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Best podcasts about studies

Show all podcasts related to studies

Latest podcast episodes about studies

Portable Practical Pediatrics
Dr. M's Women and Children First Podcast #7 – Dr. William Parker, The “Macrobiome” and Human Health

Portable Practical Pediatrics

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 59:44


Dr. William Parker, Associate Professor of Surgery and Global Health at Duke University, will discuss the biome depletion theory and how our cleanliness is disrupting normal immune function. These processes can have profound downstream effects on maternal and child health. From the Duke Medical School: What is widely known as the “hygiene hypothesis” is more appropriately described as the biota alteration or biome depletion theory: Changes in symbiont composition in the ecosystem of the human body in Western culture has led to immune dysfunction and subsequent disease. We are working on several aspects of this theory. Our earlier studies probe the immunological differences between laboratory-raised and wild-raised animals as a means of assessing differences between humans with and without Western culture, respectively. Other studies probe the role of biome enrichment, in particular the addition of helminths, in the treatment of disease. Studies are ongoing in both humans and in animals, with particular attention to the role of biome depletion in cognitive dysfunction. We discuss the future of human health with a specific focus on our macrobiome friends, parasites, with whom we have co evolved. They are now missing and we are not better off because of it.   Please enjoy my conversation with Dr. William Parker, Dr. M

The Indigenous Approach
MACV-SOG: A Conversation with John Stryker Meyer (Part I)

The Indigenous Approach

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 43:20


*The original audio file uploaded had an issue that has now been corrected. Sorry for the inconvenience.*In this two-part series, Maj. Dan Lessard sits down with MACV-SOG veteran John Stryker Meyer, AKA "Tilt", for a conversation on his experiences as a Green Beret within SOG in Vietnam.For more information on the Studies and Observations Group and Meyer's experiences in Vietnam, check out his 2003 memoir titled "Across the Fence: The Secret War in Vietnam"

The Thomistic Institute
How Do We Know Essences? Sense Knowledge and Abstraction | Fr. James Brent, O.P.

The Thomistic Institute

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 47:33


This talk was given on June 26th, 2021 at the 10th Annual Aquinas Philosophy Workshop: Knowledge, Truth, and Wisdom in Aquinas. For information on upcoming Thomistic Institute events, please visit our website at www.thomisticinstitute.org. About the speaker: Fr. James Dominic Brent, O.P. was born and raised in Michigan. He pursued his undergraduate and graduate studies in Philosophy, and completed his doctorate in Philosophy at Saint Louis University on the epistemic status of Christian beliefs according to Saint Thomas Aquinas. He has articles in the Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy on Natural Theology, in the Oxford Handbook of Thomas Aquinas on “God's Knowledge and Will”, and on “Thomas Aquinas” in the Oxford Handbook of the Epistemology of Theology. He earned his STL from the Pontifical Faculty of the Immaculate Conception. He taught in the School of Philosophy at the Catholic University of America from 2010-2014, and spent the year of 2014-2015 doing full-time itinerant preaching on college campuses across the United States. Since then, he has been an Assistant Professor of Philosophy at the Dominican House of Studies.

The Savage Nation Podcast
NEW STUDIES ON SLEEP AND COVID

The Savage Nation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 61:08


In today's podcast Savage continues his COVID health discussion by taking up the topic of SLEEP: How it relates to overall health, how it affects covid outcomes, and how you can get more and better sleep. Sleep disruption harms the sympathetic nervous system, pituitary gland, and adrenal glands, and increases pro-inflammatory responses. Longterm it can lead to hyptertension, cardiovascular & weight issues, diabetes, and even colo-rectal cancer. A study of out China showed that sleep disruption before contracting covid increased hospitalization & mortality for those who later got covid. Savage offers advice on how to get better sleep, and points out that public health officials locking us up inside only made things worse. And this is because exposure to DAYLIGHT improves sleep by synchronizing the internal clock. Sunlight is needed for the body to create Vitamin D which is a key anti-inflammatory agent, and sunlight also has disinfectant properties. The podcast includes a great interview with renowned neurocscientist and sleep expert Dr. Kristen Willeumier.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Minimalist Vegan Podcast
Why Do People Hate Vegans?

The Minimalist Vegan Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 49:36


Studies show that vegans are viewed more negatively than atheists, immigrants, homosexuals, and asexuals. In fact, the only group viewed more negatively than vegans were drug addicts! Beyond the surveys, we've felt it too. Whether it's eating out with friends or meeting someone for the first time, veganism comes with an air of inconvenience, stigma and sometimes hate. Why is that? Why do so many people seem to dislike vegans? In this episode, we step outside of our vegan-friendly algorithms and face the harsh truth of how people feel about vegans and what that means for animal rights advocates. This episode is brought to you by Woron. Woron is a sustainable and ethical underwear & everyday essentials. They're a brand based out of Copenhagen & owned by two sisters – Arina and Anya Woron. Browse their full range at woronstore.com. Use discount code MINIMALISTVEGAN at checkout to get 15% off storewide. Not to be used in conjunction with any other offer. Looking for more? Submit your question or topic suggestion at https://theminimalistvegan.com/podcast/ Visit the show notes at https://theminimalistvegan.com/070/ Check out our new cooking show on YouTube https://bit.ly/36XRk6V Follow us on Instagram @theminimalistvegan Email us at info@theminimalistvegan.com

New Books in Gender Studies
Allyson Day, "The Political Economy of Stigma: HIV, Memoir, Medicine, and Crip Positionalities" (Ohio State UP, 2021)

New Books in Gender Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 61:47


In The Political Economy of Stigma: HIV, Memoir, Medicine, and Crip Positionalities (Ohio State UP, 2021), Ally Day offers a compelling critique of neoliberal medical practices in the US by coupling an analysis of HIV memoir with a critical examination of narrative medicine practice. Using insights from feminist disability studies and crip theory, Day argues that stories of illness and disability—such as HIV memoirs—operate within a political economy of stigma, which she defines as the formal and informal circulation of personal illness and disability narratives that benefits some while hindering others. On the one hand, this system decreases access to appropriate medical care for those with chronic conditions by producing narratives of personal illness that frame one's relationship to structural inequality as a result of personal failure. On the other hand, the political economy of stigma rewards those who procure such narratives and circulate them for public consumption. The political economy of stigma is theorized from three primary research sites: a reading group with women living with HIV, a reading group with AIDS service workers, and participant observation research and critical close reading of practices in narrative medicine. Ultimately, it is the women living with HIV who provide an alternative way to understand disability and illness narratives, a practice of differential reading that can challenge stigmatizing tropes and reconceptualize the creation, reception, and circulation of patient memoir. Dr. Ally Day is Associate Professor in Disability Studies at the University of Toledo. Sohini Chatterjee is a PhD Student in Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies at Western University, Canada. Her work has recently appeared in South Asian Popular Culture and Fat Studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/gender-studies

New Books in Medicine
Allyson Day, "The Political Economy of Stigma: HIV, Memoir, Medicine, and Crip Positionalities" (Ohio State UP, 2021)

New Books in Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 61:47


In The Political Economy of Stigma: HIV, Memoir, Medicine, and Crip Positionalities (Ohio State UP, 2021), Ally Day offers a compelling critique of neoliberal medical practices in the US by coupling an analysis of HIV memoir with a critical examination of narrative medicine practice. Using insights from feminist disability studies and crip theory, Day argues that stories of illness and disability—such as HIV memoirs—operate within a political economy of stigma, which she defines as the formal and informal circulation of personal illness and disability narratives that benefits some while hindering others. On the one hand, this system decreases access to appropriate medical care for those with chronic conditions by producing narratives of personal illness that frame one's relationship to structural inequality as a result of personal failure. On the other hand, the political economy of stigma rewards those who procure such narratives and circulate them for public consumption. The political economy of stigma is theorized from three primary research sites: a reading group with women living with HIV, a reading group with AIDS service workers, and participant observation research and critical close reading of practices in narrative medicine. Ultimately, it is the women living with HIV who provide an alternative way to understand disability and illness narratives, a practice of differential reading that can challenge stigmatizing tropes and reconceptualize the creation, reception, and circulation of patient memoir. Dr. Ally Day is Associate Professor in Disability Studies at the University of Toledo. Sohini Chatterjee is a PhD Student in Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies at Western University, Canada. Her work has recently appeared in South Asian Popular Culture and Fat Studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/medicine

New Books in Sociology
Allyson Day, "The Political Economy of Stigma: HIV, Memoir, Medicine, and Crip Positionalities" (Ohio State UP, 2021)

New Books in Sociology

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 61:47


In The Political Economy of Stigma: HIV, Memoir, Medicine, and Crip Positionalities (Ohio State UP, 2021), Ally Day offers a compelling critique of neoliberal medical practices in the US by coupling an analysis of HIV memoir with a critical examination of narrative medicine practice. Using insights from feminist disability studies and crip theory, Day argues that stories of illness and disability—such as HIV memoirs—operate within a political economy of stigma, which she defines as the formal and informal circulation of personal illness and disability narratives that benefits some while hindering others. On the one hand, this system decreases access to appropriate medical care for those with chronic conditions by producing narratives of personal illness that frame one's relationship to structural inequality as a result of personal failure. On the other hand, the political economy of stigma rewards those who procure such narratives and circulate them for public consumption. The political economy of stigma is theorized from three primary research sites: a reading group with women living with HIV, a reading group with AIDS service workers, and participant observation research and critical close reading of practices in narrative medicine. Ultimately, it is the women living with HIV who provide an alternative way to understand disability and illness narratives, a practice of differential reading that can challenge stigmatizing tropes and reconceptualize the creation, reception, and circulation of patient memoir. Dr. Ally Day is Associate Professor in Disability Studies at the University of Toledo. Sohini Chatterjee is a PhD Student in Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies at Western University, Canada. Her work has recently appeared in South Asian Popular Culture and Fat Studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/sociology

New Books Network
Allyson Day, "The Political Economy of Stigma: HIV, Memoir, Medicine, and Crip Positionalities" (Ohio State UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 61:47


In The Political Economy of Stigma: HIV, Memoir, Medicine, and Crip Positionalities (Ohio State UP, 2021), Ally Day offers a compelling critique of neoliberal medical practices in the US by coupling an analysis of HIV memoir with a critical examination of narrative medicine practice. Using insights from feminist disability studies and crip theory, Day argues that stories of illness and disability—such as HIV memoirs—operate within a political economy of stigma, which she defines as the formal and informal circulation of personal illness and disability narratives that benefits some while hindering others. On the one hand, this system decreases access to appropriate medical care for those with chronic conditions by producing narratives of personal illness that frame one's relationship to structural inequality as a result of personal failure. On the other hand, the political economy of stigma rewards those who procure such narratives and circulate them for public consumption. The political economy of stigma is theorized from three primary research sites: a reading group with women living with HIV, a reading group with AIDS service workers, and participant observation research and critical close reading of practices in narrative medicine. Ultimately, it is the women living with HIV who provide an alternative way to understand disability and illness narratives, a practice of differential reading that can challenge stigmatizing tropes and reconceptualize the creation, reception, and circulation of patient memoir. Dr. Ally Day is Associate Professor in Disability Studies at the University of Toledo. Sohini Chatterjee is a PhD Student in Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies at Western University, Canada. Her work has recently appeared in South Asian Popular Culture and Fat Studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Life to the Full: A Message to Christians
Episode 60: Taking a Closer Look at the ICOC Studies INTRO - Journeys in Deconstruction PART 1

Life to the Full: A Message to Christians

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 50:19


First Principles Series PDFIllumination Publishers New York City Church of Christ  Life to the Full Facebook PageLife to the Full Youtube PageLife to the Full Instagram Page 

StarDate Podcast
Moon and Jupiter

StarDate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 2:14


Jupiter leads the Moon across the sky tonight like a dog on a leash. And it's a dog with a big bite. The planet had a big influence on the formation of the other worlds of the solar system — perhaps even the Moon. Jupiter is heavier than all the other planets and moons in the solar system combined. That gives it a strong gravitational pull. And that's the key to its effect on other worlds. When the solar system was young, Jupiter probably moved closer to the Sun, then back out again. Its gravity may have cleared out much of the planet-making material closer to the Sun. Studies say Jupiter could have pushed many asteroids out of the asteroid belt and stirred up the ones that remained, keeping them from forming a planet. Jupiter also may have cleared out material in the region that was giving birth to Mars. That kept the planet small — about half the size of Earth. And a recent study said that, although it's unlikely, Jupiter could have helped create the Moon. It could have moved toward the Sun fairly quickly, pushing things around in the inner solar system. That could have caused a collision between Earth and another planet — perhaps one as big as the original Earth. The impact destroyed both planets. But the debris might have reassembled to form Earth and the Moon — part of the influence of a giant. Jupiter stands to the upper right of the Moon at nightfall, and looks like a brilliant star. Script by Damond Benningfield Support McDonald Observatory

PHM from Pittsburgh
Review of the NEW Well-Appearing Febrile Infants 8 to 60 Days Old Guideline

PHM from Pittsburgh

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 69:23


Course: Review of the New Well-Appearing Febrile Infants 8 to 60 Days Old Guideline Course Director: Tony R Tarchichi MD  - Associate Professor in Dept of Pediatrics at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine Course Director: Sanyukta Desai MD, MSc- Assistant Professor in Pediatrics at the University of Washington School of Medicine Course Director: Paul Aronson MD, MHS - Associate Professor of Pediatrics and of Emergency Medicine at the Yale School of Medicine Disclosures: None This Podcast series was created for Pediatric Hospitalists or those healthcare professionals who take care of hospitalized children.  This episode is Review of the New Well-Appearing Febrile Infants 8 to 60 Days Old Guideline. As always there is free CME credit of up to 1.25 AMA category 1 for listening to this podcast and going to the Univ of Pitt site. See the link below.  ______________________________________________________ Objectives: Upon completion of this activity, participants will be able to: Review the process of creating the AAP Evaluation and Management of Well-Appearing Febrile Infants 8 to 60 Days Old guidelines. Review the changes made to the guidelines. Review the specific differences in workup between the three age groups the guidelines has divided febrile neonates under 60 days of life into. ______________________________________________________ Released:  10/14/2021, Reviewed 10/14/2021, Expire: 10/14/2022 If you are new to the Internet-based Studies in Education and Research (ISER) website (which is how you will get your CME credit), you will first need to create an account: Step 1. Create an Account https://www.hsconnect.pitt.edu/HSC/home/create-account.do If you have used the ISER website in the past, you can click on the link below and then log onto in order to complete the evaluation for this training: Step 2. To access the test for CME credit: Coming soon! Accreditation Statement: The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of  (1.25)  AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Knowledge on the Deeper Side
Torah Studies 5782 - 2 - Lech Lecha (Lawless Leaders vs. Moral Mentors)

Knowledge on the Deeper Side

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 76:29


Lawless Leaders vs. Moral Mentors How Important Is Character to Being a Top Dog? With Rabbi Ari Sollish (Recorded live at the Intown Jewish Academy on October 13, 2021) When a leader's star begins to rise, people tend to scrutinize their character. But how important are their personal morals anyway? After all, the main thing is getting the job done, right? The lengthy narrative of Abraham's life story clues us in.

New Books in Law
A Conversation About Reproductive Health and Abortion Studies

New Books in Law

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 68:31


Welcome to The Academic Life! In this episode you'll hear about: The field of reproductive health studies The data on contraceptive access and effectiveness [even when used correctly] Why we need to trust women What happens when a pregnant person seeking an abortion is turned away The long-term outcomes for people who have had abortions The consequences for people denied abortions A discussion of the book The Turnaway Study: Ten Years, a Thousand Women, and the Consequences of Having or Being Denied an Abortion Today's book is: The Turnaway Study, which asks what happens when a person seeking an abortion is turned away. Dr. Diane Greene Foster and a team of scientists, psychologists, epidemiologists, demographers, nurses, physicians, economists, sociologists, and public health researchers conducted a ten-year study on the outcomes of a thousand pregnant people across America, studying both those who received abortions, and those who were turned away. Dr. Foster analyzes impacts on mental and physical health, careers, and romantic relationships, offering the first data-driven examination of the negative consequences for pregnant people who are denied abortions. Our guest is: Dr. Diana Greene Foster, a professor and demographer who uses quantitative models and analyses to evaluate the effectiveness of family planning policies and the effect of unwanted pregnancy on women's lives. She led the Turnaway Study in the US, and is collaborating with scientists on a Nepal Turnaway Study. Dr. Foster also worked on the evaluation of the California State family planning program, Family PACT, demonstrating the effectiveness of the program in reducing the incidence of unintended pregnancy and the effect of dispensing a one-year supply of contraception. Dr. Foster created a new methodology for estimating pregnancies averted based on a Markov model and a microsimulation to identify the cost-effectiveness of advance provision of emergency contraception. Our host is: Dr. Christina Gessler, co-producer of the Academic Life. She is a historian of women and gender. Listeners to this episode might be interested in: American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists advocacy webpage  The Turnaway Study: Ten Years, a Thousand Women, and the Consequences of Having or Being Denied an Abortion, by Diana Greene Foster Advancing New Studies in Reproductive Health You're Doing it Wrong: Mothering, Media, and Medical Expertise by Bethany L. Johnson and Margaret M. Quinlan A discussion of the book You're Doing it Wrong,  You are smart and capable, but you aren't an island and neither are we. We reach across our mentor network to bring you podcasts on everything from how to finish that project, to how to take care of your beautiful mind. Wish we'd bring on an expert about something? DM us on Twitter: The Academic Life @AcademicLifeNBN. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/law

New Books in Medicine
A Conversation About Reproductive Health and Abortion Studies

New Books in Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 68:31


Welcome to The Academic Life! In this episode you'll hear about: The field of reproductive health studies The data on contraceptive access and effectiveness [even when used correctly] Why we need to trust women What happens when a pregnant person seeking an abortion is turned away The long-term outcomes for people who have had abortions The consequences for people denied abortions A discussion of the book The Turnaway Study: Ten Years, a Thousand Women, and the Consequences of Having or Being Denied an Abortion Today's book is: The Turnaway Study, which asks what happens when a person seeking an abortion is turned away. Dr. Diane Greene Foster and a team of scientists, psychologists, epidemiologists, demographers, nurses, physicians, economists, sociologists, and public health researchers conducted a ten-year study on the outcomes of a thousand pregnant people across America, studying both those who received abortions, and those who were turned away. Dr. Foster analyzes impacts on mental and physical health, careers, and romantic relationships, offering the first data-driven examination of the negative consequences for pregnant people who are denied abortions. Our guest is: Dr. Diana Greene Foster, a professor and demographer who uses quantitative models and analyses to evaluate the effectiveness of family planning policies and the effect of unwanted pregnancy on women's lives. She led the Turnaway Study in the US, and is collaborating with scientists on a Nepal Turnaway Study. Dr. Foster also worked on the evaluation of the California State family planning program, Family PACT, demonstrating the effectiveness of the program in reducing the incidence of unintended pregnancy and the effect of dispensing a one-year supply of contraception. Dr. Foster created a new methodology for estimating pregnancies averted based on a Markov model and a microsimulation to identify the cost-effectiveness of advance provision of emergency contraception. Our host is: Dr. Christina Gessler, co-producer of the Academic Life. She is a historian of women and gender. Listeners to this episode might be interested in: American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists advocacy webpage  The Turnaway Study: Ten Years, a Thousand Women, and the Consequences of Having or Being Denied an Abortion, by Diana Greene Foster Advancing New Studies in Reproductive Health You're Doing it Wrong: Mothering, Media, and Medical Expertise by Bethany L. Johnson and Margaret M. Quinlan A discussion of the book You're Doing it Wrong,  You are smart and capable, but you aren't an island and neither are we. We reach across our mentor network to bring you podcasts on everything from how to finish that project, to how to take care of your beautiful mind. Wish we'd bring on an expert about something? DM us on Twitter: The Academic Life @AcademicLifeNBN. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/medicine

New Books in Sociology
A Conversation About Reproductive Health and Abortion Studies

New Books in Sociology

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 68:31


Welcome to The Academic Life! In this episode you'll hear about: The field of reproductive health studies The data on contraceptive access and effectiveness [even when used correctly] Why we need to trust women What happens when a pregnant person seeking an abortion is turned away The long-term outcomes for people who have had abortions The consequences for people denied abortions A discussion of the book The Turnaway Study: Ten Years, a Thousand Women, and the Consequences of Having or Being Denied an Abortion Today's book is: The Turnaway Study, which asks what happens when a person seeking an abortion is turned away. Dr. Diane Greene Foster and a team of scientists, psychologists, epidemiologists, demographers, nurses, physicians, economists, sociologists, and public health researchers conducted a ten-year study on the outcomes of a thousand pregnant people across America, studying both those who received abortions, and those who were turned away. Dr. Foster analyzes impacts on mental and physical health, careers, and romantic relationships, offering the first data-driven examination of the negative consequences for pregnant people who are denied abortions. Our guest is: Dr. Diana Greene Foster, a professor and demographer who uses quantitative models and analyses to evaluate the effectiveness of family planning policies and the effect of unwanted pregnancy on women's lives. She led the Turnaway Study in the US, and is collaborating with scientists on a Nepal Turnaway Study. Dr. Foster also worked on the evaluation of the California State family planning program, Family PACT, demonstrating the effectiveness of the program in reducing the incidence of unintended pregnancy and the effect of dispensing a one-year supply of contraception. Dr. Foster created a new methodology for estimating pregnancies averted based on a Markov model and a microsimulation to identify the cost-effectiveness of advance provision of emergency contraception. Our host is: Dr. Christina Gessler, co-producer of the Academic Life. She is a historian of women and gender. Listeners to this episode might be interested in: American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists advocacy webpage  The Turnaway Study: Ten Years, a Thousand Women, and the Consequences of Having or Being Denied an Abortion, by Diana Greene Foster Advancing New Studies in Reproductive Health You're Doing it Wrong: Mothering, Media, and Medical Expertise by Bethany L. Johnson and Margaret M. Quinlan A discussion of the book You're Doing it Wrong,  You are smart and capable, but you aren't an island and neither are we. We reach across our mentor network to bring you podcasts on everything from how to finish that project, to how to take care of your beautiful mind. Wish we'd bring on an expert about something? DM us on Twitter: The Academic Life @AcademicLifeNBN. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/sociology

New Books Network
A Conversation About Reproductive Health and Abortion Studies

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 68:31


Welcome to The Academic Life! In this episode you'll hear about: The field of reproductive health studies The data on contraceptive access and effectiveness [even when used correctly] Why we need to trust women What happens when a pregnant person seeking an abortion is turned away The long-term outcomes for people who have had abortions The consequences for people denied abortions A discussion of the book The Turnaway Study: Ten Years, a Thousand Women, and the Consequences of Having or Being Denied an Abortion Today's book is: The Turnaway Study, which asks what happens when a person seeking an abortion is turned away. Dr. Diane Greene Foster and a team of scientists, psychologists, epidemiologists, demographers, nurses, physicians, economists, sociologists, and public health researchers conducted a ten-year study on the outcomes of a thousand pregnant people across America, studying both those who received abortions, and those who were turned away. Dr. Foster analyzes impacts on mental and physical health, careers, and romantic relationships, offering the first data-driven examination of the negative consequences for pregnant people who are denied abortions. Our guest is: Dr. Diana Greene Foster, a professor and demographer who uses quantitative models and analyses to evaluate the effectiveness of family planning policies and the effect of unwanted pregnancy on women's lives. She led the Turnaway Study in the US, and is collaborating with scientists on a Nepal Turnaway Study. Dr. Foster also worked on the evaluation of the California State family planning program, Family PACT, demonstrating the effectiveness of the program in reducing the incidence of unintended pregnancy and the effect of dispensing a one-year supply of contraception. Dr. Foster created a new methodology for estimating pregnancies averted based on a Markov model and a microsimulation to identify the cost-effectiveness of advance provision of emergency contraception. Our host is: Dr. Christina Gessler, co-producer of the Academic Life. She is a historian of women and gender. Listeners to this episode might be interested in: American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists advocacy webpage  The Turnaway Study: Ten Years, a Thousand Women, and the Consequences of Having or Being Denied an Abortion, by Diana Greene Foster Advancing New Studies in Reproductive Health You're Doing it Wrong: Mothering, Media, and Medical Expertise by Bethany L. Johnson and Margaret M. Quinlan A discussion of the book You're Doing it Wrong,  You are smart and capable, but you aren't an island and neither are we. We reach across our mentor network to bring you podcasts on everything from how to finish that project, to how to take care of your beautiful mind. Wish we'd bring on an expert about something? DM us on Twitter: The Academic Life @AcademicLifeNBN. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Gender Studies
A Conversation About Reproductive Health and Abortion Studies

New Books in Gender Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 68:31


Welcome to The Academic Life! In this episode you'll hear about: The field of reproductive health studies The data on contraceptive access and effectiveness [even when used correctly] Why we need to trust women What happens when a pregnant person seeking an abortion is turned away The long-term outcomes for people who have had abortions The consequences for people denied abortions A discussion of the book The Turnaway Study: Ten Years, a Thousand Women, and the Consequences of Having or Being Denied an Abortion Today's book is: The Turnaway Study, which asks what happens when a person seeking an abortion is turned away. Dr. Diane Greene Foster and a team of scientists, psychologists, epidemiologists, demographers, nurses, physicians, economists, sociologists, and public health researchers conducted a ten-year study on the outcomes of a thousand pregnant people across America, studying both those who received abortions, and those who were turned away. Dr. Foster analyzes impacts on mental and physical health, careers, and romantic relationships, offering the first data-driven examination of the negative consequences for pregnant people who are denied abortions. Our guest is: Dr. Diana Greene Foster, a professor and demographer who uses quantitative models and analyses to evaluate the effectiveness of family planning policies and the effect of unwanted pregnancy on women's lives. She led the Turnaway Study in the US, and is collaborating with scientists on a Nepal Turnaway Study. Dr. Foster also worked on the evaluation of the California State family planning program, Family PACT, demonstrating the effectiveness of the program in reducing the incidence of unintended pregnancy and the effect of dispensing a one-year supply of contraception. Dr. Foster created a new methodology for estimating pregnancies averted based on a Markov model and a microsimulation to identify the cost-effectiveness of advance provision of emergency contraception. Our host is: Dr. Christina Gessler, co-producer of the Academic Life. She is a historian of women and gender. Listeners to this episode might be interested in: American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists advocacy webpage  The Turnaway Study: Ten Years, a Thousand Women, and the Consequences of Having or Being Denied an Abortion, by Diana Greene Foster Advancing New Studies in Reproductive Health You're Doing it Wrong: Mothering, Media, and Medical Expertise by Bethany L. Johnson and Margaret M. Quinlan A discussion of the book You're Doing it Wrong,  You are smart and capable, but you aren't an island and neither are we. We reach across our mentor network to bring you podcasts on everything from how to finish that project, to how to take care of your beautiful mind. Wish we'd bring on an expert about something? DM us on Twitter: The Academic Life @AcademicLifeNBN. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/gender-studies

CumQueens
Episode 90: Sperm St

CumQueens

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 40:49


For decades Women (people with uteruses) have been responsible for birth control, but recent studies show that as many as 80% of men (penis havers) would take "male birth control" if it was available. So why isn't there a decent male birth control option other than condoms and vasectomies? What's stopping modern science from creating a viable male birth control option. Turns out its more complicated than it seems. https://health.clevelandclinic.org/vasectomy-reversal-5-facts-men-need-to-know-2/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7MHOk7qVhYs https://www.webmd.com/sex/birth-control/male-contraceptives https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/11/03/500549503/male-birth-control-study-killed-after-men-complain-about-side-effects https://www.healthline.com/health/birth-control/male-birth-control-options#outlook https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/treatments/4423-vasectomy-sterilization https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/jun/05/male-birth-control-step-up-responsibility https://thepolypost.com/opinion/2021/09/14/men-want-to-control-womens-bodies-because-they-are-scared-of-male-birth-control/ https://health.clevelandclinic.org/vasectomy-reversal-5-facts-men-need-to-know-2/ https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/treatments/4423-vasectomy-sterilization

Calvary Baptist Church - Colonial Heights, VA
Studies in the Minor Prophets; Amos - Crimes in the Countryside

Calvary Baptist Church - Colonial Heights, VA

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 37:59


Wednesday Bible Study on October 13, 2021

Absolute Trust Talk
074: Art Therapy and Dementia

Absolute Trust Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 31:12


Do you have a spouse or loved one who has dementia? Hearing them say “I love you” or share a memory is something that every caregiver hopes for. And in those rare instances, it truly gives a renewed sense of purpose in life. Unfortunately, often, after being diagnosed with dementia, patients are prescribed drugs that, in some cases, cause depression or suppress who they are. But what if there was a way to reduce the medications and boost the mental well-being of the person with dementia and the spouse or caregiver? Interestingly enough, evidence shows that art plays a role in improving neural health. Art therapy is being taught as an alternative approach to dementia cases, providing an opportunity for patients to boost their mood and change their behavior without diminishing their quality of life. In this episode, Kirsten sits down with the incredible Angel Duncan. Angel is a mental health, art therapist, and research clinician specializing in therapeutic program developments for people with mental health, developmental, intellectual, cognitive, and memory disorders. Angel has an extensive background in counseling psychology, life development, and Alzheimer's disease phase 1b, 2, and 3 clinical research trials. She works globally with leading organizations on brain health initiatives and is a widely published author and speaker. During their discussion, Kirsten and Angel dive into the science behind art therapy, explaining how and why it works. Duncan also shares countless examples of patients who practice art therapy demonstrating the behavioral changes and how they reconnect with their spouses again or learn to engage with their caregivers. If dementia or mental health issues have impacted your life or the life of someone you know, this episode is for you. Tune in now for more on the benefits of art therapy and why Angel Duncan has spent her career advocating for this life-changing form of treatment. Big Three from Episode #074: Research shows that by engaging in art, which taps into certain regions of the brain, those with dementia are also getting neural activation and productivity. Ultimately, this leads to a shift in mood and behavior. Art Therapy is found to be helpful for all forms of dementia and, really, all types of mental health issues. Just because someone has dementia or another cognitive issue, doesn't mean their creativity goes away. Case studies and research demonstrate exactly how art therapy brings those with dementia out of their box, helping them reconnect with the outside world. Time-stamped Show Notes: 3:08 Long-term memory is returning for dementia patients through the process of Art Therapy. Listen now to hear Angel Duncan share the benefits of staying artistically creative for those suffering from neurological diseases.  5:43 Studies prove that art truly does work for people who have dementia. Start listening now for more on how art is helping neurological disease.  8:05 Relationships between caregivers, whether family or professional, and dementia-infected patients are becoming nurtured with empathy because of art therapy.  10:13 More often than not, psychotropic drugs are the go-to fix for dementia patients, causing diminished behavior. Angel answers how art could be used as an alternative to psychotropic drugs.  14:21 Angel Duncan has advocated for art therapy for almost 20 years. Listen to her journey and the life-changing work that has come from working with like-minded physicians.  17:43 Press play here to learn what different creative mediums are included in art therapy treatments. 21:11 Ask Kirsten Segment: Kirsten answers an email from Maria in Danville looking for advice on how to encourage her mother, who has dementia, to do an estate plan. If you have a question that you'd like to have answered by Kirsten, send an email to info@absolutetrustcounsel.com. 23:56 Listen to how Angel helped co-create Art in Mind for dementia patients at the Yale Art Gallery.  28:08 Angel Duncan's Art Therapy Workshop is not just for dementia patients but also for spouses and caregivers. Listen in as Angel shares stories and feedback from those who have participated in the workshop. 30:06 Interested in learning more about art therapy? You don't want to miss out on this special event -The 12th annual Expressive Therapy Summit is hosting Neurosciences and Aging Symposium and Track Series for aging populations. Listen here for more details on the event.  32:18 Live Q&A: Do you find art therapy to be helpful in all forms of dementia? Resources/Links in this Episode: Cognitive Dynamics Lorenzo's House About Angel Duncan – How to get in touch about programs Expressive Therapy Summit [Ad] Do you need help planning for things like incapacity? The Absolute Trust Counsel team is here to help. If you become incapacitated without a plan, you don't have time to wait for court rulings, nor do you want to waste your money on that. You need support right away. At Absolute Trust Counsel, we can help put a plan in place, so you and your family are covered – no matter what the situation.  Visit our calendar to pick a date and time that works best for you, and let's get started!

New Books Network
Elizabeth Boyle, "History and Salvation in Medieval Ireland" (Routledge, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 48:19


In History and Salvation in Medieval Ireland, Dr. Elizabeth Boyle closely examines medieval Irish ideas regarding salvation history from 700 to 1200 CE through both Latin and vernacular texts for both ecclesiastical and secular audiences. Incorporating analysis from previously untranslated texts, her book delves into the use of narratives and figures from Hebrew Scriptures and the weaving of elements from the Hebrew and Irish texts into each other. The medieval Irish concept of salvation history was instrumental in writers' and readers' perception of where Ireland was situated within history and the world. Boyle illustrates how understanding this concept is important for scholars of this period, as it had a profound effect on Ireland politically, socially, culturally, and religiously. History and Salvation in Medieval Ireland was published by Routledge in 2021 as a part of their Studies in Early Medieval Britain and Ireland. Dr. Elizabeth Boyle is a lecturer in the Department of Early Irish at Maynooth University and is the author of numerous works, including the forthcoming Fierce Appetites: My Year of Untamed Thinking (Penguin, 2022). Danica Ramsey-Brimberg is a multidisciplinary researcher, who recently finished her PhD in History at the University of Liverpool. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in History
Elizabeth Boyle, "History and Salvation in Medieval Ireland" (Routledge, 2020)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 48:19


In History and Salvation in Medieval Ireland, Dr. Elizabeth Boyle closely examines medieval Irish ideas regarding salvation history from 700 to 1200 CE through both Latin and vernacular texts for both ecclesiastical and secular audiences. Incorporating analysis from previously untranslated texts, her book delves into the use of narratives and figures from Hebrew Scriptures and the weaving of elements from the Hebrew and Irish texts into each other. The medieval Irish concept of salvation history was instrumental in writers' and readers' perception of where Ireland was situated within history and the world. Boyle illustrates how understanding this concept is important for scholars of this period, as it had a profound effect on Ireland politically, socially, culturally, and religiously. History and Salvation in Medieval Ireland was published by Routledge in 2021 as a part of their Studies in Early Medieval Britain and Ireland. Dr. Elizabeth Boyle is a lecturer in the Department of Early Irish at Maynooth University and is the author of numerous works, including the forthcoming Fierce Appetites: My Year of Untamed Thinking (Penguin, 2022). Danica Ramsey-Brimberg is a multidisciplinary researcher, who recently finished her PhD in History at the University of Liverpool. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

Second Chance
Ep 60: Student Drug Dealer Given A Second Chance - Sean Lisgo

Second Chance

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 25:29


This episode is in collaboration with the Longford Trust who provide financial and mentoring support to young serving and ex-prisoners. The Longford scholarship assists in giving them a second chance to pursue a degree at university.Up until now all of my guest interviews have been recorded remotely thanks to Covid, but on this occasion I was able to meet Sean in person.After gaining qualifications to earn his place at the University of Leeds, Sean's life became problematic when he couldn't secure funding to cover his tuition fees. Selling drugs was a quick solution to this problem and Sean was arrested in his first week at University and sentenced to prison. During his time in prison and after his release Sean was determined to pursue his goal of studying mechanical engineering.The Longford Scholarship has given him a Second Chance, helping him secure a place and graduate from Teesside UniversityLongford Trust: https://www.longfordtrust.org/scholarships/the-longford-scholarships/

Let go, Lean In
Let Go, Lean In an Interview with Terri Fullerton, Writer

Let go, Lean In

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 29:41


Terri Fullerton is a deep thinker, Master's student, researcher and writer, in addition to being my friend. In our conversation Terri shares about her writing group, Freedom Road Global Writers' Group, and her participation in Your One Degree, a program to help discern your next steps. We discuss discernment, Women's Studies and the New Testament and examples of what it means to Terri to lead herself well.

First Name Basis Podcast
4:8 Can We Talk About White Privilege?

First Name Basis Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 31:51


But really, can we? I know y'all are seeing it too. You've shared with me that once you know what to look for you've started to see it all over the place. Okay so now you know it's there but what do you do about it?    In this episode we break down three super cringey examples of white privilege that I've seen in the last week. Tune in to hear how those of you who hold white privilege can respond in these racist situations.    Race Talk Roadmap   Our Race Talk Roadmap is the tool you need to begin conversations about race and racism with your children! We have a list of three tips for parents of older children and a list of three tips for parents of younger children. Visit firstnamebasis.org/racetalk to get the Race Talk Roadmap sent straight to your inbox.   Ally Elementary  Parents have been asking for a practical, interactive way to implement the anti-racist strategies that I lay out in the First Name Basis Podcast. So this October we are launching “Ally Elementary: Anti-Racist Education For Families."    During this five-week program parents will work together with their children to create a culture of anti-racism in their home, and I will be there to guide them every step of the way. We will use hands-on activities to teach our children about everything from the untold story of how race was created to how they can disrupt racism in their everyday lives. I am so excited to watch the families in our community make a meaningful transformation and improve their communities through anti-racist action. Click here to the waitlist!   Articles, Studies, & Podcasts Referenced In The Episode    First Name Basis, Season 2 Episode 14: What Is Privilege And What Do I Do With It?  This episode will help give you the background information you need to understand privilege. I suggest listening to this episode before you dive into our conversation about white privilege.    First Name Basis, Season 3 Episode 21: How To Teach Media Literacy To Our Children with Tori Nelson of Kid Nuz    Ad Fontes Media: Interactive Media Bias Chart    James Johnson is an award winning Tlingit artist and wood carver, check out his work here!    “Don't Touch My Hair” children's book by Sharee Miller   First Name Basis Bookshop  Song Credit: “Sleeper” by Steve Adams” and “Dive Down” by VYEN 

Knowledge on the Deeper Side
Torah Studies 5781 - 47 - Noach (Torah and Science: Best of Friends)

Knowledge on the Deeper Side

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 77:28


Torah and Science: Best of Friends The Synthesis Runs a Lot Deeper Than You Think. Just Do it Right With Rabbi Ari Sollish (Recorded live at the Intown Jewish Academy on September 19, 2021) Many have grappled with the apparently irreconcilable differences between religion and science; “Religion is the domain of faith; science, that of reason,” is a common attitude. A new read of when G-d disrupts a grand feat of modern engineering teaches a refreshing approach.

Assyrian Podcast
Reverend Qashisha John Badal Piro

Assyrian Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 118:06


Ep. 155 - ܩܫܝܼܫܐ ܝܘܿܚܢܢ ܒܕܠ ܦܝܼܪܘܿ - Reverend Qashisha John Badal Piro was born on February 7, 1973 in Turlock, California to his father Reverend Cor-Bishop Badal S. Piro, and Bereshwa Piro. He completed both his Bachelors of Science and Masters of Science degrees in Physiology from the University of California, Davis. In 2004, he obtained his Doctorate of Pharmacy from the University of California, San Francisco. Fr. John is a long-time practicing pharmacist, which allows him the opportunity to further serve the community which he finds the most rewarding aspect of his professional career. Ordained a priest in 2017, He is currently serving St. Mary's Mission in Sacramento, California. He recently completed his Masters in Theology from the Antiochian House of Studies.    Support for this week's episode of The Assyrian Podcast is brought to you by Tony Kalogerakos and the Injury Lawyers of Illinois and New York. If you know anyone that has been in a serious accident, please reach out to Tony Kalogerakos. Tony has been recognized as a Top 40 lawyer, and a Rising Star by Super Lawyers Publication and has obtained multiple multi-million-dollar awards. Tony can be reached at InjuryRights.com or 847-982-9516.    This episode is sponsored by The Oushana Partners - a husband and wife real estate team. Are you considering purchasing or selling a home in Arizona or California? John and Reata are available to help make your next real estate decision into a seamless transaction. Contact the Oushana's at 209-968-9519. Get to know them a bit more by checking out their website TheOushanaPartners.com

Apollos Watered
Deep Conversation w/Philip Jenkins: Is Secularization Killing Faith?

Apollos Watered

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 76:27


Travis has a conversation with well-known social critic Philip Jenkins. Jenkins is an award-winning author and scholar. Travis & Philip discuss Dr. Jenkins's book, Fertility and Faith, and how secularization may be affecting the institutional practice of religion around the world. Dr. Philip Jenkins has a doctorate from Cambridge in history, taught at Penn State University and at Baylor University's Institute for Studies of Religion. He is a well-known commentator on religion, past and present, having written about 30 books including The Next Christendom, The New Faces of Christianity: Believing the Bible in the Global South and God's Continent: Christianity, Islam and Europe's Religious Crisis, The Lost History of Christianity, Jesus Wars, just to name a few. He has published articles and op-ed pieces in several media outlets across the U.S. and Europe, including the Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, Boston Globe, New Republic, Foreign Policy, First Things, and Christian Century. The Economist has called him “one of America's best scholars of religion.” He has been interviewed on a number of television and radio shows, including CNN documentaries and news specials covering a variety of topics, such as global Christianity, sexual abuse crisis in the Catholic Church, as well as serial murder and aspects of violent crime. Jenkins is much heard on talk radio, including multiple appearances on NPR's All Things Considered, and on various BBC and RTE programs. In North America, he has been a guest on widely syndicated radio programs such as NPR's Fresh Air, as well as the nationally broadcast Canadian shows Tapestry and Ideas. His influence goes beyond North America to newspapers and radio stations in the United Kingdom, Ireland, Canada, Australia, Denmark, Sweden, the Netherlands, and Brazil. Now, in the highlight of his life ;-), he is on Apollos Watered! Travis & Phil discuss tacos, sushi, the 80's movie Matewan, and the possible correlation between secularization, religious institutions, birth rates, and gender roles in society. It's not just a European thing, but a global thing. It's truly a deep and heady conversation that helps us wrestle with our world and our place in it. You can get Fertility and Faith https://www.amazon.com/Fertility-Faith-Demographic-Revolution-Transformation/dp/148131131X/ref=sr_1_7?dchild=1&keywords=Philip+Jenkins&qid=1634080618&sr=8-7 (here)

Self Love Sit Downs
How to start & the benefits of Journaling

Self Love Sit Downs

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 36:35


Have you ever sat down to start journaling but had a difficult time starting? Or have you ever heard of the benefits journaling can have on your day-to-day actions? Studies have shown an increase in self-esteem and problem-solving abilities with the simple task of taking a pen to paper. Okay, so you are ready to start journaling but quickly realize that you don't have the slightest idea where to start. In this episode, Kelsey and Armando talk about the benefits, tips, and journal prompts to help you transition to living a better, more fruitful mental health life. 5:45- Benefits of journaling17:20- Tips to start journaling30:35- Journal prompts Don't forget to hit that Subscribe button and leave a review. As always, thanks for sharing your time with us and listening to this episode of Self Love Sit Downs. God Bless. Contact us at selflovesitdowns@gmail.comInstagram:Kelsey @kelsey_teddiArmando @mandofarias05 Facebook Groups:Kelsey Teddi Fitness As always, Self Love Starts with YOU!Journaling Prompts:What is on my mind?How do I feel today?What is my heart telling me today?What in my day triggered anxiety?What is the likelihood of my anxious thoughts telling me?What are the challenges I have overcome in my past?What's a time I felt anxious and it worked out fine?What can I do for myself to be a better version of myself?What do I need today?Describe the best part of your day.List three people you are grateful for and why.What brought you joy today?What are three qualities you like about yourself?Describe a memory that makes you happy.What did you accomplish today?What is one thing you are proud of overcoming recently?What were a low of my day and 2 highs of my day?What am I looking forward to and why?What are my intentions for today?I am ready to welcome..I am feeling..What did life teach me today?What is one way I would like to grow in this season?What am I doing well in life?What could I do to improve in life currently?What do I need to forgive myself for in this season?What excuses are currently holding me back from my goals?What are my life bucket list items?If I could go back and change one thing, what would that be?What type of person do I want to be in 3 years?

Toddler Purgatory
Your Sleep Questions Answered (with guest Becca Campbell of Little Z Sleep)

Toddler Purgatory

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 52:15


Studies indicate that up to 50% of children experience a sleep problem. When babies and kids don't sleep moms don't sleep either– so this week we're talking to a sleep expert! Becca Campbell is the founder and creator of Little Z's® Sleep Consulting , where parents can easily get sleep help through online courses for children ages 0-5 years old. Becca's courses and her Little Z's Sleep Podcast have helped thousands of families around the world make sleep a thing. In this episode Becca brings the knowledge on the four types of newborns how sleep schedules should change a little bit every month during your child's first year of life the right age to drop the naps for good when kids can successfully share a room (and sleep at night) what "overtired" looks like in a toddler what to do when your kid naps at daycare, and then isn't tired at bedtime Doing the extra work around sleep is worth it in the long run– and Becca is full of terrific advice. Special thanks to our sponsors: Calm is the # 1 mental wellness app that gives you the tools to improve the way you feel. Go to calm.com/toddler to get 40% off a CalmPremium Subscription! Choose Lovevery and take the guesswork out of your child's play! Get free shipping when you sign up to receive your play kits at lovevery.com/laughing. Home Chef meals come right to your door with fresh, perfectly pre-portioned ingredients and an easy-to-follow recipe card. For a limited time, go to homechef.com/laughing for $90 off your first month. That's a value of 10 free meals!  Betterhelp Start taking charge of your mental health– no matter where you live! Go to betterhelp.com/laughing to get 10% off your first month of counseling. dosist health offers an advanced assortment of plant-based CBD+ products designed to help address specific needs like, sleep, calm and relief. Use promo code TODDLER20 for 20% off your purchase through 11/30/21 at dosisthealth.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Vegan Gym Podcast
How Much Protein Can You Absorb? (12 Studies Analyzed)

The Vegan Gym Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 17:49


There are many common “broscience” myths in the fitness industry that have zero scientific merit. One of the most well-known bodybuilding myths is the idea that your body can only absorb a limited amount of protein from a single meal. Well, the truth is that your body can absorb nearly an unlimited amount of protein into the bloodstream. The more accurate question (that actually does have scientific merit) is, “how much absorbed protein can your body use from a single meal to build muscle?” Or in more technical terms, “what amount of protein maximally stimulates the postabsorptive rates of myofibrillar muscle protein synthesis?” That's the question we'll answer in this episode.Support the show (https://www.thevegangym.com/)

The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee
Top 12 Superfoods For Fighting Breast Cancer | Dr. Kristi Funk

The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 48:03


Studies show certain foods can substantially lower the risk of breast cancer. Some of them may already be in your kitchen!   Dr. Kristi Funk, board-certified breast cancer surgeon and best-selling author, reveals the 12 best superfoods for fighting breast cancer as she joins "The Weight Loss Champion" Chuck Carroll on The Exam Room™ podcast.   The scientifically proven healthy dozen includes everything from popular fruits and vegetables to the most common spices.   This is the second of four special episodes dedicated to breast cancer.   Dr. Funk is helping to lead the Let's Beat Breast Cancer campaign with the Physicians Committee. She encourages women to take the four-week LBBC challenge to improve their health and reduce their risk for breast cancer.   — — — Let's Beat Breast Cancer 4-Week Challenge https://letsbeatbreastcancer.org — — — BREASTS: The Owner's Manual https://amzn.to/3mmCP3h — — — Dr. Kristi Funk Summit: https://bit.ly/CncrKckng21 Website: https://pinklotus.com IG: @drkristifunk Twitter: @drkristifunk Facebook: https://bit.ly/DrFunkFB — — — Chuck Carroll IG: @ChuckCarrollWLC Twitter: @ChuckCarrollWLC Facebook: http://wghtloss.cc/ChuckFacebook — — — Barnard Medical Center Appointments https://bit.ly/BMCtelemed 202-527-7500 — — — Share the Show Please subscribe and give the show a 5-star rating on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or many other podcast providers. Don't forget to share it with a friend for inspiration!

Columbia International University's Podcast
10/12/2021-Michael Bulware-Purity In Your 20's

Columbia International University's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021


Michael Bulware offers his testimony of staying sexually pure with his girlfriend before they were married and challenges college students to do the same. Scripture:

Business Matters
Nobel economics prize awarded for real-life studies

Business Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 53:22


This year's Nobel prize for economics has been shared by three recipients. David Card, Joshua Angrist and Guido Imbens were awarded the prize for their use of "natural experiments" to understand how economic policy and other events connect. Professor Card, of UC Berkeley, tells us about his work on the minimum wage. Also in the programme, with energy prices rising across the US and Europe, we ask David Shepherd, energy editor at the Financial Times to explain what's been happening. And the President of the Environmental Defense Fund, Fred Krupp talks us through methane emission cuts and the difference they can make to climate change . We're joined throughout the programme by Karen Lema, Reuters Bureau Chief for the Philippines and Andy Uhler, Marketplace reporter in Austin Texas. (Picture: The Nobel economics prize is announced. Picture credit: Reuters.)

CCO Infectious Disease Podcast
Key HIV Studies Influencing My Practice Following IDWeek 2021 – Audio Recap

CCO Infectious Disease Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 41:37


In this episode, Darcy Wooten, MD, discusses new HIV data from IDWeek 2021, including:A rapid test-and-treat program to start DTG/3TC in patients newly diagnosed with HIV (STAT)Efficacy when switching from 3-drug to 4-drug TAF-based regimens to DTG/3TC (TANGO)Virologic outcomes with 2-drug vs 3-drug ART regimens (Trio Health HIV Network Study)Metabolic complications in treatment-naive patients (Study 1489 and Study 1490)Resistance analysis of an investigational agent, lenacapavir (CALIBRATE)The Positive Perspectives Survey to evaluate the U=U Educational Campaign in North American patientsPresenter:Darcy Wooten, MDAssociate Professor of MedicineDivision of Infectious Diseases and Global Public HealthDepartment of MedicineUniversity of California, San DiegoSan Diego, CaliforniaLink to full program:https://bit.ly/3BCHF2E

World Business Report
Nobel economics prize awarded for real-life studies

World Business Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 26:28


This year's Nobel prize for economics has been shared by three recipients. David Card, Joshua Angrist and Guido Imbens were awarded the prize for their use of "natural experiments" to understand how economic policy and other events connect. Professor Card, of UC Berkeley, tells us about his work. Also in the programme, with high energy prices leading to the suspension of steel production in parts of Europe, we ask Portuguese Member of the European Parliament, Pedro Marques, what governments can do to help deal with the situation. The BBC's Vivienne Nunis reports on the economic importance of donkeys to sub-Saharan Africa. Plus, we hear from Prince Charles, heir to the British throne, about whether business is doing enough to tackle climate change. Today's edition is presented by Rob Young, and produced by Nisha Patel and Benjie Guy. (Picture: The Nobel economics prize is announced. Picture credit: Reuters.)

Dr. John Barnett on SermonAudio
FTGC-19d - Do You Want To Start Personal Life Change Devotional Studies In The Book O

Dr. John Barnett on SermonAudio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 29:00


A new MP3 sermon from DTBM, International is now available on SermonAudio with the following details: Title: FTGC-19d - Do You Want To Start Personal Life Change Devotional Studies In The Book O Subtitle: 52 Greatest Chapters Of The Bi Speaker: Dr. John Barnett Broadcaster: DTBM, International Event: Sunday Service Date: 10/11/2021 Length: 29 min.

Conversations for Yoga Teachers
Rebecca Pacheco, Author, Still Life (EP.152)

Conversations for Yoga Teachers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 72:10


Join me for a wonderful look into the latest book by author Rebecca Pacheco, as she explores themes of meditation and mindfulness in her latest book, Still Life. Rebecca is the author of “Do Your Om Thing” (Harper Collins, 2015) and skillfully presents the reader with an instruction guide to learning this time-tested tradition, while weaving personal stories into the narrative. Rebecca's writing style feels like the friend you need right now to listen and guide you through stressful times and also at the same time, through showing her own vulnerability, encourages you to be bold in showing your's as well.    You can get Rebecca's book anywhere books are sold and find her on Instagram @omgal.   Rebecca Pacheco is the author of two books: Still Life: The Myths and Magic of Mindful Living, published by HarperCollins in August 2021 and Do Your Om Thing (2015), which was named one of the “top ten yoga and meditation books every yogi needs” by Yoga Journal and is used in teacher training programs across the United States. She has more than 20 years of experience practicing and teaching yoga and meditation and has appeared on NPR and The CBC and been featured in Forbes, The Huffington Post, Reuters, and more. She frequently contributes to the Boston Globe on a range of mind-body topics and is a graduate of the University of Richmond, where she studied English Literature and Women's Studies. She lives in Boston with her family.

Cup Of Nurses
CON EP 69: What is Electromagnetic Field & its Harmful Effects

Cup Of Nurses

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 46:14


Electric and magnetic fields are invisible areas of energy (also called radiation) that are produced by electricity, which is the movement of electrons, or current, through a wire. Our power lines, cellphones, microwaves, Wi-Fi routers, computers, and other appliances send out a stream of these invisible energy waves. Join us as we delve into electromagnetic fields & their harmful effects on the human body and the current guidelines for EMF.   Cup of Nurses: https://fanlink.to/CONsite Frontline Warriors: https://fanlink.to/FWsite Youtube https://fanlink.to/CONYT Apple https://fanlink.to/Applepodcast Spotify https://fanlink.to/Spotifypodcast Cup of Nurses Store https://fanlink.to/CONshop Frontline Warriors store https://fanlink.to/FWshop Interested in Travel Nursing? https://fanlink.to/TravelNurseNow Free Travel Nursing Guide  https://fanlink.to/Travelnursingchecklist Nclex Guide https://fanlink.to/NCLEXguide Cup of Nurses FB Group https://www.facebook.com/groups/cupofnurses Frontline Warriors FB group https://fanlink.to/FWFBgroup   0:00 Cup of Nurses Introduction 1:56 Episode Introduction 2:43 What are electric and magnetic fields? 4:28 Electric Field 4:55 Magnetic Field 10:58 Ionizing Radiation 15:25 Studies linking EMF to damage 20:28 Random facts from the internet potentially linking EMFs to disease

Historically Thinking: Conversations about historical knowledge and how we achieve it

In the last days of 1358, thousands of French villagers across northern France revolted against a faltering regime, from Normandy in the west, to Picardy and Champagne in the east. Castles and manor houses were burned and looted, noblemen and the families were assaulted, murdered, and possibly raped. Enraged nobles counterattacked, executing rebels, or those they believed to be rebels, and burning whole villages. This was the Jacquerie, taking its name from “Jacques Bonhomme”, the sobriquet given to its participants. It was one of the many calamitous events of that decade, which had begun with the Black Death in 1348. But what is its story? Why did the Jacquerie arise? Who were they? Why did this revolt so quickly end? And were there any lasting effects? With me to describe the story of the Jacquerie is Justine Firnhaber-Baker, Senior Lecturer at the University of St. Andrew's, and author of The Jacquerie of 1358: A French Peasant's Revolt. A former fellow of All Souls Oxford, she is also a general editor of The Medieval Journal, and editor in chief of St. Andrew's Studies in French History and Culture.

High Intensity Health Radio with Mike Mutzel, MS
Your Mitochondria Have Antiviral Properties: Where's the Exercise Mandate

High Intensity Health Radio with Mike Mutzel, MS

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 18:08


Scientists recently uncovered various ways mitochondria support immune health via anti-viral properties. We discuss this research and why health experts should be emphasizing exercise and fasting as strategies to improve mitochondrial, and thus immune, health. Support Your Fast with Berberine HCL + Lipoic Acid and Biotin: https://bit.ly/berberine-biotin-ala-stack Use code podcast at checkout to save Link to research, images and video: https://bit.ly/3FwQopn Time Stamps: 0:00 Intro 0:22 Mitochondria and Immune Health 00:27 Exercise, Fasting and Mitochondrial Health 00:56 Mitochondria and Immunity: novel insights 03:24 Mitochondria in metabolism and energy production 04:27 Mitochondria have antiviral properties 05:45 Staying safe but eating junk and not exercising 06:51 Overview of Studies 07:59 Metformin and Berberine 09:03 Exercise reduces risk of death

Sermons – Calvary Chapel At The Cross

The Holy Spirit as Umpire ——– CONNECT WITH US FURTHER ——– FACEBOOK: https://facebook.com/CCAtTheCross TWITTER: https://twitter.com/CCAtTheCross PODCAST: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/calvary-chapel-at-cross-sermons/id1033643190?mt=2 FREE WORSHIP MUSIC: https://AtTheCross.org/worship-music/ GIVING ONLINE: https://AtTheCross.org/giving/ The post The Holy Spirit as Umpire appeared first on Calvary Chapel At The Cross.

The Slavic Connexion
"Frozen by the Thaw": The Soviet Masculinity Crisis of the Long Sixties with Marko Dumančić

The Slavic Connexion

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 42:32


On this episode, Marko Dumančić joins Lera and Cullan to talk about his recently published monograph entitled Men Out of Focus: The Soviet Masculinity Crisis in the Long Sixties wherein he unpacks the changing conceptions of men in post-Stalinist society by taking a deeper look at Soviet films made at the time. This is a fun conversation, riddled with film talk. We hope you enjoy! ABOUT THE GUEST https://cseees.unc.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/282/2018/10/fullsizeoutput_d03.jpeg Marko Dumančić is an associate professor at Western Kentucky University's History Department. He works on a range of topics involving gender and sexual identity in the Soviet Union during the Cold War and in former Yugoslavia during the 1980s and 1990s. His first monograph, Men out of Focus: The Soviet Masculinity Crisis in the Long Sixties, examines the causes undergirding changing conceptions of masculinity in post-Stalinist society. His current research looks at the concept of genocidal masculinities in Bosnia during the 1990s and seeks to determine the motivations of soldiers who committed wartime human rights abuses. His work has appeared in Journal of Cold War Studies, Cold War History, Studies in Russian and Soviet Cinema, and The Cambridge History of Communism. You can find Men Out of Focus here (https://www.amazon.com/Dumancic-Men-Focus-Marko-Duman%C4%8Di%C4%87/dp/1487505256/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=men+out+of+focus&qid=1633818233&sr=8-1). https://mail.google.com/mail/u/1?ui=2&ik=7aed11d76b&attid=0.0.1&permmsgid=msg-f:1710259909750369228&th=17bc10539a432bcc&view=fimg&sz=s0-l75-ft&attbid=ANGjdJ9DZ0Rg0n1tFqBOc6RIaSotw-x0zPMJD_cYgVv1_EdhP6GIyvTH_6EN9GPHwC3VfNFXRhLZEpMumZTG-sVmQRg2-DWM7Fj_4fgOb-f4-8epLnCQMaV0ULD7zBw&disp=emb PRODUCER'S NOTE: This episode was recorded on June 15th, 2021 via Zoom. To reach us via email, send a message to slavxradio@utexas.edu if you have questions, suggestions, or would like to be a guest on the show! CREDITS Co-Producer: Lera Toropin (@earlportion) Co-Producer: Cullan Bendig (@cullanwithana) Associate Producer: Zach Johnson Assistant Producer: Sergio Glajar Assistant Producer: Misha Simanovskyy Associate Producer/Administrator: Kathryn Yegorov-Crate Executive Assistant: Katherine Birch Recording, Editing, and Sound Design: Michelle Daniel Music Producer: Charlie Harper (Connect: facebook.com/charlie.harper.1485 Instagram: @charlieharpermusic) www.charlieharpermusic.com (Main Theme by Charlie Harper and additional background music by Charlie Harper, Ketsa, Scott Holmes) Additional sound effects and clips from movies referenced in the episode come from YouTube. Executive Producer & Creator: Michelle Daniel (Connect: facebook.com/mdanielgeraci Instagram: @michelledaniel86) www.msdaniel.com DISCLAIMER: Texas Podcast Network is brought to you by The University of Texas at Austin. Podcasts are produced by faculty members and staffers at UT Austin who work with University Communications to craft content that adheres to journalistic best practices. The University of Texas at Austin offers these podcasts at no charge. Podcasts appearing on the network and this webpage represent the views of the hosts, not of The University of Texas at Austin. https://files.fireside.fm/file/fireside-uploads/images/9/9a59b135-7876-4254-b600-3839b3aa3ab1/P1EKcswq.png Special Guest: Marko Dumančić.

Get Your Life Back in Rhythm
The 4 Best Reasons Why Intermittent Fasting May Prevent Atrial Fibrillation (and an early death)

Get Your Life Back in Rhythm

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 16:30


The 4 Best Reasons Why Intermittent Fasting May Prevent AFib Fasting has been shown to slow aging and help most chronic medical conditions but can intermittent fasting also prevent atrial fibrillation? In this article, I'll share everything you need to know about intermittent fasting's role in atrial fibrillation prevention. Why Did I Write this Article? My long-term readers know I've always been impressed by the strong data supporting intermittent fasting for longevity and cardiovascular health. Indeed, both of our books, The Longevity Plan and The AFib Cure, had a section on intermittent fasting. The reason why I chose to cover this topic again came from a recent podcast interview I heard with Dr. David Sinclair. For those not familiar with Dr. David Sinclair, he is a Harvard University longevity researcher. And interestingly, the person who helped him write his New York Times best-seller, Lifespan, was the same person who helped me write The Longevity Plan and The AFib Cure. In this podcast, Dr. David Sinclair reported that he doesn't snack and only eats one meal a day. As someone who has always struggled with fasting, my goal is that writing again on the topic of intermittent fasting will help me to redouble my efforts to fast regularly. And to help you redouble your efforts, below are my 4 best reasons why intermittent fasting may prevent AFib. 1. Fasting May Slow Aging Researchers have long known that caloric restriction, or eating the absolute minimum number of calories to keep the body functioning, makes animals of all types live longer. Indeed, if you're a rat you'll live 80% longer with caloric restriction. But while caloric restriction works great for animals in a controlled experiment, it is almost impossible for humans to maintain caloric restriction long-term. The beautiful thing is that humans may not need to calorically restrict themselves to achieve this longevity boost. Indeed, intermittent fasting activates the same genes that caloric restriction does. How does this happen? Studies show that periodic fasting activates an energy-sensing protein called AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which then keeps the energy center of the cell, the mitochondria, in a “youthful” state. With regards to AFib, as age-related fibrosis (or scarring) of the left atrium is a significant driver of AFib, anything that slows the aging process would be expected to also slow the development of AFib. Indeed, based on a study we were involved with at Intermountain Medical Center, shorter telomeres, which is a marker of premature aging, was associated with atrial fibrillation. 2. Fasting May Lower Blood Pressure 10 mmHg When we fast, blood sugar levels are less likely to spike high. The research is pretty clear, the more time we can give our bodies a break from food the better our insulin sensitivity, the slower our body "rusts" with aging, and the lower our blood pressure runs. And when it comes to AFib, lower is usually better. Indeed, studies show that high blood pressure doubles the risk of AFib. So if you suffer from AFib, the goal is to keep your blood pressure always below 130/80 mmHg. But if your goal is to maximize longevity, then the research suggests a blood pressure in the range of 110/70 mmHg, without the help of blood pressure medications, is where you probably need to be. 3. Fasting is Good for a 9 Pound Weight Loss If you're looking for a quick 9-pound weight loss, then the science suggests you may want to try intermittent fasting. For example, I have found that when I skip dinner I eat approximately 500 fewer calories for the day. And these 500 fewer calories are maintained even after accounting for any "make-up" calories I may consume on the following days. While most people practice intermittent fasting by skipping breakfast, medical science argues the opposite. Studies show that if you're going to skip a meal, skipping dinner is best. To optimize health and longevity,

Mile High Endurance Podcast
Skye Moench Chattanooga Champ

Mile High Endurance Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 64:38


When we last spoke to Skye Moench we had no idea that later this year she would race The Collin's Cup, finish 6th at 7.0 World Champs and then crush IM Chattanooga by more than 25 minutes.  Skye Moench's dominating win at IRONMAN Chattanooga with a greater than 25-minute lead just a week after St George.    Show Sponsor: VENGA CBD Thanks very much to Venga CBD for helping make the show possible. Venga CBD is not like most CBD companies who just post a bunch of products and hope you figure it out. Venga was started in Colorado by athletes like you who wanted a better way to use CBD to help fight pain, train longer, race harder and recover faster. That's why they created a SYSTEM of CBD products for athletes and only have 4 products that cover 100% of your CBD needs. I use it every day in one form or another! Each product is specifically made to support an area of your endurance life from training to racing to recovery. Combined together the Venga CBD system is designed to make you unstoppable! Save a whopping 30% off & get free shipping when you buy the Venga Endurance System versus buying the products separately  - seriously, this is the best deal on the market. Just go to https://vengaendurance.com/303podcast to order yours today. First-time order is 30% off with code (303PODCAST).  We've also added 50% off your first month's subscription with code (303SUBSCRIPTION).   In Today's Show Feature interview with Skye Moench (IM Chattanooga winner) Endurance News No, Running Doesn't Wear Down Your Cartilage. It Strengthens Your Joints. What's new in the 303 Small Town America at the Heart of Gravel Racing? The Rad Dirt in Trinidad Shows Us Why Video of the Week Ironman Chattanooga Highlights   Interview Sponsor: UCAN Take your performance to the next level with UCAN Energy and Bars made with SuperStarch®  UCAN uses SuperStarch instead of simple sugars to fuel serious athletes.  UCAN keeps blood sugar steady compared to the energy spikes and crashes of sugar-based products.  Steady energy equals sustained performance! You put in the training, so don't let nutrition limit your performance.  Use UCAN in your training and racing to fuel the healthy way, finish stronger and recover more quickly!  Use the code 303UCAN for 20% off at ucan.co/discount/303UCAN/ or ucan.co Use the code 303UCAN for 20% off at ucan.co/discount/303UCAN/ or ucan.co,    Interview with Skye Moench A little over two years ago Skye won the 2019 Ironman European Championship Frankfurt. In April of this year we interviewed Skye.  At this point in the season she was fresh off a 6th at Challenge Daytona and 5th at Challenge Miami.  Skye had already made an amazing comeback from her bike crash the kept her from racing at Kona back in 2019.  We came away from that interview with a headline of "Skye's Comeback".  We had no idea at that time that later this year she would be on the final list for The Collin's Cup, finish 6th at 7.0 World Champs and then crush IM Chattanooga by more than 25 minutes. Was that part of the plan?  Did that win gap come as a surprise? How cool is that new purple Trek bike?   All those questions and more coming up right now with Skye Moench! Results (ironman.com)   Post interview: Skye adding another voice to the pros who thinks that The Collins Cup is a "must do" race and opportunity to connect with other pros and make new friends. Focus on the long distance and Kona.  It sounded to me that she raced St George, but goal was Kona Ironman Florida vs Ironman Cozumel     Our News is sponsored by Buddy Insurance. It's big time training and racing season.  Buddy Insurance is the kind of peace of mind so you can enjoy your training and racing to their fullest.  Buddy's mission is simple, to help people fearlessly enjoy an active and outdoor lifestyle.  You can now get on-demand accident insurance to make sure you get cash for bills fast and fill any gaps between your current coverage.  Go to buddyinsurance.com and create an account.  There's no commitment or charge to create one.  Once you have an account created, it's a snap to open your phone and in a couple clicks have coverage for the day.  Check it out!   Endurance News: No, Running Doesn't Wear Down Your Cartilage. It Strengthens Your Joints. Numerous studies have shown that, contrary to what your sedentary friends may sometimes argue, running does not cause arthritis. New research shows, in fact, that running may actually help strengthen your joints against future wear and tear, says Jean-Francois Esculier, leader of research and development for The Running Clinic (headquartered near Montreal, Canada) and a medical professor at the University of British Columbia.   In a Sept. 3 paper in Sports Medicine, Esculier's team examined 43 studies that had used MRI to measure the effect of running on cartilage. One major finding of these studies, he says, was that the impact from running squeezes water out of cartilage and into the underlying bone. That means that an MRI taken immediately after running will show a decrease in cartilage thickness. So, Esculier says, “If you want to say running is bad, you can show a study that shows it reduces the thickness of the cartilage.” But the effect is transient and harmless, he says, because the moment you finish your run, the cartilage begins to reabsorb water and expand back to normal. “It only takes an hour,” he says. In fact, he says, running may actually be beneficial. Historically, Esculier says, doctors, researchers, and runners were taught that cartilage simply is what it is, and won't respond to training. “But we now know that cartilage can adapt,” he says. “Even with novice runners, after only 10 weeks, you see changes in cartilage so that it can actually tolerate more load.” What's happening, he says, is a side-effect of having fluid squeezed out of the cartilage into the underlying bone. When it comes back, he says, it brings with it nutrients that feed the cartilage and make it stronger. “So not only is running not bad for your joints, it's actually good for your joints,” he says. It isn't just beginners whose joints can strengthen with use. Studies of more experienced runners, he says, suggest that they have developed cartilage that is more resistant to the type of impacts seen in running than that of non-runners. One of the more dramatic studies looked at competitors in the TransEurope FootRace, a 4,486-kilometer mountain run (2,787 miles) that went from Sicily to northern Scandinavia in 64 days. A team of scientists followed the runners, using a portable MRI to assess them every 900 kilometers or so. Amazingly, Esculier says, they found not only that the competitors didn't have cartilage damage, but that their cartilage adapted during the race. About Bill's friend London Marathon - Raphael Pacheco Deb Connelly - Monday Running   What's New in the 303: Small Town America at the Heart of Gravel Racing? The Rad Dirt in Trinidad Shows Us Why Posted on October 5, 2021 By Becky Furuta If the heart of gravel racing is the wild west of cycling – where the rules are few and weirdness is welcomed instead of scrutinized – small town America is its soul. The lure of gravel racing is in the long, off-road adventure. It's tricky trails and hellacious hills and mud so thick it's like riding through peanut butter and rolling roads with expansive views. It's dust and limestone chunks and pea gravel that bury your tires like quicksand. Due in part to its grassroots heritage, gravel remains the antidote to the technology-driven, aggressive and often super-competitive mentality of road cycling. Most of today's gravel grinders began as small-scale events, and often with no entry fees. Despite their growth, they're dripping with the same low-key attitude that attracted participants in the first place. Small towns and gravel are perfectly paired. A convergence of factors have fueled gravel's popularity, but all speak to quiet country roads with little traffic and natural scenery. The character of these towns shape the events and the way they unfold. Trinidad, Colorado is no exception. And the quirky town on the New Mexico border may well become one of gravel's new hotspots. The small city of 9000 residents was founded in 1862 after rich coal seams were discovered in the region. By 1910, Trinidad was a company town. Colorado Fuel and Iron operated the largest steel mills in the West, and dozens of mines, coke ovens and transportation lines cropped up to support local industry. CF&I created small communities for the workers they recruited to come from Europe, believing they were less likely to try and organize. To the contrary, this led to one of the darkest chapters in American labor history. Just a few miles north of Trinidad in the Spring of 1914, Union organizer Louis Tikas and 20 others were killed in a violent company crackdown known as the Ludlow Massacre. It was a bloody insurrection that occurred in protest of brutal working conditions. Three of the victims – a woman and her two children – suffocated in the dirt pit where they were hiding. By the 1920s, the coal industry was fading but Trinidad found a new, strange prosperity when mobster Al Capone and his family took the town during prohibition. They were able to easily blend in with local Italian families who continued to call the city home. Lavish hotels, a Carnegie library, an Opera House and the oldest synagogue in the state of Colorado cropped up in what would be called “the Victorian jewel of Southern Colorado.” Just having dirt alone isn't enough to make Trinidad a gravel success story. Part of an event's draw is the community itself, and how well they embrace the cyclists who come to visit. It's about the community and the culture, the adventure and the Instagram images of rolling hills and farmland. It's about getting people to drive hours in search of something different. Trinidad seems to understand all of that. City Council members greeted riders at the start and the finish. Restaurants enthusiastically marketed to gravel tourists. (Just ask me about the singing waiters at Rino Italian Restaurant downtown.) The route featured unique terrain you won't find at other gravel events. Only time will tell if Trinidad's next identity is built around bikes and outdoor tourism, but judging by the reactions of participants in The Rad Dirt Fest, it's right on track. Trinidad, like so many other rural communities, may well become a town transformed by bikes.     Video Of The Week: Ironman Chattanooga 2021 Highlights   Closing: Thanks again for listening in this week.  Please be sure to follow us @303endurance and of course go to iTunes and give us a rating and a comment.  We'd really appreciate it! Stay tuned, train informed, and enjoy the endurance journey!

The Impossible State
Dovish Hawk? South Korea's Military Buildup

The Impossible State

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 28:39


In this episode, Victor Cha is joined by Dr. Lami Kim, Assistant Professor at the U.S. Army War College, and a CSIS-USC U.S.-Korea NextGen Scholar for a conversation on their recent op-eds in Foreign Affairs and War on the Rocks, military buildup under South Korean president Moon Jae-in, and options for dealing with the North Korean crisis.  Dr. Victor Cha, Foreign Affairs: https://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/north-korea/2021-09-22/last-chance-stop-north-korea   Dr. Lami Kim, War on the Rocks: https://warontherocks.com/2021/09/a-hawkish-dove-president-moon-jae-in-and-south-koreas-military-buildup/

Get Gutsy with Jenny Fenig
Make Progress + Peace Featuring Vivian Lin

Get Gutsy with Jenny Fenig

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 38:13


Meet our next guest on our livestream speaker series: VIVIAN LIN! Vivian is a corporate marketer turned entrepreneur and “lady lash boss”, owning multiple Deka Lash studios in Boston.  She grew up Asian-American in one of the most historic colonial towns in America and has walked life in Washington DC, New York City and Asia, where she became American-Asian. With a BA in Psychology and Women's Studies from Williams College and an MBA from Columbia University, her passion in coaching comes from helping women managers and entrepreneurs find their true personal and professional poise, especially when navigating transitional and emotional times. When she has free time, she loves exploring the world with her three kids, running marathons, and nurturing her flower garden. In addition to sharing insights into her journey as a coach, Vivian offers tips on making progress and peace when you have a full plate and are navigating change. Vivian is a graduate of Magic Makers Coach Certification, a powerhouse program dedicated to helping you master the craft AND business of intuitive coaching online. We are now accepting applications for our next class. This is our 7th year offering this program with live coaching and support, and the upcoming class is the FINAL live round of the program. I'm so excited to see who joins us for this game-changing experience! Details + application > http://MagicMakersCoach.com. Tune in to this episode of COACH MAGIC and get inspired to take the next right step in your work.

The Dr. Tyna Show
15: Solo Episode: Pay Attention to Israel

The Dr. Tyna Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 34:26


On this episode of the Dr. Tyna Show I'm going solo and bringing you the latest updates from Israel, a country with a nearly 90% vaccination rate and an over 50% with boosters, meaning 3 shots. While indeed the vaccinated are experiencing a lower severe hospitalization rate and death rate than the unvaccinated, the percentages may surprise you. Plus, it's looking like natural immunity is far superior than induced immunity from vaccination. I'll cover all of this and more. Studies mentioned in this podcast: https://courses.drtyna.com/israel As always, if you have any questions for the show please email us at podcast@drtyna.com.  And if you like this show, please rate, review and subscribe on your podcast app.  Follow Dr. Tyna: Instagram https://www.instagram.com/drtyna/ Download my FREE book and get on my email list: https://courses.drtyna.com/book Shop my stores: https://store.drtyna.com and https://drtynahemp.com 10% off Relax Tonic with code RELAX10

The Damage Report with John Iadarola

Facebook, Instagram, & Whatsapp suffer hours-long worldwide outages. Conspiracy theorists are having a field day over the Facebook shutdown. Ron Johnson makes Tucker Carlson uncomfortable by letting one damning fact slip. Then, Tucker Carlson questions whether covid mitigation “actually saved lives.” Studies show the devastating effects of long covid. Hollywood production workers vote to authorize a strike.Co-Host: Brett Erlich See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.