Podcasts about Scientific American

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American popular science magazine

  • 1,264PODCASTS
  • 2,619EPISODES
  • 39mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Jun 28, 2022LATEST
Scientific American

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Best podcasts about Scientific American

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Latest podcast episodes about Scientific American

Pravidelná dávka
256. Zem a vek: Má svet v Biblii len 6000 rokov?

Pravidelná dávka

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 20:01


Učí Biblia niečo o veku Zeme? Ako pracovali takzvaní chronológovia? A prečo mnohí kresťania prijímali a prijímajú mladý vek Zeme? ----more---- Prečítajte si túto dávku aj ako článok na SME. [čoskoro] Súvisiace dávky PD#164: Plochozemisti, https://bit.ly/davka164 PD#158: Kreacionizmus, https://bit.ly/davka158 PD#155 Rasy a Genezis II. https://bit.ly/davka155 PD#151 Rasy a Genezis https://bit.ly/davka151 PD#84: Svet pred Darwinom, https://bit.ly/davka84 PD#76: Kopernik, https://bit.ly/davka76 Použitá a odporúčaná literatúra  Answers in Genesis, ‘Young-Earth Creationist View Summarized And Defended', 2011. Barr, ‘Why the World Was Created in 4004 B.C.', 1985. Blancke et al., ‘Creationism in Europe: Facts, Gaps, and Prospects', 2013. Numbers, Creationists, 2006. Sarna, Understanding Genesis, 1970. Scientific American, 'Creationism Invades Europe', 2016. Walton, The Lost World of Genesis One, 2009. *** Baví ťa s nami rozmýšľať? ❤️ Podpor našu tvorbu ľubovoľným darom, https://bit.ly/PDdar, alebo cez Patreon, https://bit.ly/PDtreon, a čo tak štýlový merch, https://bit.ly/mercPD? Ďakujeme za podporu!

Open Your Eyes with Dr. Kerry Gelb
Ep 79 - Dr. Harvey Fishman "Dry Eye"

Open Your Eyes with Dr. Kerry Gelb

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 80:56


Dr. Fishman was an undergraduate chemistry major and then earned a Ph.D. from Stanford in Chemistry and Neuroscience working in the area of lasers, microfluidics, and neuroscience. Dr. Fishman then conducted post-doctoral research Neurobiology working in the field of retinal ganglion cell nerve regeneration. He earned an M.D. from Stanford and after his medical internship, Dr. Fishman joined Stanford Ophthalmology both as an ophthalmology resident and faculty and founded the Ophthalmic Tissue Engineering Laboratory (OTEL). As director of OTEL. he was awarded one of the first BIO-X grants and became the founder of the artificial retina prosthesis project which has recently gone into clinical trials for patients with macular degeneration. After completing his residency training in advanced eye surgery and medical treatment for eye diseases at Stanford, Dr. Fishman started his own concierge ophthalmology practice in Palo Alto where he continues to lead advancements in ocular surface disease and novel diagnostics for dry eye, cancer detection, and the ocular microbiome. Dr. Fishman has a special interest in digital health and has co-founded several silicon-valley start-ups. Dr. Fishman has co-authored 34 Peer-reviewed Publications, 11 U.S. Patents, and his research has been highlighted in Scientific American, The Economist, JAMA, and Ophthalmology Times.

Topic Lords
140. The Most Edible Petrochemical

Topic Lords

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 75:09


Support Topic Lords on Patreon and get episodes a week early! (https://www.patreon.com/topiclords) Lords: * Kevin * https://www.jwst.nasa.gov/ or http://ircamera.as.arizona.edu/nircam/ * https://youtu.be/in6RZzdGki8 * https://youtu.be/lrY04VPDg8I * John Topics: * Reading the other headlines/articles on newspapers in films that flash on screen solely for the headline * http://www.chess-in-the-cinema.de/ * The Game Boy Camera/revisiting the PXL-2000 topic and other toy cameras/tech * Best Halloween candy: candy corn or pumpkin-shaped candy corn? * Icarus, by Edward Field * https://genius.com/Edward-field-icarus-annotated * Douglas Hofstadter Microtopics: * The James Webb Space Telescope. * The thing you get the most DMs about. * Recording a fan's answering machine message in the Mario Frustration voice. * The guy who "fixed" the NES triangle wave. * Bandlimiting your oscillators. * What the real Lordheads know. * Another place to shitpost. * 3D entertainment. * Deku momentum problems. * The analog stick mod for Mario 64 DS. * A remaster that is in direct conversation with what it's remastering. * The pros and cons of Mario 64 DS. * Abandoned let's-plays. * Waterworld for the Virtual Boy. * Wario Ware and Rhythm Heaven. * How to give Nintendo money in 2022. * Prodigy Child Wins Every Award Given. * Pausing movies to read the nonsense headlines that the prop designers didn't expect you to read. * Pausing the movie to complain about the nonsensical Scrabble game depicted. * A movie about people who don't know how to play Clue. * A mahjongg game that is a literary microcosm of the players' lives. * Leaning across the couch to your girlfriend and saying "that's Chappie's chess game." * Playing Super Mario Bros. with the Power Glove. * The Steam reviews for the 8-bit wrestling game that appears for three seconds in The Wrestler. * The only digital camera that was under $100 in the 90s. * How to get images off of the Game Boy Camera. * Hooking together a TV, VCR, SNES, Super Game Boy and Game Boy Camera and plugging it in with a very long extension cord so you can shoot a movie outdoors. * An in-your-face student film about what happens when computers can detect emotion. * Using your Game Boy Camera as a webcam on Twitch. * The Game Boy Camera's music sequencer. * The Game Boy Camera asking ROM hackers if they are feeling ok. * The Gold Zelda Camera. * The gold Breath of the Wild cartridge that tastes like the Master Sword. * The Cool Cam. * The Lefty RX. * Ranking candy by its volume to surface area ratio. * Getting sick of candy corn naysayers. * Wax Lips: Ya Gotta Eat 'Em! * A powder that's been glued into a little puck. * What the American Oil and Gas Historical Society has to say about wax lips. * The oleaginous history of wax lips. * Edible dinosaur bones. * Bananasaurus Rex-flavored string cheese. * The Genius of the Hero falling to the Middling Stature of the Merely Talented. * Looking back on your best work and knowing you'll probably never best it but still liking your life more now. * A short story with extra line breaks. * Turning any text into a poem by resizing the window so there are extra line breaks. * Robert Altman's follow-up to MASH. * A retelling of Icarus featuring the wicked witch saying a slur. * What it means to be conscious. * Godel, Escher, Bach: I am a Strange Loop except more confusing. * Writing a book for the general public and having to figure out how to make your ideas fun. * Searching YouTube for "Crab Cannon" and only finding music for weirdos and no cannons of any kind. * Martin Gardner's column about math games in Scientific American. * Metamagical Themas. * Using math to do fun space stuff. * Stream Frasier Online Free. * Rubik's Cube except spelled like an asshole.

Noggin - The Simple Psychology Podcast
Ep. 1 - Touch & Attachment

Noggin - The Simple Psychology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 24:05


What do monkeys, rats, worms, and humans all have in common? We all need physical touch to survive and thrive. Today we discuss attachment and the role it plays in human development. References: Harlow, H. F. (1959). Love in infant monkeys. Scientific American, 200(6), 68-75. Ardiel, E. L., & Rankin, C. H. (2010). The importance of touch in development. Paediatrics & child health, 15(3), 153-156. Caldji, C., Tannenbaum, B., Sharma, S., Francis, D., Plotsky, P. M., & Meaney, M. J. (1998). Maternal care during infancy regulates the development of neural systems mediating the expression of fearfulness in the rat. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 95(9), 5335-5340. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/noggin-psychologypodcast/support

Kobo in Conversation
Riley Black on the end of the world and new beginnings

Kobo in Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 57:39


We were joined by science writer Riley Black, author of several bestsellers on paleontology including My Beloved Brontosaurus, Written in Stone, and Skeleton Keys. And if you've read literally anything anywhere about dinosaurs in the last decade, you've probably happened upon pieces by her in National Geographic, WIRED, Smithsonian Magazine, and Scientific American. Her new book is The Last Days of the Dinosaurs: An Asteroid, Extinction, and the Beginning of Our World. It's a richly narrated story that starts with the end of the world, and also depicts the beginnings of the world where our mammal forebears would learn to thrive—and it represents a new beginning for the author as well. Here more from Kobo in Conversation

Can't Make This Up
They Are Already Here with Sarah Scoles

Can't Make This Up

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 48:36


Today I speak with Sarah Scoles about her new book They Are Already Here: UFO Culture and Why We See Saucers. "An anthropological look at the UFO community, told through first-person experiences with researchers in their element as they pursue what they see as a solvable mystery—both terrestrial and cosmic. More than half a century since Roswell, UFOs have been making headlines once again. On December 17, 2017, the New York Times ran a front-page story about an approximately five-year Pentagon program called the Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program. The article hinted, and its sources clearly said in subsequent television interviews, that some of the ships in question couldn't be linked to any country. The implication, of course, was that they might be linked to other solar systems. The UFO community—those who had been thinking about, seeing, and analyzing supposed flying saucers (or triangles or chevrons) for years—was surprisingly skeptical of the revelation. Their incredulity and doubt rippled across the internet. Many of the people most invested in UFO reality weren't really buying it. And as Scoles did her own digging, she ventured to dark, conspiracy-filled corners of the internet, to a former paranormal research center in Utah, and to the hallways of the Pentagon. In They Are Already Here we meet the bigwigs, the scrappy upstarts, the field investigators, the rational people, and the unhinged kooks of this sprawling community. How do they interact with each other? How do they interact with “anomalous phenomena”? And how do they (as any group must) reflect the politics and culture of the larger world around them? We will travel along the Extraterrestrial Highway (next to Area 51) and visit the UFO Watchtower, where seeking lights in the sky is more of a spiritual quest than a “gotcha” one. We meet someone who, for a while, believes they may have communicated with aliens. Where do these alleged encounters stem from? What are the emotional effects on the experiencers? Funny and colorful, and told in a way that doesn't require one to believe, Scoles brings humanity to an often derided and misunderstood community. After all, the truth is out there . . ." Sarah Scoles is a science writer whose work has appeared in The Atlantic, Slate, Smithsonian, the Washington Post, Scientific American, Popular Science, Discover, New Scientist, Aeon, and Wired. A former editor at Astronomy magazine, Scoles worked at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, the location of the first-ever SETI project. She lives in Denver, Colorado. Want to listen to new episodes a week earlier and get exclusive bonus content? Consider becoming a supporter of the podcast on Patreon! Like the podcast? Please subscribe and leave a review! Follow @CMTUHistory on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram & TikTok --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Life, Death and the Space Between
Extraordinary Awakenings with Steve Taylor, PhD

Life, Death and the Space Between

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 35:29


EXTRAORDINARY AWAKENINGS with STEVE TAYLOR, PhD     “It's ego dissolution. But it's not just ego dissolution; it's also the birth of a new self. It's not just a break down, which is ego dissolution, it's a shift up.  It's the uncovering of a deeper spiritual self which was always there but it seems to have been dormant, waiting for the opportunity to emerge.” – Steve Taylor, PhD, describing extraordinary awakenings       Episode Summary:   Why do some people who experience the absolute worst that life has to offer respond not by breaking down but by shifting up, into a higher-functioning, awakened state, like a phoenix rising from the ashes?    Today we talk with Steve Taylor, PhD, the author of Extraordinary Awakenings: When Trauma Leads to Transformation, and other bestselling books. He is senior lecturer in psychology at Leeds Beckett University in Leeds, West Yorkshire, England; and the chair of the Transpersonal Psychology Section of the British Psychological Society. Steve's articles and essays have been published in over 100 academic journals, magazines, and newspapers and he blogs for Scientific American and Psychology Today.   Listen in to hear how you can encourage your own spontaneous, extraordinary awakening.     Topics We Discuss:   [2:56] His research in transformation through turmoil (instantaneous), in contrast with post-traumatic growth (normally slow and gradual).    [5:41] Breakdown of the ego giving way to a larger, more spiritual self.   [8:23] What is means to awaken. The surface personality and its attachments fade, while soul qualities emerge. Interconnectivity increases.   [11:47] Triggers for profound transformation:  prison, military conflict, bereavement, near death experience, cancer diagnosis.   [17:03]  We can encourage transformational experiences, hopefully without the life-or-death level turmoil -- acknowledging, embracing and accepting challenging situations.   [20:05] When the “normal self” dies away during these extraordinary awakenings, disease and addiction can instantaneously resolve during.   [22:33] Why Steve Taylor is optimistic about the future of humanity. Evolution is a continuum of increasing consciousness.   [27:46] Amy's speed round questions: What is spirituality? What is something people don't know about you? What is one thing you're looking forward to right now? What's one thing you're deeply grateful for? What book in on your nightstand? What is your favorite spiritual or healing practice? What is the most spiritually transformative experience of your life?       FOLLOW STEVE TAYLOR:   Find out more about Steve's books on Amazon. Or check out his website. Have you had an awakening experience?  You can share your own extraordinary awakening here.       SUPPORT DR. AMY ROBBINS:   If you're enjoying the podcast and finding value in guest interviews, ghost stories, and the content I share, please consider supporting the show by becoming a Patreon member for as little as $5 a month at Patreon.com/DrAmyRobbins   As a member you'll get more say in the content we cover and exclusive access to behind-the-scenes goodness!   Stay Connected with Dr. Amy Robbins:   Instagram YouTube Website Facebook  

How To Talk To Kids About Anything
How to Raise Kids Who Don't Act Like Jerks with Melinda Wenner Moyer

How To Talk To Kids About Anything

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 67:34


Special guest: Melinda Wenner Moyer This podcast will focus on how to raise kids who don't act like jerks—who aren't racist, sexist, rude bullies and instead show up in this world as empathetic, kind good people. Melinda Wenner Moyer, who writes for Scientific American and The New York Times, offers her insights from assessing thousands of research studies on kids on this latest episode of How to Talk to Kids about Anything. The post How to Raise Kids Who Don't Act Like Jerks with Melinda Wenner Moyer appeared first on drrobynsilverman.com.

Consider This from NPR
Warning Vulnerable Populations About Monkeypox Without Stigmatizing Them

Consider This from NPR

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 15:02


Many of the people affected by the current global monkeypox outbreak are reported to be men who identify as gay or bisexual, or men who have sex with men. The virus can affect anyone, but in response to where the majority of cases are, public health officials are gearing their information toward communities of gay and bisexual men. And that has some saying that the messaging echoes back to the HIV/AIDS crisis and has the potential to stigmatize the gay community while missing others who are susceptible to the disease. We speak with Dr. Boghuma K. Titanji, physician and clinical researcher in infectious diseases at Emory University, about the lessons public health officials can learn from the HIV/AIDS crisis of the 80s and 90s.And Northwestern University journalism professor Steven Thrasher talks about his recent article for Scientific American, "Blaming Gay Men for Monkeypox Will Harm Everyone."In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

The Listening Brain
A Conversation with Lydia Denworth, Author of I Can Hear You Whisper!

The Listening Brain

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 49:58


Lydia Denworth is an award-winning science journalist and a sought-after speaker. She is a contributing editor at Scientific American and the author of Friendship: The Evolution, Biology, and Extraordinary Power of Life's Fundamental Bond, which was named one of the best leadership books of 2020 by Adam Grant and called “the best of science writing” by Booklist. She has written two other books of popular science: I Can Hear You Whisper and Toxic Truth. Her work has also appeared in The Atlantic, New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Newsweek, Time and many other publications. She lives in Brooklyn, New York with her family. 

The Monster Island Film Vault
Episode 66: Damon Noyes vs. ‘The Giant Claw'

The Monster Island Film Vault

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 160:16


Hello, kaiju lovers! Today's episode is AS BIG AS A BATTLESHIP! Damon Noyes visits the Island (after yet another harrowing experience) for “Ameri-kaiju” to discuss 1957's The Giant Claw. This infamous movie stars the ugliest antimatter-powered space bird you've ever seen! “Crazy Bernice,” as she's known on the Island, looks more like Beaky Buzzard than Rodan, despite her movie being similar to the latter's. Nate and Damon spend a surprising amount of time on this wacky movie, poking fun at the Claw marionette, theorizing over the bird's origins, discussing borderline creepy 1950s flirting, and the movie's unofficial sequel novels! You might be wondering, “What could Marchand possibly research as a Toku Topic for The Giant Claw?” Antimatter. What else? After the broadcast, Nate and Damon break in to commentate on Crazy Bernice escaping from the Beta Site and attacking H.E.A.T.—but thankfully, Zilla is around! Check out the movies Damon was in! Maxie, directed by Jarrett Bryant, is on the streaming site Vimeo. One can get $1.00 off the price by using the code: LaneCounty. “Off the Road,” a 13-minute short from Hewlett Artistry, can be viewed on YouTube here: https://youtu.be/ZdJHBY2a4fg. The “La Carcagne Promo” was written by Damon Noyes. The epilogue, “Crazy Bernice,” was written by Nathan Marchand. Guest stars: Damon Noyes as Kevin Gomora Additional music: “Mechagodzilla vs. Anguirs” by Masaru Sato “Pacific Rim” by Niall Stenson “Chant My Name!” by Masaaki Endo Sound effects sourced from Freesound.org, including those by InspectorJ, and created by J.P. Gant. Check out Nathan's spinoff podcasts, The Henshin Men and The Power Trip. We'd like to give a shout-out to our MIFV MAX patrons Travis Alexander and Michael Hamilton (co-hosts of Kaiju Weekly); Danny DiManna (author/creator of the Godzilla Novelization Project); Eli Harris (elizilla13); Chris Cooke (host of One Cross Radio); Bex from Redeemed Otaku; Damon Noyes, The Cel Cast, TofuFury, Eric Anderson of Nerd Chapel, and Ted Williams! Thanks for your support! You, too, can join MIFV MAX on Patreon to get this and other perks starting at only $3 a month! (https://www.patreon.com/monsterislandfilmvault) Buy official MIFV merch on TeePublic! (https://www.teepublic.com/user/the-monster-island-gift-shop) This episode is approved by Cameron Winter and the Monster Island Board of Directors. Timestamps: “La Carcagne” Promo: 0:00-1:05 Intro: 1:05-17:58 Entertaining Info Dump: 17:58-25:23 Toku Talk: 25:23-1:34:31 Promos: 1:34:31-1:35:51 Toku Topic: 1:35:51-2:12:09 Housekeeping & Outro: 2:12:09-2:31:52 Epilogue: 2:31:52-end Podcast Social Media: Twitter (https://twitter.com/TheMonsterIsla1) Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/MonsterIslandFilmVault/) Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/monsterislandfilmvault/) Follow Jimmy on Twitter: @NasaJimmy (https://twitter.com/nasajimmy?lang=en) Follow the Monster Island Board of Directors on Twitter: @MonsterIslaBOD (https://twitter.com/MonsterIslaBOD) Follow the Raymund Martin and the MIFV Legal Team on Twitter: @MIFV_LegalTeam Follow Crystal Lady Jessica on Twitter: @CystalLadyJes1 (https://twitter.com/CrystalLadyJes1) Follow Dr. Dourif on Twitter: @DrDorif (https://twitter.com/DrDoriff) www.MonsterIslandFilmVault.com #JimmyFromNASALives       #MonsterIslandFilmVault      #Amerikaiju             #TheGiantClaw © 2022 Moonlighting Ninjas Media Bibliography/Further Reading: “Antimatter.” Wikipedia. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antimatter) Barnette, R. Michael and Helen Quinn. “What is antimatter?” Scientific American. 24 Jan. 2002 (originally posted 18 Oct. 1999). (https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/what-is-antimatter-2002-01-24/) Bissette, Stephen. “The Giant Claw: An Introduction.” Cold War Creatures blu-ray bookley, Arrow Video. Cold War Creatures: Four Films from Sam Katzman – The Giant Claw Special Features (Arrow Video): Commentary by Emma Westwood and Cerise Howard “Family Endangered!” by Mike White “Introduction by Kim Newman” Cooper, Jackson. “Turkey in the Sky!: The Appealing Legacy of The Giant Claw.” Cold War Creatures blu-ray bookley, Arrow Video. Kwon, Diana. “Ten things you might not know about antimatter.” Symmetry: Dimensions of Particle Physics, 28 April 2015. (https://www.symmetrymagazine.org/article/april-2015/ten-things-you-might-not-know-about-antimatter) Mann, Adam. “What is antimatter?” Live Science, 13, Dec. 2021. (https://www.livescience.com/32387-what-is-antimatter.html) New Scientist articles on antimatter. (https://www.newscientist.com/round-up/antimatter-mysteries/) Schoell, William. Creature Features: Nature Turned Nasty in the Movies. McFarland & Company, Inc., Jefferson, NC, 2008. Warren, Bill. Keep Watching the Skies!: American Science Fiction Movies of the Fifties, The 21st Century Edition. McFarland. 2016. Wiki articles on The Giant Claw: IMDB (https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0050432/) Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antimatter)

GODSAIDMANSAID.COM - WEEKLY AUDIO PODCAST
Scientific American and the Facts & Authority They Don't Own

GODSAIDMANSAID.COM - WEEKLY AUDIO PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 15:00


Listen to learn more...

Ask a Decision Engineer
S4E03 - Barry Schwartz on why we should focus on practical wisdom

Ask a Decision Engineer

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 44:10


When making a decision, we should seek out the "best" option, right? Turns out, seeking to maximize your outcomes is likely to leave you less happy and more stressed. On the show today I bring you one of my mentors, Barry Schwartz, who wrote the game-changing book The Paradox of Choice, Why More is Less.Barry shares why maximizing is a bad goal, talks about the benefits of constraints, and shows how practical wisdom is what will enable us to succeed in the face of uncertainty and ambiguity.Topics covered03:01 What prompted him to get into this field06:48 What makes a decision bad? And people making decisions inconsistent with their goals.09:07 Maximizing is a bad goal11:07 Culture's influence on maximizing and unhappiness12:14 Why constraints are good22:37 Support Barry's grandkids' education!23:13 Practical wisdom28:02 What is needed is judgment, not rules31:24 The need to learn how to live with uncertainty and ambiguity34:56 Why you should learn to be a chefs vs. a cook37:59 Analytical tools can help…40:11 Key things to rememberGuest BioBarry Schwartz is an emeritus professor of psychology at Swarthmore College and a visiting professor at the Haas School of Business at Berkeley. He has spent fifty years thinking and writing about the interaction between economics, psychology, and morality.  He has written several books that address aspects of this interaction, including The Battle for Human Nature, The Costs of Living, The Paradox of Choice, Practical Wisdom, and most recently, Why We Work. Schwartz has written for sources as diverse as The New York Times, The New York Times Magazine, the Chronicle of Higher Education, Slate, Scientific American, The New Republic, the Harvard Business Review, and the Guardian. He has appeared on dozens of radio shows, including NPR's Morning Edition, and Talk of the Nation, and has been interviewed on Anderson Cooper 360 (CNN), the PBS News Hour, The Colbert Report, and CBS Sunday Morning. Schwartz has spoken four times at the TED conference, and his TED talks have been viewed by more than 20 million people.Resources To learn more from Michelle about decision making, check outThe Ask A Decision Engineer websiteHer Stanford Continuing Studies course (now enrolling, class starts July 14)Her Personal Decision Toolkit course on MavenHer Decision Toolkit course for coaches and thought partners on Maven

To The Point - Cybersecurity
Cyber Crime Unicorns, Hypponen's Law and More! With Mikko Hypponen

To The Point - Cybersecurity

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 33:28


Joining the podcast this week is Mikko Hypponen, Chief Research Officer at WithSecure. He breaks down the rise and fall of cybercrime unicorns, the effectiveness of unicorn hunting season and bounties, the impact of nations fighting back in today's cyber war, Ukraine's preparedness for Russian cyber war, cryptocurrencies future and how he came up with Hypponen's Law. And be sure to keep an eye out for his upcoming book from Wiley later this summer, “If It's Smart, It's Vulnerable”! Mikko Hypponen, Chief Research Officer, WithSecure Mikko Hypponen is a global security expert. He has worked at F-Secure, now WithSecure, since 1991. Mr. Hypponen has written on his research for the New York Times, Wired and Scientific American and he appears frequently on international TV. He has lectured at the universities of Stanford, Oxford and Cambridge. He was selected among the 50 most important people on the web by the PC World magazine and was included in the FP Global 100 Thinkers list. Mr. Hypponen sits in the advisory boards of t2 and Social Safeguard. For links and resources discussed in this episode, please visit our show notes at https://www.forcepoint.com/govpodcast/e185

StarTalk Radio
Cosmic Queries – Big Bang Bonanza with Brian Keating

StarTalk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 49:40


What happened before The Big Bang? Neil deGrasse Tyson and comic co-host Matt Kirshen answer questions about inflation theory, multiverses, the cosmic microwave background, and the possible end of the scientific method with cosmologist Brian KeatingNOTE: StarTalk+ Patrons can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free here: https://startalkmedia.com/show/cosmic-queries-big-bang-bonanza-with-brian-keating/Thanks to our Patrons Jack McCarty, Mira Killian, David, Colleen OLeary, Kelia Hamilton, Lucas Charlston, Brad Z, Clueless Gamer, Billy, and larry hall for supporting us this week.Photo Credit: NASA/Goddard/WMAP Science Team, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

Growth Island
#111: Lydia Denworth - How to Build Stronger Friendships?

Growth Island

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 59:31


Friendships, like all relationships, take time and effort. But it does more for your life than most of the health hacks you can think of; to shine more light on the subject, I have Lydia Denworth on the show. Lydia Denworth is a science journalist based in Brooklyn, New York. She is a contributing editor at Scientific American, and the author of the book ‘Friendship: The Evolution, Biology, and Extraordinary Power of Life's Fundamental Bond'. She has visited brain imaging labs and baboon troops in Kenya to understand friendship from a scientific perspective. In this episode we discuss:

The John Batchelor Show
2/2 #BigAstronomy: Dwarf Galaxy Leo P and a window on the early cosmos. Ken Croswell, astronomer and author

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 5:15


Photo:  Irregular Dwarf Galaxy IC 1613 2/2  #BigAstronomy: Dwarf Galaxy Leo P and a window on the early cosmos.  Ken Croswell, astronomer and author https://www.pnas.org/doi/10.1073/pnas.2204371119 Ken Croswell, Scientific American; astronomer and author: The Alchemy of the Heavens, Planet Quest, Magnificent Universe, See the Stars, The Universe at Midnight, and Magnificent Mars.

The John Batchelor Show
1/2 #BigAstronomy: Dwarf Galaxy Leo P and a window on the early cosmos. Ken Croswell, astronomer and author https://www.pnas.org/doi/10.1073/pnas.2204371119

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 13:35


Photo:  A distinctly disorganised dwarf 1/2   #BigAstronomy: Dwarf Galaxy Leo P and a window on the early cosmos.   Ken Croswell, astronomer and author https://www.pnas.org/doi/10.1073/pnas.2204371119 Ken Croswell, Scientific American; astronomer and author: The Alchemy of the Heavens, Planet Quest, Magnificent Universe, See the Stars, The Universe at Midnight, and Magnificent Mars.

Illuminate Higher Education
Affordable, Accessible, Highest Quality Education for all with Anant Agarwal, Founder and CEO of edX and Chief Open Education Officer of 2U

Illuminate Higher Education

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2022 54:38


Anant Agarwal is the Chief Open Education Officer of 2U/edX. He was the Founder and CEO of edX, an online learning destination founded by Harvard and MIT. Anant taught the first edX course on circuits and electronics from MIT, which drew 155,000 students from 162 countries.He has served as the director of CSAIL, MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, and is a professor of electrical engineering and computer science at MIT. He is a successful serial entrepreneur, having co-founded several companies including Tilera Corporation, which created the Tile multicore processor, and Virtual Machine Works.Anant won the Maurice Wilkes prize for computer architecture, the Yidan Prize for Education Development, and MIT's Smullin and Jamieson prizes for teaching. He holds a Guinness World Record for the largest microphone array, and is an author of the textbook "Foundations of Analog and Digital Electronic Circuits."His work on Organic Computing was selected by Scientific American as one of 10 World-Changing Ideas in 2011, and he was named in Forbes' list of top 15 education innovators in 2012. Anant is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a fellow of ACM.He hacks on WebSim, which is an online circuits laboratory in his spare time. Anant holds a Ph.D. from Stanford and a bachelor's from IIT Madras.00:00-02:21-Introduction02:22-05:52-What shaped Anant's Journey05:53-10:15- What did Anant see as a difference between different educational paradigms10:16-14:37- What is the difference between the three modalities of teaching14:38-17:59- What support does a student get in a massive open online course18:00-21:52- How to help a student who is struggling to learn21:53-26:23- The merger of edX and 2U26:24-29:06- Motivating the students29:07-34:42- Affordability34:43-37:34- Are there opportunities to merge online and immersive programs for things that require real work areas37:35-40:39- What inspired Anant to start edX 40:40-43:42- How is Anant doing on his goal of educating a billion people?43:43-45:37- What drives Anant to focus himself on education and what leads him to focus on creating a learning environment?45:38-49:32- Will traditional 4-year colleges will be open to the idea of separate teaching from learning?49:33-53:13- Trends in future education53:14-54:11- ClosingThis episode is brought to you by N2N's Illuminate App, The iPaaS for Higher Education. Learn more at https://illuminateapp.com/web/higher-education/Subscribe and listen to more episodes at IlluminateHigherEducation.comContact Anant Agarwal: https://www.linkedin.com/in/agarwaleduLearn more about 2U: https://2u.com/Learn more about edX: https://www.edx.org/  

Engines of Our Ingenuity
Engines of Our Ingenuity 2242: The Flying Circus of Physics

Engines of Our Ingenuity

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 3:50


Episode: 2242 The Flying Circus of Physics: Of questions and answers.  Today, a book of questions.

That's Total Mom Sense
Lara Heimann: Moving Better to Feel Better

That's Total Mom Sense

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 37:11


Lara Heimann is an international yoga pioneer and Physical Therapist focused on evolving the practice of yoga to empower movement and balance amidst a modern lifestyle of technology and sedentariness. She is redefining the modern practice of yoga through her comprehensive LYT Method®, emphasizing smart alignment, functional movement, and spiritual wellness. Lara has taught her methodology to thousands of students in more than 50 countries and has led workshops worldwide to speak about and explore consciousness, anatomy and purposeful movement. She is a regular contributor to Women Fitness, and has been featured in outlets like NBC News, Today Show, Inside Edition, Yahoo, Shape, Scientific American, MSN, Nylon, Pop Sugar, Elite Daily, Well+Good and so many more. She has also partnered with the New York City Department of Transportation to lead a city-wide yoga class to nearly 400 participants during its Summer Streets initiative. Through its holistic connection between body and mind, Lara's methodology is a clear and influential roadmap to ignite the spirit to operate at its highest potential. Coined a “yoga mama” by students across the globe, and a teacher of teachers, Lara is also a certified Natural Food Chef (Natural Kitchen Cooking School) and Holistic Health Coach (Institute of Integrative Nutrition) who champions healthy habits beyond the mat and advocates for the environment and all species of animals. Meet My Guest: WEBSITE: LYTyoga.com INSTAGRAM: @lara.heimann INSTAGRAM: @lytyogamethod

Arroe Collins
Avi Loeb Releases The Book Extraterrestrial The First Sign Of Intelligent Life Beyond Earth

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 17:26


"Provocative and thrilling ... Loeb asks us to think big and to expect the unexpected."-Alan Lightman, New York Times bestselling author of Einstein's Dreams and Searching for Stars on an Island in Maine Harvard's top astronomer lays out his controversial theory that our solar system was recently visited by advanced alien technology from a distant star. In late 2017, scientists at a Hawaiian observatory glimpsed an object soaring through our inner solar system, moving so quickly that it could only have come from another star. Avi Loeb, Harvard's top astronomer, showed it was not an asteroid; it was moving too fast along a strange orbit, and left no trail of gas or debris in its wake. There was only one conceivable explanation: the object was a piece of advanced technology created by a distant alien civilization. In Extraterrestrial, Loeb takes readers inside the thrilling story of the first interstellar visitor to be spotted in our solar system. He outlines his controversial theory and its profound implications: for science, for religion, and for the future of our species and our planet. A mind-bending journey through the furthest reaches of science, space-time, and the human imagination, Extraterrestrial challenges readers to aim for the stars-and to think critically about what's out there, no matter how strange it seems. The Harvard astrophysics professor lays out his case that earth had its first contact with extraterrestrial life in 2017, when the first known interstellar object, 'Oumuamua, fitted through our Solar System. This past July, Professor Loeb revealed the Galileo Project, an academic effort to search for evidence of extraterrestrial life. Professor Loeb recently spoke about his new project at the "Our Future in Space" program and expands this argument in a Scientific American article linking 'Oumuamua to the Pentagon's unidentified aerial phenomena (UAP) report. Loeb posits that scientists, not government officials, should be the ones studying UAPs - and that the government cannot rule out the possibility that these objects have extraterrestrial origins without better scientific data.

Arroe Collins
Avi Loeb Releases The Book Extraterrestrial The First Sign Of Intelligent Life Beyond Earth

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 17:26


"Provocative and thrilling ... Loeb asks us to think big and to expect the unexpected."-Alan Lightman, New York Times bestselling author of Einstein's Dreams and Searching for Stars on an Island in Maine Harvard's top astronomer lays out his controversial theory that our solar system was recently visited by advanced alien technology from a distant star. In late 2017, scientists at a Hawaiian observatory glimpsed an object soaring through our inner solar system, moving so quickly that it could only have come from another star. Avi Loeb, Harvard's top astronomer, showed it was not an asteroid; it was moving too fast along a strange orbit, and left no trail of gas or debris in its wake. There was only one conceivable explanation: the object was a piece of advanced technology created by a distant alien civilization. In Extraterrestrial, Loeb takes readers inside the thrilling story of the first interstellar visitor to be spotted in our solar system. He outlines his controversial theory and its profound implications: for science, for religion, and for the future of our species and our planet. A mind-bending journey through the furthest reaches of science, space-time, and the human imagination, Extraterrestrial challenges readers to aim for the stars-and to think critically about what's out there, no matter how strange it seems. The Harvard astrophysics professor lays out his case that earth had its first contact with extraterrestrial life in 2017, when the first known interstellar object, 'Oumuamua, fitted through our Solar System. This past July, Professor Loeb revealed the Galileo Project, an academic effort to search for evidence of extraterrestrial life. Professor Loeb recently spoke about his new project at the "Our Future in Space" program and expands this argument in a Scientific American article linking 'Oumuamua to the Pentagon's unidentified aerial phenomena (UAP) report. Loeb posits that scientists, not government officials, should be the ones studying UAPs - and that the government cannot rule out the possibility that these objects have extraterrestrial origins without better scientific data.

Anchored by Truth from Crystal Sea Books - a 30 minute show exploring the grand Biblical saga of creation, fall, and redempti

Episode 163 – Paul’s Places – Part 4: Corinth Welcome to Anchored by Truth brought to you by Crystal Sea Books. In John 14:6, Jesus said, “I am the way, the truth, and the life.” The goal of Anchored by Truth is to encourage everyone to grow in the Christian faith by anchoring themselves to the secure truth found in the inspired, inerrant, and infallible word of God. Script: Brothers and sisters, consider what you were when God called you to be Christians. Not many of you were wise from a human point of view. You were not in powerful positions or in the upper social classes. 1 Corinthians, chapter 1, verse 26, God’s Word Translation ******** VK: Hello! I’m Victoria K. Welcome to Anchored by Truth brought to you by Crystal Sea Books. We’re glad to be with you today as we continue with our series on Anchored by Truth that we are calling “Paul’s Places.” By “Paul,” of course, we’re referring to the Apostle Paul who wrote at least 13 of the books out of the 27 books that comprise the New Testament. The Apostle Paul, started out life named “Saul.” But his encounter on the road to Damascus with the risen Christ changed Saul forever. So, later Saul began to go by the name “Paul.” And as Paul he became the foremost apostle to the gentiles. God used Paul to write almost half of the New Testament including first and second Corinthians, the books we’re focusing on today. To help us continue this study about “Paul’s Places” we have RD Fierro back in the studio. RD is an author and the founder of Crystal Sea Books. RD, in our last couple of episodes we focused on the book of Romans. So, today you want to move to the next couple of books as they are arranged in the order of the New Testament – which are the books of first and second Corinthians. What are we going to see in these books? RD: Well, I’d like to start by thanking our listeners for joining us here today. We have a singular focus on Anchored by Truth which is to help people develop a solid understanding of why they may be confident that the Bible is the inspired word of God. 15 or 20 years ago this kind of focus was far less necessary. When you told people in those days that you believed in the Bible most people didn’t think anything about it. Even people who did not personally believe in the Bible largely accepted the fact that the Bible was widely thought to be the word of God. But we have now experienced an unrelenting attack on the reliability of scripture for more than 2 decades. There have been countless TV shows, movies, books, not to mention internet presentations that claim to reveal “the real Jesus” or the “real story” behind this Bible “myth” or that “Bible story.” But today if you proclaim that you believe that the Bible is the inspired word of God you are more likely to encounter open disbelief at best or outright hostility at worst. VK: And often this hostility is quite blatant. In 2001 PBS aired a 7 episode series entitled “Evolution.” Around that same time the magazine Scientific American published an article entitled “15 Answers to Creationist Nonsense.” The subtitle of that article was “Opponents of evolution want to make a place for creationism by tearing down real science but their arguments don’t make sense.” And these are just two examples of the many that could be cited where the Bible is now openly attacked by seemingly informed sources. RD: Right. And these attacks on the reliability and inspiration of scripture don’t just come from outside the church. There have been and are prominent teachers within the church who have abandoned the idea that the Bible is inspired. Well, the good news is that these attacks can be refuted but the bad news is that it takes time, energy, and effort to do so. The Bible has truth, facts, and reason as its bedrock and that can be demonstrated, however in order for us to demonstrate that it does take effort. We try to give listeners a head start in knowing how to build their own confidence in the Bible as the inspired Word of God in our shows. But we must ask listeners not to just read the Bible but also come to know something about ancient history including the places and cultures that existed thousands of years ago. VK: And that’s the big reason we wanted to undertake this study series on “Paul’s Places.” Paul’s Places is all about the epistles, or letters, that the Apostle Paul wrote to various churches. And in our Bibles the titles assigned to those epistles, which we also call books, are geographic names like Romans, Corinthians, Philippians, etc. RD: Yes. And since we raised the subject for anyone who wants to get the detailed rebuttal to the PBS series and the Scientific American article I highly recommend Dr. Jonathan Sarfati’s book Refuting Evolution 2. He takes apart the arguments made by PBS and the magazine piece by piece using the application of real science and logic. VK: Or listeners can go to our website, crystalseabooks.com, and click on the Anchored by Truth icon and then go to “2020.” In 2020 we did a 10 episode series entitled “The Truth in Genesis” featuring Dr. Sarfati where we did a good introduction on the science that demonstrates that the book of Genesis is literal history. So, where do you want to start today? RD: Well, as we have just mentioned Bible has truth, facts, and reason as its bedrock. This is true not just for books like Genesis but for all the other books including the books of the New Testament. One way to see this is to do what we are doing in this series – looking at the epistles, the letters, written by the Apostle Paul and investigating the reason that a particular letter was written to a particular church. When we do so we find out that the unique geographic and historical circumstances of the church and the city are very helpful to understanding why that epistle contained the material that it did. VK: And so today we want to look at the historical and cultural setting for the city of Corinth and see how that relates to the contents of the 2 letters that were written to that church. So, the first thing that we need to clarify is that Corinth still exists as a city today in the nation of Greece. You can find it on a map with a simple internet search. Corinth is about 50 miles west of Athens and today we would say it is located in southern Greece. But in Paul’s time Corinth was in a province called Achaia which was essentially southern Greece. The northern part of Greece in Paul’s time was called Macedonia. The cities of Philippi and Thessalonica, which also received letters from Paul, were located in Macedonia. RD: Yes. So, if you look at a map to see where Corinth is located even today one fact leaps out at you. Corinth is located on a very narrow strip of land called an isthmus that connects the northern part of Greece with the southern part. At its narrowest this isthmus is only about 6 miles wide. On the eastern side of the isthmus is the Saronic Gulf which connects to the Aegean Sea. On the western side is the Gulf of Corinth which connects to the Ionian Sea. This obviously means Corinth sits in an ideal place to be a commercial and trading center. VK: Corinth is very near the middle of the isthmus. And as you said the narrowest part was about six miles wide, although it was somewhat wider where Corinth stood. Therefore, it was a natural place to transfer goods and passengers whether they were heading east from Italy and Europe or west from Asia. The Greeks and Romans both tried to connect the two seas by cutting across this isthmus; and traces still remain of their attempts. They also tried to figure out ways to move ships across the isthmus but none of these attempts succeeded. So, Corinth just relied on its two ports to receive and dispatch ships. Because of its unique location Corinth was literally where, for the Mediterranean world and Roman Empire, the east met the west. RD: Exactly. So, just an example of its importance in the Roman world if you look at a map Corinth was almost due west of the city of Ephesus which is on the western tip of Turkey near the modern day city of Izmir, Turkey. Ephesus was the major commercial center for the Roman province of Asia. By boat Corinth would be about 250 miles from Turkey where as if someone used a land route it would be closer to 900 miles. In ancient Rome it would have been the difference between a couple of days (with favorable winds) and several weeks. Coming from Rome and heading east the same thing would have been true from the opposite direction. The city of Syracuse which is on the southern tip of Italy would have been a few days by boat but weeks by land. VK: So, this tells us that Corinth was a city that was used to a lot of travelers coming and going. And it was a place where a lot of goods and money changed hands. In other words, it was a vibrant city commercially during Paul’s time. And therefore anyone who lived in Corinth would have had the opportunity to meet and speak with travelers from all over the Roman world. Right? RD: Right, sort of. VK: Why sort of? RD: Well, this is where we have to start thinking about the kind of traffic that would have been taking place in that day. There were a lot of travelers, a lot of merchants, and lot of sailors and ship crew. So, just as in many modern day port cities there were a lot of people who were away from their homes and who had been spending long days on ships. It was a very important commercial and trading center but it was also a city that catered to desire. VK: Corinth had a long history even prior to the 1st century AD. At one time it even had its own navy. According to Greek historians the first ships of war were built there in 664 B.C. But it had its ups and downs. It was destroyed by Romans in 146 B.C., because of a rebellion but Julius Caesar restored Corinth a century later (46 B.C.). After its restoration it grew so rapidly that it soon became again one of the most important centers in Greece. And it was a very important city when Paul visited it on his second missionary journey. RD: It was important from the standpoint of trade and commerce but it was literally known throughout the Roman world for the amount of sexual immorality that took place there. The study note from the New Geneva Study Bible says, “Corinth was thoroughly pagan and immoral. The city was filled with pagan temples and on the south there was a high acropolis with a temple of Aphrodite. From the fifth century BC the expression ‘to Corinthianize’ meant to be sexually immoral.” VK: And that’s why you said “sort of.” What you meant was Corinth was a great place to found a church because any message delivered there would likely be spread across the entire Roman Mediterranean world. But it would have been a challenging place to have a church, wouldn’t it? I mean there would have been a lot of temptation in a place like Corinth. RD: Exactly. But let’s go a little deeper into what having a temple of Aphrodite actually meant in terms of the daily life there. It was common in ancient cities for the city to worship one god or goddess. For instance, Diana was the principal deity worshipped at Ephesus. Minerva or Athena was worshipped at Athens. Diana was the goddess of the hunt, nature, and wild things. Minerva or Athena was the goddess of wisdom, justice, law, and defensive warfare. So, Athens was well known for its elevated philosophy. VK: I see where you’re going. Venus was the Roman equivalent of the goddess Aphrodite. Venus was the goddess of love, sex, and fertility in the Roman pantheon. So, the worship of Venus exacerbated the tendencies that were already present in Corinth because of the sea trade and commercial interests. I guess we could think of Corinth as a sort of ancient version of Las Vegas. RD: Yes. Corinth was dedicated to the goddess of love, or licentious passion. The temple of Venus was erected on the north side of the Acrocorinthus, a mountain about half a mile in height on the south of the city. This mountain was covered with temples and splendid houses but was especially devoted to Venus. There was actually a law that said that 1,000 beautiful females should officiate as courtesans, or public prostitutes, before the altar of the goddess of love. Some merchants would actually send to foreign countries to get women and present them to the temple to, in their minds, enhance their chances for business success. Obviously, in a city with a lot of foreign travelers the temple, the prostitutes, generated a lot of revenue for the city. Travelers would lose their money so quickly there was a proverb that said, "It is not for everyone to go to Corinth," VK: So, my guess is you’re going to tell us that one of the primary reasons Paul wrote 1 Corinthians was to address the problem of sexual immorality which was rampant in Corinth. And this problem was made all the more egregious because in Corinth not only was sexual immorality not discouraged it was actively encouraged by the government, the economic forces within the city, and the religious establishment at the temple. Yikes. I’d like to say that is different from today but I’m not so sure that it is. RD: You’re absolutely right about the point I’m making. The Apostle Paul spent more time talking about sexual immorality and how to overcome it in 1 Corinthians than in any other epistle that he wrote. Paul spent the better part of chapter 5 through 7 of 1 Corinthians discussing sexual immorality in one way or another. That’s close to 20% of the content of this book and it’s far more than he discussed a single “sin issue” in any of his other epistles. 1 Corinthians is 16 chapters and so is the book of Romans. VK: And we talked about the book of Romans in our last two episodes of Anchored by Truth. 1 Corinthians and Roman are about the same length. In his letter to the Romans, however, Paul devoted less than a half-dozen verses to discussing sexual immorality, as opposed to nearly 3 chapters in 1 Corinthians. So, it’s clear to see that sexual immorality was a much bigger problem for the church in Corinth than the church in Rome. And now we know from Corinth’s location, history, culture, and economy why that was true. Interesting. Sad, but interesting. So, in what other ways did the geography and culture of Corinth influence the problems that Paul was dealing with in 1 Corinthians? RD: Well, one of the other big issues that Paul dealt with in 1 Corinthians that he scarcely mentions in any of his other epistles was the issue of food offered to idols. VK: The issue of whether Christians could eat food that had been offered to idols came up in the early church because of this pervasiveness of pagan temples that were present in most of the cities of the Roman world. It was common in those times for people when they bought food to take it to a temple and ask a pagan priest to bless it. This was especially common when wealthier people were putting on a large dinner – in essence a feast - for their friends or business associates. And this would have been a common practice for meals or feasts that were being put on for members of craft or professional guilds. Right? RD: Right. Then, as today, it was common for people who worked at a specific trade or craft to belong to a guild, a professional organization. In fact, in many places you couldn’t practice a trade or craft unless you belonged to the guild because the guild was the organization that decided who got what work. And just like today the guilds would put on what we would call “business dinners.” At these guild dinners the members would do the same things they do today – socialize, discuss business issues and government problems, gossip, and make connections. VK: So, anyone in the church in Corinth who was part of a trade or practice would have had the practice of attending these professional or business dinners for years or decades. It was a normal part of life for them. But when they became Christians they had a problem they had never had before. RD: Yes. Let’s put ourselves in the shoes – or sandals – of the guild dinner organizer for a second. The organizer isn’t a Christian so he shares, or at least practices, the local religious beliefs. Well, one purpose of the local god or goddess was to provide the city residents with good fortune and material blessings. So, naturally the dinner organizer would want to be sure the dinner promoted the success of the guild’s members. This would include not only buying good food but getting a blessing on that food before it’s served at the banquet. Getting the food, especially the meat, blessed was a common part of banquet preparation. Well, getting the food blessed meant that that food had been dedicated to the god or goddess, the idol. VK: And the dinner guests would have expected the dinner host to do that, wouldn’t they? And if the host or the guests weren’t Christians, which the vast majority weren’t, there was no problem with getting the blessing and eating the food. But Christians are prohibited from worshipping idols and eating food that had been dedicated to an idol would have been a form of worship. So, the Christian guest has a problem that none of the other guests have. RD: Exactly. VK: And Paul made this problem very clear in 1 Corinthians, chapter 10, verses 18 through 22. Paul said, “Think about the people of Israel. Weren’t they united by eating the sacrifices at the altar? What am I trying to say? Am I saying that food offered to idols has some significance, or that idols are real gods? No, not at all. I am saying that these sacrifices are offered to demons, not to God. And I don’t want you to participate with demons. You cannot drink from the cup of the Lord and from the cup of demons, too. You cannot eat at the Lord’s Table and at the table of demons, too. What? Do we dare to rouse the Lord’s jealousy? Do you think we are stronger than he is?” That’s from the New Living Translation. RD: Yes. So, again we see how Corinth’s culture and economy impacted the church in Corinth and therefore the letter that Paul wrote to the church. In this case we are still talking about the first letter Paul wrote where Paul felt it necessary to correct some of the church members’ behavior that he had either observed or been told about. Corinth was a commercial center. In Paul’s day the economy was vibrant. The crafts and trades in Corinth were prospering including lots of people who had been in a craft or business before Paul first preached there on his second missionary journey. But for the craftsmen, tradesmen, or business owners who encountered Paul or the new faith of Christianity things now change. VK: Now, you’re being told that there is not a pantheon of gods and goddesses. There is one true God who made heaven and earth. And you are learning that that one true God has prescribed certain standards for behavior and especially for worship. Paul was a Jew and many of his first audience members were Jews. So, they were all very familiar with the first of the 10 commandments. “I am the LORD your God, the one who brought you out of Egypt where you were slaves. Do not worship any god except me.” That’s Exodus, chapter 20, verses 2 and 3 from the Contemporary English Version. So, now you are being told that if you continue to eat food that has been offered to a pagan god or goddess you are participating in idolatry. And that is hard on you because times and business are good and you don’t want that to change. RD: Right. And that helps explain why in the very first part of 1 Corinthians Paul said, “Remember, dear brothers and sisters, that few of you were wise in the world’s eyes or powerful or wealthy when God called you. Instead, God chose things the world considers foolish in order to shame those who think they are wise. And he chose things that are powerless to shame those who are powerful.” That’s 1 Corinthians 1:26 and 27 in the New Living Translation. Paul was noting that most of the church members were not “wealthy” or “powerful” when they became Christians. VK: In other words, not very many of the business owners, the well-established tradesmen, or the upper crust in Corinth wanted to give up their lifestyle to follow Jesus. And we are experiencing that same thing today aren’t we? RD: Yes. We started out this episode noting that in America and in most of the western nations being a Christian was perfectly acceptable, if not even outright encouraged. Even people who weren’t Christians didn’t have a problem with their neighbors who were and many probably were glad to do business with them because Christianity promotes virtuous conduct including honest business conduct. But as we noted that common cultural consensus has been eroded and now some Christian businesses have been outright attacked because they have insisted on adhering to their values. And even more people are displaying an unwillingness to set aside their worldly pleasures to embrace the narrow gate that opens to salvation. VK: So, in a very sad and odd way we are turning the clock back almost 2,000 years. In 1st century AD Corinth a business owner, say someone who sold cloth and fabric, might have practiced their business for decades and got along just fine. But once they heard Paul preach and became a Christian now they can’t go to the guild dinners anymore or, at least if they go, they have to explain why they are not eating some or all of the food. And they can’t go to dinners at the houses of some friends anymore. And now they especially know they can’t go down to the temple of Aphrodite anymore for … well, for what they know will be taking place at the temple. They are declining to do many of the things that their friends are still doing and their friends cannot figure out why. It’s easy to understand how a person like that may have questions for which they really want answers. RD: Right. Paul had founded the church in Corinth on his second missionary journey. And at the time he wrote 1 Corinthians 3 to 5 years had passed. And during that time problems had arisen and many church members were looking for answers. So, they turned to the great Apostle who had founded the church. So, what we see in 1 Corinthians is Paul having to address several issues that were exceptionally problematic because of Corinth’s culture and geography. And we’re going to see in the next episode of Anchored by Truth that the sexual immorality and idolatry he addressed were not the only issues Paul had to confront. VK: This sounds like a great time for a prayer. Today, let’s listen to a prayer of adoration for the Father. A lot of people will wonder whether the price they will pay to be a Christian is worth it. That question is easily answered when we consider the magnificence of our salvation. As the old hymn says “I'd rather have Jesus than silver or gold; I'd rather be His than have riches untold; I'd rather have Jesus than houses or lands. I'd rather be led by His nail pierced hand.” ---- PRAYER OF ADORATION FOR THE SON VK: Before we close we’d like to remind our audience that a lot of our radio episodes are linked together in series of topics so if they missed any episodes in this series or if they just want to hear one again, all of these episodes are available on your favorite podcast app. To find them just search on “Anchored by Truth by Crystal Sea Books.” If you’d like to hear more, try out crystalseabooks.com where “We’re not perfect but our Boss is!” (Opening Bible Quote from the God’s Word Translation) 1 Corinthians, chapter 1, verse 26, God’s Word Translation 1 Corinthians 1 Barnes' Notes (biblehub.com)

Science Friday
History Of Sex, Plastic Battery, Mosquito Smell, Postpartum Art. June 3, 2022, Part 1

Science Friday

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 48:11


Scientists Found The Biggest Known Plant On Earth This week, an underwater seagrass meadow claimed the title for the world's largest plant. This organism sprawls across 77 square miles of shallow ocean and has survived 4,500 years. To accomplish this, it kept cloning itself and created identical offshoots to spread along the sand. The ocean has changed wildly over the last 4,500 years, yet this plant has survived. Researchers believe that cloning itself may have helped the plant adapt to a changing ocean, offering hope that seagrass meadows may be more resilient than expected in the face of climate change. Sophie Bushwick, a technology editor at Scientific American, joins Ira to talk about how this mighty meadow persisted for millennia and what it tells scientists about climate change. Sophie and Ira also discuss other stories from this week in science, including what countries are most responsible for fueling the extinction of wildlife, what a well-preserved fossil tell us about the sex lives of ancient trilobites, why male mice are terrified of bananas, the creation of a flea-sized robot that walks like a crab, and how scientists developed an algorithm to pinpoint the whereabouts of unknown asteroids.   Building A Better Battery… Using Plastic? The lithium-ion battery in your cell phone, laptop, or electric car is a crucial component of the modern world. These batteries can charge quickly, and pack a lot of power into a small space. But they're also expensive, require mining scarce lithium, and need to be handled carefully. Other battery technologies have issues as well. For example, the heavy lead-acid battery that starts your car is quite reliable—but lead has its own environmental and health costs. That's why PolyJoule, a startup company based near Boston, is trying to create a new kind of battery, somewhere on the performance curve between those old lead-acid batteries and lithium-ion cells. Their technology relies not on a metal, but on polymer plastics. Read more at sciencefriday.com.   Bug Off: Why Mosquitoes Have An Annoyingly Amazing Sense Of Smell Mosquitoes use their sense of smell to find their next meal: us. So what would happen if you tweaked their smell so that humans smell really gross to them? That's what Dr. Chris Potter and his lab recently tried to do—they changed the neurons responsible for the insect's smell detection, so that in the presence of animal odors, their olfactory systems would be overwhelmed. Instead of smelling like a nice meal, mosquitoes would be repelled by the scent of humans, like if you were stuck in a small room with someone wearing too much cologne. This method worked in Drosophila, the common fruit fly, so Potter and his team were hopeful that would also be the case for mosquitoes. Instead, the experiment didn't go as planned. Because finding a blood meal is so important for mosquitoes, those little buggers evolved backups for their backup receptors. When Potter turned one pathway off, another one kicked in. Ira talks with Dr. Chris Potter, an associate professor of neuroscience in the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, based in Baltimore, Maryland, about his findings, and why we can never quite get mosquitoes to bug off.   So You Think You Know About Sex When it comes to sex, there's really no such thing as normal. What was once considered taboo, sometimes goes mainstream. And some things considered new have been around as long as sex itself, like birth control, abortion, and sexually transmitted infections. All that and more is contained in the new book, Been There, Done That: A Rousing History of Sex, by Rachel Feltman, executive editor of Popular Science, based in New York City. Radio producer Shoshannah Buxbaum talks with author Rachel Feltman about queer animals, crocodile dung contraception, ancient STIs, what led to the United States' original abortion ban, and more.   Processing Postpartum With AI And Synthetic Breast Milk Art One of Ani Liu's strengths as an artist is her ability to process emotion through different scientific mediums: machine learning, chemistry, 3D-printing. The result is often visceral: she's used organic chemistry to concoct perfumes that smell like people emotionally close to her and engineered a device that enables the wearer to control the direction of swimming sperm with their mind. And at her new exhibition—next to a 3D-printed sculpture of a pig's uterus—lies 328 feet of clear tubing with a milky-white substance pumped through it, a commentary on pumping breast milk as a new parent. “I wanted to use my own breast milk, but it wouldn't be stable for the duration of the show,” she said. Liu became a parent shortly before the pandemic, and she channeled that experience into a new show called “Ecologies of Care,” to process her postpartum period and the communities in her life that helped her through that time. “I hope that this can allow new parents to bond and maybe feel less lonely,” she said. “In making it, I was questioning how do we create better communities of care? I made all of this work before the formula shortage, before our reproductive rights were even more under threat. When I look at this, I'm hoping that you see this particular slice of love and labor.”   Transcripts for each segment will be available the week after the show airs on sciencefriday.com.  

DNA Today: A Genetics Podcast
#187 Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy with June Kinoshita and Rojan Kavosh

DNA Today: A Genetics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022


This week we're diving into Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy (FSHD) and highlighting the utilization of whole genome mapping in the diagnosis of FSHD. Joining us to explore these topics are June Kinoshita, Director of Research and Patient Engagement at the FSHD Society, and Rojan Kavosh, a genetic counselor by training who is currently a Genomic Testing Consultant at PerkinElmer Genomics.June Kinoshita joined the FSHD Society in 2012 and served as its Executive Director until September of 2017. Previously, June co-founded and served as Executive Editor of the Alzheimer Research Forum, the pre-eminent Web community for researchers in neurodegenerative disorders. June has worked closely with a variety of foundations to develop initiatives for multiple sclerosis, schizophrenia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and other disorders. She is also an entrepreneur, having co-founded N-of-One, Inc., a pioneering individualized clinical decision support oncology company. June graduated from Harvard College where she studied physics, and began her career as a science journalist, working as a writer and editor for Scientific American, Science, The New York Times Magazine, and many other national publications. Rojan Kavosh MS, CGC, is a licensed certified genetic counselor and Genomic Testing Consultant at PerkinElmer Genomics. Prior to joining PerkinElmer Genomics, she worked as a perinatal genetic counselor in the Fetal Center at Stanford Children's Hospital. Rojan graduated from UCLA with a degree in Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology, and earned her Master's in Genetic Counseling from UC Irvine.On This Episode We Discuss:Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy (FSHD)Types of FSHDCauses of FSHD Digenic inheritance patterns Genome optical mapping vs. whole genome sequencingThe genetic etiology of FSHD type 1 vs 2Benefits of ordering FSHD testing through PerkinElmer GenomicsClinical trials for FSHDWhen the FSHD Society predicts that treatments will be available for people with FSHDTo learn more about genetic testing for FSHD, visit PerkinElmer Genetics and the FSHD Society and be sure to follow the FSHD Society on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, and Instagram. Stay tuned for the next new episode of DNA Today on June 10, 2022. New episodes are released on Fridays. In the meantime, you can binge over 185 other episodes on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, streaming on the website, or any other podcast player by searching, “DNA Today”. Episodes since 2021 are also recorded with video which you can watch on our YouTube channel. DNA Today is hosted and produced by Kira Dineen. Our social media lead is Corinne Merlino. Our video lead is Amanda Andreoli. See what else we are up to on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, YouTube and our website, DNApodcast.com. Questions/inquiries can be sent to info@DNApodcast.com. HemoShear Therapeutics is a clinical stage company developing new treatments for patients with rare metabolic disorders. By partnering with fellow biopharma companies, HemoShear is accelerating their drug discovery and development programs in metabolic disorders, and also liver diseases and gout. HemoShear is currently conducting a clinical trial for a new therapy for propionic and methylmalonic Acidemia. Learn more about these conditions and the clinical trial in an upcoming episode of DNA Today! You can also visit hemoshear.com. (SPONSORED)

60-Second Science
Where Are Vaccines for Little Kids, and the Latest on Long COVID

60-Second Science

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 8:03


Today we bring you a new episode in our podcast series COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks,  Scientific American ’s senior health editors  Tanya Lewis  and  Josh Fischman  catch you up on the essential developments in the pandemic: from vaccines to new variants and everything in between. You can listen to all past episodes  here . 

The Way Podcast/Radio
82) Last Days of The Dinosaur

The Way Podcast/Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 64:55


When a massive asteroid struck Earth 66 million years ago, a devastating mass extinction followed, taking with it more than half of the world's species. The consequences, both immediate and long-term, of this disastrous event are detailed by author and paleontologist Riley Black in her latest book, The Last Days of the Dinosaurs: An Asteroid, Extinction, and the Beginning. Today she joins me to further discuss the incredible evolutionary opportunities that arose out of the worst day in history. Bio: Riley has been a fossil fanatic since the time she was knee-high to a Stegosaurus. A prolific writer, Riley wrote her popular Laelaps blog for publications such as WIRED, National Geographic, and Scientific American for more than a decade. Her fossil-filled tweets have led Business Insider to call her one of the top "science social media wizards" and HLN to dub her one of "Twitter's 8 coolest geeks", as well, and she was the host of Parallax Film's Dinologue. And in a childhood dream come true, Riley was also hired to be the "resident paleontologist" for Jurassic World. In between blogs, Riley also freelances for a variety of publications - from National Geographic to Slate - and writes books. Her first, Written in Stone, was an exploration about what evolution's great transitions tell us about our place in nature, and her second, My Beloved Brontosaurus, was a critically-acclaimed romp with the new dinosaurs science is bringing to life. Website - http://rileyblack.net/ Book - http://rileyblack.net/books Artwork by Phillip Thor - https://linktr.ee/Philipthor_art To watch the visuals with the trailer go to https://www.podcasttheway.com/trailers/ The Way Podcast - www.PodcastTheWay.com - Follow at Twitter / Instagram - @podcasttheway (Subscribe/Follow on streaming platforms and social media!) Thank you Don Grant for the Intro/Outro. Check out his podcast - https://threeinterestingthings.captivate.fm Intro guitar copied from Aiden Ayers at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7UiB9FMOP5s *The views demonstrated in this show are strictly those of The Way Podcast/Radio Show*

Two Girls Shooting the Sh*t with Em and Mo

Em and Mo talk about pronouns, identity, and subconscious bias. Do you know your friends' pronouns? Listen in as they tackle their own biases, address the gendering of inanimate objects, and share some interesting data from a Scientific American article entitled "Why We Should All Use They/Them Pronouns". --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/twogirlsshootingthesh1t/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/twogirlsshootingthesh1t/support

Your Life In Process
Extend Your Mind Beyond Your Brain with Annie Murphy Paul

Your Life In Process

Play Episode Listen Later May 29, 2022 51:03


We are sensing the world around us all the time. We often do not recognize the information picked up by our bodies. Do you want to extend your thinking beyond your brain? Do you want to learn how to use your body to enhance your use of information in the world around you? In this episode of “Your Life in Process,” Diana discusses why and how to expand our thinking beyond our brain with acclaimed science writer, Annie Murphy Paul. About Annie Murphy PaulAnnie Murphy Paul is an acclaimed science writer whose work has appeared in the New York Times Magazine, Scientific American, and The Best American Science Writing, among many other publications. Her latest book is The Extended Mind: The Power of Thinking Outside the Brain, published in June of 2021 and selected as an "Editors' Choice" by the New York Times Book Review. She is also the author of Origins, named by the New York Times Book Review as a “Notable Book,” and The Cult of Personality, hailed by Malcolm Gladwell in the New Yorker as a “fascinating new book.” Her TED Talk has been viewed more than 2.6 million times. Annie is a recipient of the Rosalynn Carter Mental Health Journalism Fellowship, the Spencer Education Journalism Fellowship, and the Bernard L. Schwartz Fellowship at New America. A graduate of Yale University and the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, she is currently a Learning Sciences Exchange Fellow at New America.  Key TakeawaysWe can often get so in our heads that we forget we have a body. Begin to extend your mind by noticing your own physical body and internal sensations.  Gestures and body language are essential parts of transmitting and receiving messages with others in our lives. When we explore pieces of nature outside of our mind with our bodies, we feel restored, creative, and connected.  Relevant Resources Mentionedhttps://drdianahill.com/extras/ (Download Your Daily Practice for Episode 22 Here) Follow https://twitter.com/anniemurphypaul?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor (Annie Murphy Paul on Twitter)  Learn More about https://anniemurphypaul.com/ (Annie Murphy Paul) Read https://anniemurphypaul.com/books/the-extended-mind/ (The Extended Mind) Learn More about http://insightla.org/drdianahill (InsightLA) https://drdianahill.com/events/ (Diana's upcoming events) Thank you for listening to Your Life in Process! If you have any questions or feedback you can contact me by email at podcast@yourlifeinprocess.com, leave me an audio message at (805) 457-2776, or message me on Instagram @drdianahill and remember when you become psychologically flexible, you become free. Thank you to my team Craig, Angela Stubbs, Ashley Hiatt, Abby Diehl, and to our sponsorhttps://lightfully.com/ ( )InsightLA Meditation for making this podcast possible. Thank you to Benjamin Gould ofhttps://bellandbranch.com/ ( Bell & Branch) for your beautiful music. Episode Segments[00:01] Introduction [01:56] About Annie Murphy Paul [07:04] Thinking With Our Body [09:49] Thinking With Interoceptive Awareness [16:39] Thinking With Gesture [21:56] Thinking With Natural Spaces [27:40] Diana's Upcoming Events At ACBS World Conference  [28:18] Cognitive Offloading [33:45] Thinking In Our Work Spaces [38:57] Thinking With Experts [40:56] The Value of Social Cognition [43:08] The Group Mind [46:39] Your Daily Practice

Sisters Cracking Up
Why Women Drink with Gabrielle Glaser

Sisters Cracking Up

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 56:42


Join Sisters Cracking Up, as we interview Gabrielle Glaser on her groundbreaking, bestselling book, "Her Best-Kept Secret: Why Women Drink -- and How They Can Regain Control." If you've ever struggled with alcohol addiction (or if someone you love has) OR if you've ever simply questioned your own relationship with alcohol (pandemic drinking, anyone?), this episode is a must listen. From how women process alcohol, to how they feel about themselves when they drink, to what makes women drink...it's all here in this episode. (HINT: They're all very different from men's experience with booze.) And if you're a woman considering AA, Glaser's findings and research on women and AA may surprise (shock!) you. Join sisters Abby Rodman and Julie Howard for an in-depth interview with Gabrielle Glaser on her acclaimed book. Gabrielle Glaser is the author, most recently, of "American Baby: A Mother, A Child, and the Shadow History of Adoption," which tells the shocking truth about postwar adoption in America through the bittersweet story of one teenager, the son she was forced to relinquish, and their lifelong search to find each other. The New York Times, the Washington Post, and NPR named it a best book of 2021.  Gabrielle's 2013 book examining women's drinking and the American rehab industry, "Her Best-Kept Secret: Why Women Drink -- and How They Can Regain Control" was a New York Times bestseller.  She has covered the intersection of health, medicine, and culture for The New York Times and many other publications, including The Atlantic, The Washington Post, and Scientific American, and is the mother of three grown daughters.     

ADP: Col. Kevin Randle (Ret), PhD
Kevin Randle Interviews - MICHAEL SHERMER - Skepticism and UFOs

ADP: Col. Kevin Randle (Ret), PhD

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 49:11


Dr. Michael Shermer is the Founding Publisher of Skeptic magazine, the host of the Science Salon Podcast, and a Presidential Fellow at Chapman University where he teaches Skepticism 101. For 18 years he was a monthly columnist for Scientific American. He is the author of New York Times bestsellers including Why People Believe Weird Things and The Believing Brain, Why Darwin Matters, The Science of Good and Evil, and The Moral Arc. His new book is Heavens on Earth: The Scientific Search for the Afterlife, Immortality & Utopia.

Leading With Empathy & Allyship
Racial, Ethnic, & Gender Equity In The Global Workplace With Julia Taylor Kennedy

Leading With Empathy & Allyship

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 40:55


In Episode 86, Julia Taylor Kennedy, Executive Vice President at Coqual, joins Melinda to discuss key insights from Coqual's Equity Series that feature insights on racial, ethnic, and gender equity in the global workforce. Julia takes us through her findings on specific differences around workplace equity across various countries. She shares how professionals from underrepresented groups experience inequity in performance evaluations, promotions, and compensation. She also offers a strategic approach for employers, managers, and DEI practitioners to measure and improve equity in global workplaces by identifying marginalized groups, addressing systemic issues, and understanding where there might be gaps in inclusion initiatives.About Julia Taylor Kennedy (she/her)Julia Taylor Kennedy is executive vice president at Coqual where she leads cutting-edge research on issues affecting today's professional workforce with an eye toward solutions for a more inclusive and equitable global workplace and world. Julia holds a mirror to how workplaces work today—and gives companies a way forward.Julia is a thought leader who has spoken at the United Nations, the Conference Board, the Executive Leadership Council, New York City Bar's Associate Leadership Institute, and many companies. She's been featured in Harvard Business Review, Business Insider, Fortune, Scientific American, and The Washington Post; she also has appeared on Bloomberg TV, American Public Media's Marketplace, Wharton Business Radio, and more.Find Leading With Empathy & Allyship useful? Subscribe to our podcast and like this episode!For more about Change Catalyst, and to join us for our monthly live event, visit https://ally.cc. There, you'll also find educational resources and highlights from this episode.Connect With Julia Taylor Kennedy On SocialLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/julia-taylor-kennedy-893aa25Connect With Us On SocialYouTube: youtube.com/c/changecatalystTwitter: twitter.com/changecatalystsFacebook: facebook.com/changecatalystsInstagram: instagram.com/techinclusionLinkedIn: linkedin.com/company/changecatalystsProduction TeamCreator & Host: Melinda Briana EplerCo-Producers: Renzo Santos & Christina Swindlehurst ChanCreative Director @ Podcast Rocket: Rob Scheerbarth[Image description: Leading With Empathy & Allyship promo and photos of Julia Taylor Kennedy, a White woman with short, curly brown hair, amber earrings, and teal blue shirt, and host Melinda Briana Epler, a White woman with red hair, glasses, and orange shirt holding a white mug behind a laptop.]Support the show

Open Your Eyes with Dr. Kerry Gelb
Ep 76 Part 3 - Dr. Harvey Fishman "Glaucoma - Strategies For Prevention"

Open Your Eyes with Dr. Kerry Gelb

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 49:15


Dr. Fishman was an undergraduate chemistry major and then earned a Ph.D. from Stanford in Chemistry and Neuroscience working in the area of lasers, microfluidics, and neuroscience. Dr. Fishman then conducted post-doctoral research Neurobiology working in the field of retinal ganglion cell nerve regeneration. He earned an M.D. from Stanford and after his medical internship, Dr. Fishman joined Stanford Ophthalmology both as an ophthalmology resident and faculty and founded the Ophthalmic Tissue Engineering Laboratory (OTEL). As director of OTEL. he was awarded one of the first BIO-X grants and became the founder of the artificial retina prosthesis project which has recently gone into clinical trials for patients with macular degeneration. After completing his residency training in advanced eye surgery and medical treatment for eye diseases at Stanford, Dr. Fishman started his own concierge ophthalmology practice in Palo Alto where he continues to lead advancements in ocular surface disease and novel diagnostics for dry eye, cancer detection, and the ocular microbiome. Dr. Fishman has a special interest in digital health and has co-founded several silicon-valley start-ups. Dr. Fishman has co-authored 34 Peer-reviewed Publications, 11 U.S. Patents, and his research has been highlighted in Scientific American, The Economist, JAMA, and Ophthalmology Times.

KPCW Cool Science Radio
Cool Science Radio | May 19, 2022

KPCW Cool Science Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 53:02


On today's Cool Science Radio, John Wells and Lynn Ware Peek's guests are Sophie Bushwick and Chris Cashwell. We start the show by discussing (01:36) why is it that for many of us cryptocurrency just seems so... cryptic? Sophie Bushwick, senior technology editor at Scientific American, helps us understand how crypto has become a mass-market product advertised to everyday buyers. But the risk of volatility that could bankrupt untold numbers of people is still high.Then, (28:20) artificial intelligence is ubiquitous and used for myriad applications most of us aren't aware of - like how it is being used to triage cancer patients. Chris Cashwell of Azra A.I. joins the show to discuss one evolving AI technology first developed to track down terrorists post 9/11, then later expanded to help law enforcement combat human trafficking, and now to help cancer patients.

PlanetGeo
Super_Volcanoes: Dr. Robin George Andrews

PlanetGeo

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 56:47


Join us this week for our interview of Dr. Robin George Andrews.  Robin George Andrews is a freelance science journalist based in London. His work has appeared in National Geographic, The New York Times, The Atlantic, Scientific American, Gizmodo, Atlas Obscura and elsewhere. He trained as a volcanologist, earning a doctorate in the subject, but then realized that telling people stories of spectacular eruptions and off-world scientific shenanigans brought him more joy than academia ever could. His upcoming book — Super Volcanoes: What They Reveal about Earth and the Worlds Beyond is out now - go buy a copy!I must admit, it took Jesse and I a while to realize that the book is called Super Volcanoes - two words.  In other words, all volcanoes are super.  Most volcanologists strongly dislike the term Supervolcanoes - one word, that is typically used to describe Yellowstone National Park.  Robin has a huge personality which made for a very fun interview.  We talked about Hawaii, Yellowstone, deep ocean volcanoes, Tonga, and Marie Tharp to name just a few.  Tune in to get all the details.  You won't be disappointed.——————————————————Instagram: @planetgeocastTwitter: @planetgeocastFacebook: @planetgeocastEmail: planetgeocast@gmail.comWebsite: https://planetgeocast.buzzsprout.com/ 

The Kyle Thiermann Show
#286 Trouble Sleeping? Get Some Sun - Mariana Figueiro, Ph.D.

The Kyle Thiermann Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 59:26


Mariana G. Figueiro, Ph.D., is Director of the Lighting Research Center (LRC) and Professor of Architecture at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Dr. Figueiro is well known for her research on the effects of light on human health, circadian photobiology, and lighting for older adults. Her research is regularly featured in national media including The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and Scientific American. Dr. Figueiro has also brought attention to the significance of light and health as a topic of public interest through her TEDMED talk.Contact Dr. FigueiroIf you dig this podcast, would you be please leave a short review on Apple Podcasts? It’s takes less than 60 seconds and makes a difference when I drop to my knees and beg hard-to-get guests to come on the show. All of my stuff is on Thiermann.substack.comConnect with me on Instagram | Twitter | YouTubeBrought to you by Santa Cruz Medicinals and RPM Training.RPM Training is a Norcal based active lifestyle brand founded on the idea that legit, purposeful functional training is the foundation of a truly full, adventurous life. I love their workout equipment and use it daily. Use the code KYLETMAN at checkout and get 10% off any order. Santa Cruz Medicinals CBD has supported this podcast from day one. Their founder actually convinced me to start the podcast! They make a range of potent CBD products and my personal favorite is the Peppermint Tincture, which I use most nights before before I go to bed. Use the code KYLE10 at checkout, and get 10% off any order. Sore muscles, be gone!Connect with me on Instagram | Twitter | YouTubeSend voice memos to: info@kyle.surf Get full access to Writing by Kyle Thiermann at thiermann.substack.com/subscribe

Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness
How F$^*#d Up Is Fatphobia? with Professor Sabrina Strings

Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 55:36


What do Enlightenment-era paintings, 19th-century American fashion magazines, and Sir Mix-A-Lot's “Baby Got Back” have in common? They're all strong examples of what fatphobia has to do with race, class, and gender discrimination. This week, learn all about the origins of anti-fat bias, and how it persists today, with Professor Sabrina Strings. Sabrina Strings, Ph.D. is a Chancellor's Fellow and Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of California, Irvine. Sabrina has been featured in dozens of venues, including BBC News, NPR, Huffington Post, Vox, Los Angeles Times, Essence, Vogue, and goop. Her writing has appeared in diverse venues including, The New York Times, Scientific American, Ethnic and Racial Studies, and Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society. Her book, Fearing the Black Body: The Racial Origins of Fat Phobia (2019), was awarded the 2020 Best Publication Prize by the Body & Embodiment Section of the American Sociological Association.You can follow Dr. Strings on Twitter @SaStrings and check out her website sabrinastrings.com. Want to learn more? Here are some books and resources she recommends:Da'Shaun Harrison's The Belly of the BeastSonya Renee Taylor's The Body Is Not An ApologyDr. Joy Cox's Fat Girls In Black BodiesRoxane Gay's HungerTressie McMillan Cottom's THICKDr. Jill Andrew's workNAAFAJoin the conversation, and find out what former guests are up to, by following us on Instagram and Twitter @CuriousWithJVN. Jonathan is on Instagram and Twitter @JVN and @Jonathan.Vanness on Facebook.Transcripts for each episode are available at JonathanVanNess.com. Love listening to Getting Curious? Now, you can also watch Getting Curious—on Netflix! Head to netflix.com/gettingcurious to dive in.Our executive producer is Erica Getto. Our associate producer is Zahra Crim. Our editor is Andrew Carson. Our socials are run and curated by Middle Seat Digital. Our theme music is “Freak” by QUIÑ; for more, head to TheQuinCat.com. Getting Curious merch is available on PodSwag.com.

60-Second Science
How to Care for COVID at Home, and Is That Sniffle Allergies or the Virus? COVID Quickly, Episode 30

60-Second Science

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 8:18


Today we bring you a new episode in our podcast series COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks, Scientific American ’s senior health editors Tanya Lewis and Josh Fischman catch you up on the essential developments in the pandemic: from vaccines to new variants and everything in between. You can listen to all past episodes here .

PlanetGeo
Who Becomes a Volcanologist? Dr. Robin Andrews

PlanetGeo

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 8:31


Join us this week for our interview of Dr. Robin George Andrews.  Robin George Andrews is a freelance science journalist based in London. His work has appeared in National Geographic, The New York Times, The Atlantic, Scientific American, Gizmodo, Atlas Obscura and elsewhere. He trained as a volcanologist, earning a doctorate in the subject, but then realized that telling people stories of spectacular eruptions and off-world scientific shenanigans brought him more joy than academia ever could. His upcoming book — Super Volcanoes: What They Reveal about Earth and the Worlds Beyond is out now - go buy a copy!I must admit, it took Jesse and I a while to realize that the book is called Super Volcanoes - two words.  In other words, all volcanoes are super.  Most volcanologists strongly dislike the term Supervolcanoes - one word, that is typically used to describe Yellowstone National Park.  Robin has a huge personality which made for a very fun interview.  We talked about Hawaii, Yellowstone, deep ocean volcanoes, Tonga, and Marie Tharp to name just a few.  Tune in to get all the details.  You won't be disappointed.——————————————————Instagram: @planetgeocastTwitter: @planetgeocastFacebook: @planetgeocastEmail: planetgeocast@gmail.comWebsite: https://planetgeocast.buzzsprout.com/ 

The Motherkind Podcast
What if motherhood is the making of you? with Dr. Pragya Agarwal

The Motherkind Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 38:18


Welcome to the Motherkind podcast. The show that is going to help you navigate the massive challenges of motherhood and life with more acceptance, joy, ease and purpose. This week's guest is the brilliant Dr. Pragya Agarwal She is a behavioral scientist, academic, journalist and award-winning author who has written widely on racial inequality, parenting and gender. Her most recent book is (M)otherhood. I love this chat. I found Pragya's story really inspiring and I hope you will too. As always, we continue the conversation over on Instagram, so come and join us there. THIS WEEK'S SPONSOR - GYMONDO We are grateful to Gymondo for sponsoring this week's episode Gymondo is an online fitness and well-being platform with 100s of 20 to 30-minute workouts and training programmes ranging from HIIT and yoga to dance and meditation, plus over 1000 healthy recipes. Aside from the freedom and flexibility Gymondo offers, exercising at home is fun, saves you money, fits perfectly into your lifestyle and helps you stick to your fitness goals. Start a 14-day FREE trial and save 50% on your annual membership. You may access the offer just by clicking on this link or by going to gymondo.com and adding the code MOTHERKIND. ABOUT DR. PRAGYA AGARWAL Dr. Pragya Agarwal is a behavioral and data scientist and author of Sway: Unravelling Unconscious Bias (Bloomsbury, 2020), Wish We Knew What To Say: Talking with Children About Race (Little Brown, 2020), and (M)otherhood: On the Choices of Being a Woman (Canongate, 2021). She has also written a picture book for children, Standing up to Racism (Hachette, 2021). Pragya is the visiting professor of social inequities and injustice at Loughborough University and founder of a research think-tank, The 50 Percent Project, looking at global inequities. She is a two-time TEDx speaker and hosted a podcast, Outside the Boxes. Her writing has also appeared in the Guardian, Independent, Scientific American, New Scientist, Literary Hub, AEON, Hinterland Magazine, amongst others. Her next book, Hysterical, will be published in September 2022 with Canongate. You can connect with her at: @DrPragyaAgarwal drpragyaagarwal.com MOTHERKIND PROGRAMMES AND RESOURCES FREEDOM FROM PERFECTIONISM: Are you ready to find freedom from guilt? Let me help you find Freedom from Perfectionism if you are a mother who has ever felt not quite enough. INSTAGRAM: @motherkind_zoe - come engage with Zoe and our community over on Instagram for inspiration, tips and sometimes a bit of humour to get us through our day.

Creeps & Crimes
S2 Ep85: Spontaneous Human Combustion & Kacie Woody

Creeps & Crimes

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 75:05


WE'RE BACK FROM TRAVELS BABY AND FULL OF CHARISMA!!!! Morgan starts us off with the insane anomaly that is the Wick Effect of Spontaneous Human Combustion! Taylar then covers the case of Kacie Woody, a 13 year old girl from Arkansas who was targeted by an online predator. ALL AD CODES AND LINKS ARE HERE! JOIN OUR PATREON FOR 2 EXCLUSIVE EPISODES EACH MONTH AND THE ENTIRE BACK LOG OF EPS AND BONUS MATERIAL GO WATCH ON YOUTUBE Be sure to like, comment, subscribe and turn on post notifications for our channel! Let's Get Creepy!! Follow us on Instagram Check out our website Sources: How Stuff Works: Scientists Unexplained, The Post Mortem Post, Scientific American, Britannica, The North East Today, SHC- Wiki, Mary Reeser- Wiki, Wick Effect-Wiki, Kacie Woody Foundation: Kacie's Story, Arkansasonline.com (Arkansas Democrat Gazette) Caught in the Web (Four Part Series) by Cathy Frye (2003) , Los Angeles Times: Kidnap Suspect Kills Girl, 13, Self by Tony Perry (2002), Web of Lies, Man With A Van: Catfish Killer: Investigation Discovery, San Diego Union Tribune “FBI Scours ex-home of La Mesan who killed girl, self..” By Mark Arner (2002), Find a Grave: Kacie Woody & Kristie Lea (Smith) Woody, Associated Press: Greenbrier, Arkansas: KLRT-TV, David Leslie Fuller: Find a Grave, KATV interview with Tim Woody, Wiki

Legal Grounds | Conversations on Life, Leadership & Law

I usually don't ask questions to start off these episode descriptions, mostly because I don't know how you, the listener, will answer. But here we go:Do you think you could give up eating meat? If you're like me, the gut reaction is probably heck no! But then maybe you start to think about your health… or maybe you start to think about the health of the planet… or the plight of animals on factory farms… I get it. These aren't always enjoyable things to think about, but I also think it's necessary for us to constantly challenge our previously held beliefs. And boy did this conversation do that in spades. Paul Shapiro is the CEO of The Better Meat Company. Founded in 2018, their process for turning potatoes into a porter-house is one of the coolest scientific things I've gotten to learn about in a while. Paul got his start as an activist, founding the organization Compassion of Killing and then went on to multiple leadership positions at the Humane Society of the United States.Paul is a four-time TEDx speaker, and is also the author of the bestselling book, Clean Meat: How Growing Meat Without Animals will Revolutionize Dinner and the World. He has been interviewed by outlets like CNN and luminaries such as Neil DeGras Tyson, and his writing has been featured everywhere from Scientific American to The Washington Post. We talk about the impact of our meat-driven society on our planet and the animals we share it with, and let's just say while I might not go vegan, I'm definitely eating a little less meat. And I gotta tell you, I feel a little bit better. Enjoy the show!