lot of moisture and mold build up in her bathroom. Nicole from Illinois has a crack caused by earthquake damage. Don in Pennsylvania has a question about LED lighting in his kitchen. Maria from Delaware wants to know how to paint over paneling. Anthony in Tennessee needs a DIY solution for putting a bunk bed in his RV. J.W. From Georgia wants to put a wood burning stove into his coal burning stove. Do you have a home improvement or decor question? Call the show 24/7 at 888-MONEY-PIT (888-666-3974) or post your question here.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Take 2: Utah's Legislature with Heidi Hatch, Greg Hughes and Jim Dabakis
Take 2 Podcast: Who’s running for office, Legislative session wraps up; transgender athletes

Take 2: Utah's Legislature with Heidi Hatch, Greg Hughes and Jim Dabakis

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 5, 2022 51:12


Host: Heidi Hatch Guests: Maura Carabello & Greg Hughes Filing Deadline 5pm Friday: Who's in, who's out and who is running for a different office? LINK: All but 8 Utah legislators file to run for re-election All but 8 Utah legislators file to run for re-election https://t.co/u8akiZMpx9 — Heidi Hatch KUTV (@tvheidihatch) March 5, 2022 … Continue reading Take 2 Podcast: Who’s running for office, Legislative session wraps up; transgender athletes →

Pop Culture & Movie News - Let Your Geek SideShow
Kraven the Hunter Casts Calypso, Good Omens Season 2 Wraps - March 2, 2022

Pop Culture & Movie News - Let Your Geek SideShow

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 2, 2022 1:23


Kraven the Hunter Casts Calypso, Good Omens Season 2 Wraps, Twisted Metal Lands on Peacock, Rebel Moon Casting. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Nerd Academy Podcast
Batman First Reactions, Marvel D+ Migration, Indy 5 Wraps - The Nerd Academy Podcast Ep 112

The Nerd Academy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 2, 2022


On this week's TNAP your favorite nerds round up the week's geeky news and discuss the first reviews for The Batman, the move to Disney+ that the Netflix Marvel shows are making, the next Pokemon Gen, and more! Amidala Initiative: https://www.gofundme.com/f/the-amidala-initiative-for-equality-texas?utm_campaign=m_pd+share-sheet&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter Kentucky Relief Please Donate: https://t.co/rFXwSm1abM Sunday's Bloody Mary: https://sundaysbloodymary.com/shop/ Help us out by chuckin' a buck on our Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/thenerdacademypodcast

MASN All Access Podcast
EP 174: De Jon Watson wraps up early minor league camp

MASN All Access Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 2, 2022 50:43


Some baseball is happening in West Palm Beach. De Jon Watson spoke after the Nats wrapped up early minor league camp. Bobby and Amy break down the latest on the top prospects.

DisKingdom Podcast - Disney | Marvel | Star Wars
Better Nate Than Ever” Disney+ Release Date + Filming On “Indiana Jones 5” Wraps | Disney Plus News

DisKingdom Podcast - Disney | Marvel | Star Wars

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 28, 2022 3:24


Monday's Disney+ news includes: 00:00 “Better Nate Than Ever” Disney+ Original Trailer Released https://whatsondisneyplus.com/better-nate-than-ever-disney-original-trailer-released/ 01:00 Filming On “Indiana Jones 5” Wraps https://whatsondisneyplus.com/filming-on-indiana-jones-5-wraps/ 02:00 “Star Wars: The Mandalorian” Comic Book Adaptation Coming Soon https://whatsondisneyplus.com/star-wars-the-mandalorian-comic-book-adaptation-coming-soon/ 02:10 “The Proud Family: Louder & Prouder” Penny Avatar Added To Disney+ https://whatsondisneyplus.com/the-proud-family-louder-prouder-penny-avatar-added-to-disney/ 02:20 Marvel's “The Defenders” Profile Avatars Removed From Netflix https://whatsondisneyplus.com/marvels-the-defenders-profile-avatars-removed-from-netflix/ 02:45 What's New On Disney+ Today - The Walking Dead #DisneyPlus  VISIT ONLINE -  http://www.WhatsOnDisneyPlus.com If you enjoy our content, please consider supporting it via our Patreon or as a YouTube Channel Membership from as little as $2 a month and get access to exclusive content and much more.

The Patriots Report with Christopher Price
Episode 34: Chris and Nicole Yang of The Boston Globe put the wraps on New England's 2021 season, try and figure out how the Patriots can keep pace with the rest of the AFC, examine some of New England's most pressing personnel questions...and m

The Patriots Report with Christopher Price

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 27:48


Nicole Yang drops by for her second appearance on "The Patriots Report," and talks about: -What she'll remember most about the 2021 Patriots. -What happened before (seven-game win streak) and after the bye (four losses in five games). -How can New England compete with Buffalo, Kansas City and some of the rest of the AFC's elite? -What does the future hold for Josh McDaniels, Jerod Mayo, Ivan Fears and Cam Achord? -What are the offseason personnel priorities for the Patriots? ...and much more.

The Unplayable Podcast
Ricky Ponting wraps up the Ashes and nominates his future stars

The Unplayable Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022


 Test legend Ricky Ponting joined Louis Cameron for one final time this summer to recap the Australia's dominant Ashes series. Ponting names his Player of the Series, weighs in on English kids in Sheffield Shield, nominates four key players for the Aussies' future and backs Justin Langer as coach.Josh Schonafinger then joins Louis as the pair revisit their pre-Ashes predictions and heap praise on Hobart as a Test venue.