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American popular science magazine

  • 1,099PODCASTS
  • 2,332EPISODES
  • 38mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Jan 20, 2022LATEST
Scientific American

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Best podcasts about Scientific American

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Latest podcast episodes about Scientific American

KERA's Think
From the archives: When our bodies attack us

KERA's Think

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 43:31


One of medicine's great mysteries is: Why does the body's immune system sometimes attack itself? Scientific American senior editor Josh Fischman joins guest host Courtney Collins to talk about rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, multiple sclerosis and other autoimmune diseases and the progress being made to fight them. “The Body Against Itself” appears in the September issue of Scientific American. This episode originally aired on Sept. 21, 2021

60-Second Science
COVID Quickly, Episode 21: Colds Build COVID Immunity, and the Omicron Vaccine Delay

60-Second Science

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 7:14


Today we bring you a new episode in our podcast series COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks, Scientific American ’s senior health editors Tanya Lewis and Josh Fischman catch you up on the essential developments in the pandemic: from vaccines to new variants and everything in between. You can listen to all past episodes here .

Daily Renegade
Bryan Melvin | Christian Marauder| Is it really the end or not? Q&A

Daily Renegade

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 44:00


Please SUBSCRIBE & SHARE! Is it the End? Marauder Report Special - Q & A - January 18 2022 Are we really heading off a cliff into the end of days? Is this the real deal or just another false alarm? Shouldn't we just skip teaching bible prophecy and focus on God's love and cotton candy? Is this one-world religion stuff really – real? Is this all? Join in today as we continue to answer questions today on the Christian Marauder Please Subscribe, Like, and Ring that Bell! All Bible verses cited from ESV, NKJV, NASB Pictures from Pixabay, Pinterest, Istock, Shutterstock Content Protected by Section 107 of the Copyright Act For research, education, criticism purposes Website: Afterhoursministries.com Email - bwmelvin1@gmail.com If you like to help keep me on the air you can do so through Pay Pal - thru either my website or at: bwmelvin1@gmail.com bryanmelvin1@aol.com My New Rumble channel: https://rumble.com/vq0tb8-age-of-aquarius-judas-generation-7.html Check out my book on Amazon or local book dealers: A Land Unknown: Hell's Dominion Tags - Occult world, Guidestones, Bible number meanings, Diabolic demonic world Sources Reverse Aging Mice, Article from Scientific American and the Guardian https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/aging-is-reversible-at-least-in-human-cells-and-live-mice/ https://www.theguardian.com/science/2010/nov/28/scientists-reverse-ageing-mice-humans Notre Dame becomes woke theme park https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-10246695/Notre-Dame-turned-woke-theme-park.html Sky News - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kQuAUiGvyRw Abrahamian or Abrahamic House https://www.forhumanfraternity.org/abrahamic-family-house/  

This Is Hell!
Today's militia movement / Amy Cooter

This Is Hell!

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 81:40


Sociologist Amy Cooter on her article "Citizen Militias in the U.S. Are Moving toward More Violent Extremism" for Scientific American. https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/citizen-militias-in-the-u-s-are-moving-toward-more-violent-extremism/

The Charles Mizrahi Show
Unleashing Your Dog — Dr. Marc Bekoff

The Charles Mizrahi Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 56:30


Our canine best friends bring limitless joy to humankind. Even if you don't have a dog, you've met one on the street. You've seen one at a park. Or maybe, you've even seen their head sticking out of a car window. These intelligent animals have a lot to offer us — as long as we care for them the right way. In this episode, author and canine expert Dr. Marc Bekoff joins host Charles Mizrahi to talk about how we have — and should — interact with dogs. Topics Discussed: An Introduction to Marc Bekoff (00:00:00) The Evolution of Dogs (00:04:01) Pet Communication (00:07:46) Fear and Caution (00:15:13) The Responsibilities of Ownership (00:24:20) Pandemic Dogs (00:27:31) Common Misconceptions (00:33:46) Wolf Genes (00:40:05) Considering Dog Ownership (00:43:09) Unleashing Your Dog (00:47:11) Guest Bio: Marc Bekoff, Ph.D., is a biologist, ecologist, professor emeritus, and author. He researches animal behavior and cognition, human-animal interactions, and compassionate conservation. He's also a fellow of the Animal Behavior Society and the co-chair of the Ethics Committee of the Jane Goodall Institute. Marc has published 30 books, including Canine Confidential: Why Dogs Do What They Do and The Emotional Lives of Animals: A Leading Scientists Explores Animal Joy, Sorrow, and Empathy — and Why They Matter. His work has been featured in Time Magazine, Scientific American, and BBC Wildlife. Resources Mentioned: ·      https://www.amazon.com/Dogs-World-Imagining-without-Humans/dp/0691196184 (A Dog's World: Imagining the Lives of Dogs in a World without Humans) ·      https://www.amazon.com/Unleashing-Your-Dog-Companion-Possible/dp/160868542X (Unleashing Your Dog: A Field Guide to Giving Your Canine Companion the Best Life Possible) Transcript: https://charlesmizrahi.com/podcast/2022/01/18/unleashing-your-dog-dr-marc-bekoff/ (https://charlesmizrahi.com/podcast/) Don't Forget To... • Subscribe to my podcast! • Download this episode to save for later • Liked this episode? Leave a kind review!   Subscribe to Charles' Alpha Investor newsletter today: https://pro.banyanhill.com/m/1729783 (https://pro.banyanhill.com/m/1729783)

Yoga Is Vegan
120-Living in Your Values with Lara Heimann

Yoga Is Vegan

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 63:22


In today's episode, Yoga is Vegan's Holly Skodis and Lara Heimann talk about how common it is that yoga teachers complete Yoga Teacher Trainings without understanding how the body works. We discuss incorporating veganism into Yoga and we talk about Lara's vegan journey.The seeds of Lara's fascination with the brain-body connection were planted at the tender age of 18 as she laced up her running shoes for a marathon she had not trained for. Hitting the wall at mile 20, Lara learned that she could overcome physical fatigue with mental strength and powered herself across the finish line and into a lifelong quest to learn about the physical-mental relationship. She went on to get a BA from Duke University in Biological Anthropology and Anatomy, an MS from Duke University in Physical Therapy, and a Neurodevelopmental Training Certification through Stanford University.In 1999, after several years of yoga practice and teaching, Lara took a 200-hour yoga teacher training and was shocked to learn that most yoga doesn't inform about body awareness and mechanics. In the years to follow, Lara created her LYT Yoga Method®, combining physiology, kinesiology, neurology, and functional movement patterns to yield a more cohesive philosophy.Lara Heimann is an international yoga pioneer and Physical Therapist focused on evolving the practice of yoga to empower movement and balance amidst a modern lifestyle of technology and sedentariness. She is redefining the modern practice of yoga through her comprehensive LYT Method®, emphasizing smart alignment, functional movement, and spiritual wellness. Lara has taught her methodology to thousands of students in more than 50 countries and has led workshops worldwide to speak about and explore consciousness, anatomy and purposeful movement. She is a regular contributor to Women Fitness, and has been featured in outlets like NBC News, Today Show, Inside Edition, Yahoo, Shape, Scientific American, MSN, Nylon, Pop Sugar, Elite Daily, Well+Good and so many more. She has also partnered with the New York City Department of Transportation to lead a city-wide yoga class to nearly 400 participants during its Summer Streets initiative. Through its holistic connection between body and mind, Lara's methodology is a clear and influential roadmap to ignite the spirit to operate at its highest potential. Coined a “yoga mama” by students across the globe, and a teacher of teachers, Lara is also a certified Natural Food Chef (Natural Kitchen Cooking School) and Holistic Health Coach (Institute of Integrative Nutrition) who champions healthy habits beyond the mat and advocates for the environment and all species of animals. In today's episode, Yoga is Vegan's Holly Skodis and Lara Heimann talk about how common it is that yoga teachers complete Yoga Teacher Trainings without understanding how the body works. We discuss incorporating veganism into Yoga and we talk about Lara's vegan journey.Connect with Lara:Website: lytyoga.com Instagram: @lara.heimannTo you want to support this show? If you enjoy the Yoga is Vegan podcast a great way to show your support is by leaving a review on the Apple Podcasts app. This helps other find the podcast and hopefully find the connection between Yoga and Veganism. Following the podcast on Spotify and Apple Podcasts helps also.

Ever Forward Radio
EFR 567: What the Brain-Heart Coherence Reveals About Performance, Sleep, Stress Management, and Learning Styles with Ned Mason

Ever Forward Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 57:12


For years, brain enthusiasts and performance coaches have been striving to find ways to assess human health with nothing more than their brain waves. As an outcome of their strenuous efforts, technology has opened doors to that humongous possibility – of analyzing the state of the human brain at any point to see what you need to do to perform better! One star performer in brain health technology is Wave Neuroscience -- and we're diving into the lessons from their advancement today. Meet Ned Mason, retired Navy SEAL Commander and now Chief Operating Officer at Wave Neuroscience, as he joins Chase on a special LIVE demo episode of Ever Forward Radio. Wave Neuroscience is a company that develops technologies to help you understand your brain without pharmaceuticals or invasive procedures.  Today, Ned performs Wave Neuroscience's brain assessment on Chase, measuring the frequencies of his brain waves alpha, theta, and delta, and touring his brain health using the measured parameters. He provides a detailed breakdown of the results of his evaluation (Chase's brain care report and brain synchrony score) and explains what each brain wave tells about behavioral and lifestyle traits like the effectiveness of sleep, learning style, and grasping speed. Tune in now to be informed of the latest brain vocabulary, brain science, and how to use this breakthrough technology in your wellness journey!   Follow Wave Neuro @waveneuro Follow Chase @chase_chewning   Episode resources: Save 15% on the blood sugar bundle from Sugarbreak with code CHASE at www.Sugarbreak.com/chase Get your free WHOOP 4.0 activity tracker at https://join.whoop.com/everforward  EFR 565 with Dr. Erik Won https://chasechewning.com/podcasts/episode/565  Scientific American sleep article https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/what-happens-in-the-brain-during-sleep1/  Watch the video and learn more at https://chasechewning.com/podcasts/episode/567 

Quillette Podcast
Michael Shermer: Watching 'Scientific American' Go Woke

Quillette Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 50:08


Quillette podcast host Jonathan Kay talks to book author and Skeptic editor Michael Shermer about why scientific media, professional organizations, and academic departments are increasingly succumbing to progressive ideological fads.

Science Friday
Historic Big Bang Debate, Black Hole Sounds, Plant DNA Mutations. Jan 14, 2022, Part 2

Science Friday

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 46:56


A Debate Over How The Universe Began Even though it's commonly accepted today, the Big Bang theory was not always the universally accepted scientific explanation for how our universe began. In fact, the term ‘Big Bang' was coined by a prominent physicist in 1948 to mock the idea. In the middle of the 20th century, researchers in the field of cosmology had two warring theories. The one we would come to call the Big Bang suggested the universe expanded rapidly from a primordial, hot, and ultra-dense cosmos. Conversely, the so-called ‘Steady State' theory held that the universe, at any given point in time, looked roughly the same. The story of how the Big Bang became the accepted theory of physics is also a story of two men. One, Fred Hoyle, was a steady state supporter who thought the universe would last forever. Meanwhile, George Gamow, the major public advocate of the Big Bang, begged to differ. They debated in the pages of Scientific American and in competing popular books, as both dedicated scientists and earnest popularizers of their field. And while Gamow ended up winning the debate, for the most part, the two men managed to come together in one way: They accidentally explained the origins of every element of matter by being part right, and part wrong. The truth, it turned out, would lie in the middle. Ira talks to physicist and science historian Paul Halpern about this story, detailed in his book, Flashes of Creation: George Gamow, Fred Hoyle, and the Great Big Bang Debate.   The World According To Sound: Listening To Black Holes Collide In this piece, you can actually listen to gravitational waves, the ripples in spacetime made by the tremendous mass of colliding black holes. It is possible to hear them, because their wavelengths have been shifted all the way into the human range of hearing by MIT professor Scott Hughes. Drawn together by their immense gravity, nearby black holes will swirl faster and faster until they are finally absorbed completely into one another. When the pitch rises, it means the force of gravity is increasing as the black holes collide. Not all black holes come together at the same rate or release the same amount of gravitational waves, so each combining pair has its own particular sonic signature. Some black holes collide quickly. Others slowly merge. Some produce relatively high pitches, because of the intensity of the gravitational waves, while others have a low bass rumbling. Some even make the sound of a wobbling top as the two black holes swirl around each other, before eventually meeting and becoming totally absorbed into one another.   Is There A Method To Plant Mutation? Mutation is one of the cornerstones of evolutionary biology. When an organism's DNA mutates thanks to damage or copying error, that organism passes the mutation on to its offspring. Those offspring then become either more or less equipped to survive and reproduce. And at least until recently, researchers have assumed that those mutations were random—equally likely to happen along any particular snippet of a piece of DNA. Now, scientists are questioning whether that's actually true—or if mutation is more likely to occur in some parts of the genome than others. New research published in the journal Nature this week looks at just that question, in a common weed called Arabidopsis thaliana. After following 24 generations of plants for several years and then sequencing the offspring, the team found that some genes are far less likely to mutate than others. And those genes are some of the most essential to the function of DNA itself, where a mutation could be fatal. Conversely, the genes most likely to mutate were those associated with the plant's ability to respond to its environment—potentially a handy trick for a highly adaptable weed. Lead author Grey Monroe talks to Ira about his group's findings, why this skew in mutation likelihood may benefit plants like Arabidopsis, and why it may be time to think differently about evolution.

The Dirobi Health Show
Paul Shapiro, The Better Meat Company

The Dirobi Health Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 42:23


If you are interested in subjects like "the omnivores dilemma," or maybe you like meat, but not factory farming practices, listen in to one of the thought leaders in the sustainable, clean meat movement, Paul Shapiro.Paul Shapiro who is the author of the national bestseller Clean Meat: How Growing Meat Without Animals Will Revolutionize Dinner and the World, the CEO of The Better Meat Co., a four-time TEDx speaker, and the host of the Business for Good Podcast. and a long-time leader in food sustainability. Paul is an authority figure on food and agricultural sustainability.  He has been invited on hundreds of news outlets, including StarTalk Radio with Neil deGrasse Tyson, The Rich Roll Podcast, and CNN.  He's also published hundreds of articles ranging from daily newspapers such as The Washington Post to pop-sci publications like Scientific American as well as magazines like FORTUNE and academic journals. I have attached Paul's one-page bio with more information.  You can find his website here: www.bettermeat.co as well a link to his book: www.cleanmeat.comSee all links, artwork and notes at:https://blog.dirobi.comThis show is for informational and entertainment purposes only.

Feel Better, Live More with Dr Rangan Chatterjee
#227 Dr Andrew Huberman: The One Daily Practice Everyone Should Do, Training Your Brain and Reducing Anxiety

Feel Better, Live More with Dr Rangan Chatterjee

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 118:51


CAUTION: Contains themes of an adult nature.If I told you there was a simple, free habit you could take up to optimise your health in just five to 10 minutes a day, would you be up for trying it? If the answer's yes, then you're going to love today's guest, a brilliant science communicator who reveals what the habit is – and shares ground-breaking insights from his research. Dr. Andrew Huberman is a professor of neuroscience at Stanford University School of Medicine in the US and he has made numerous contributions to the fields of brain development, brain function and neuroplasticity. His lab's most recent work focuses on the influence of vision and breathing on human performance and brain states such as fear and courage. His work has been published in top scientific journals including Nature, Science, and Cell and has been featured in global media outlets such as TIME magazine, BBC, and Scientific American. We begin this conversation discussing why exposure to morning light is key to optimum human functioning. Our visual system is about more than just seeing. The light that enters our eyes, even in blind people, gives knowledge to the nervous system. Getting the right light, at the right time, sets the clock in all of your body's cells, which in turn will affect many different functions in the body. It stimulates the cortisol you need for energy and focus. And it has positive effects on everything from sleep, energy and immunity to appetite, mood and so much more. We also discuss what exactly is going on in the brain when we feel fearful and how something as simple as getting outside and looking at the horizon can completely change our physiology and powerfully inhibit anxiety. Finally, we talk about the role that technology is having on our attention and Andrew shares a variety of simple exercises that we can all do to train our brains to improve our focus, health and performance. Andrew is a special human being and someone who I have been wanting to speak to for a long, long time. I really enjoyed speaking to him - I hope you enjoy listening.Thanks to our sponsors: https://vivobarefoot.com/livemore https://calm.com/livemore http://www.athleticgreens.com/livemoreOrder Dr Chatterjee's new book Happy Mind, Happy Life: UK version and US & Canada version Show notes available at https://drchatterjee.com/227 Support the podcast: Members get ad-free episodes and exclusive content including my take on the topics most requested by the FBLM community https://drchatterjee.com/membershipDISCLAIMER: The content in the podcast and on this webpage is not intended to constitute or be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have heard on the podcast or on my website. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

One Small Bite
Why is Fat Bad? Let's Dismantle Fat-phobia!

One Small Bite

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 27:54


Hola amigos! Welcome back!Why do we fear fat? Consider how we admire animals who are fat and beautiful. Animals don't try to lose weight and we admire them! So why is fat so bad for us? Spoiler alert, it's not. It's the fatphobia that is bad for us. Highlights of this episode:the origins of fatphobiahow fatphobia is affecting our healthhow fatphobia affects our relationship to food and eatingnew ways to dismantle fatphobia and pursue healthAnnouncements:Happy New Year! Summary: Early 20th century, slimness started to be promoted, not for medical reasons, but in fear of the black body. Dr. Sabrina Strings writes about the history of fatphobia, in her book, Fearing the Black Body: The Racial Origins of Fat Phobia. Our culture promotes one type of body as acceptable, leaving people who do not fit that description, out. In a Scientific American article by Virginia Sole-Smith, she correctly pointed out that fatphobia is one bias that creates unaccounted for variables. David mentions that research can have a contagion affect, where researchers do not question existing data, and carries data over to support their own science. It's science that does not question itself.David rejects “obesity” and “overweight” because this does not define a person and contributes to fatphobia. This phobia is a vicarious form of stress. A fat person may not get the same treatment as a thin person in healthcare and this is wrong.  We are at the beginning of the year, which brings hope. What if we made small changes that were unstainable for life?  Instead of, “I have to lose weight,” which puts us into an unstainable punish mode, why not try to find something you can do for life. Literally, the rest of your life.Where do I go from here?If you like this episode, then download the show wherever you listen to your podcasts at Apple, Spotify, Stitcher, Google, iHeartRadio, Castbox, etc!Hit that subscribe button so you won't miss another episode. Big Ask: Leave a Review! Please, take a few minutes and leave me a review on your podcast app. Each review helps other listeners find the podcast, which provides me with the ability to continue bring you unique content. So spread the love. Loss for words? Just write what you like about the show.Share the show with friends.If you want to work with us, schedule an appointment or a free 15 minute discovery call. Explore our website and click Schedule an Appointment. Or, reach us by email info@orozconutrition.com or phone 678-568-4717.Once again, I greatly appreciate you for listening and supporting my show. Remember, it really only takes One Small Bite to start transforming your life. Chop the diet mentality; Fuel Your Body; and Nourish Your Soul!

Did That Really Happen?
A Very Long Engagement

Did That Really Happen?

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 52:36


This week we're traveling back to 1920s France with A Very Long Engagement! Join us to learn about the amazing story of that time the president of France fell out of a train in his pajamas, the No Man's Land, WWI-era aircraft, the Paris Flood of 1910, and more! Sources: Film Background: Rotten Tomatoes, A Very Long Engagement: https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/a_very_long_engagement_2004 Roger Ebert Review: https://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/a-very-long-engagement-2004 Liza Bear, "Jean-Pierre Jeunet, With a Distaste for War, on His Bittersweet 'A Very Long Engagement'", IndieWire: https://www.indiewire.com/2004/11/jean-pierre-jeunet-with-a-distaste-for-war-on-his-bittersweet-a-very-long-engagement-78528/ Execution and the No Man's Land: Nicholas Atkin, Petain. Routledge, 1998. Self Harm and Hand Wounding, National Archives, UK: https://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/education/resources/loyalty-dissent/self-harm-hand-wounding/ John Sweeney, "Lest We Forget: The 306 'Cowards' We Executed in the First World War," The Guardian: https://www.theguardian.com/world/1999/nov/14/firstworldwar.uk William A. Pelz, "Protest and Mutiny Confront Mass Slaughter: Europeans in WWI," A People's History of Modern Europe, Pluto Press. Steven R. Welch, "Military Justice," The International Encyclopedia of the First World War, Available at https://encyclopedia.1914-1918-online.net/article/military_justice Bentley B. Gilbert and Paul P. Bernard, "The French Army Mutinies of 1917," The Historian 22, 1 (1959) Douglas Gill and Gloden Dallas, "Mutiny in Etaples Base in 1917," Past and Present 69, 1975. Airpower in WWI: Malcolm Cooper, "The Development of Air Policy and Doctrine on the Western Front, 1914-1918," Aerospace Historian 28, 1 (1981) "Who Killed the Red Baron?" Nova, available at https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/redbaron/race-nf.html Ellen Castelow, "WWI: The Battle for the Skies," available at https://www.historic-uk.com/HistoryUK/HistoryofBritain/World-War-One-The-Battle-for-the-Skies/ The 1910 Paris Flood: Nalina Eggert, "When Paris was under water for two months," BBC News 3 June 2016, https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-36443329 The Guardian, "Flooding in Paris in 1910," 7 January 2010, https://www.theguardian.com/weather/gallery/2010/jan/07/paris-france-great-flood-1910 Ishaan Tharoor, "What Paris looked like the last time floods were this bad," The Washington Post 3 June 2016, https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/worldviews/wp/2016/06/03/what-paris-looked-like-the-last-time-floods-were-this-bad/ Paul Simons, "The great Paris flood of 1910," The Times (London), 19 February 2020, https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/the-great-paris-flood-of-1910-3rmlz22mw Pierre-Alain Roche, "The Seine River Flooding in the Ile-de-France Region" OECD https://www.oecd.org/env/cc/33995401.pdf The Sisseton weekly standard. (Sisseton, Roberts County, S.D.), 18 Feb. 1910. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062049/1910-02-18/ed-1/seq-9/ The Spokane press. [volume] (Spokane, Wash.), 28 Jan. 1910. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085947/1910-01-28/ed-1/seq-1/ The Tacoma times. [volume] (Tacoma, Wash.), 07 Feb. 1910. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085187/1910-02-07/ed-1/seq-1/ Associated Press, "Grim Specter Stalks Over Paris," Weekly Journal Miner 2 February 1910 (Prescott, AZ), https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85032923/1910-02-02/ed-1/seq-1/ United Press, "Paris Flood Now Abating; Fight to Prevent Disease," Perth Amboy Evening News (Perth Amboy, NJ) 29 January 1910, https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85035720/1910-01-29/ed-2/seq-1/ "Scientific American, ""Lessons of the Paris Flood."" 102, no. 6 (February 5, 1910): 118. https://www.jstor.org/stable/26008227 " President Deschanel and the Train: Edwin L. James, "Deschanel Escape Thrills France," The New York Times 25 May 1920, https://nyti.ms/323VKcW Laurence Hills, "M. Deschanel Escapes Death," The Sun and the New York Herald 25 May 1920, https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83030273/1920-05-25/ed-1/seq-1/ Ralph Courtney, "President of France Falls From Fast Train at Night," New York Tribune 25 May 1920, https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83030214/1920-05-25/ed-1/seq-1/ Associated Press, "Deschanel in Pajamas Falls Off Moving Train," Evening Public Ledger Philadelphia, PA, 24 May 1920, https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045211/1920-05-24/ed-1/seq-1/ "French President Falls From Moving Train But Is Not Missed for 40 Miles," The Washington times. [volume] (Washington [D.C.]), 24 May 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026749/1920-05-24/ed-1/seq-1/ https://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/a-very-long-engagement-2004 https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0344510/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Very_Long_Engagement

Here & Now
Top science stories of 2021; Insuring nature against extreme storms

Here & Now

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 41:56


This year, scientists learned more about COVID-19 as the virus continued to circulate and mutate. The cicadas emerged from underground, and Perseverance landed on Mars. Laura Helmuth, editor in chief of Scientific American, talks about the year in science. And, climate change is forcing the insurance industry to adapt and come up with new products. We dive into one experiment: a policy to insure nature against extreme storms, specifically a coral reef in Mexico.

Last First Date Radio
EP 485: Francine Russo - How to Find Love After 50

Last First Date Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 46:50


Francine Russo is the author of Love after 50 and They're Your Parents, Too! Armed with a PhD in English literature, she became a journalist focusing on psychology, relationships and social trends. Having cut her teeth at the Village Voice, she's gone on to write for virtually every publication from the Atlantic to The New York Times. She covered the Boomer beat at Time magazine for over a decade, and her cover stories have appeared on Parade, Scientific American and New York Magazine. In this episode of Last First Date Radio: How Francine found love again after being widowed twice How to stay hopeful when you're searching for love after 50 The biggest challenges to dating at this age What it means to do the ‘headword' before dating How to get a reality check in dating Different ways people make love work at this stage in life How to reframe rejection How to make sex work well later in life And more! FrancineRusso.com ►Please subscribe/rate and review the podcast on Apple Podcasts http://bit.ly/lastfirstdateradio ►If you're feeling stuck in dating and relationships and would like to find your last first date, sign up for a complimentary 1/2 hour breakthrough session with Sandy https://lastfirstdate.com/application ►Join Your Last First Date on Facebook https://facebook.com/groups/yourlastfirstdate ►Get a copy of Sandy's book, Becoming a Woman of Value; How to Thrive in Life and Love https://bit.ly/womanofvaluebook ►This episode is brought to you by Amazon Music Unlimited. For a limited time, get it for FREE for 30 days. Go to getamazonmusic.com/lastfirstdate to learn more and claim this offer. ►We're also brought to you by Stello Mints, the mint with CBD that will help calm dating and relationship jitters. Go to https://stellomints.com and enter lastfirstdate at checkout to get a free sample! ►Want to be coached on the show? Fill out an application here: https://bit.ly/LFDradiocoaching ► FREE download: “Top 10 Reasons Why Men Suddenly Pull Away” → http://bit.ly/whymendisappear ►Join the Woman of Value Club https://lastfirstdate.com/the-woman-of-value-club/ ►Website → https://lastfirstdate.com/ ►Twitter → https://twitter.com/lastfirstdate1 ► Instagram → https://www.instagram.com/lastfirstdate1/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/sandy-weiner9/message

The You-est You™ Podcast
The Way of Miracles with Dr. Mark Mincolla & Christina Vircillo Bresson

The You-est You™ Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 51:56


Meet Mark Mincolla Ph.D. & Christina Vircillo Bresson   Mark Mincolla, Ph.D., is a Nutritional Therapist and Quantum Energy Healer who has transformed the lives of more than 60,000 people over the last 35 years. Through his innovative genius, he has integrated ancient Chinese energy healing techniques with cutting-edge nutritional science in what he calls Electromagnetic Muscle Testing, a one-of-a-kind approach that zeros in on each individual's unique nutritional needs. Dr. Mincolla was awarded the Divine Contribution to Humanity Award in 2021, and his movie was awarded the Best Health Awareness Film of 2021. He has authored 7 international best-selling books to date. Mark Mincolla Ph.D. has appeared on Dr. Oz, Better TV, WFXT FOX25 Boston, KCBS in Los Angeles, along with numerous national TV & radio shows, and in regional and national magazines.   Christina Vircillo Bresson has been in production, filmmaking, and visual storytelling for 25 years. After studying visual art and earning a BFA from Rutgers University, Mason Gross School of the Arts, she began her career in post-production. In 2006 she launched her own production company in NYC, Three One Creative. Her company's ground-breaking work has won industry recognition, including Promax, BDA, Telly, and Emmy awards. Her company's high-profile client list includes most major networks and media brands, including Nickelodeon, MTV, VH1, Food Network, NBC, ESPN, and Scientific American. You can find The Way of Miracles film at https://thewayofmiracles.com The Way of Miracles First off, I highly recommend that you find the time to watch The Way of Miracles! It is a stunning depiction of the power of love and healing that exists in all of us.    Here are some of the beautiful take-aways from this enlightened conversation: All healing starts with compassion and listening to your heart. It's about letting your heart talk to other hearts. There are actually two of you: your mortal self (the ego) and your immortal self (your soul). You can focus on the material world and self (your ego), or you can focus on developing your inner world and identifying with your higher self (our soul). Know your soul self and reorient your life to come from your soul self. Miracles are a natural part of life. You are a miracle. Give yourself the gift of 10 minutes of staring in the mirror, gazing at the center of your eye until you can feel your being. Become what you see! Start where you are. Start small, focus on daily gratitude and witness your thoughts, don't become them. There's nothing more important than miracles, and remember, you are most definitely a miracle.   Final Thoughts In The Way of Miracles, Christina Vircillo Bresson and Mark Mincolla, Ph.D., show us that healing truly does come from a place of love. Be sure to listen to this episode for all their insights on the presence of miracles in our lives.    Connect with Christina Vircillo Bresson Website: threeonecreative.com Instagram: @christinavircillo Connect with Mark Mincolla Ph.D. Website: markmincolla.com Facebook: @MarkMincollaPhD Instagram: @markmincolla LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/MarkMincollaPhD YouTube: youtube.com/user/markmincolla       Sacred Connection As always, this community is a sacred, safe place built on love and acceptance. It was created to help you evolve and expand into your highest self. Please share your wisdom, comments, and thoughts. I love hearing from you and learning how you are being your truest, you-est you. Please join us in our Facebook group The You-est You® Community for Soul Seekers Join host Julie Reisler, author and multi-time TEDx speaker, each week to learn how you can tap into your best self and become your You-est You® to achieve inner peace, happiness, and success at a deeper level! Tune in to hear powerful, inspirational stories and expert insights from entrepreneurs, industry thought leaders, and extraordinary human beings that will help to transform your life. Julie also shares a-ha moments that have shaped her life and career and discusses key concepts from her book Get a PhD in YOU Here's to your being your you-est you! Enjoying the show? For iTunes listeners, get automatic downloads and share the love by subscribing, rating & reviewing here! *Share what you are struggling with or looking to transform with Julie at podcast@juliereisler.com. Julie would love to start covering topics of highest interest to YOU.   You-est You Links: Subscribe to the Podcast  Learn more at JulieReisler.com Become a Sacred Member at the Sacredology® Membership Join The You-est You® Community for Soul Seekers on Facebook Subscribe to Julie's YouTube Channel Book Julie as a speaker at your upcoming event Amazon #1 Best selling book Get a PhD in YOU Download free guided-meditations from Insight Timer Julie's Hungry For More On line Program (10 Module Interactive Course) 15 Days Of Gratitude To Change Your Life on InsightTimer

White Shores with Theresa Cheung
Extraordinary Awakenings with influential spiritual author and psychologist, Steve Taylor

White Shores with Theresa Cheung

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 36:06


Extraordinary Awakenings with influential spiritual author and psychologist, Steve TaylorTheresa talks to Steve Taylor PhD, author of Extraordinary Awakenings and many other bestselling books. He's senior lecturer in psychology at Leeds Beckett University and the chair of the Transpersonal Psychology Section of the British Psychological Society. Steve's articles and essays have been published in over 100 academic journals, magazines, and newspapers and he blogs for Scientific American and Psychology Today. To contact Steve, order his books and find out more visit:www.StevenMTaylor.comTo find out more about Theresa's bestselling dream, intuition, afterlife, astrology and mystical titles and mission, visit:Www.theresacheung.comhttp://linktr.ee/theresacheungYou can contact Theresa via @thetheresacheung on Instagram and her author pages on Facebook and Twitter and you can email her directly at: angeltalk710@aol.comThank you to Cluain Ri for the blissful episode music

The Morning Show with Nikki Medoro Podcast
December 22, 2021: Nikki Medoro - "Opioids Feel Like Love. That's Why They're Deadly"

The Morning Show with Nikki Medoro Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 31:07


"Unbroken Brain: A Revolutionary New Way of Understanding Addiction" Maia Szalavitz, Freelance journalist for the New York Times, TIME.com, VICE, and Scientific American joins The Morning Show with Nikki Medoro to discuss her best selling book.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Danger Close with Jack Carr
Michael Easter: The Comfort Crisis

Danger Close with Jack Carr

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 101:25


Today's guest on Danger Close merges the worlds of science, adventure, fitness, philosophy, and psychology in the quest to understand and enhance human performance and happiness.     Michael Easter is a bestselling author, journalist, speaker, and professor in the journalism department at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. His work has appeared in Esquire, Vice, Men's Journal, Outside, Men's Health, and Scientific American.    Combining the “statistical and mystical” he has made it his mission to travel the world and investigate the experiences and teachings of influential thinkers and those “living at the extremes” and then share his insights through his work. His book and articles have received endorsements from Navy SEALs, Olympic champions, CIA officers, physicians and Pulitzer Prize-winning authors.  His book, The Comfort Crisis: Embrace Discomfort to Reclaim You Wild, Happy, Healthy Self, is on shelves now.  You can follow him on Instagram @michael_easter and can learn more at eastermichael.com. Sponsors:   SIG Sauer: Today's episode is presented by SIG Sauer   Featured Gear: Best Defense Foundation   Maui Brewing Co x Chula Vista Brewing “Day of Infamy” Cream Ale    Fear, Adrenaline and Excitement by Jack Holder   Pearl Harbor Bottle Breacher with Wood Gift Box   Born Primitive   Nine Line Apparel

The Creative Process Podcast
(Highlights) GAIA VINCE

The Creative Process Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021


“The good thing about our species is that we create our own environment. What we've been doing so far is creating an environment where we're much more successful. We live a lot longer, we're much healthier than we have been in the past. There are many, many more of us, so we're very successful as a species and that's been at the expense of other ecosystems, but what's happened is we are now dominating the planet to a dangerous degree, but we are also self-aware. We're capable of understanding that.”Gaia Vince is a science writer and broadcaster interested in the interplay between humans and the planetary environment. She has held senior editorial posts at Nature and New Scientist, and her writing has featured in newspapers and magazines including the Guardian, The Times and Scientific American. She also writes and presents science programmes for radio and television. Her research takes her across the world: she has visited more than 60 countries, lived in three and is currently based in London. In 2015, she became the first woman to win the Royal Society Science Book of the Year Prize solo for her debut, Adventures in the Anthropocene: A Journey to the Heart of the Planet We Made. She is author of Transcendence: How Humans Evolved Through Fire, Language, Beauty & Time.· www.oneplanetpodcast.org · www.creativeprocess.info

The Creative Process Podcast

Gaia Vince is a science writer and broadcaster interested in the interplay between humans and the planetary environment. She has held senior editorial posts at Nature and New Scientist, and her writing has featured in newspapers and magazines including the Guardian, The Times and Scientific American. She also writes and presents science programmes for radio and television. Her research takes her across the world: she has visited more than 60 countries, lived in three and is currently based in London. In 2015, she became the first woman to win the Royal Society Science Book of the Year Prize solo for her debut, Adventures in the Anthropocene: A Journey to the Heart of the Planet We Made. She is author of Transcendence: How Humans Evolved Through Fire, Language, Beauty & Time. · www.wanderinggaia.com· www.oneplanetpodcast.org · www.creativeprocess.info

Did That Really Happen?
Little Women

Did That Really Happen?

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 70:27


This week we're traveling back to 19th century America with Greta Gerwig's Little Women! Join us as we learn more about selling hair, scarlet fever, women catching fire, women's colleges, and more! Sources: Hair Selling: Elisabeth G. Gitter, "The Power of Women's Hair in the Victorian Imagination," PMLA 99, 5 (1984) JM Allen, "Monster Topknots and Balloon Chignons: Purity and Contamination in the False Hair Trade," University of Salford, 2018: https://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/44308/3/Monster%20top%20knots.pdf "The Trade in Human Hair," March 1869, available at https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/the-trade-in-human-hair/ Emma Tarlo, "The Secret History of Buying and Selling Hair," Smithsonian, available at https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/secret-history-buying-and-selling-hair-180961080/ Women's Colleges: Roberta Wein, "Women's Colleges and Domesticity, 1875-1918," History of Educatio Quarterly 14, 1 (1974) "First Students Arrive at Mt. Holyoke Seminary," MassMoments, available at https://www.massmoments.org/moment-details/first-students-arrive-at-mt-holyoke-seminary.html Erich M. Studer-Ellis, "Springboard to Mortarboard: Women's College Foundings in New York, Massachusetts, and Pennsylvania," Social Forces 73, 3 (1995) Background: RT: https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/little_women_2019 A.O. Scott, "'Little Women' Review: This Movie is Big" New York Times; https://www.nytimes.com/2019/12/23/movies/little-women-review.html "Notes on a Scene" Vanity Fair YouTube https://youtu.be/Li9ff4rQlck Wiki: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_Women_(2019_film) Women Catching Fire: Alison Matthews David, "Blazing Ballet Girls and Flannelette Shrouds: Fabric, Fire, and Fear in the Long Nineteenth Century," TEXTILE, 14, no.2 (2016): 244-67. https://doi.org/10.1080/14759756.2016.1139382 "A Shocking Accident." The Indiana Sentinel 23 June 1874, p.5. https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87056600/1874-06-23/ed-1/seq-5/ "Pungent Paragraphs," The Republican. (Oakland, Md.), 12 Feb. 1887. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88065202/1887-02-12/ed-1/seq-6/ "Accidents." The Canton Advocate (Canton, SD) 13 January 1881. https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025440/1881-01-13/ed-1/seq-1/ Ceredo Advance (Ceredo, WV) 31 march 1887), 1. https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86092392/1887-03-31/ed-1/seq-1/ "Too Many Women." Pittsburg Dispatch 14 September 1890, p.20. https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84024546/1890-09-14/ed-1/seq-20/ Scarlet Fever: Regina Radikas and Cindy Connolly, "Young patients in a young nation: scarlet fever in early nineteenth century rural New England," Pediatric Nursing 33, no. 1 (2007). Karl F. Meyer, "Principles of Prophylaxis Against Typhoid Fever, Whooping-Cough, Scarlet Fever and Smallpox," California and Western Medicine XXXVII, no. 6 (1932). https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1658460/pdf/calwestmed00442-0002.pdf Melanie A. Kiechle, "Learning to Smell Again: Managing the Air between the Civil War and Germ Theory," in Smell Detectives: An Olfactory History of Nineteenth-Century Urban America (University of Washington Press, 2017) https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctvcwnp2p.11 C. Killick Millard, "The Etiology of "Return Cases" Of Scarlet Fever," The British Medical Journal 2, no. 1966 (September 1898): 614-18. https://www.jstor.org/stable/20255715 Robert Milne, "The Home Treatment Of Scarlet Fever," The British Medical Journal, 2, no. 2496 (October 1908): 1333-34. https://www.jstor.org/stable/25279631 Frances E. Morley, "Scarlet Fever: Isolation and Disinfection," The American Journal of Nursing 1, no.8 (May 1901): 558-61. https://www.jstor.org/stable/3402124 "The Scarlet Fever Epidemic," Scientific American 36, no. 7 (February 1877): 105. https://www.jstor.org/stable/26055536 "Scarlet Fever." The Portland daily press 9 December 1885, p.2 https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016025/1885-12-09/ed-1/seq-2/ "Scarlet Fever: All You Need to Know" CDC https://www.cdc.gov/groupastrep/diseases-public/scarlet-fever.html

RNZ: Sunday Morning
Why Homo sapiens are doomed to go extinct

RNZ: Sunday Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2021 34:49


In his new book, A (Very) Short History of Life on Earth, British palaeontologist and evolutionary biologist Dr Henry Gee offers a rather blunt assessment of why humanity might already be a dead species walking. 

60-Second Science
COVID Quickly, Episode 21: Vaccines Against Omicron, and Pandemic Progress

60-Second Science

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 5:22


Today we bring you a new episode in our podcast series COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks, Scientific American ’s senior health editors Tanya Lewis and Josh Fischman catch you up on the essential developments in the pandemic: from vaccines to new variants and everything in between. You can listen to all past episodes here .

Biotech Facts & Fallacies
GLP Podcast: Coming soon — USDA ‘bioengineered’ labels; Scientific American strays from science; Schools teach anti-GMO falsehoods

Biotech Facts & Fallacies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 39:07


Muscle For Life with Mike Matthews
Michael Easter on the Power of Embracing Discomfort

Muscle For Life with Mike Matthews

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 49:51


Are we too comfortable? Do we complain too much? Modern life is filled with modern conveniences that are engineered to make life easier and more enjoyable. But what if these contemporary comforts masquerading as a panacea of pleasure are really a double-edged sword? What have we lost in the process of gaining comfort? Is there value in choosing to be uncomfortable and adding discomfort to our lives? What are the benefits? These are questions Michael Easter addresses in his book The Comfort Crisis, and in this interview. As he'll explain in the podcast, he's traveled all around the world and interviewed an interesting cast to learn why you should inject challenge into your life and not get too comfortable. In case you're not familiar with Michael Easter, he's not only an author, but a contributing editor at Men's Health magazine, columnist for Outside magazine, and professor at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. His work can be found in Men's Journal, New York, Vice, Scientific American, and Esquire. So if you're interested in hearing why Michael Easter chose to spend a month in the Arctic, what he gained from the experience, and how you can include more discomfort in your own life, you don't want to miss this podcast! Timestamps: 0:00 - Pre-order my new fitness book now for a chance to win over $12,000 in splendid swag: https://www.muscleforlifebook.com/ 6:20 - What is the "comfort crisis"? 7:31 - How does too much comfort harm us individually and collectively? 10:06 - Should we make things harder for ourselves? 11:15 - How do you introduce "productive discomfort" into your life? 15:22 - Boredom increases creativity. 18:27 - The effects of solitude. 19:57 - Did you learn something about yourself by being alone in the arctic? 22:46 - How much comfort is appropriate? 28:15 - Is it wrong to "savor" life? 33:57 - How long have the benefits stuck with you? 35:47 - What is misogi? 47:16 - Where can people find your work? Mentioned on the Show: Pre-order my new fitness book now for a chance to win over $12,000 in splendid swag: https://www.muscleforlifebook.com/ The Comfort Crisis: https://www.amazon.com/Comfort-Crisis-Embrace-Discomfort-Reclaim/dp/0593138767/?tag=mflweb-20 Michael Easter's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/michael_easter/ Michael Easter's website: https://eastermichael.com/

Science Talk
Top Ten Emerging Tech of 2021

Science Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 39:47


The World Economic Forum and Scientific American team up to highlight technological advances that could change the world--from self-fertilizing crops, on-demand drug manufacturing, breath-sensing diagnostics to 3D-printed houses.

Faithful Politics
REPLAY - "Critical Race Theory, Part 3 of 3" w/ James Lindsay, Founder of New Discourses

Faithful Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 75:20


**We're currently on a brief vacation and will return in early 2022, but wanted to replay some of our favorite episodes and interviews from this past year** Hope you enjoy! In the final episode of our series exploring what Critical Race Theory (CRT) is, we speak with author, mathematician, and political commentator, Dr. James Lindsay. James has written six books spanning a range of subjects including religion, the philosophy of science and postmodern theory. He is the founder of New Discourses and currently promoting his new book "Cynical Theories: How Activist Scholarship Made Everything about Race, Gender, and Identity―and Why This Harms Everybody." Dr. Lindsay offers a viewpoint and opinion on Critical Race Theory that differs from the previous two guests in this series. While many believe that CRT is a legal framework by which to view the racial disparity among minorities, Dr. Lindsay argues that this is a dangerous, and racist, theory that undermines the progress and the vision of the Civil Rights Movement. If you are interested in hearing a counter argument to CRT, Dr. Lindsay provides a well informed and well researched view that you are unlikely to hear anywhere else. To learn more about New Discourses, please visit: https://newdiscourses.comHere is an article from the Atlantic about the Sokal squared paper we referenced in the show: https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2018/10/new-sokal-hoax/572212/Guest Bio:James Lindsay has a doctorate in math and background in physics. He is the author of five books and his essays have appeared in TIME, Scientific American, and The Philosophers' Magazine. He led the "grievance studies affair" probe and his forthcoming book with Helen Pluckrose, Cynical Theories, looks at the evolution of postmodern thought in scholarship and activism.Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/faithpolitics)

Create and Grow Rich Podcast
The Business of Your Brain: How Neuroscience Gives Us Insight In Engagement, Decisions and Imagination - Dr. Moran Serf - Episode #79

Create and Grow Rich Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 40:14


Dr. Cerf is the intersection of the brain, the business and the art of engagement. His research uses neuroscience to understand the underlying mechanisms of our psychology, emotion, decision-making and dreams. Cerf holds multiple patents and his work has been published in academic journals such as Nature, and portrayed in popular media outlets such as Wired, Scientific American, BBC, CNN, The Atlantic, Time, Forbes and dozens of others. A professor of neuroscience and business (Kellogg School of Management) and the Alfred P. Sloan professor (American Film Institute; 'AFI'), he holds an interesting perspective of what's under the hood. The difference between science and science fiction is time. Dr. Cerf tells us why. Enjoy!   Dr. Cerf's TED Talk Dr. Cerf's LinkedIn   I AM CREATIVE & 7 Gems of Intercultural Creativity books       This episode is produced by CAFFEstrategies.com – an industry leader in intercultural creative thinking development and the home of the 16 Diamond Tools of Creative Thinkers and the 7 Gems of Intercultural Creativity!   The mission of CAFFE Strategies is to equip organizations with strategies of Intercultural Creativity that supports their DE&I goals. Intercultural Creativity is a unique type of training that develops intercultural competence (which is needed for inclusion and belonging) primarily using creative thinking strategies and cognitive processes, which is needed for value creation. In addition to utilizing our 7 Gems of Intercultural Creativity methodology, the other creative thinking strategies used in our trainings include divergent thinking, reframing, un-obvious associations, combinatory thinking, metaphorical processing, transformation ideation, and imagination development, to develop intercultural competence, self awareness, cultural-awareness and creative thinking.          

Inquiring Minds
Sizing Up the Notion of Tailoring Your Brain with Emily Willingham

Inquiring Minds

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 33:37


In this episode, Emily Willingham joins Indre to talk about tailoring the brain, a subject on which she's an expert and about which she writes extensively in her book The Tailored Brain: From Ketamine, to Keto, to Companionship, A User's Guide to Feeling Better and Thinking Smarter. Emily is a journalist, a science writer, the author of previous books, including Phallacy: Life Lessons from the Animal Penis, a coauthor of The Informed Parent: A Science-Based Resource for Your Child's First Four Years, and is a regular contributor to Scientific American and other publications. She is the joint recipient with David Robert Grimes of the 2014 John Maddox Prize which is awarded by the science charity Sense About Science to those who stand up for science in the face of personal attacks. If you want to learn how to to feel better and think smarter – and, really, who doesn't? – then today's episode of Inquiring Minds is definitely a ‘must listen'.   Show Links: Inquiring Minds Podcast Homepage Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/inquiringminds See https://omnystudio.com/policies/listener for privacy information. The Tailored Brain: From Ketamine, to Keto, to Companionship, A User's Guide to Feeling Better and Thinking Smarter Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/inquiringminds See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

PlanetGeo
Energy and Climate Part 2: Professor Michael Mann (Re-Release).

PlanetGeo

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 33:34


Join us as we re-release of our favorite interviews that we have done, with one of the truly great climate scientists and communicators, Professor Michael Mann!Michael Mann, Distinguished Professor at The Pennsylvania State University, has a long history of studying and discussion climate change.  His new book, titled The New Climate War, is out now!In this episode we interview Mike about his journey in academia, what the new climate war is all about, and what he sees as the best path towards solutions.  We discuss how last climate war has ended, what we all can do to fix the problem, and how Dr. Mann sees the future working out.Remember to leave us a rating and a review, and share PlanetGeo with your friends! Follow us on all the social medias @planetgeocast. Dr. Michael E. Mann received his undergraduate degrees in Physics and Applied Math from the University of California at Berkeley, an M.S. degree in Physics from Yale University, and a Ph.D. in Geology & Geophysics from Yale University.Dr. Mann was a Lead Author on the Observed Climate Variability and Change chapter of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Third Scientific Assessment Report in 2001 and was organizing committee chair for the National Academy of Sciences Frontiers of Science in 2003. He has received a number of honors and awards including NOAA's outstanding publication award in 2002 and selection by Scientific American as one of the fifty leading visionaries in science and technology in 2002. He contributed, with other IPCC authors, to the award of the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize. He was awarded the Hans Oeschger Medal of the European Geosciences Union in 2012 and was awarded the National Conservation Achievement Award for science by the National Wildlife Federation in 2013. He made Bloomberg News' list of fifty most influential people in 2013.  In 2014, he was named Highly Cited Researcher by the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) and received the Friend of the Planet Award from the National Center for Science Education. He received the Stephen H. Schneider Award for Outstanding Climate Science Communication from Climate One in 2017, the Award for Public Engagement with Science from the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2018 and the Climate Communication Prize from the American Geophysical Union in 2018. In 2019 he received the Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement and in 2020 he received the World Sustainability Award of the MDPI Sustainability Foundation. He was elected to the U.S. National Academy of Sciences in 2020. He is a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union, the American Meteorological Society, the Geological Society of America, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry. He is also a co-founder of the award-winning science website RealClimate.org.——————————————————Instagram: @planetgeocastTwitter: @planetgeocastFacebook: @planetgeocastEmail: planetgeocast@gmail.comWebsite: https://planetgeocast.buzzsprout.com/ 

Blunt Blowin' Mama
BBM Ep.139: Does cannabis use in pregnancy cause emotional & behavioral dysfunction in kids? (featuring Nurses Kait, BSN, RN & Adjuan, RN)

Blunt Blowin' Mama

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 54:04


On this week's episode of Blunt Blowin' Mama, we analyze a new study — published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on Nov. 15 — on cannabis use in pregnancy. The study's researchers revealed in their findings that cannabis use in pregnancy causes higher levels of cortisol in the children born, resulting in more instances of anxiety, stress, and depression. There were also reports that children born to mothers who smoked weed during pregnancy had higher instances of aggression and hyperactivity. We reached out to the study's author Yasmin Hurd but we received no reply. So, we brought on nurses Adjuan and Kait to unpack the study's findings and provide real, transparent, and unbiased insights. Check out the full episode now!  This episode was sponsored by Smoker's Balm, a Black-woman owned lip care brand that sells the most amazing lip scrubs and balm. Treat your lips to 15% off with promo code: LIPCARE https://smokersbalm.com/ Follow on IG :) Smoker's Balm: @smokersbalm Shonitria: @bluntblowinmama Adjuan, RN: @nurse_unrxed Kait, RN: @cannanursekait The Study: https://www.pnas.org/content/118/47/e2106115118 The larger 2017 research study (Pardon, Shonitria misspoke in the episode and cited it was published in 2016 but it was published in 2017) : https://academic.oup.com/ije/article/46/5/1388/2907773?login=true NBC News article on the study: https://www.nbcnews.com/health/womens-health/pot-use-pregnancy-linked-mental-behavioral-health-issues-kids-rcna5597 Scientific American article on the study: https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/cannabis-use-in-pregnancy-is-linked-to-child-anxiety-hyperactivity/  

Dobré ráno | Denný podcast denníka SME
Toto je chaos, nie boj s pandémiou (9. 12. 2021)

Dobré ráno | Denný podcast denníka SME

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 26:14


Najskôr mal lockdown po dvoch týždňoch skončiť. Potom sa mal predlžovať, dokonca sprísniť. Nakoniec zákaz vychádzania platí naďalej, zatvárajú sa školy, zároveň sa však od zajtra môžu otvoriť všetky obchody. Pôvodne sa nemali otvoriť služby, ale aj to sa na poslednú chvíľu zmenilo. Seniorom chcú zároveň rozdávať stovky eur za očkovanie, no špekuluje sa aj o povinnej vakcinácii. Čo teda vlastne na Slovensku platí a čo nie, čo robiť môžeme a čo by sme nemali a aký teda máme plán v boji s treťou vlnou? Tomáš Prokopčák sa pýta Michala Katušku. Odporúčanie: Zamysleli ste sa niekedy nad našim vymieraním. Nemyslím teraz nad šiestym masovým vymieraním druhov, ktoré ľudstvo na našej planéte spustilo, myslím zánik samotného ľudského druhu. Pretože sa zdá, že to nemusí byť len myšlienkove cvičenie. Britský paleontológ a evolučný biológ - a inak tiež editor magazínu Nature – Henry Gee napísal pre Scientific American text Ľudia sú odsúdení na zánik. Argumentuje v ňom, prečo si so sebou nesieme takzvaný dlh vyhynutia a prečo ľudstvo už môže byť síce stále chodiacim, ale vlastne už mŕtvym druhom. Naozaj odporúčam si tento komentár prečítať. Prečítať si ho môžete tu: www.scientificamerican.com/article/humans-are-doomed-to-go-extinct/ –  Ak máte pre nás spätnú väzbu, odkaz alebo nápad, napíšte nám na dobrerano@sme.sk  –  Všetky podcasty denníka SME nájdete na sme.sk/podcasty  –  Podporte vznik podcastu Dobré ráno a kúpte si digitálne predplatné SME.sk na sme.sk/podcast  –  Odoberajte aj denný newsletter SME.sk s najdôležitejšími správami na sme.sk/brifing –  Ďakujeme, že počúvate podcast Dobré ráno.

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives
Technoptimist Radio 12/8/21: How music can rewire the brain after injury

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 5:24


Join Teresa Carey as she breaks down the latest news on the technology that is solving the world's biggest problems. In today's show, Teresa covers luminescent cities, rock dust that can absorb greenhouse gasses, and digital music therapy. To learn more about the topics in this episode: Luminescent materials could cool our cities and light the streets Rock dust can turn farmland into a sponge for greenhouse gases How music can rewire the brain after an injury Green sand beaches could erase carbon emissions About the host: Teresa Carey is a senior staff writer at Freethink.com, where she covers genetics and the environment. She is also a US Coast Guard licensed captain and a NatGeo Explorer. In addition to Freethink her work can be found in BuzzFeed, Scientific American, PBS NewsHour, NPR Weekend Edition, Smithsonian and more. Find her on twitter @teresa_carey The post Technoptimist Radio 12/8/21: How music can rewire the brain after injury first appeared on WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives.

Science Friday
Ralph Nader On 55 Years Of Car Safety, Spinal Cord Research, Omicron And Travel Bans. Dec 3, 2021, Part 1

Science Friday

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 47:48


Travel Bans Do Little To Slow Spread Of Omicron After South African researchers first detected the new COVID variant Omicron last week, it's already been found in dozens of countries around the world, including in the United States. Travel restrictions imposed by the Biden administration and others have done little to slow its spread. Instead, experts say that increasing global vaccination rates is critical to stopping future troubling mutations from occurring and spreading. In other news, scientists are re-testing a foundational piece of science, the Miller-Urey experiment, first conducted in 1952, which simulated how life on earth could have originated. Scientists are questioning their old assumptions that the glass container in the original experiment was inert. Joining Ira to talk through these and other big science stories of the week is Sophie Bushwick, Technology editor at Scientific American.   Ralph Nader Reflects On His Auto Safety Campaign, 55 Years Later It's hard to imagine a world without seatbelts or airbags. But five decades ago, it was the norm for car manufacturers to put glamour over safety. “It was stylistic pornography over engineering integrity,” Ralph Nader, prolific consumer advocate and several-time presidential candidate, tells Science Friday. This winter marks the 55th anniversary of Nader's groundbreaking investigation, “Unsafe at Any Speed,” a damning look at how little auto safety technology was in vehicles back in the 1960s. The book had a massive effect on auto safety in the U.S., setting the groundwork for laws about seatbelts, and the creation of the United States Department of Transportation. Nader joins Ira to discuss what's happened over 55 years of auto safety advances, and what kind of work is needed to make sure new technology, like self-driving cars, have the safety checks they need before going out on the roads.   New Drug Reverses Paralysis In Mice With Spinal Cord Injuries Nearly 300,000 people are living with spinal cord injuries in the United States. Currently, recovery or effective treatment remains elusive. Researchers haven't yet figured out a reliable way to knit back together severed spinal cords or nerves. Now, a new study in mice shows promising potential to prevent paralysis after injury. Researchers gave paralyzed mice a specially formulated injection that uses a novel technique called “dancing molecules.” And after a month, the mice were walking again. Joining Ira to better understand this new development in spinal cord treatment is Samuel Stupp, professor of materials science, chemistry, biomedical engineering and medicine, and director of the Simpson Querrey Institute for BioNanotechnology at Northwestern University in Chicago, Illinois.

60-Second Science
COVID Quickly, Episode 20: The Omicron Scare, and Anti-COVID Pills Are Coming

60-Second Science

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 6:47


Today we bring you a new episode in our podcast series COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks, Scientific American ’s senior health editors Tanya Lewis and Josh Fischman catch you up on the essential developments in the pandemic: from vaccines to new variants and everything in between. You can listen to all past episodes here .

Xtemporaneous
Episode 61 Re Release Flat Earth Conspiracy

Xtemporaneous

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 45:10


This is rerelease of an earlier episode. We will be back next week with all new content about power and ambition in the Thorn Birds. This is the first episode in a series of podcasts dedicated to exploring the war on science. Marc and Kristina discuss Flat Earthers through the lens of Behind the Curve, a 2018 Netflix Documentary. This is part 1 of a two part episode. Watch for part two to drop next Friday! Links and citations for this week's sources Behind the Curve. Netflix. United States: Delta-v Productions, 2018. https://www.netflix.com/title/81015076. Brown, Andrea. “He's Semi-Famous for Being Flat-out Wrong about Earth.” HeraldNet.com. HeraldNet.com, January 15, 2019. https://www.heraldnet.com/news/hes-semi-famous-for-being-flat-out-wrong-about-earth/. Nguyen, Hoang. “Most Flat Earthers Consider Themselves Very Religious.” YouGov, April 2, 2018. https://today.yougov.com/topics/philosophy/articles-reports/2018/04/02/most-flat-earthers-consider-themselves-religious. Gilman, Greg. “The Subjects of the Flat Earth Documentary Behind the Curve Are Trolling You to Victory.” SYFY WIRE. SYFY WIRE, March 8, 2019. https://www.syfy.com/syfywire/netflix-flat-earth-documentary-behind-the-curve-conspiracy-theorists. Kohner, Kyle. “Round Or Flat, 'Behind The Curve' Prevails As One Of The Most Fun & Intriguing Documentaries Of The Year [LAFF Review].” The Playlist, October 8, 2018. https://theplaylist.net/behind-the-curve-laff-review-20180930/. Revenge of the Nerds. YouTube. United States: 20th Century Fox, 1984. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TrlUYxG1oTs. Hadley, Noel Josh. “Everything That Was Beautiful Became Ugly: Escaping Flat Earth with Patricia Steere.” The Unexpected Cosmology, June 18, 2020. https://theunexpectedcosmology.com/everything-that-was-beautiful-became-ugly-escaping-flat-earth-with-patricia-steere/. Moyer, Melinda Wenner. “People Drawn to Conspiracy Theories Share a Cluster of Psychological Features.” Scientific American. Scientific American, March 1, 2019. https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/people-drawn-to-conspiracy-theories-share-a-cluster-of-psychological-features/. Alfred Moore, Joseph Parent. “Conspiracy Theories Aren't Just for Conservatives.” The Washington Post. WP Company, April 18, 2019. https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/monkey-cage/wp/2014/08/21/conspiracy-theories-arent-just-for-conservatives/. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/marc-snediker/support

Keen On Democracy
Jordan Salama on Journeying Colombia's Magdalena River

Keen On Democracy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 38:45


In this episode of “Keen On”, Andrew is joined by Jordan Salama, the author of “Every Day the River Changes: Four Weeks Down the Magdalena”. Jordan Salama has written essays on climate change, letter-writing, and American Jewish life for The New York Times, tracked down Syrian traveling salesmen in the Andes, covered Lionel Messi and the Argentina national soccer team during the 2016 Copa América, and produced a radio feature about a cross-country railroad trip that appeared on NPR's All Things Considered. You can find his writing in The New York Times, National Geographic, Smithsonian, Scientific American, and more. Visit our website: https://lithub.com/story-type/keen-on/ Email Andrew: a.keen@me.com Watch the show live on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ajkeen Watch the show live on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ankeen/ Watch the show live on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lithub Watch the show on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/LiteraryHub/videos Subscribe to Andrew's newsletter: https://andrew2ec.substack.com/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Doctor's Kitchen Podcast
#128 Why We Make Bad Food Choices with Jack Bobo

The Doctor's Kitchen Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 61:41


How does our food environment dictate our health? Well, as it turns out it's incredibly important! Can you believe that in the 1950s and 60s, Americans had comparable obesity levels to the Europeans? What shifted their diets, and ultimately their waistlines, is a number of factors including public policy on nutrition, but also the food environment including portion sizing and the sheer number of choices involved in food consumption.Jack Bobo is the author of ‘Why smart people make bad food choices.' He is also the CEO of Futurity, a food foresight company that advises companies, foundations and governments on emerging food trends and consumer attitudes and behaviors related to the future of food. Recognized by Scientific American in 2015 as one of the 100 most influential people in biotechnology, Jack is a global thought leader and previously served as the Chief Communications Officer and Senior Vice President for Global Policy and Government Affairs at Intrexon Corporation. Prior to joining Intrexon Jack worked at the U.S. Department of State for thirteen years as a senior advisor for global food policy.Today we'll talk aboutInformation overload in the grocery aislesHow decision fatigue affects your ability to eat wellWhy what you believe to be eating can have a powerful physiological effectChoice ArchitectureDesigning a deliberate foodscape that delivers health outcomes.And what we can learn from the infamous Google canteens that could be applied to the outside worldAs always check out thedoctorskitchen.com for recipes, our community and links to items discussed on the show. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Catalyst Health and Wellness Coaching Podcast
Work Less, Accomplish More: Dr. Alex Pang (Episode #194)

Catalyst Health and Wellness Coaching Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 42:51


What if you could work less but get more done? Seriously – less hours – better results. I don't know about you – but I'm all in – and when today's guest agreed to join us to share his insights on this topic, I could hardly wait to tap his brain.Welcome to the latest episode of the Catalyst Health, Wellness & Performance Coaching Podcast. Today's guest is Dr. Alex Pang, best-selling author of several books, including the latest hit  Shorter: Work Better, Smarter and The Distraction Addiction. He has a Ph.D. in the history of science from the University of Pennsylvania. His work has appeared in Scientific American, The Atlantic Monthly, American Scholar, the Los Angeles Times, and many scholarly journals and I'm excited to have his work make my work just a little more manageable going forward.For more information about the Catalyst Community, earning your health & wellness coaching certification, the annual Rocky Mountain Coaching Retreat & Symposium and much more, please see https://www.catalystcoachinginstitute.com/ or reach out to us Results@CatalystCoachingInstitute.com If you'd like to share the Be A Catalyst! message in your world with a cool hoodie, t-shirt, water bottle stickers and more (100% of ALL profits go to charity), please visit https://teespring.com/stores/be-a-catalyst If you are a current or future health & wellness coach, please check out our Health & Wellness Coaching Forum Group on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/278207545599218.  This is an awesome group if you are looking for encouragement, ideas, resources and more. Finally, if you enjoy the Catalyst Podcast, you might also enjoy the YouTube Coaching Channel, which provides a full library of freely available videos covering health, wellness & performance: https://www.youtube.com/c/CoachingChannel

60-Second Science
COVID Quickly, Episode 19: Mandate Roadblocks, Boosters for All, and Sickness in the Zoo

60-Second Science

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 9:08


Today we bring you a new episode in our podcast series COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks, Scientific American ’s senior health editors Tanya Lewis and Josh Fischman catch you up on the essential developments in the pandemic: from vaccines to new variants and everything in between. You can listen to all past episodes here .

Wife Me Up
Season 3 Episode 7: UNSTUCK: Stories of Hope - Shame

Wife Me Up

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 16:32


Shame is one of the biggest stuck cycles that we're finding as we research STUCK. Shame can be defined as a feeling of embarrassment or humiliation that arises in relation to the perception of having done something dishonorable, immoral, or improper. According to the Scientific American, Shame is the uncomfortable sensation we feel in the pit of our stomach when it seems we have no safe haven from the judging gaze of others. We feel small and bad about ourselves and wish we could vanish. Although shame is a universal emotion, how it affects mental health and behavior is not self-evident. Hear a few listener stories about shame today, and as always, walk away with some HOPE. Megan Recommends: A book! The Hiding Place by Corrie ten Boom Follow Megan on Socials: Website: www.meganefaulkner.com Facebook: www.facebook.com/meganefaulk Instagram/Twitter: @meganefaulk --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/wife-me-up/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/wife-me-up/support

The Ultimate Health Podcast
441: Too Much Comfort Is Destroying Your Health & What to Do About It | Michael Easter

The Ultimate Health Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 88:55


Watch the full video interview on YouTube here: https://bit.ly/michaeleaster441 Michael Easter (IG: @michael_easter) is the author of The Comfort Crisis, a contributing editor at Men's Health magazine, columnist for Outside magazine, and professor at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV). His work has appeared in more than 60 countries and can also be found in Men's Journal, Vice, Scientific American, Esquire, and others. In this episode, we discuss: The evolution of The Comfort Crisis Time spent outdoors has great mental health benefits Michael's 33-day Alaskan backcountry hunting trip Boredom tells us to go do something different The nature pyramid The feeling of hunting for the 1st time The unforgiving weather conditions in the Arctic tundra Understanding for one thing to live, another has to die How do other cultures view death? Traveling to Bhutan to learn the secret to happiness The cosmic calendar concept Death used to be more intimate Rites of passage What is a misogi? The discomfort of failure The benefits of accomplishing a misogi Experiencing periods of hunger Expanding your comfort zones makes your life better Practicing gratitude gives you perspective Working for your food The big difference between loneliness and solitude Block off time every day for solitude Balancing screen time Show sponsors: Organifi

Apple News Today
People with disabilities say flying is routinely dehumanizing

Apple News Today

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 9:46


Amid rising tensions between the U.S. and China, presidents Biden and Xi are to gather for a virtual summit. The Wall Street Journal has the story. Wheelchairs broken in transit, airport escorts who don’t show up, children with autism being separated from their parents: Three years after Congress mandated that airlines and TSA improve flying for people with disabilities, passengers tell NPR the same mistakes continue to be made. Extreme weather is pushing farmers to experiment with regenerative agriculture. Bloomberg News details how farmers are testing out drought-resistant seeds and plants that can survive harsh weather patterns. A new study finds that hand gestures may be the key to learning a new language. Scientific American explains the research.

Kings and Generals: History for our Future
History of the Mongols SPECIAL: Chinggis Genetic Legacy

Kings and Generals: History for our Future

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 22:25


At the start of the twenty-first century, a study was released which brought the thirteenth century starkly into the present. A 2003 study led by Chris Tyler-Smith published in the American Journal of Human Genetics simply titled “The Genetic Legacy of the Mongols,” determined that an alarming number of men across Asia, from China to Uzbekistan, carried the same haplotype on their Y-chromosome, indicating a shared paternal lineage. 8% of the studied group, just over 2100 men from 16 distinct populations in Asia shared this haplotype, which if representative of the total world population, would have come out to about 16 million men. This was far beyond what was to be expected of standard genetic variation over such a vast area. The researchers traced the haplogroup to Mongolia, and with the BATWING program determined that the most recent common ancestor lived approximately 1,000 years ago, plus or minus 300 years in either direction. The study determined that this could only be the result of selective inheritance, and there was only man who fit the profile, who had the opportunity to spread his genes across so much of Asia and have them be continually selected for centuries to come; that was Chinggis Khan, founder of the Mongol Empire. Identifying him with the Y-Chromosome haplogroup, the C3* Star Cluster, the image of Chinggis Khan as the ancestor of 0.5% of the world population has become irrevocably attached to his name, and a common addition in the comment sections on any Mongol related topic on the internet will be the fact that he is related to every 1 in 200 men in Asia today. Yet, recent studies have demonstrated that this may not be the case, and that Chinggis Khan's genetic legacy is not so simple as commonly portrayed. I'm your host David, and this is Kings and Generals: Ages of Conquest.       Inside each human being are the genes we inherit from our parents. Distinct alleles within the thousands of genes of our 23 chromosomes affect the makeup of our bodies, from our physical  appearances to blood type. Each allele is inherited from our parents, who inherited from their parents, and so on, leaving in each human being a small marker of every member of their ancestry. Due to interbreeding and mixing over time, people living in a certain region will share  alleles, given that various members of their community shared ancestors at some point. A collection of these alleles is a haplotype, and a group of similar haplotypes with shared ancestry is a haplogroup. Tracing specific haplogroups attached to the Y-Chromosome, for instance, allows us to trace paternal ancestry of selected persons. It was the haplogroup dubbed the C3*star cluster that the researchers identified as Chinggis Khan's haplotype, though later research has redefined it to the C2* star cluster. Thus, while you may see it somewhat interchangeably referred to as C3 or C2, depending on how recent the literature you're reading is. Whoever carried the markers on their chromosome associated with this haplogroup, according to the study, was therefore a descendant of Chinggis Khan. The lineage, it should be noted, does not start with Chinggis Khan; it is detectable in the ancestors of the Mongols dating back at least to the fifth century BCE, to the Donghu people in eastern Mongolia and Manchuria. It is found in high frequencies in populations which had close contact with Mongols from Siberia to Central Asia, as as the Buryats, Udeges, Evens, Evenks, Kazakhs, and in lower frequencies in places conquered by the Mongol Empire. As demonstrated by the 2003 study, a map of these haplogroups lines up rather neatly with a map of the Mongol Empire at the time of Chinggis Khan's death.        The 2003 study found that 8% of the men sampled had high frequencies of haplotypes from a set of closely related lineages, the C2*  star cluster. With the highest numbers of this cluster found in Mongolia, it was the logical origin point for this cluster. Its frequencies in so many populations of the former Mongol Empire seemed to suggest it spread with Mongol imperial expansion. The researchers therefore identified Chinggis Khan and his close male-relatives as the likely progenitors. While the public has understood this as Chinggis Khan and his family raping a massive percentage of the thirteenth century human population, this was not quite what the study implied. Rather, the selective marriage into the Chinggisid royal family, with each son having high numbers of children, and so on for generations due to prestige associated with the lineage, was the cause for the haplogroup's spread.        The study decided that, since the haplogroups showed up in high frequencies among the Hazara of Afghanistan and Pakistan, and as they were deemed to be direct descendants of Chinggis Khan, then this must have meant no one else other than the Great Khan himself was the most recent common ancestor for this haplogroup. The high frequencies across Asian populations, an origin point in Mongolia, an estimated common ancestor approximately a thousand years ago, and association with the supposed Chinggisid Hazaras was the extent of the evidence the study had to make Chinggis Khan the progenitor.       When released, this study made headlines around the world. You'll find no shortage of articles stating that “Genghis Khan was a prolific article,” with the underlying, thought generally unstated, assumption that these genes were spread by a hitherto unimaginable amount of rape, “backed up” by the medieval sources where Chinggis is described taking his pick of conquered women after the sack of a city. It's a useful addition to the catalogue of descriptions to present the Mongols as mindless barbarians, with this study being essentially the scientific data to back up this presentation.  It's now become one of the key aspects of Chinggis Khan's image in popular culture.       However, as more recent studies have demonstrated, there are a number of problems with this evidence presented in the 2003 study. Firstly, later researchers have pointed out how indirect the evidence is for the connection of Chinggis Khan to the C2 lineage. The estimates for the most recent common ancestor can vary widely depending on the methods used; while some estimates can place a figure within Chinggis Khan's epoch, other estimates put the most recent common ancestor for the C2* cluster over 2,000 year ago. Even going by the 2003 study, it still gives a 600 year window for the most recent common ancestor, who still could have lived centuries before or after Chinggis Khan.   One of the most serious assumptions in the study was that the Hazara of Afghanistan were direct descendants of Chinggis KhanThis is an assumption which rests more on misconception than medieval materials. In fact, the thirteenth and fourteenth century sources indicate that Chinggis Khan spent only a brief time in what is now Afghanistan, only from late 1221 and throughout much of 1222, which he largely spent campaigning, pursuing Jalal al-Din Mingburnu and putting down local revolts before withdrawing. There is no indication that a Mongol garrison was left in the region by Chinggis, and it is not until the 1230s that Mongol forces returned and properly incorporated the region into the empire. Still, it was not until the end of the thirteenth century were Chinggisid princes actually staying in the region, when Chagatayid princes like Du'a's son Qutlugh Khwaja took control over the Negudaris. The sources instead describe waves of Mongol garrisons into Afghanistan which began almost a decade after Chinggis Khan's death, from the initial tamma garrisons under Ögedai Khaan's orders to Jochid troops fleeing Hulegu to Afghanistan in the 1260s. Later, from the late fourteenth century onwards, Afghanistan was the heart of the Timurid realm, and while the Timurids shared some descent from Chinggis through marriage, it's not exactly the process which would have led to high percentages of Chinggisid ancestry.Together, this strongly suggests that the Hazara would not bear Chinggisid ancestry in any considerable quantity.   Perhaps most prominently, there is little evidence that connects the C2* star cluster to known descendants of Chinggis Khan. The fact that no tomb of Chinggis Khan or any other known members of his family has been found, means that there is no conclusive means to prove what haplogroups he possessed. Without human remains which undeniably belong to one of his close male relatives or himself, Chinggis Khan's own haplogroup can not ever be reliably identified. Most royal Chinggisid lineages in the western half of the empire, such as that of the Ilkhanate or Chagatais, disappeared long before the advance of genetic sciences. You might think that looking in Mongolia, you'd find a lot of Chinggisids running about, but this is not the case. Even during the empire, many members of the Chinggisid family were spread across Asia, leaving by the end of the fourteenth century largely lines only from his brothers, and of his grandsons Ariq Böke and Khubilai. In the fifteenth century, a massive massacre of the royal family was carried out by the leader of the Oirats and the true master of Mongolia, the non-Chinggisid Esen Taishi. Mongolia was reunified some fifty years later under the Khubilayid prince Dayan Khan, and it was the descendants of his sons who made up the Chinggisid nobility for the next centuries. Then, in the 1930s Soviet supported purges resulted in the near annihilation of the Chinggisid princes, Buddhist clergy and other political enemies. From 1937-1939, over 30,000 Mongolians were killed, and the Dayan Khanid nobility nearly extinguished.   While it is true that today in Mongolia, you can find many people who claim the imperial clan name of Borjigin, this is largely because after democratization in Mongolia in 1990, Mongolians were encouraged to take clan names- a fact that, as many commenters have pointed out, historically the Mongols did not do, unless they were actually members of the Chinggisid royal family. While the 1918 census in Mongolia recorded only 5.7% of the population as being Borjigid, during the recent registering of clan names some 50% chose, of course, the most famous and prestigious name for themselves. Therefore, it's rather difficult to find a lot of a Chinggisids today.   The 2003 study relied on a random selection of people from across Asia, rather than looking specifically for individuals who claimed Chinggisid descent. Other studies which have sought out people who claim Chinggisid ancestry do not support the C2* Star cluster hypothesis of the 2003 study. A 2012 study by Batbayar and Sabitov in the Russian Journal of Genetic Genealogy of Mongolian individuals who could trace their lineage back to Chinggis Khan's fifteenth century descendant, Dayan Khan, found none of them matched the Star cluster proposed by the 2003 study. To overcome the previously mentioned issues about finding Chinggisids, to quote Batbayar and Sabitov, “In this study, seven patrilineal descendants of [...] Dayan Khan and two of Chinggis Khan's brothers' descendants were chosen for Y-chromosome DNA sequencing. Rather than testing a multitude of subjects, for the sake of accuracy, the most legitimate and proven descendants of Dayan Khan were selected. The DNA donors were selected based upon their official Mongol and Manchu titles and ranks, which were precisely recorded in Mongolian, Manchu, and Soviet documents.” Essentially, as close as you can get to a definite, unbroken paternal line from Chinggis Khan, given the 800 years since his death. When they compared the Dayan Khanid descendants, the descendants of Chinggis' brothers, and those who could reliable claimed ancestry from Chinggis' son Jochi, Batbayar and Sabitov demonstrated that essentially each lineage bore different haplogroups, and none, except for a small branch of the Jochids, bore the C2* star cluster of the 2003 study.    Study of the bodies of medieval Mongol burials have likewise yielded contrasting results when their DNA has been examined.  One of the most notable burials which has been studied is the Tavan Tolgoi suit, from eastern Mongolia. Essentially it was a burial of an extremely wealthy family, dated to the mid-thirteenth century. Adorned with jewelry and buried in coffins made of Cinnamon, which would have had to be imported from southeastern Asia, the researcher suggested due to such obvious wealth and power that they must have been Chinggisid. Their bodies showed haplogroups associated, interestingly enough, with western Asia populations, with effectively no descendants in modern Mongolian populations, and most definitely, not the C2* star cluster. This led to the 2016 study by Gavaachimed Lkhagvasuren et al., titled “Molecular Genealogy of a Mongol Queen's Family and her Possible kinship with Genghis Khan,” to suggest Chinggis must have borne this haplogroup, and possibly, western Asian ancestry. He also pointed to supposed descriptions of Chinggis Khan having red hair as possible supporting literary evidence.    But this is not reliable evidence. Firstly, none of the graves conclusively can be identified as Chinggisid.  The Chinggisid's known preference for burials on Burkhan Khaldun seems unlikely to make the Tavan Tolgoi burials a close relation.  Further, the “red hair” description of Chinggis Khan comes from a mistranslation of a phrase from Rashid al-Din's Compendium of Chronicles, where Chinggis remarks that young Khubilai lacked his grandfather's ruddy features, indicating not red hair, but a face red in colour; hardly uncommon for a man who spent his lifetime in the harsh winds of the steppe. Therefore, the Tavan Tolgoi burials seem more likely to represent a family, possibly of Qipchaq origin, taken from western Asia, incorporated into the Mongol military and gaining wealth and power- hardly unusual in the Mongol army, but revealing nothing of Chinggis' haplogroups. Other wealthy burials of nobility from the Mongol Empire in Mongolia and northern China have revealed differing chromosomal haplogroups, providing no answer as of yet to the question of the Great Khan's own genetic lineage.   Much like the 2003's study erroneous identification of the Hazaras as direct descendants of Chinggis Khan, a more recent study demonstrates the pitfalls of attempting to connect historical figures to genetic data. A 2019 study by Shao-Qing Wen et al. in the  Journal of Human Genetics looked at the y-chromosomal profiles of a family from northwestern China's Gansu-Qinghai area, who traced their ancestry back to Kölgen, a son of Chinggis Khan with one of his lesser wives. Importantly, this family also backed up their claims in genealogical records, and had inhabited the same region for centuries. After the expulsion of the Mongols, they had been made local officials [tusi 土司] by the succeeding Ming and Qing dynasties. This family, the Lu, did not match the C2* Star Cluster, but actually showed close affinity to other known descendants of Chinggis Khan, the Töre clan in Kazakhstan. The Töre  trace their lineage to Jani Beg Khan (r.1473-1480), one of the founders of the Kazakh Khanate and a tenth generation descendant of Chinggis Khan's first born son Jochi. Jochi, as you may recall, was born after his mother Börte was taken captive by Chinggis Khan's enemies, and was accused, most notably by his brother Chagatai, of not being their father's son. Chinggis, for the record, always treated Jochi as fully legitimate. As the Lu family in China traced themselves to Kölgen, who shared only a father with Jochi, then the fact that the Lu and the Töre belong to the same C2 haplogroup, with a  genealogical separation of about 1,000 years, would suggest that if this is in fact the Y-chromosomal lineage of Chinggis Khan, then Jochi's uncertain paternity could be laid to rest, and that he was a true son of Chinggis Khan.   This theory is comfortable and convenient, but other scholars have noted that the connection of the Lu to Toghan, the descendant of Kölgen, is very tenuous. The sources connecting the Lu clan to Kölgen's family were not compiled until the late Qing Dynasty, some four to five centuries after Toghan's death. The sources more contemporary to Toghan's life do not match the description of his life described in the histories used by the Lu clan, leading scholars to argue that, while the Lu clan does have Mongolian origin, and likely did have an ancestor with the very common medieval Mongolian name of Toghan, it seems likely that at some point the Lu clan's family compilers decided to associate their own ancestor with the more well known Chinggisid of the same name, and therefore claim for themselves Chinggisid ancestry and prestige- hardly an unknown thing by compilers of Chinese family trees. Therefore, the matter of Jochi's paternity still remains uncertain.       Perhaps the final nail in the coffin comes in the 2018 study by  Lan Hai-Wei, et al. in the European Journal of Human Genetics. Compiling data from previous studies that found issue with the 2003 hypothesis, they looked at groups with high frequencies of the C2* Star clusters like the Hazara or the Daur, a Mongolic-speaking people from Northeastern China who, based off of historical records, make no claims of Chinggisid descent. Newer estimates also suggest the most recent common ancestor for this lineage was over 2,600 years ago. In the most recent hypothesis then, it seems more likely that the star cluster identified by the 2003 study does not represent the lineage of Chinggis Khan, but was simply an incredibly common paternal lineage among ordinary inhabitants of the Mongolian plateau. Its presence in other peoples across Asia was not evidence of selective breeding into the Golden Lineage, but simply the movement of Mongolian troops into a region, and intermixing with the local population. In the case of the Hazaras, this is the exact scenario demonstrated by the historical sources, with waves of Mongol troops rather than a host of Chinggisids descending into the Hazarajat. The possibility cannot be excluded however, that while C2* was a dominant haplotype in thirteenth century Mongolia, that before 1200 it had already been spread across Central Asia by earlier nomadic expansions of Mongolia-based empires like the Göktürk Khaghanates or the Uighur. The Mongol expansion in the thirteenth century, then, would only be another wave of the spread of C2* across Eurasia.       While it is possible that Chinggis Khan and his close male relatives did in fact, carry the C2* star cluster, there is no evidence which directly or conclusively connects him to it. His known descendants through the line of Dayan Khan are of a different Y-chromosomal haplogroup. The descendants of Dayan Khan, himself a descendant of Chinggis Khan's grandson Khubilai, and the Kazakh Töre, descendants of Chinggis Khan's son Jochi, bear haplotypes so distant that their most recent common ancestor is estimated to have lived 4,500 years ago, which does not fair well for the likelihood of Jochi being Chinggis' son. A third known and tested branch, of the Shibanids in Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan, does match the C2* star cluster, but has less than 1,000 known members and again, are descended from Chinggis Khan via Jochi. Chinggis Khan then cannot be said to be the ancestor of 0.5% of the world's population, since his y-chromosomal marking remains unknown. Any attempts at identifying it conclusively can never be more than mere assumptions without finding the bodies of either the Khan or any of his close-male relatives- a prospect highly unlikely, given the Chinggisids' preference for secret graves. Thus, it seems that his haplotypes are but one more secret that Chinggis will keep with him.       Our series on the Mongols will continue, so be sure to subscribe to the Kings and Generals podcast to follow. If you enjoyed this, and would like to help us keep bringing you great content, please consider supporting us on patreon at www.patreon.com/kingsandgenerals, or sharing this with your friends. This episode was researched and written by our series historian, Jack Wilson. I'm your host David, and we'll catch you on the next one.  -SOURCES- Abilev, Serikabi, et al. “The Y-Chromosome C3* Star-Cluster Attributed to Genghis Khan's Descendants is Present at High Frequency in the Kerey Clan from Kazakhstan.” Human Biology 84 no. 1 (2012): 79-99.   Adnan, Atif, et al. “Genetic characterization of Y-chromosomal STRs in Hazara ethnic group of Pakistan and confirmation of DYS448 null allele.” International Journal of Legal Medicine 133 (2019): 789-793.   Callaway, Ewen. “Genghis Khan's Genetic Legacy Has Competition.” Scientific American. January 29th, 2015.   Derenko, M.V. “Distribution of the Male Lineages of Genghis Khan's Descendants in Northern Eurasian Populations.”  Russian Journal of Genetics 43 no. 3 (2007): 3334-337.   Dulik, Matthew C. “Y-Chromosome Variation in Altaian Kazakhs Reveals a Common paternal Gene Pool for Kazakhs and the Influence of Mongolian Expansions.” 6 PLoS One no. 3 (2011)   Gavaachimed Lkhagvasuren et al. “Molecular Genealogy of a Mongol Queen's Family and her Possible kinship with Genghis Khan.” PLoS ONE 11 no. 9 (2016)   Kherlen Batbayar and Zhaxylyk M. Sabitov. “The Genetic Origins of the Turko-Mongols and Review of The Genetic Legacy of the Mongols. Part 1: The Y-chromosomal Lineages of Chinggis Khan.” The Russian Journal of Genetic Genealogy 4 no. 2 (2012):    Lan-Hai Wei, et al. “Whole-sequence analysis indicates that the  Y chromosome C2*-Star Cluster traces back to ordinary Mongols, rather than Genghis Khan.” European Journal of Human Genetics 26, (2018): 230-237.   Lan-Hai Wei et al.  “Genetic trail for the early migrations of Aisin Gioro, the imperial house of the Qing Dynasty.” Journal of Human Genetics 62 (2017): 407-411.   Shao-Qing Wen et al., “Molecular genealogy of Tusi Lu's family reveals their apternal relationship with Jochi, Genghis Khan's eldest son.” Journal of Human Genetics 64 (2019): 815-820.   Ye Zhang et al. “The Y-chromosome haplogroup C3*-F3918, likely attributed to the Mongol Empire, can be traced to a 2500-year-old nomadic group.” Journal of Human Genetics 63 (2018): 231-238.   Yi Liu. “A Commentary on molecular genealogy of Tusi Lu's family reveals their paternal relationship with Jochi, Genghis Khan's eldest son.” Journal of Human Genetics 66 no. 5 (2020): 549–550.    Zakharov, I.A. “A Search for a “Genghis Khan” Chromosome.” Russian Journal of Genetics 46 no. 9 (2010): 1130-1131.     Zerjal, Tatiana, et al. “The Genetic Legacy of the Mongols.” American Journal of Human Genetics 72 (2003): 717-721.  

Humans 2.0 | Mind Upgrade
Everything You Need to Manage Social Anxiety w/ Dr. Ellen Hendriksen - Episode 50

Humans 2.0 | Mind Upgrade

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 15:33


Dr. Ellen Hendriksen is a clinical psychologist who helps millions calm their anxiety and be their authentic selves. She serves on the faculty at Boston University's Center for Anxiety and Related Disorders (CARD) and is the author of HOW TO BE YOURSELF: Quiet Your Inner Critic and Rise Above Social Anxiety.During Ellen's tenure as founding host of the award-winning podcast, Savvy Psychologist, the podcast was downloaded 15 million times, rose as high as #3 on the overall iTunes charts, and was picked as a Best New Podcast on iTunes.Ellen's scientifically-based, zero-judgment approach has been featured in Harvard Business Review, The Observer, New York Magazine, O: The Oprah Magazine, goop, Scientific American, Psychology Today, and many other media outlets.PS. Check out Michael Stein's Podcast here - https://longshotleaders.com/Read the rest of the show notes: - Subscribe to my FREE Newsletter: https://bit.ly/3eANWld- Read or Listen to my book Screw Being Shy: https://bit.ly/2PqV2QI- Quickly Apply for 1 on 1 Coaching: https://bit.ly/2Pslqd0- Sign up for my online course: https://www.markmetry.com/program~~~CONNECT w/ MARK~~~- LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/mark-metry/- Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/markmetry- Twitter: https://twitter.com/markymetry- Website: https://www.markmetry.com/- Email: markmetry722@gmail.com

60-Second Science
COVID Quickly, Episode 18: Vaccines for Kids and the Limits of Natural Immunity

60-Second Science

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 6:32


Today we bring you a new episode in our podcast series COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks, Scientific American ’s senior health editors Tanya Lewis and Josh Fischman catch you up on the essential developments in the pandemic: from vaccines to new variants and everything in between. You can listen to all past episodes here .

Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas
171 | Christopher Mims on Our Interconnected Industrial Ecology

Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 87:10


As the holidays approach, we are being reminded of the fragility of the global supply chain. But at the same time, the supply chain itself is a truly impressive and fascinating structure, made as it is from multiple components that must work together in synchrony. From building an item in a factory and shipping it worldwide to transporting it locally, processing it in a distribution center, and finally delivering it to an address, the system is simultaneously awe-inspiring and deeply dehumanizing. I talk with Christopher Mims about how things are made, how they get to us, and what it all means for the present and future of our work and our lives.Support Mindscape on Patreon.Christopher Mims received a bachelor's degree in neuroscience and behavioral biology from Emory University. He is currently a technology columnist at The Wall Street Journal. He has previously written for publications such as Wired, Scientific American, The Atlantic, and Smithsonian. His new book is Arriving Today: From Factory to Front Door — Why Everything Has Changed About How and What We Buy.Columns at The Wall Street JournalWikipediaTwitterSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Apple News Today
What to know as Supreme Court considers Texas abortion ban

Apple News Today

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 7:46


Today the Supreme Court hears cases challenging the new Texas law that prohibits almost all abortions. SCOTUSblog explains what to watch. The CDC is expected to recommend Pfizer’s COVID vaccine for children aged 5 to 11. But it’s a different dose than adults get, so rolling it out will require new steps. NPR has details. Concierge medicine promises better access to doctors for patients who pay a fee. Critics say it makes primary care harder to get for those who can’t pay. Scientific American takes a look. Like to sneak in a quick snooze during your commute to work? The Washington Post looks at a new bus service that takes it to the next level: a five-hour route to nowhere, expressly designed for napping.

Science Friday
Rising Seas Stories, Pseudo-Biology of Monsters, Howling Wolf Soundscape. Oct 29, 2021, Part 2

Science Friday

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 47:18


The Science Behind Cryptid Sightings People around the world have long been fascinated by the idea that there are strange creatures out there, ones that may or may not exist. Tales circulate about cryptids–animals whose existence can't be proved—like Bigfoot hiding out in American forests, or sea serpents lurking just below the water in coastal towns. Despite the best efforts of monster hunting T.V. shows and amateur sleuths, there may never be concrete proof that these creatures exist. But that doesn't stop people from analyzing strange photographs or odd carcasses and saying maybe, just maybe, cryptids do exist. Darren Naish, a paleontologist and author based in Southampton, U.K., has a particular interest in looking at cryptozoology—from a skeptical perspective. His breakdowns of cryptid sightings from a scientific perspective have been published in Scientific American, his website, and in his book, Hunting Monsters: Cryptozoology and the Reality Behind the Myths. Darren speaks to guest host Sophie Bushwick about faked evidence, his relationship with cryptozoology, and how cryptids may lead to other pseudoscience beliefs.   Stories From Those On The Frontlines Of Sea Level Rise Next week marks the start of the UN's annual conference on climate change in Glasgow, Scotland. It's a big moment for global consensus on climate change: Nations are supposed to make new, aggressive pledges to lower their emissions in the attempt to prevent the planet from hitting 1.5 degrees Celsius of warming. Meanwhile, in the world we see and touch, seas are already rising. In some coastal areas, seas have risen between 0.5 to 1.5 feet in the last century. We're also already seeing hurricanes with higher storm surge, and heavier rainfall. More change, of course, is projected. The SciFri Book Club has been talking about these risks, and reading about how these numbers have endangered wetlands, flooded homes, lost livelihoods, and sometimes scattered communities in Elizabeth Rush's 2018 book Rising: Dispatches From The New American Shore. But while we've talked to wetland scientists and Elizabeth herself, the voices of community members most affected by climate change—a key part of Rising's mission—were still missing. In a final conversation with guest host Sophie Bushwick, producer Christie Taylor shares some of the stories of people on the frontlines, including a real-estate agent who helped his neighbors relocate after Hurricane Sandy, and the leader of the Gullah Geechee people on the sea islands of the southeast coast. Plus, social scientist A.R. Siders' insights into communities' need to adapt to sea level rise, and how they can be most successful.   Listen To The Haunting Howls That Once Permeated Europe Last year, Melissa Pons, a field recordist and sound designer, set out to capture a sound that at one time would have been familiar to almost any European: the howl of an Iberian wolf. There was a time when the sounds of wolves filled the forests and mountains of Europe. But after centuries of persecution by humans, only some 12,000 wolves remain in all of Europe. Isolated pockets of wolves can be found in Italy, Spain, Greece, and Finland. A sixth of the entire remaining population lives in the mountains of Portugal. Pons headed to the remote, mountainous region of Picão—a settlement on the small island Príncipe off the west coast of Africa—where there is a rehabilitation center for the Iberian wolf. There are some 350 packs of wolves spread out over about 45 acres of the reserve. Pons first explored the region and observed the wolves. Then she set up her recording gear and gathered over 100 hours of tape. From those recordings, she composed an album where each track captures a distinct soundscape made by these wolves. The album is available online and half the proceeds go toward supporting the rehabilitation center in Portugal.