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Leading science journalists provide a daily minute commentary on some of the most interesting developments in the world of science. For a full-length, weekly podcast you can subscribe to Science Talk: The Podcast of Scientific American . To view all of our archived podcasts please go to www.scientif…

Scientific American


    • Dec 1, 2021 LATEST EPISODE
    • weekdays NEW EPISODES
    • 2m AVG DURATION
    • 685 EPISODES

    Listeners of 60-Second Science that love the show mention: 60 seconds, tid bits, quick hits, string theory, science news, sciences, science topics, science podcasts, snippets, bites, pun, tidbits, scientific, kitchen, ease, english, well written, wide variety, students, subjects.



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    Latest episodes from 60-Second Science

    To Better Persuade a Human, a Robot Should Use This Trick

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 12:00

    A new study finds that, for robots, overlords are less persuasive than peers.

    Redo of a Famous Experiment on the Origins of Life Reveals Critical Detail Missed for Decades

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 5:35

    The Miller-Urey experiment showed that the conditions of early Earth could be simulated in a glass flask. New research finds the flask itself played an under appreciated, though outsized role.

    COVID Quickly, Episode 19: Mandate Roadblocks, Boosters for All, and Sickness in the Zoo

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 9:08

    Today we bring you a new episode in our podcast series COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks, Scientific American ’s senior health editors Tanya Lewis and Josh Fischman catch you up on the essential developments in the pandemic: from vaccines to new variants and everything in between. You can listen to all past episodes here .

    Flocking Together May Have Helped Dinosaurs Dominate the Earth

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 2:31

    A fossil bed in Patagonia provides evidence of complex social structure in dinosaurs as early as 193 million years ago. And scientists say that herding behavior could have been key to the beasts’ success.

    Engineered Bacteria Use Air Bubbles as Acoustically Detonated Tumor TNT

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 8:03

    Ultrasound triggered cells home in on tumors and then self destruct to deliver damage or therapeutics from inside.

    COVID Quickly, Episode 18: Vaccines for Kids and the Limits of Natural Immunity

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 6:32

    Today we bring you a new episode in our podcast series COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks, Scientific American ’s senior health editors Tanya Lewis and Josh Fischman catch you up on the essential developments in the pandemic: from vaccines to new variants and everything in between. You can listen to all past episodes here .

    These Bugs Produce Smelly Defenses That Need to Be Heard to Be Believed

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 7:21

    You read that right. Researchers have taken the chemical defenses of some insects and turned them into sounds , which, it turns out, repel people just as well.

    For Some Parents, Hiding a Dead Body Shows How Much You Care

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 6:44

    In beetles—we are talking beetles—some of whom have learned, over millions of years of evolution, to dampen the stench of decay in order to help their young thrive.

    Date of the Vikings' First Atlantic Crossing Revealed by Rays from Space

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 2:49

    By dating the remnants of trees felled in Newfoundland, scientists have determined that the Norse people likely first set foot in the Americas in the year A.D. 1021.

    COVID Quickly, Episode 17: Vaccine Lies and Protecting Immunocompromised People

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 6:41

    Today we bring you a new episode in our podcast series COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks, Scientific American ’s senior health editors Tanya Lewis and Josh Fischman catch you up on the essential developments in the pandemic: from vaccines to new variants and everything in between. You can listen to all past episodes here .

    How Can an Elephant Squeak Like a Mouse?

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 5:02

    New research using a camera that can “see" sound” shows some elephants can produce high-pitched buzzing with their lips.

    Beethoven's Unfinished 10th Symphony Brought to Life by Artificial Intelligence

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 7:15

    Nearly 200 years after his death, the German composer’s musical scratch was pieced together by machine—with a lot of human help.

    The Kavli Prize Presents: Understanding The Universe [Sponsored]

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 6:19

    Ewine van Dishoeck received The Kavli Prize in Astrophysics in 2018 for elucidating the life cycle of interstellar clouds and the formation of stars and planets. What other mysteries of space are left to be uncovered?

    A Canary in an Ice-Rich, Slumping Rock Glacier in Alaska

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 7:54

    Here’s what we can learn about climate change and infrastructure from Denali National Park’s only road.

    COVID Quickly, Episode 16: Vaccines Protect Pregnancies, and a New Antiviral Pill

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 5:00

    Today we bring you a new episode in our podcast series COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks, Scientific American ’s senior health editors Tanya Lewis and Josh Fischman catch you up on the essential developments in the pandemic: from vaccines to new variants and everything in between. You can listen to all past episodes here .

    The Mystery of Water Drops That Skate Across Oil at Impossible Speeds

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 6:21

    The speed of these self-propelling droplets on a hot oil surface seemed to defy physics until researchers broke out the super slow motion camera.

    Night Flights Are No Sweat for Tropical Bees

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 3:58

    New research uses night vision to see how nocturnal bees navigate the dark.

    These Bacteria Steal from Iron and Could Be Secretly Helping to Curb Climate Change

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 2:56

    Photoferrotrophs have been around for billions of years on Earth, and new research suggests that they have played an outsize roll in the natural capture of carbon dioxide.

    COVID, Quickly, Episode 15: Booster Shot Approvals--plus Vaccines for Kids?

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 7:43

    Today we bring you a new episode in our podcast series COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks, Scientific American ’s senior health editors Tanya Lewis and Josh Fischman catch you up on the essential developments in the pandemic: from vaccines to new variants and everything in between. You can listen to all past episodes here .

    Dinosaurs Lived--and Made Little Dinos--in the Arctic

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 4:28

    New research shows that the prehistoric giants were even cooler than we thought

    During a Rodent Quadrathlon, Researchers Learn That Ground Squirrels Have Personalities

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 4:59

    The rodents’ personalities may help them to secure territory and avoid prey.

    A Car Crash Snaps the Daydreaming Mind into Focus

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 3:56

    One researcher’s poorly timed attention lapse flipped a car—and pushed science forward.

    COVID, Quickly, Episode 14: Best Masks, Explaining Mask Anger, Biden's New Plan

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 7:57

    Today we bring you a new episode in our podcast series COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks, Scientific American ’s senior health editors Tanya Lewis and Josh Fischman catch you up on the essential developments in the pandemic: from vaccines to new variants and everything in between. You can listen to all past episodes here .

    The Kavli Prize Presents: Understanding Atoms [Sponsored]

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 7:03

    Gerd Binnig shared the Kavli Prize in Nanoscience in 2016 for inventing the atomic force microscope. What transformative impact has this invention had on nanoscience?

    In Missouri, a Human 'Bee' Works to Better Understand Climate Change's Effects

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 3:06

    Researcher Matthew Austin has become a wildflower pollinator, sans the wings.

    These Baby Bats, like Us, Were Born to Babble

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 5:16

    The greater sac-winged bat develops its own language in much the way we do.

    Their Lives Have Been Upended by Hurricane Ida

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 5:41

    Theresa and Donald Dardar lived their whole lives in coastal Louisiana. They knew the “big one” might come someday. It did, and now everything is uncertain.

    COVID, Quickly, Episode 13: Vaccine Approval, Breakthrough Infections, Boosters

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 6:26

    Today we bring you a new episode in our podcast series COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks, Scientific American ’s senior health editors Tanya Lewis and Josh Fischman catch you up on the essential developments in the pandemic: from vaccines to new variants and everything in between. You can listen to all past episodes here .

    Flexible Microprocessor Could Enable an 'Internet of Everything'

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 4:16

    Researchers have developed a microprocessor built on high-performance plastic rather than silicon—and they say it could enable smarter food labels and supply chain management.

    Years Before COVID-19, Zombies Helped Prepare One Hospital System For the Real Pandemic

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 5:46

    The educational experiment used escape rooms and the undead to set the stage for a terrible situation that would become all too real.

    The Incredible, Reanimated 24,000-Year-Old Rotifer

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 5:38

    The last time this tiny wheel animalcule was moving around, woolly mammoths roamed the earth.

    Astronomers Find an Unexpected Bumper Crop of Black Holes

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 3:24

    In trying to explain the spectacular star trails of the star cluster Palomar 5, astronomers stumbled on a very large trove of black holes.

    Inside Millions of Invisible Droplets, Potential Superbug Killers Grow

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 6:34

    New research has created microscopic antibiotic factories in droplets that measure a trillionth of liter in volume.

    The Secret behind Songbirds' Magnetic Migratory Sense

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2021 2:54

    A molecule found in the retinas of European robins seems to be able to sense weak magnetic fields, such as that of Earth, after it is exposed to light.

    COVID, Quickly, Episode 12: Masking Up Again and Why People Refuse Shots

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2021 6:18

    Today we bring you a new episode in our podcast series COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks, Scientific American ’s senior health editors Tanya Lewis and Josh Fischman catch you up on the essential developments in the pandemic: from vaccines to new variants and everything in between. You can listen to all past episodes here .

    The Kavli Prize Presents: Understanding Touch [Sponsored]

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2021 5:46

    Ardem Patapoutian shared the Kavli Prize in Neuroscience in 2020 for answering a basic question: How does touch actually work?

    Moths Have an Acoustic Invisibility Cloak to Stay under Bats' Radar

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2021 2:45

    New research finds they fly around on noise-cancelling wings

    COVID, Quickly, Episode 11: Vaccine Booster Shots, and Reopening Offices Safely

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2021 5:33

    Today we bring you a new episode in our podcast series: COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks,  Scientific American ’s senior health editors  Tanya Lewis  and  Josh Fischman  catch you up on the essential developments in the pandemic: from vaccines to new variants and everything in between. You can listen to all past episodes here .

    Your Brain Does Something Amazing between Bouts of Intense Learning

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2021 4:02

    New research shows that lightning-quick neural rehearsal can supercharge learning and memory.

    COVID, Quickly, Episode 10: Long Haulers, Delta Woes and Barbershop Shots

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2021 7:00

    Today we bring you a new episode in our podcast series: COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks,  Scientific American ’s senior health editors  Tanya Lewis  and  Josh Fischman  catch you up on the essential developments in the pandemic: from vaccines to new variants and everything in between.

    This Newly Discovered Species of Tree Hyrax Goes Bark in the Night

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2021 5:04

    A study makes the case for the new species, based on its looks, genes and sounds

    COVID, Quickly, Episode 9: Delta Variant, Global Vaccine Shortfalls, Beers for Shots

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2021 5:41

    Today we bring you a new episode in our podcast series: COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks,  Scientific American ’s senior health editors  Tanya Lewis  and  Josh Fischman  catch you up on the essential developments in the pandemic: from vaccines to new variants and everything in between.

    Animal Kids Listen to Their Parents Even before Birth

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2021 5:01

    Human children: please take note of the behavior of prebirth zebra finches

    For African Elephants, Pee Could Be a Potent Trail Marker

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2021 2:17

    Scientists found that elephants often sniff pathways—and seem especially attuned to urine.

    A 'Universal' Coronavirus Vaccine To Prevent the Next Pandemic

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2021 5:06

    A pan-coronavirus vaccine could be 'one vaccine to rule them all' and so far has shown strong results in mice, hamsters, monkeys, horses and even sharks.

    COVID, Quickly, Episode 8: The Pandemic's True Death Toll and the Big Lab-Leak Debate

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2021 5:27

    Today we bring you a new episode in our podcast series: COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks,  Scientific American ’s senior health editors  Tanya Lewis  and  Josh Fischman  catch you up on the essential developments in the pandemic: from vaccines to new variants and everything in between.

    Puppies Understand You Even at a Young Age, Most Adorable Study of the Year Confirms

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2021 4:25

    Researchers in the happiest lab in the world tested 375 pups and found they connected with people by eight weeks

    New 3-D-Printed Material Is Tough, Flexible--and Alive

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2021 5:23

    Made from microalgae and bacteria, the new substance can survive for three days without feeding. It could one day be used to build living garments, self-powered kitchen appliances or even window coverings that sequester carbon.

    Bats on Helium Reveal an Innate Sense of the Speed of Sound

    Play Episode Listen Later May 28, 2021 4:18

    A new experiment shows that bats are born with a fixed reference for the speed of sound—and living in lighter air can throw it off.

    The Dirty Secret behind Some of the World's Earliest Microscopes

    Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2021 3:03

    Dutch scientist Antonie van Leeuwenhoek made extraordinary observations of blood cells, sperm cells and bacteria with his microscopes. But it turns out the lens technology he used was quite ordinary.

    COVID, Quickly, Episode 7: The Coming Pandemic Grief Wave, and Mask Whiplash

    Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2021 7:03

    Today we bring you a new episode in our podcast series: COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks,  Scientific American ’s senior health editors  Tanya Lewis  and  Josh Fischman  catch you up on the essential developments in the pandemic: from vaccines to new variants and everything in between.

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