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American popular science magazine

  • 1,015PODCASTS
  • 2,175EPISODES
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  • Oct 15, 2021LATEST
Scientific American

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Best podcasts about Scientific American

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Latest podcast episodes about Scientific American

Everyday Motherhood
257. How to Raise Kids Who Aren't Assh*les with Melissa Wenner Moyer

Everyday Motherhood

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 40:01


  You are exactly the right mom for your kids.  I am so glad to know you.  Find me on Instagram at @everyday_runner_christy Don't forget to SUBSCRIBE to this podcast & check out the new website-- www.keepcalmmotheron.com Don't forget to leave a rating or review.  Email me Play4life.Christy@gmail.com  Want to share a family play idea?  Leave a message on SpeakPipe!   Today's guest is Melinda Wenner Moyer.  Melinda Wenner Moyer is a contributing editor at Scientific American magazine and a regular contributor to The New York Times, Washington Post, and other national magazines and newspapers. She is a faculty member in the Science, Health & Environmental Reporting program at NYU's Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute. Her first book, How To Raise Kids Who Aren't Assholes, was published in July 2021. Find her online at  https://www.melindawennermoyer.com/ https://melindawmoyer.substack.com/   Self-Care: Melinda is going for walks and reading fiction. She just finished The Authenticity Project: A Novel  by Clare Pooley   Family Fun:  Cook food from different cultures and countries around the world.  Christy loves YumYum Boxes to explore the world from home with candy and snack foods.  (Affiliate Link Below) Get $5 Off Your First Box!        You are exactly the right mom for your kids.  I am so glad to know you.    Find me on Instagram at @everyday_runner_christy   Don't forget to SUBSCRIBE to this podcast & check out the new website-- www.keepcalmmotheron.com Don't forget to leave a rating or review.  Email me Play4life.Christy@gmail.com  Want to share a family play idea?  Leave a message on SpeakPipe!  

Conspiracy In The Force - Star Wars and Conspiracy Theories
The Last Woke Jedi (with Stephen Kent)

Conspiracy In The Force - Star Wars and Conspiracy Theories

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 61:55


On this episode, we chatted with Stephen Kent, who is the host of the Star Wars/political-themed "Beltway Banthas" podcast and the popular YouTube series "Right Now with Stephen Kent" as well as the author of the upcoming book "How The Force Can Fix The World". We discussed his love of Star Wars as well as an article from the Scientific American about how J.E.D.I. is an inappropriate term to use for justice, equity, diversity and inclusion work. We discussed the flawed logic employed by the PhD's who wrote the article, but also came to a similar conclusion in how Star Wars/corporatism is probably not an apt symbol for social justice work. Follow Stephen and his work at the links below: Link to pre-order his new book: https://www.centerstreet.com/titles/stephen-kent/how-the-force-can-fix-the-world/9781546000488/ Scientific American article: https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/why-the-term-jedi-is-problematic-for-describing-programs-that-promote-justice-equity-diversity-and-inclusion/ Stephen's rebuttal to the Scientific American article: https://thefederalist.com/2021/09/27/not-even-the-jedi-are-good-enough-for-social-justice-warriors/ Stephen's social media links: https://twitter.com/Stephen_Kent89 https://www.youtube.com/c/rightlyaj Beltway Banthas podcast: https://www.retrozap.com/beltway-banthas/ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/conspiracyintheforce/support

Good Life Project
Dr. Maya Shankar | Change Happens

Good Life Project

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 62:57


Imagine being so drawn to a pursuit as a kid, it consumes most of your waking hours, rapidly becomes your identity, and is the thing you believe you'll devote your life to, and then, in the blink of an eye, it's taken away. That's what happened to Maya Shankar, who fell in love with the violin as a small child, studied it with love and devotion, was being mentored by the legendary Itzhak Perlman, and was sure it would be her profession for life. Until, an injury took it all away in the blink of an eye. How that moment affected her, and how she'd eventually discover a new, equally fulfilling devotion years later - human behavior and cognitive science - is a big part of today's conversation, along with a deep dive into how we change our minds.Maya is currently the Senior Director of Behavioral Economics at Google and is the Creator, Host, and Executive Producer of “A Slight Change of Plans”, a podcast with Pushkin Industries. Maya previously served as a Senior Advisor in the Obama White House, where she founded and served as Chair of the White House's Behavioral Science Team — a team of scientists charged with improving public policy using research insights about human behavior. She has been profiled by the New Yorker and has been featured in the New York Times, Scientific American, Forbes, and on NPR's All Things Considered, Freakonomics, and Hidden Brain. You can find Maya at: Website | A Slight Change of Plans podcastIf you LOVED this episode:You'll also love the conversations we had with Brené Brown about how we show up in our work and life. My new book SparkedCheck out our offerings & partners: Peloton: Access high-energy workouts, instantly. Experience motivation like never before with the Peloton bike, now $400 less. Go to onepeloton.com to learn more.Indeed: Connect with your talent audience so you can make more quality hires faster. Post your job, interview candidates, and make offers all on Indeed. Get started right now with a FREE $75 sponsored job credit to upgrade your job post at Indeed.com/GOODLIFE. Offer valid through December 31st. Terms and conditions apply. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives
Technoptimist Radio 10/13/21: CRISPR restores vision in colorblind

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 5:21


Join Teresa Carey as she breaks down the latest news on the technology that is solving the world's biggest problems. In today's show, Teresa covers how companies are trying to recycle solar panels, solar power batteries in Nigeria, and how CRISPR restored vision in colorblind people. To learn more about the topics in this episode: CRISPR partially restores vision in colorblind people Solar panel recycling: how companies will make it work Solar power batteries offer Nigerians green energy About the host: Teresa Carey is a senior staff writer at Freethink.com, where she covers genetics and the environment. She is also a US Coast Guard licensed captain and a NatGeo Explorer. In addition to Freethink her work can be found in BuzzFeed, Scientific American, PBS NewsHour, NPR Weekend Edition, Smithsonian and more. @teresa_carey The post Technoptimist Radio 10/13/21: CRISPR restores vision in colorblind first appeared on WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives.

Starve the Ego Feed the Soul
Why You Need Relational Self-Awareness - Dr. Alexandra Solomon

Starve the Ego Feed the Soul

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 56:14


Welcome back Starve the Ego Feed the Soul fam! Donorbox link to show your support for the show or buy me a coffee https://donorbox.org/nico-barrazaOver the last two decades, Dr. Alexandra H. Solomon has become one of today's most trusted voices in the world of relationships, and her work on Relational Self-Awareness has reached millions of people around the world. Dr. Solomon is a licensed clinical psychologist at The Family Institute at Northwestern University, and she is on faculty in the School of Education and Social Policy at Northwestern University where she teaches the internationally renowned course, Building Loving and Lasting Relationships: Marriage 101. In addition to writing articles and chapters for leading academic journals and books in the field of marriage and family, she is the author of two bestselling books, Loving Bravely and Taking Sexy Back. Dr. Solomon regularly presents to diverse groups that include the United States Military Academy at West Point and Microsoft, and she is frequently asked to talk about relationships with media outlets like The Today Show, O Magazine, The Atlantic, Vogue, and Scientific American.In this episode Dr. Solomon and I dive deeper into her ideas around building relational self-awareness (RSA) and why this is the most important thing we can be working on to live more fulfilling and joyous lives. If you have followed me for a while you know I am consistently reverting back to building self-awareness as the nexus of being better humans, partners, parents, lovers, friends, and so on. Dr. Solomon brings her amazing background as a clinical psychologist and expands on this with me in an hour long conversation that is filled with so much insight.A link to Dr. Solomon's new podcast launching this month https://dralexandrasolomon.com/podcast/Links to Dr. Solomon's E-course and books: https://dralexandrasolomon.com/train-with-alexandra/And last but not least...her social media links are belowInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/dr.alexandra.solomon/Twitter: https://twitter.com/ahsolomonFacebook:https://www.facebook.com/dralexandrasolomon/YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/alexandrahs1

First Draft: A Dialogue on Writing
First Draft - Annie Murphy Paul

First Draft: A Dialogue on Writing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 67:52


Annie Murphy Paul is an acclaimed science writer whose work has appeared in the New York Times, the Boston Globe, Scientific American, Slate, Time magazine, and The Best American Science Writing, among many other publications. She is the author of Origins, reviewed on the cover of The New York Times Book Review and selected by that publication as a "Notable Book," and The Cult of Personality, hailed by Malcolm Gladwell in the New Yorker as a “fascinating new book.” Her new book is called The Extended Mind. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Hamin Media Group
The new Force order: a Star Wars podcast- Episode 133: Beam Me Up

Hamin Media Group

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 103:40


It's sacrilege, 90 year old William Shatner is going into outer space before a Stars Wars actor! Will Gina be back for Mando Season 4? More KOTOR news for Spiro to comment on.   Is the term JEDI evil?? The woke article from Scientific American thinks so.  We get more info about Jedha that's canon. Who's More OVER this week is an emotional roller coster. It's the aftermath of Anakin and Obi Wan vs  Han returning to Kylo.  Which scene is more OVER! As usual email newforceorder@yahoo.com for comments, answers or with suggestions.     Please support the That Yoda Guy museum and Nick Maley @Nick Maley on Facebook. Unique one of a kinder Star Wars items for sale there!!! 

60-Second Science
COVID Quickly, Episode 16: Vaccines Protect Pregnancies, and a New Antiviral Pill

60-Second Science

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 5:00


Today we bring you a new episode in our podcast series COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks, Scientific American ’s senior health editors Tanya Lewis and Josh Fischman catch you up on the essential developments in the pandemic: from vaccines to new variants and everything in between. You can listen to all past episodes here .

History Goes Bump Podcast
Ep. 405 - Haunted Guam

History Goes Bump Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 36:49


Guam is a United States territory located within the Mariana Islands. The island was occupied by humans starting around 4,000 years ago. Guam IS the Chamarro people. This indigenous group has endured hundreds of years of conquest and occupation of their island and yet their culture has survived. A wonderful culture that embraces the spirit world. On this episode, we are going to share the history, legends and hauntings of Guam! The Moment in Oddity was suggested by Duey Oxberger and features a Colonial ship found under World Trade Center and This Month in History features Scientific American reporting on radios coming into homes. Our sponsor for this episode is HelloFresh. Go to HelloFresh.com/bump14 and enter code bump14 for 14 free meals, plus free shipping! Check out the website: http://historygoesbump.com Show notes can be found here: https://historygoesbump.blogspot.com/2021/10/hgb-ep-405-haunted-guam.html Become an Executive Producer: http://patreon.com/historygoesbump Music used in this episode: Main Theme: Lurking in the Dark by Muse Music with Groove Studios (Moment in Oddity) Vanishing by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4578-vanishing License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license (This Month in History) In Your Arms by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3906-in-your-arms License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license Outro Music: Happy Fun Punk by Muse Music with Groove Studios All other music licensing: PODCASTMUSIC.COM License Synchronization, Mechanical, Master Use and Performance Direct License for a Single Podcast Series under current monthly subscription.

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives
Technoptimist Radio 10/6/21: Star Trek's Holodeck will soon be a reality

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 5:18


Join Teresa Carey as she breaks down the latest news on the technology that is solving the world's biggest problems. In today's show, Teresa covers the smallest microfliers, a special feature of oyster reefs, and holograms you can touch. To learn more about the topics in this episode: Flying microchips the size of sand are tracking air data. Watch them fly. How oyster reefs protect against hurricane damage These holograms are so real you can touch them About the host: Teresa Carey is a senior staff writer at Freethink.com, where she covers genetics and the environment. She is also a US Coast Guard licensed captain and a NatGeo Explorer. In addition to Freethink her work can be found in BuzzFeed, Scientific American, PBS NewsHour, NPR Weekend Edition, Smithsonian and more. @teresa_carey The post Technoptimist Radio 10/6/21: Star Trek's Holodeck will soon be a reality first appeared on WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives.

The MindStrong Project
#139 - Michael Easter: Best-Selling Author, "The Comfort Crisis"

The MindStrong Project

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 64:23


On this episode, Michael Easter joins the show for an in-depth discussion regarding his literary masterpiece, "The Comfort Crisis".  Harvey, Brian, and the MSP crew have long believed in the power of doing hard things and "getting comfortable being uncomfortable", which makes this conversation a must-listen as they dive deep with Michael into the science and research from his book.  They discuss how modern living impacts the human body.  Specifically, Michael shares his approach of combining evolutionary wisdom with modern science.  This episode is PACKED with research that illuminates our generation's greatest challenge: The Comfort Crisis.  Simply put, Michael is a literary savage. Enjoy! ABOUT MICHAEL EASTER Michael is a celebrated best-selling author and leading voice in the human health space who travels the world surrounding himself with world thought-leaders.  Michael's work has appeared in over 60 countries, adopted by professional sports teams, endorsed by the CIA and Navy Seals, and Pulitzer Prize-winning authors.  His writings have been captured in Men's Health Magazine, Outside Magazine, Men's Journal, Cosmopolitan, Vice, Esquire, Scientific American, Women's Health, and others.  He is currently a professor in the journalism department at University of Nevada, Las Vegas.  Michael lives with his wife and their two dogs, Stockton and Conway.   WHERE TO FIND MICHAEL EASTER Website: https://eastermichael.com Instagram: @michael_easter Twitter: @Michael_Easter

London Calling
Travels with Delingpole

London Calling

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 52:20


A midweek release for this episode as James has been on the “last holiday” with his family and comes to us from Croatia and the shores of the Adriatic. The big story this week is Britain’s fuel “crisis” and the PM’s decision to “bring in the army.” The blame, of course, is directed at Brexiteers, justified or not. London Calling fans greet Toby as he participated in a lockdown debate this week and we speculate whether or not those that approached him are really “Team Toby” or just saying that to spare his feelings. And finally, who has jumped the shark into woke silliness more? Scientific American for the demonisation of the Jedi for being “white saviours”or the season two of Ted Lasso? In Culture Corner, James rediscovers the late novelist Irwin Shaw (The Young Lions, Rich Man, Poor Man) and the glories of the printed page in a real book. Opening sound this week is of the PM addressing the petrol situation courtesy of GB News.

Many Minds
The eye's mind

Many Minds

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 13:51


Welcome back folks! Today, we've got an audio essay for you. I won't say too too much—don't want to spoil it—but it's about pupils. Not as in students, but as in the dark cores of our eyes. This one of those that's been in the works for a little while. About a year ago I started collecting all the cool new pupil-related stuff coming out. Then at some point this summer some extra cool stuff came out and I said, “That's it—time to do it, time to pull this material together into some kind of episode.” So that's what we have for you today. And I hope you find it eye-opening. Quick reminder before we get to it: As always, we could really use your help in getting the word out about the show. That might mean subscribing, if you don't already. It might mean rating or reviewing us on Apple Podcasts. It might mean sending the show to a friend or two. I mean honestly it could mean knitting a Many Minds cardigan for the cold months ahead and sporting it around town. Ceaselessly. Alright all, on to this week's essay ‘The eye's mind.' Enjoy!   A text version of this episode (enriched with images!) is readable on Medium.   Notes 2:00 – The eye of the giant squid was described in detail for the first time in 2012, in this paper. 3:10 – On diversity in animal pupils, see this recent paper. 4:40 – Pupil changes to imagined and linguistically encoded light can be read about here and here. 5:30 – Eckherd Hess's early research on pupils is summarized in his 1965 Scientific American article, ‘Attitude and Pupil Size'. 6:45 – The 1966 paper by Kahneman and Beatty is here. Or see a 2018 review of more recent research on pupils and cognitive effort. 8:10 – Hess's studies on the social functions of pupils are recounted in his 1975 Scientific American article, ‘The Role of Pupil Size in Communication'. Several of his classic studies have been replicated just this year (with good but not perfect success). 8:50 – Mariska Kret's suggestion about how pupils fit the baby schema can be found here. 9:45 – Kret's studies of pupil mimicry include this one, this one, and this one, among others. 10:15 – The 2021 paper by Wohltjen & Wheatley on “pupillary synchrony” is available here. 12:00 – The 1974 Nature article titled ‘Pupils of a talking parrot' is available here.

Science Talk
Inside the Nail-biting Quest to Find the 'Loneliest Whale'

Science Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 18:34


It’s a tale of sound; the song of a solitary whale that vocalizes at a unique frequency, 52 Hertz, that no other whale—as the story goes—can seemingly understand.  It’s also a tale about science, and ocean life, laced with fantasy, mystery and mostly shrouded in darkness.  The whale, of unknown species and nicknamed ‘52’, was originally discovered in 1989 and has been intermittently tracked by scientists ever since. Its solitary nature baffled marine researchers. And its very existence captured the attention and hearts of millions of people.  But as 52 roams the ocean’s depths, a lot about its nature is still up in the air.  No one has ever seen it in the flesh.  Scientists have determined that it’s a male, large, possibly a hybrid, and speculated that its unique song—too low in frequency for humans, too high for whales—might be a result of a malformation.  Scientific American sat down with Josh Zeman, an award-winning filmmaker who created a documentary about 52, to talk not just about his impressive cinematic quest (and it is impressive and beautifully shot) but also the science and academic collaborations that fueled it. The documentary—written and directed by Zeman and executive produced by actors Leonardo DiCaprio and Adrian Grenier—is inspired by the findings of the late bioacoustics scientist William Watkins. It’s propelled by passion and curiosity, and relies on underwater acoustics to track 52 through the sound-rich and noise-heavy environment of the ocean.  A departure for Zeman in terms of genre choice, the film still exudes an air of mystery and sleuthing reminiscent of whodunits, and unfolds like a classic true-crime story, which Zeman, an investigative reporter, and a true-crime documentarian, is originally famous for.  Then again, when Zeman started making the movie, the whale was MIA and has been silent for years. In essence, Zeman re-opened a cold case to—in his own words—“set the record straight” and “bring the audience into the world of the whale.” With the help of marine scientists, he followed streams of whale songs, and other breadcrumbs in the form of auditory clues, listening in, analyzing, tracking, slowly and persistently narrowing down the circle around 52. He found him, lost him, found him again until eventually, he made an unexpected revelation about him.  It may not be the closure Zeman expected to give to his audiences. But it’s definitely a fresh chapter in this evolving tale.  Zeman says he is hopeful that other storytellers will take up the mantle and continue to unearth more facts about 52.  “What a more beautiful gift can you give than to say, ‘actually, there's another chapter.’ And then 20 years later, somebody else comes in and adds their chapter,” he says. “That’s what storytelling is.”

Neurotic Nourishment
Season Three, Episode 10: How to Raise Kids Who Aren't Assholes

Neurotic Nourishment

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 56:57


Season Three, Episode 10: How to Raise Kids Who Aren't Assholes Melinda Wenner Moyer is an award-winning journalist whose research-based articles have appeared in pretty much every publication that has rejected my own work. She is a contributing editor at Scientific American magazine and a regular contributor to The New York Times, Washington Post, and other national magazines and newspapers. She is a faculty member in the Science, Health & Environmental Reporting program at NYU's Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute. Her first book, How To Raise Kids Who Aren't Assholes, was published in July 2021 by J.P. Putnam's Sons. Go to her website www.melindawennermoyer.com to subscribe to her newsletter in order to receive a weekly dose of insight, information, and amusing anecdotes. You can also find her on Twitter @lindy2350 and on instagram @MelindaWMoyer Link to purchase the book --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/neuroticnourishment/support

Curiosity Daily
Your Second Brain, Jupiter's Hot Atmosphere, Placebo Buttons

Curiosity Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 14:55


Learn about the “second brain” in your gut; what makes Jupiter's atmosphere so hot; and why placebo buttons are useful. The 'second brain' in your gut might have evolved before the brain in your head by Cameron Duke Nield, D. (2021). The “Second Brain” in Your Gut Might Have Evolved Before The Brain in Your Head. ScienceAlert. https://www.sciencealert.com/we-have-a-brain-like-system-in-our-guts-and-it-may-have-evolved-before-brains-did?utm_source=pocket_mylist Rao, M., & Gershon, M. D. (2016). The bowel and beyond: the enteric nervous system in neurological disorders. Nature Reviews Gastroenterology & Hepatology, 13(9), 517–528. https://doi.org/10.1038/nrgastro.2016.107 Spencer, N. J., Travis, L., Wiklendt, L., Costa, M., Hibberd, T. J., Brookes, S. J., Dinning, P., Hu, H., Wattchow, D. A., & Sorensen, J. (2021). Long range synchronization within the enteric nervous system underlies propulsion along the large intestine in mice. Communications Biology, 4(1). https://doi.org/10.1038/s42003-021-02485-4 Hadhazy, A. (2010, February 12). Think Twice: How the Gut's “Second Brain” Influences Mood and Well-Being. Scientific American. https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/gut-second-brain/  Researchers have solved the decades-old mystery of Jupiter's hot atmosphere by Briana Brownell Hendricks, S. (2021, August 10). Solved: A 50-year mystery about Jupiter. Big Think; Big Think. https://bigthink.com/surprising-science/jupiter-heat-aurora  ‌Berman, R. (2021, July 14). Every 27 minutes, there's an X-ray aurora on Jupiter. Here's why. Big Think; Big Think. https://bigthink.com/surprising-science/jupiter-aurora  Space scientists reveal secret behind Jupiter's “energy crisis.” (2021, August 4). Phys.org. https://phys.org/news/2021-08-space-scientists-reveal-secret-jupiter.html  ‌O'Donoghue, J., Moore, L., Bhakyapaibul, T., Melin, H., Stallard, T., Connerney, J. E. P., & Tao, C. (2021). Global upper-atmospheric heating on Jupiter by the polar aurorae. Nature, 596(7870), 54–57. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-021-03706-w  ‌Yao, Z., Dunn, W. R., Woodfield, E. E., Clark, G., Mauk, B. H., Ebert, R. W., Grodent, D., Bonfond, B., Pan, D., Rae, I. J., Ni, B., Guo, R., Branduardi-Raymont, G., Wibisono, A. D., Rodriguez, P., Kotsiaros, S., Ness, J.-U., Allegrini, F., Kurth, W. S., & Gladstone, G. R. (2021). Revealing the source of Jupiter's x-ray auroral flares. Science Advances, 7(28), eabf0851. https://doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.abf0851  Placebo buttons give us the illusion of control that we crave by Cameron Duke Baraniuk, C. (2015). Press me! The buttons that lie to you. Bbc.com. https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20150415-the-buttons-that-do-nothing Jenkins, H. M., & Ward, W. C. (1965). Judgment of contingency between responses and outcomes. Psychological Monographs: General and Applied, 79(1), 1–17. https://doi.org/10.1037/h0093874 Langer, E. J. (1975). The illusion of control. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 32(2), 311–328. https://doi.org/10.1037/0022-3514.32.2.311 Follow Curiosity Daily on your favorite podcast app to learn something new every day withCody Gough andAshley Hamer. Still curious? Get exclusive science shows, nature documentaries, and more real-life entertainment on discovery+! Go to https://discoveryplus.com/curiosity to start your 7-day free trial. discovery+ is currently only available for US subscribers. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Something You Should Know
Why It's So Hard to Eat Healthy & The Amazing Ways All Humans are Connected

Something You Should Know

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 49:02


Jet lag can cause a trip to get off to a tough start. This episode begins with some simple and effective ways to minimize the effects of jet lag so your trip can get good, right from the start. https://www.webmd.com/sleep-disorders/features/jet-lag-remedies Despite all the advances in health and medicine, one thing that has gotten substantially worse is the overweight and obesity problem. Why is it that in the 21st century, so many people make food choices that cause them to be gain weight and be unhealthy? Jack Bobo has explored this for his book Why Smart People Make Bad Food Choices (https://amzn.to/2ZhLYlz) and joins me with some fascinating data. Jack was recognized by Scientific American in 2015 as one of the 100 most influential people in biotechnology. He is a global thought leader who has delivered more than 500 speeches in 50 countries and has advised four U. S. Secretaries of State on food and agriculture. We like to think of ourselves as independent beings but actually, we are all connected in ways you can't even imagine. That's according to Tom Oliver, professor of ecology at the University of Reading and author of the book The Self Delusion: The Surprising Science of Our Connection to Each Other and the Natural World (https://amzn.to/2XF9xEa). Tom believes we are not as autonomous as we think we are, and we are constantly changing because of the people and world around us although much of it happens below the radar. For generations kids have had piggy banks to keep their money. But have you ever wondered why they are called piggy banks? What do pigs have to do with it? Surprisingly little as you will hear me explain. https://www.paragonbank.co.uk/blog/origins-of-the-piggy-bank PLEASE SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS! We really enjoy The Jordan Harbinger Show and we think you will as well! Check out https://jordanharbinger.com/start OR search for The Jordan Harbinger Show on Apple Podcasts, Spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts.  Go to https://Backcountry.com/SYSK to get 15% OFF your first full-priced purchase. Get a $75 CREDIT at https://Indeed.com/Something Get $15 off your first box of premium seafood when you visit https://WildAlaskanCompany.com/Something Design like a pro with Canva Pro! Get a FREE 45 day extended trial at https://canva.me/something Your fitness is essential! Join Planet Fitness now at https://planetfitness.com Firstleaf – the wine club designed with you in mind! Join today and you'll get 6 bottles of wine for $29.95 and free shipping! Just go to https://tryfirstleaf.com/SOMETHING Omaha Steaks is the best! Get awesome pricing at https://OmahaSteaks.com/BMT Visit https://www.remymartin.com/en-us/ to learn more about their exceptional spirits! https://www.geico.com Bundle your policies and save! It's Geico easy! Never try to beat a train across the tracks. Stop. Trains can't. Paid for by NHTSA Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

DNA Today: A Genetics Podcast
#157 NSGC 2021 Recap

DNA Today: A Genetics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 60:00


The National Society of Genetic Counselors' (NSGC) 40th annual conference occurred virtually this past week. In this special extended installment of DNA Today we are recapping and reflecting on a few sessions from the conference. You can also check out our recap episodes of 2020 and 2019. Guests Laura Hercher has been a genetic counselor for nearly two decades. She is also the host of fellow genetics podcast, The Beagle Has Landed. She is a faculty member and director of student research at the Joan H. Marks Graduate Program in Human Genetics at Sarah Lawrence College, the country's first and largest training program for genetic counselors. Hercher is a writer and commentator with publications including articles in Wired, Aeon and Scientific American as well as peer reviewed journals. She is a co-founder of the DNA Exchange, a blog for the genetic counseling community founded in 2009, which has grown to over 100,000 views in 2017.Sally Rodríguez is a licensed and board-certified genetic counselor who specializes in the area of reproductive genetics, with expertise in expanded carrier screening (ECS), noninvasive prenatal screening (NIPS), and preimplantation genetic testing (PGT). Sally was an early-stage employee at Recombine, a genetic testing laboratory focused on reproductive genetics, and developed and managed the lab's ECS and NIPS offerings through the company's acquisition by CooperSurgical. Currently, she serves as a genetic counselor at Sequence46, a PGT laboratory. She received her Bachelor's degree in Molecular Biology from Princeton University in 2009 and her Master's degree in Genetic Counseling from The Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health in 2013. Sally is an active member of NSGC, the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM), and the Minority Genetics Professionals Network (MGPN).NSGC 2021 Conference Session OD01: Advocating for Autonomy: Genetic Counselors as Champions for Comprehensive Reproductive Health with Laura Hercher Overview of Texas SB 8 (Abortion Ban) Texas SB 8 disproportionately affecting pregnant peopleRepercussions on genetic counseling from Texas SB 8National impact on Texas SB 8Jackson Women's Health Organization vs DobbsIncrease in abortion laws vs public opinion Defining abortion reason bansTo learn more about abortion law from Laura Hercher, check out The Beagle Has Landed her podcast episode with Jordan Brown. NSGC 2021 Conference Session B03: The Devil is in the Details: Race-Based Medicine and Healthcare Disparities in Genetic Counseling with Sally RodríguezComparing race/ethnicity based vs panethic carrier screening How laboratories use ethnicity in carrier screening Pitfalls of race/ethnicity based testingIssue with self-reported race/ethnicitySelf-reported race vs genetic ancestry Calculate carrier residual risk of being a carrier based ethnicity Cause of disparities in residual risks Testing for genetic ancestry as part of carrier screening ACMG updated practice guidelines Downstream effects of disparities in carrier screening How healthcare providers can solve carrier screening disparity issues Other NSGC 2021 sessions mentioned during the episode:C02: Prenatal Testing: When Multiple Technologies Reveal More than Meets the Eye LabCorp sponsored with case presentations by Samantha Caldwell, Lila Dayani, and Deanna HutchinsonC03: 2021 Janus Lecture: “You Can Never Feel My Pain”: The History and the Future of Sickle Cell Disease. Presented by Barbara HarrisonD02: The Routine Incorporation of Molecular Ancestry into Carrier Screening: Sema4's Clinical Experience. Presented by Lisa Edelmann and Audra Bettinelli Stay tuned for the next new episode of DNA Today this Friday on October 1st where we explore the genetics of ALS with Genomenon! New episodes are released on the first and third Friday of the month, with some bonus episodes like this one! In the meantime, you can binge over 150 other episodes on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, streaming on the website, or any other podcast player by searching, “DNA Today”. Episodes in 2021 are also recorded with video which you can watch on our YouTube channel. See what else we are up to on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, YouTube and our website, DNApodcast.com. Questions/inquiries can be sent to info@DNApodcast.com. Do you or someone you know have Prader-Willi syndrome? Harmony Biosciences is looking for people with Prader-Willi syndrome to enroll in a new clinical study in the United States. Harmony Biosciences will be studying the safety and impact of an investigational medication on excessive daytime sleepiness, cognition, and behavioral function in people with Prader Willi syndrome. Learn more about the clinical study and refer a patient to a study center here. (SPONSORED)If you're a healthcare provider helping pregnant patients you have inevitably been asked the question, “Can I take this medication during my pregnancy”? Then you need TERIS, a clinical electronic resource that contains information on the teratogenic risks of over 1,700 medications and other environmental exposures and infections, including 200 of the most frequently prescribed drugs. What makes TERIS a unique database? TERIS is governed by an Advisory Board of world-renowned experts in clinical teratology and is an intellectual property of the University of Washington. Visit TERIS today for your free no obligation 2-week evaluation license. (SPONSORED)

Science Friday
Two Climate Change Bills, COVID Vaccine Boosters. Sept 24, 2021, Part 1

Science Friday

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 47:14


Ice-Hunting Lunar Rover Robot Gets A Landing Site This week, NASA announced that it had selected a destination for a planned robotic lunar rover called VIPER, the Volatiles Investigating Polar Exploration Rover. The mission is planned for launch in 2023, and will rove about the Moon's south pole, mapping the location and concentration of water ice deposits. The plan is for a commercial spaceflight mission to deliver the rover to a spot near the western edge of the Nobile Crater at the Moon's south pole. Sophie Bushwick, technology editor at Scientific American, joins Ira to talk about the mission and other stories from the week in technology and science—including tiny airborne micro-machines, an upcoming voyage for the James Webb Space Telescope, and the discovery of ancient kids' handprints that could be the world's oldest-known art.   Congress Is Considering Two Climate Change Bills. What's In Them? President Biden has made many promises about slowing climate change. During his campaign, he pledged to bring the United States' energy sector to zero carbon emissions by 2035. On Earth Day this year, he pledged to reduce total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions by 50% by 2030, and by 100% by 2050. But the key policy changes that will help the country get there remain pending as the relevant bills continue to make their way through Congress. The first is an infrastructure bill that would pledge billions toward cleaner transit and resiliency projects in disaster-stricken communities. But that measure is tied intricately with the fate of a second, $3.5 trillion budget bill that would direct billions of dollars to incentivize coal and natural gas-burning utilities to switch over to renewable energy. If both are to pass without substantial changes, they rely on consensus among the narrow majorities of Democrats in the Senate and the House—neither of which is guaranteed. New York Times reporter Coral Davenport walks through what's in the bills, and why so much is still up in the air even after a summer of climate-driven disasters.   Behind The Booster Battle Update 9/24/2021: This week, CDC director Rochelle Walensky overruled the recommendations of an advisory panel and authorized a third dose of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine for the elderly and certain “high risk” individuals, mirroring an earlier FDA decision. In late August, President Biden had said that COVID-19 vaccine booster shots might soon be on the horizon for many Americans. In late August, President Biden said that COVID-19 vaccine booster shots might soon be on the horizon for many Americans. But last Friday, an FDA advisory committee voted to recommend booster doses only for people over age 65—and this Wednesday, the FDA authorized Pfizer boosters for use in the elderly and “high risk” individuals. In the republished article (which you can read on sciencefriday.com) from September 16, written before the FDA review, Kaiser Health News' Arthur Allen and Sarah Jane Tribble examine the backstory behind the debate over boosters, and how leaders from the NIH got out in front of FDA and CDC recommendations.

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives
Technoptimist Radio 8/11/21: Will Power Plants Move Into the Cloud?

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 4:38


Join Teresa Carey as she breaks down the latest news on the technology that is solving the world's biggest problems. In today's show, Teresa covers how a power plant could become cloud-based, the U.S.'s first electric tugboat, and what editing sugarcane's genome means for the planet. To learn more about the topics: Will power plants move into the cloud? The first U.S. electric tugboat will replace a tug that burns 30,000 gallons of diesel per year Researchers edit the sugarcane plant's genome for the first time Should We Genetically Engineer Carbon-Hungry Trees? This Genetically Modified Grass Can Clean Up Toxic Pollution About the host: Teresa Carey is a senior staff writer at Freethink.com, where she covers genetics and the environment. She is also a US Coast Guard licensed captain and a NatGeo Explorer. In addition to Freethink her work can be found in BuzzFeed, Scientific American, PBS NewsHour, NPR Weekend Edition, Smithsonian and more. @teresa_carey The post Technoptimist Radio 8/11/21: Will Power Plants Move Into the Cloud? first appeared on WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives.

60-Second Science
COVID, Quickly, Episode 15: Booster Shot Approvals--plus Vaccines for Kids?

60-Second Science

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 7:43


Today we bring you a new episode in our podcast series COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks, Scientific American ’s senior health editors Tanya Lewis and Josh Fischman catch you up on the essential developments in the pandemic: from vaccines to new variants and everything in between. You can listen to all past episodes here .

Kentucky Author Forum
Sonia Shah and Caitlin Dickerson

Kentucky Author Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 46:17


Journalist and award-winning author Sonia Shah discusses her book “The Next Great Migration: The Beauty and Terror of Life on the Move” with journalist Caitlin Dickerson. Sonia Shah is a science journalist and author of critically acclaimed books on science, politics and human rights. She was a finalist for the 2021 PEN/E.O Wilson Literary Science Writing Award, and won a Publishers Weekly best nonfiction book of 2020, a best science book of 2020 by Amazon, and a best science and technology book of 2020 by Library Journal. Shah's writing has appeared in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Foreign Affairs, Scientific American, and has been featured on CNN, RadioLab, and Fresh Air. Her TED talk about malaria has been viewed by over 1,000,000 people around the world. Caitlin Dickerson is a staff writer for The Atlantic, where she writes about immigration and the American experience. Dickerson joined The Atlantic in 2021 after four years at The New York Times, where she broke news about changes in deportation and detention policy, and profiled the lives of immigrants. Dickerson has also contributed to the Times' audio work, as a frequent guest and guest-host for The Daily. Dickerson was previously an investigative reporter at NPR, where she won a Peabody Award.

Power Hour with Alex Epstein
The Pseudoscientific Smearing of Steve Koonin

Power Hour with Alex Epstein

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 52:15


On April 27th, physicist Steve Koonin, who worked in the Obama Administration's Department of Energy, published a challenge to climate catastrophism called “Unsettled: What Climate Science Tells Us, what It Doesn't, and Why It Matters.” While the climate catastrophe movement usually ignores criticisms, Koonin's scientific standing, plus the fact that the book became a major bestseller, made this harder to do. Unfortunately, climate catastrophists have still tried their best to ignore Koonin's arguments, and when they have engaged him it is through scientific smearing—such as an attack in Scientific American that consisted largely of ad hominems and attacking summaries of his book by a Washington Post columnist. On this week's episode of Power Hour, Steve Koonin joins Alex Epstein to discuss not only the smears but much of what has been happening in the climate conversation over the last 5 months, including: - The recent IPCC report—including the curious absence of key graphs, the use of "attribution studies," and the methodology used to make climate models "hotter" even though they have typically over predicted warming in the past. - The media's exaggerated portrayal of the recent IPCC report. - The positive reaction to Koonin's book. - What scientists have told Koonin behind the scenes. - Koonin's upcoming debates.

What's Next! with Tiffani Bova
Getting from Where You Are to Where You Want to Be with Katy Milkman

What's Next! with Tiffani Bova

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 30:08


Welcome to the What's Next! podcast with Tiffani Bova.     This week I am thrilled to bring you this episode of the What's Next! Podcast, an encore of my LinkedIn Live chat with the wonderful Katy Milkman. Katy is the James G. Dinan Professor at The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania and holds a secondary appointment at Penn's Perelman School of Medicine. Her research explores ways that insights from economics and psychology can be harnessed to change consequential behaviors for good. She has received numerous awards for her research including an early career award from the Federation of Associations in Behavioral & Brain Sciences. Katy was also named one of the world's top 40 business school professors under 40 by Poets and Quants and she was a finalist for the Thinkers 50 2017 Radar Thinker Award. She also frequently writes about topics related to behavioral science for The Washington Post and Scientific American. In 2018, she began hosting Charles Schwab's popular podcast “Choiceology with Katy Milkman”, which explores key lessons from behavioral economics about decision making. I am so happy to bring you this episode of the What's Next! Podcast! with Katy Milkman!     THIS EPISODE IS PERFECT FOR… anyone wanting to make a change!    TODAY'S MAIN MESSAGE… Do you need a fresh start? Do you need to make a change? Well, change is a big word…or it can be. So where do you start? What do you focus on? Katy Milkman is here to demystify change and make it a little less scary and a little more doable. Step one, according to Katy? Decide that you want to make a change. Simple enough, right? Once you've made the decision, you can get started. Get reflecting, listening, trying different things. You've probably learned a great deal about yourself during the last year and a half. What has it shown you? Which changes didn't serve you and which changes have surprised you? Listen in on my discussion with Katy on change, habits, progress, and long-term goals.    WHAT  I  LOVE  MOST… Katy's optimistic outlook on the change we are seeing and the changes we hope to make.    Running time: 30:07     Subscribe on iTunes     Find Tiffani on social:  Facebook  Twitter  LinkedIn     Find Katy online:  Twitter  LinkedIn  Katy's Website    How to Change Book 

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives
Technoptimist Radio 9/22/21: Artificial Clouds Could Save The Great Barrier Reef

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 5:13


Join Teresa Carey as she breaks down the latest news on the technology that is solving the world's biggest problems. In today's show, Teresa covers artificial clouds, Facebook's new smart glasses, and the true value of disposable packaging. To learn more about the topics in this episode: How artificial clouds could save the Great Barrier Reef Facebook's smart glasses are stylish and creepy Think smart about disposable packaging with this scorecard About the host: Teresa Carey is a senior staff writer at Freethink.com, where she covers genetics and the environment. She is also a US Coast Guard licensed captain and a NatGeo Explorer. In addition to Freethink her work can be found in BuzzFeed, Scientific American, PBS NewsHour, NPR Weekend Edition, Smithsonian and more. @teresa_carey The post Technoptimist Radio 9/22/21: Artificial Clouds Could Save The Great Barrier Reef first appeared on WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives.

Portable Practical Pediatrics
Dr. M's SPA Newsletter Audiocast Volume 11 Issues 36 and 38

Portable Practical Pediatrics

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 32:02


Audiocast #36 - Vision and Breathing What are the connections between breathing and vision? Dr. Huberman, a Stanford Neurobiologist has been researching this topic for years and his findings are fascinating. From a 2020 Scientific American article: "But Andrew Huberman, a neuroscientist at Stanford University who studies the visual system, sees matters a bit differently. Stress, he says, is not just about the content of what we are reading or the images we are seeing. It is about how our eyes and breathing change in response to the world, as well as the cascades of events that follow. Both these bodily processes also offer us easy and accessible releases from stress. For more: https://www.salisburypediatrics.com/patient-education/dr-magryta-s-newsletter/999-volume-11-letter-36 Audiocast #38 - Type II Diabetes and Covid in Kids The pandemic has taken an amazing toll on human health. According to two new studies that are not yet in print, the pandemic caused a doubling in diabetes in children. This is not a trivial matter as insulin resistance, diabetes, obesity and metabolic syndrome in general are the diagnostic diseases associated with increased risk for cancer, coronary artery disease and early death from issues like COVID. The antecedent triggers have been well studied and discussed in this newsletter. Sedentary behavior coupled to a high fat, high refined carbohydrate diet are the main drivers of disease and the pandemic forced many a child's hand. They were less likely to exercise and move during the poor quality zoom events. Physical education classes were non existent. Food quality plummeted from a poor school based place to a worse home based place. For more: https://www.salisburypediatrics.com/patient-education/dr-magryta-s-newsletter/1007-type-ii-diabetes-and-covid-in-kids Best, Dr. M

KERA's Think
When Our Bodies Attack Us

KERA's Think

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 106:43


One of medicine's great mysteries is: Why does the body's immune system sometimes attack itself? Scientific American senior editor Josh Fischman joins guest host Courtney Collins to talk about rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, multiple sclerosis and other autoimmune diseases and the progress being made to fight them. “The Body Against Itself” appears in the September issue of Scientific American.

Listen To Sassy
November 1988 Fashion Etc.: Suede, Sunflowers & Scent

Listen To Sassy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 51:34


It's hard to know what the editors think their reader is doing in November 1988, based on the issue's fashion and style content. Is she dressing drably for a job? Visiting the Southwest (again) in suede? Attending a formal girls-only party? Maybe all three in succession! At least the hair story suggests pleasantly un-fussy styles...not that you can really see them in the photos. We also learn about the coming sunflower invasion, how to even out your eyelashes, what perfume is, and much much more! Roll your hair up -- or don't -- and join us!Visual Aids

Bigger Than Us
#166 Katie Worth, Author of Miseducation: How Climate Change is Taught in America

Bigger Than Us

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 40:43


KATIE WORTH is an investigative journalist who writes about science, politics, and their myriad intersections. She joined FRONTLINE in 2015 as the inaugural FRONTLINE-Columbia Tow Journalism Fellow, and in 2018 was selected as an O'Brien Fellowship in Public Service Journalism. She has worked on several FRONTLINE'S enterprise reporting projects and co-produced the cinematic interactive story “The Last Generation,” which won an Emmy for “Outstanding New Approaches: Documentary.” Her work has appeared in Scientific American, National Geographic, Slate, and The Best American Science and Nature Writing 2016. Worth grew up in Chico, California, just a few miles from Paradise, site of one of the worst of the massive fires that, because of climate change, are currently devastating the American West. During her reporting for Miseducation, she returned to her old middle school to find that climate change is being taught there as the subject of an unresolved scientific dispute, not a proven reality. https://www.amazon.com/Miseducation-Climate-Change-Taught-America/dp/1735913642 https://nexuspmg.com/https://nexuspmg.com/

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.
How To Improve Focus And Attention

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 16:15


How To Improve Focus And Attention | This episode is brought to you by Athletic GreensPreserving, supporting, and strengthening brain function is crucial to aging optimally. While we once thought that declining brain function was a given as you get older, we now know that our brain's have the ability to change structure and function all throughout our lives. Our diets and quality of sleep are crucial for a well functioning brain but so is our ability to harness focus and attention.In this mini-episode Dr. Hyman speaks to Dr. Andrew Huberman about enhancing neuroplasticity to support learning, memory, alertness, and attention. He also speaks with Jim Kwik about the science of learning how to learn.Dr. Andrew Huberman is a neuroscientist and tenured Professor in the Department of Neurobiology at the Stanford University School of Medicine. He has made numerous important contributions to the fields of brain development, brain function, and neural plasticity, which is the ability of our nervous system to rewire and learn new behaviors, skills, and cognitive functioning. Dr. Huberman is a McKnight Foundation and Pew Foundation Fellow and was awarded the Cogan Award in 2017, which is given to the scientist making the largest discoveries in the study of vision. His lab's most recent work focuses on the influence of vision and respiration on human performance and brain states such as fear and courage. Work from the Huberman Laboratory at Stanford University School of Medicine has been published in top journals including Nature, Science, and Cell and has been featured in TIME, BBC, Scientific American, Discover, and other top media outlets.Jim Kwik is the founder of Kwik Learning and a widely recognized world expert in speed-reading, memory improvement, brain performance, and accelerated learning. For over two decades he has served as the brain coach to many of the world's leading C-suite executives and celebrities. After a childhood brain injury left him learning-challenged, Jim created strategies to dramatically enhance his mental performance. He has since dedicated his life to helping others unleash their true brainpower to learn faster and perform smarter. His recent book, Limitless, provides the keys to accelerated learning and endless potential. This episode is brought to you by Athletic Greens. Athletic Greens is offering Doctor's Farmacy listeners a full year supply of their Vitamin D3/K2 Liquid Formula free with your first purchase, plus 5 free travel packs. Just go to athleticgreens.com/hyman to take advantage of this great offer. Find Dr. Hyman's full-length conversation with Dr. Andrew Huberman, “How to Rewire Your Brain For Sleep” here: https://DrMarkHyman.lnk.to/DrAndrewHubermanFind Dr. Hyman's full-length conversation with Jim Kwik, “How To Upgrade Your Brain And Learn Faster” here: https://DrMarkHyman.lnk.to/JimKwik See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives
Technoptimist Radio 9/15/21: The world's largest direct air capture plant is open

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 5:16


Join Teresa Carey as she breaks down the latest news on the technology that is solving the world's biggest problems. In today's show, Teresa covers an activist way to stop illegal fishing, the world's largest direct air capture plant, and what the Montreal Protocol did for us. To learn more about the topics in this episode: Unique underwater sculptures thwart harmful illegal fishing The world's largest direct air capture plant just opened Saving the ozone layer avoided 2.5 degrees of global warming Green sand beaches could erase carbon emissions Can seaweed save the planet? How balloons could soak up carbon and fight climate change Should we genetically engineer carbon-hungry trees? About the host: Teresa Carey is a senior staff writer at Freethink.com, where she covers genetics and the environment. She is also a US Coast Guard licensed captain and a NatGeo Explorer. In addition to Freethink her work can be found in BuzzFeed, Scientific American, PBS NewsHour, NPR Weekend Edition, Smithsonian and more. @teresa_carey The post Technoptimist Radio 9/15/21: The world's largest direct air capture plant is open first appeared on WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives.

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit
How to Hack Your Brain to Conquer Your Fears and Increase Motivation (Minisode #46)

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 38:56


How to Hack Your Brain to Conquer Your Fears and Increase Motivation | This episode is brought to you by BiOptimizers and Even.At one point or another, we've all felt stuck in a rut with feelings of laziness and fear. During these times it can be really hard to take a step back and wonder what's happening in the body, as opposed to just the mind, but it's the link between the two that can push us through it. Neurotransmitters have some incredible power over how we function. Dopamine is responsible for craving, motivation, and pursuit. Adrenaline relates to agitation and endurance. Serotonin helps us be grateful and feel good about what we have. And acetylcholine can help us focus. This is just a snapshot of the chemical symphony happening in our bodies all the time, and we can actually leverage these inner reactions to better understand the way we react to the world around us and make positive changes. In today's mini-episode, Dhru speaks with Dr. Andrew Huberman and Dr. Mark McLaughlin about the connection between fear, laziness, and motivation, and tools and strategies for overcoming them. Dr. Andrew Huberman is a neuroscientist and tenured Professor in the Department of Neurobiology at the Stanford University School of Medicine. He has made numerous important contributions to the fields of brain development, brain function, and neural plasticity. His lab's most recent work focuses on the influence of vision and respiration on human performance and brain states such as fear and courage. Work from the Huberman Laboratory at Stanford University School of Medicine has been published in top journals including Nature, Science, and Cell, and has been featured in TIME, BBC, Scientific American, Discover, and other top media outlets. Dr. Mark McLaughlin is a practicing board-certified neurosurgeon, a national media commentator, thought leader in performance enhancement, and author of the book, Cognitive Dominance: A Brain Surgeon's Quest to Outthink Fear. Find Dhru's full-length conversation with Dr. Andrew Huberman here: https://lnk.to/DrAndrewHuberman2/ Find Dhru's full-length conversation with Dr. Mark McLaughlin here: https://lnk.to/DrMarkMclaughlin/ For more on Dhru Purohit, be sure to follow him on Instagram @dhrupurohit, on Facebook @dhruxpurohit, on Twitter @dhrupurohit, and on YouTube @dhrupurohit. You can also text Dhru at (302) 200-5643 or click here https://my.community.com/dhrupurohit. Interested in joining The Dhru Purohit Podcast Facebook Community? Submit your request to join here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/2819627591487473/.This episode is brought to you by BiOptimizers and Even. If I had to pick one supplement that has made the biggest difference in my overall health, it would be magnesium. I personally started taking magnesium to help with my sleep, especially when I travel, and it's been super helpful. But I don't take just any old magnesium, I take BiOptimizers Magnesium Breakthrough. It contains 7 different forms of magnesium, which all have different functions in the body. I haven't found anything else like it on the market. Right now, BiOptimizers is offering my community a few special bundles and for a limited time BiOptimizers is also giving away free bottles of their bestselling products P3OM and Masszymes with select purchases, just head over to magbreakthrough.com/dhru with code DHRU10.Prescription drugs can have some benefits when they're used the right way, but it's important to recognize that they can also deplete key nutrients. This company called Even has created a whole system to help you replenish what's been lost while using certain medications, such as antidepressants, statins, or birth control. Their products are created by physicians, nutritionists, and pharmacists who have identified the exact recipe to rebalance nutrient levels and biochemistry while taking certain meds. Right now, Even is offering my community free consultations and 20% off your first order. Just go to feeleven.com/dhru to check out Even's line of supplements that specifically address medication-induced nutrient deficiencies. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Did That Really Happen?
No Sudden Move

Did That Really Happen?

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 51:47


This week we're traveling back to 1950s Detroit with No Sudden Move! Join us to learn more about organized crime in Detroit, breakfast cereal, 20th century name changing patterns, air pollution in Los Angeles, and more! Sources: "Way Worse" Google Ngram: https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=way+worse&year_start=1800&year_end=2019&corpus=26&smoothing=3&case_insensitive=true Breakfast Cereal: Anna Kang, "The Untold Truth of Honey Smacks," Mashed, https://www.mashed.com/203798/the-untold-truth-of-honey-smacks/ Wiki: "Honey Smacks," https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honey_Smacks Joel Stice, "The Untold Truth of Trix," Mashed, https://www.mashed.com/198934/the-untold-truth-of-trix/ Natasha Bruns, "Celebrating 60 Years of the Trix Rabbit," https://blog.generalmills.com/2019/08/celebrating-60-years-of-trix-rabbit/ "The Origin of the "Trix Rabbit,"" https://cartoonresearch.com/index.php/the-origin-of-the-trix-rabbit/ Suzanne Raga, "11 Colorful Facts You Might Not Know About Trix," Mental Floss, https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/74134/11-colorful-facts-you-might-not-know-about-trix-cereal EA Wartella, AH Lichtenstein, and CS Boon (eds.), "History of Nutrition Labeling," Front-of-Package Nutrition Rating Systems and Symbols: Phase I Report, Institute of Medicing (US) Committee on Examination of Front-of-Package Nutrition Rating Systems and Symbols (Washington DC: National Academies Press, 2010). https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK209859/ Air Pollution in LA: "History of Reducing Air Pollution in the United States," EPA, https://www.epa.gov/transportation-air-pollution-and-climate-change/accomplishments-and-success-air-pollution-transportation Sarah Gardner, "LA Smog: the battle against air pollution," Marketplace NPR, https://www.marketplace.org/2014/07/14/la-smog-battle-against-air-pollution/ Bennet Goldstein and Howell Howard, "Antitrust Law and the Control of Auto Pollution: Rethinking the Alliance between Competition and Technical Progress," Environmental Law 10:3 (Spring 1980): 517-558. https://www.jstor.org/stable/43265516 Randy Alfred, "Attack of the L.A. Smog Archives," WIRED (26 jULY 2010). https://www.wired.com/2010/07/gallery-smog/ Sarah S. Elkind, "Influence through Cooperation: The Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce and Air Pollution Control in Los Angeles, 1943-1954," in How Local Politics Shape Federal Policy: Business, Power, and the Environment in Twentieth-Century Los Angeles, 52-82 (Unviersity of North Carolina Press, 2011). https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5149/9780807869116_elkind.7 David Vogel, "Protecting Air Quality," in California Greenin': How the Golden State Became an Environmental Leader, 154-188, (Princeton University Press, 2018). https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctvc77k1p.9 James M. Lents and William J. Kelly, "Clearing the Air in Los Angeles," Scientific American 269:4 (October 1993): 32-39. https://www.jstor.org/stable/24941646 Organized Crime: Robert A. Rockaway, "The Notorious Purple Gang: Detroit's All-Jewish Prohibition Era Mob," Shofar 20, 1 (2001) Giacomo "Black Jack" Tocco: The Last of the Old Detroit Partnership. American Mafia History. Available at https://americanmafiahistory.com/giacomo-black-jack-tocco/ "FBI Detroit History," FBI.gov, available at https://www.fbi.gov/history/field-office-histories/detroit Name Changes: An Anonymous Jewish American, "I Changed My Name," The Atlantic, 1948, available at https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/1948/02/i-changed-my-name/306252/ Kirsten Fermaglich, "What's Uncle Sam's Last Name? Jews and Name Changing in New York City During the WWII Era," Journal of American History 102, 3 (2015) Kirsten Fermaglich, "Too Long, Too Foreign. . . Too Jewish: Jews, Name Changing, and Family Mobility in New York City, 1917-1942," Journal of American Ethnic History 34, 3 (2015) Film Background: IMDB https://www.imdb.com/title/tt11525644/ Rotten Tomatoes https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/no_sudden_move Brian Tallerico, "No Sudden Move" (1 July 2021), https://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/no-sudden-move-movie-review-2021

Curiosity Daily
Backward Letters, Dogs Detect Lies, Neutron Star Mountains

Curiosity Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 13:23


Learn about why children write letters backward; how dogs know when you're lying to them; and mountains on neutron stars. Children write letters backward because they haven't unlearned the rules of reality by Steffie Drucker Sigman, M. (2017, August 8). The fascinating reason that children write letters backwards. Ideas.ted.com. https://ideas.ted.com/the-fascinating-reason-that-children-write-letters-backwards/  Vox. (2020). Why kids write letters backward [YouTube Video]. In YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o1iYSsFqVG4  Why Do Young Children Write Letters Backward? (2016). Wonderopolis.org. https://wonderopolis.org/wonder/Why-Do-Young-Children-Write-Letters-Backward  Dogs know when you are lying to them by Cameron Duke  Riddle, T. (2012, July 24). Liars: It Takes One to Know One. Scientific American. https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/liars-it-takes-one-to-know-one/  Lonardo, L., Völter, C. J., Lamm, C., & Huber, L. (2021). Dogs follow human misleading suggestions more often when the informant has a false belief. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 288(1955), 20210906. https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2021.0906  Yirka, B. (2021, July 27). Dogs can tell when people are lying to them, study finds. Phys.org; Phys.org. https://phys.org/news/2021-07-dogs-people-lying.html  The tallest mountains on neutron stars may be less than a millimeter high by Briana Brownell A bug's life: millimetre-tall mountains on neutron stars. (2021). The Royal Astronomical Society. https://ras.ac.uk/news-and-press/research-highlights/bugs-life-millimetre-tall-mountains-neutron-stars  https://www.facebook.com/spacecom. (2009, May 18). Neutron Star Crust Is Stronger than Steel. Space.com; Space. https://www.space.com/6682-neutron-star-crust-stronger-steel.html  ‌Baker, H. (2021, July 21). Neutron star “mountains” may be blocking our view of mysterious gravitational waves. Livescience.com; Live Science. https://www.livescience.com/millimeter-tall-neutron-star-mountains.html  ‌Gittins, F., Andersson, N., & Jones, D. I. (2020). Modelling neutron star mountains. Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 500(4), 5570–5582. https://doi.org/10.1093/mnras/staa3635  Follow Curiosity Daily on your favorite podcast app to learn something new every day withCody Gough andAshley Hamer. Still curious? Get exclusive science shows, nature documentaries, and more real-life entertainment on discovery+! Go to https://discoveryplus.com/curiosity to start your 7-day free trial. discovery+ is currently only available for US subscribers. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

In Research Of
S03E09 - Monster Hunters

In Research Of

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 143:04


Jeb and Blake tackle the Ooky world of Monster Hunters.     Nimoy in the forest shadows...   Peter Byrne and Tim Dinsdale - two legendary monster hunters meet. Monsters in the intro to this episode are from the TV film Manbeast! Myth or Monster   For reasons I can't explain, some of the images in this episode reminded me of 1970s album covers...   Arch Buckley 2007 Obituary  Warren Thompson 2013 Obituary  Al Berry 2013 Reminiscence   Ron Moorhead (Sierra Sounds)   We have more material on Doc Shiels but that will be a different post for Patrons.  Scientific American discussion on Bigfoot Language (by MonsterTalk co-host Dr. Karen Stollznow) Some supportive analysis of the Sierra Sounds recordings that we discuss in the episode.   Another paper from Dr. Kirlin  Ook Ook in Sierra Sound paper  The most annoying font ever at the Oregon Regional Primate Research Center?

60-Second Science
COVID, Quickly, Episode 14: Best Masks, Explaining Mask Anger, Biden's New Plan

60-Second Science

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 7:57


Today we bring you a new episode in our podcast series COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks, Scientific American ’s senior health editors Tanya Lewis and Josh Fischman catch you up on the essential developments in the pandemic: from vaccines to new variants and everything in between. You can listen to all past episodes here .

Breaking Bad Science
Episode 65 - Lightning, Hurricanes, and More Climate Change

Breaking Bad Science

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 45:39


We'd love to hear from you (feedback@breakingbadscience.com)Look us up on social media Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/385282925919540Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/breakingbadsciencepodcast/Website: http://www.breakingbadscience.com/Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/breakingbadscienceWhen Thor's hammer strikes the ground, there's no doubt the impact will be loud, but why do we know that? He's no larger than a regular human. So where does the sound come from? How does any of this weather stuff happen? Join hosts Shanti and Danny as we discuss how heat becomes weather, weather becomes lightning, and lightning becomes sound and how these revelations add to the global warming and climate change conversation.ReferencesNational Severe Storms Laboratory. Severe Weather 101. NSSL. https://www.nssl.noaa.gov/education/svrwx101/lightning/types/Ranada, A., Trueba, J.; Ball Lightning an Electromagnetic Knot?. Nature. 05-Sep-1996. 383:32. Doi: https://doi.org/10.1038/383032a0Fritz, A.; Scientists Think They've Solved the Mystery of How Volcanic Lightning Forms. Washington Post. 13-Apr-2016. https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/capital-weather-gang/wp/2016/04/13/scientists-think-theyve-solved-the-mystery-of-how-volcanic-lightning-forms/Mason, B.; Weird, Rare Clouds and the Physics Behind Them. Wired. 29-Sep-2009. https://www.wired.com/2009/09/clouds/Scientific American; Why do We Have Hurricane Season? Scientific American. 27-Aug-2007. https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/why-do-we-have-a-hurricane-season/#EPA. Climate Change Indicators: Tropical Cyclone Activity. United States Environmental Protection Agency. https://www.epa.gov/climate-indicators/climate-change-indicators-tropical-cyclone-activitySupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/breakingbadscience?fan_landing=true)

Living Mirrors with Dr. James Cooke
Mellody Hayes on individual and societal transformation | Living Mirrors #65

Living Mirrors with Dr. James Cooke

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 93:28


Dr. Mellody Hayes is a physician, writer and speaker, who focuses on psychedelic medicine. She is a graduate of Harvard and UCSF medical school, and was a cofounder of Decriminalize Nature, a leading force behind psychedelic decriminalisation. Her writings have been published in Scientific American and Los Angeles Times and she's been behind multiple projects in the psychedelic space including a ketamine clinic that provides psychedelic psychotherapy. We discussed the role of psychedelics in individual and societal transformation and how the two are connected.

Value Inspiration Podcast
When innovation gets so impactful that the industry starts working against you

Value Inspiration Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 38:18


This podcast interview focuses on product innovation that has the power to give blind people their sight back and make robots see and interpret exactly what we see. My guest is Sheila Nirenberg, Founder, and CEO of Bionic Sight and Nirenberg Neuroscience.Sheila Nirenberg is a professor of neuroscience at Cornell Medical School and the founder of two start-up companies in New York City – one that develops new kinds of prosthetic devices (Bionic Sight, LLC), and one that develops new kinds of smart robots (Nirenberg Neuroscience LLC). Her lab at the university focuses on basic science, and her companies take what's learned in the lab and use it to develop solutions to real-world problems. She's won numerous awards for innovative research, including a MacArthur “genius” Award, and has been featured in a TED talk, a BBC documentary, a PBS documentary, the Discovery Channel, Scientific American, as well as many peer-reviewed publications. The reason? Her work on cracking the neural code of the retina i.e. the code the retina uses to communicate with the brain to allow us to see.And that inspired me, and hence I invited Sheila to my podcast. We explore what's still broken in deep-learning approaches and how that holds us back. We dig into her breakthrough - and what opportunities this enables for remarkable innovation that impact all of us. During our conversation, she shares some of her biggest challenges which were often led by the limited mindset of humans rather than driven by limitations in technology. She also shares her vision on what it takes to shape a software business that people keep talking about. Here are some of her quotes:My claim to fame is that I cracked this code in the retina, so the transformation mathematically from images to the signals that leave the eye, and go to the brain, As soon as I did that, I realized immediately the application of it is that you can make an artificial retina that could restore sight to the blind. And then I was thinking, well, if I could make if that really were true, and I can make send the same signals to the brain, why couldn't I send it to a robot's brain? So I quickly patented that and started a second company.During this interview, you will learn four things:True value can arrive when we challenge ourselves to find innovative approaches that require exponentially less dataThat often technology is not the issue to drive meaningful change, but skepticism, fear, and narrow mindedness - and how to go about that The lessons to be learned on how to go about funding and taking the Venture Capital routeThe big lessons around having grid and perseverance to succeedFor more information about the guest from this week:Sheila NirenbergWebsite Nirenberg NeuroscienceWebsite Bionic Sight See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

But it is Rocket Science
Episode 40: Black Holes - Are they Actually Supermassive? - BIIRS Season 3

But it is Rocket Science

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 41:10


Do you know what Black Holes actually are? Are we actually all holograms? Pour yourself a cup of coffee (or tea) and come hang out with your friendly neighborhood aerospace engineers to find out! We have Merch!! https://www.butitisrocketscience.com/shop Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/biirs Find us on social media! Instagram: butitisrocketscience Twitter: butitisRS Facebook: But it is Rocket Science Henna's Sources: Beall, Abigail. “Theory Claims to Offer the FIRST 'Evidence' Our Universe Is a Hologram.” WIRED UK, WIRED UK, 31 Jan. 2017, www.wired.co.uk/article/our-universe-is-a-hologram. Bouman, Katherine L. “Extreme Imaging via Physical Model Inversion: Seeing around Corners and Imaging Black Holes.” Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2017. Garner, Rob. “What Are Black Holes?” NASA, NASA, 15 Nov. 2017, www.nasa.gov/vision/universe/starsgalaxies/black_hole_description.html. “Gravitational Singularity.” Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, 2 Aug. 2021, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gravitational_singularity. Information@eso.org. “Anatomy of a Black Hole.” Www.eso.org, www.eso.org/public/images/eso1907h/. Kurzgesagt. “Black Holes Explained – from Birth to Death.” YouTube, YouTube, 15 Dec. 2015, Schirber, Michael. “Eye-to-Eye with a Black Hole.” Space.com, Space, 11 July 2005, www.space.com/1297-eye-eye-black-hole.html. “Stars.” NASA, NASA, science.nasa.gov/astrophysics/focus-areas/how-do-stars-form-and-evolve. Sutter, Paul. “Can We Solve the Black Hole Information Paradox with 'Photon Spheres'?” Space.com, Space, 16 July 2021, www.space.com/black-hole-information-paradox-photon-spheres. “What Happens When Stars Produce Iron?” Futurism, Futurism, 14 July 2014, futurism.com/what-happens-when-stars-produce-iron. Anna's Sources: “18Th Century.” Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, 1 Sept. 2021, Beall, Abigail. “What Is Einstein's Theory of Relativity?” WIRED UK, WIRED UK, 28 Mar. 2017, www.wired.co.uk/article/einstein-theory-relativity. Bernstein, Jeremy. “The Reluctant Father of Black Holes.” Scientific American, Scientific American, 1 Apr. 2007, www.scientificamerican.com/article/the-reluctant-father-of-black-holes-2007-04/. “Black Hole of Calcutta.” Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, 5 Sept. 2021, “Black Hole.” Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, 5 Sept. 2021, Colonial America (1492-1763), www.americaslibrary.gov/jb/colonial/jb_colonial_subj.html. Einstein, Albert. “On a Stationary System with Spherical Symmetry Consisting of Many Gravitating Masses.” The Annals of Mathematics, vol. 40, no. 4, 1939, p. 922., doi:10.2307/1968902. “How Scientists Captured the First Image of a Black Hole - Teachable Moments.” NASA, NASA, 19 Apr. 2019, www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/news/2019/4/19/how-scientists-captured-the-first-image-of-a-black-hole/. “J. Robert Oppenheimer.” Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, 28 Aug. 2021 “John Michell.” Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, 3 Aug. 2021, “John Michell: COUNTRY Parson DESCRIBED Black Holes IN 1783: Amnh.” American Museum of Natural History, www.amnh.org/learn-teach/curriculum-collections/cosmic-horizons-book/john-michell-black-holes. Michael Lane Smith | Published Sep 10, et al. “The United States Was Called The United Colonies UNTIL Sept. 9, 1776.” Task & Purpose, 10 Sept. 2015, taskandpurpose.com/history/the-united-states-was-called-the-united-colonies-until-sept-9-1776/. Mills, Virginia. “Black Holes: Who Didn't See Them FIRST?: Royal Society.” Black Holes: Who Didn't See Them First? | Royal Society, 4 June 2019, royalsociety.org/blog/2019/06/black-holes/. “Planetary Motion: The History of an Idea That Launched the Scientific Revolution.” NASA, NASA, earthobservatory.nasa.gov/features/OrbitsHistory. “Science and Technology.” On-Line: SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, www.exnet.com/1996/02/20/science/science.html. Music from filmmusic.io "Tyrant" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) License: CC BY (creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)

Futility Closet
357-Scenes From an Earthquake

Futility Closet

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 33:45


The San Francisco earthquake of 1906 is remembered for its destructive intensity and terrible death toll. But the scale of the disaster can mask some remarkable personal stories. In this week's episode of the Futility Closet podcast we'll describe the experiences of some of the survivors, which ranged from the horrific to the surreal. We'll also consider a multilingual pun and puzzle over a deadly reptile. Intro: In the 1600s, a specialized verb described the carving of each dish. The Earls of Leicester kept quiet in Parliament. An iconic image: The quake toppled a marble statue of Louis Agassiz from its perch on the second floor of Stanford's zoology building. Sources for our feature: Malcolm E. Barker, Three Fearful Days, 1998. Gordon Thomas and Max Morgan-Witts, The San Francisco Earthquake: A Minute-by-Minute Account of the 1906 Disaster, 2014. Louise Chipley Slavicek, The San Francisco Earthquake and Fire of 1906, 2008. Richard Schwartz, Earthquake Exodus, 1906: Berkeley Responds to the San Francisco Refugees, 2005. Gordon Thomas, The San Francisco Earthquake, 1971. Edward F. Dolan, Disaster 1906: The San Francisco Earthquake and Fire, 1967. William Bronson, The Earth Shook, the Sky Burned, 1959. Charles Morris, The 1906 San Francisco Earthquake and Fire: As Told by Eyewitnesses, 1906. Alexander Olson, "Writing on Rubble: Dispatches from San Francisco, 1906," KNOW: A Journal on the Formation of Knowledge 3:1 (Spring 2019), 93-121. Susanne Leikam, "The 1906 San Francisco Earthquake and Fire," Journal of Transnational American Studies 7:1 (2016). Penny Allan and Martin Bryant, "The Critical Role of Open Space in Earthquake Recovery: A Case Study," EN: Proceedings of the 2010 NZSEE Conference, 2010. Brad T. Aagaard and Gregory C. Beroza, "The 1906 San Francisco Earthquake a Century Later: Introduction to the Special Section," Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America 98:2 (2008), 817-822. Jeffrey L. Arnold, "The 1906 San Francisco Earthquake: A Centennial Contemplation," Prehospital and Disaster Medicine 21:3 (2006), 133-134. "... and Then the Fire Was Worse Than the Earthquake ...," American History 41:1 (April 2006), 34-35. Andrea Henderson, "The Human Geography of Catastrophe: Family Bonds, Community Ties, and Disaster Relief After the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake and Fire," Southern California Quarterly 88:1 (Spring 2006), 37-70. Kristin Schmachtenberg, "1906 Letter to the San Francisco Health Department," Social Education 70:3 (2006). Laverne Mau Dicker, "The San Francisco Earthquake and Fire: Photographs and Manuscripts From the California Historical Society Library," California History 59:1 (Spring 1980), 34-65. James J. Hudson, "The California National Guard: In the San Francisco Earthquake and Fire of 1906," California Historical Quarterly 55:2 (Summer 1976), 137-149. Michael Castleman and Katherine Ellison, "Grace Under Fire," Smithsonian 37:1 (April 2006), 56-60, 64-66. Jack London, "Story of an Eyewitness: The San Francisco Earthquake," Collier's Weekly (May 5, 1906), 107-13. "San Francisco and Its Catastrophe," Scientific American 94:17 (April 28, 1906), 347. Bob Norberg, "A City in Flames," [Santa Rosa, Calif.] Press Democrat, April 13, 2006. "The Ground Shook, a City Fell, and the Lessons Still Resound," New York Times, April 11, 2006. "Eyewitness to History," San Francisco Examiner, April 18, 1996. "The San Francisco Earthquake," [Beechworth, Victoria] Ovens and Murray Advertiser, June 23, 1906. "The Call-Chronicle-Examiner," [Hobart, Tasmania] Mercury, May 30, 1906. "Earthquake at San Francisco," Fitzroy City Press, May 25, 1906. "The San Francisco Earthquake," Singleton [N.S.W.] Argus, April 24, 1906. "Flames Unchecked; Whole City Doomed," Richmond [Ind.] Palladium, April 20, 1906. "Beautiful Buildings That Lie in Ruins," New York Times, April 20, 1906. "The Relief of San Francisco," New York Times, April 20, 1906. "Over 500 Dead," New York Times, April 19, 1906. "Disasters Suffered by San Francisco," New York Times, April 19, 1906. "City of San Francisco Destroyed by Earthquake," Spokane Press, April 18, 1906. "Loss of Life Is Now Estimated at Thousands," Deseret Evening News, April 18, 1906. San Francisco 1906 Earthquake Marriage Project. Listener mail: "Virginia philology ...," New Orleans Daily Democrat, June 12, 1878. "Many old English names ...," [Raleigh, N.C.] News and Observer, Sept. 20, 1890 "'Darby' -- Enroughty," Richmond [Va.] Dispatch, Nov. 26, 1902. "A Virginian of the Old School," Weekly Chillicothe [Mo.] Crisis, Feb. 9, 1882. Leonhard Dingwerth, Grosse und mittlere Hersteller, 2008 Rachael Krishna, "Tumblr Users Have Discovered a Pun Which Works in So Many Languages," BuzzFeed, Feb. 2, 2016. "The pun that transcends language barriers," r/tumblr (accessed Aug. 28, 2021). This week's lateral thinking puzzle was contributed by listener Michelle Carter. Here are two corroborating links (warning -- these spoil the puzzle). You can listen using the player above, download this episode directly, or subscribe on Google Podcasts, on Apple Podcasts, or via the RSS feed at https://futilitycloset.libsyn.com/rss. Please consider becoming a patron of Futility Closet -- you can choose the amount you want to pledge, and we've set up some rewards to help thank you for your support. You can also make a one-time donation on the Support Us page of the Futility Closet website. Many thanks to Doug Ross for the music in this episode. If you have any questions or comments you can reach us at podcast@futilitycloset.com. Thanks for listening!

ZEIT WISSEN - Woher weißt Du das?
Klimawandel: das Methanrätsel

ZEIT WISSEN - Woher weißt Du das?

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2021 31:11


Klimaforschende der Technischen Universität München scannen seit 2019 den Himmel über München und haben dabei eine überraschende Methanquelle ausfindig gemacht: Gasgrills auf dem Oktoberfest. Die sind nur ein kleiner Beitrag zur globalen Erwärmung, aber symptomatisch für eine Wissenslücke: Es gibt weltweit eine starke Diskrepanz zwischen den erwarteten und den tatsächlich gemessenen Methankonzentrationen in der Atmosphäre. Finanziert von den Vereinten Nationen macht sich die Forschungsgruppe nun in einer anderen deutschen Großstadt auf die Suche nach Methanlecks. Diese Forschung hat unmittelbare Folgen für die Klimapolitik: Diskutieren wir zu viel über Kohlendioxidemissionen und vernachlässigen dabei das Methan? (00:40) Weitere Themen: Der Chemieprofessor Andreas Fath hat den Rhein und den Tennessee River der Länge nach durchschwommen und die Flüsse so genau untersucht wie niemand zuvor. Von Medikamentenrückständen bis Mikroplastik: Wie geht es den Flüssen? Hella Kemper hat Fath beim Training für sein nächstes großes Forschungsabenteuer, die Donau, besucht. (14:55) Marie Brand redet gern mit Händen und Füßen – aber warum gestikulieren wir eigentlich beim Sprechen? (11:10) Und Christoph Drösser fragt in seiner unmöglichen Kolumne: Wie und wo haben Aale Sex? (26:26) Links und Quellen: Der erste Teil des neuen IPCC-Reports (https://www.ipcc.ch/report/ar6/wg1/downloads/report/IPCC_AR6_WGI_Full_Report.pdf) beschäftigt sich mit den klimawissenschaftlichen und physikalischen Grundlagen des Klimawandels. Erstmals ist ein Kapitel über kurzlebige klimawirksame Stoffe enthalten. In 2019 und 2020 sind umfangreiche, gut recherchierte Übersichtsartikel zum Methanrätsel in den amerikanischen Magazinen "Wired" (https://www.wired.com/story/atmospheric-methane-levels-are-going-up-and-no-one-knows-why/) und "Scientific American" (https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/methane-levels-reach-an-all-time-high/) erschienen. Wie viel Methan Kühe pro Tag ausrülpsen, untersuchten Wissenschaftler unter anderem von der Washington State University (https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/8567486/). Einen Übersichtsartikel über die Messmethode der Münchner Wissenschaftler gibt es hier (https://amt.copernicus.org/articles/14/1111/2021/) und Ergebnisse zu den Untersuchungen auf dem Oktoberfest hier (https://acp.copernicus.org/articles/20/3683/2020/). Eine kostenlose Probeausgabe des ZEIT-WISSEN-Magazins erhalten Sie unter http://www.zeit.de/wissen-podcast. Dort sehen Sie auch die Top-Storys der aktuellen Ausgabe. Schreiben Sie uns an redaktion@zeit-wissen.de

The Focus Group
Monkey Love

The Focus Group

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2021 51:59


Shop Talk covers two stories this week. Apple's Tim Cook is an early riser because he feels he can unplug and get more done in the morning uninterrupted before his day gets blown off-track. Then, while we concentrate on financial needs in retirement, we often overlook the importance of true social needs as we age. Surrounding ourselves with a network of friends we can rely on is as important as finances according to Forbes. Caught My Eye remembers Actor Ed Asner and a Belgian woman who is banned from a Zoo for bonding with Chita the chimp. Alfred Beach, born September 1st, is our Business Birthday. Beach published “Scientific American,” patented a typewriter for the blind, and designed NYC's first subway.We're all business. Except when we're not.Apple Podcasts: apple.co/1WwDBrCSpotify: spoti.fi/2pC19B1iHeart Radio: bit.ly/2n0Z7H1Tunein: bit.ly/1SE3NMbStitcher: bit.ly/1N97ZquGoogle Podcasts: bit.ly/1pQTcVWPandora: pdora.co/2pEfctjYouTube: bit.ly/1spAF5aAlso follow Tim and John on:Facebook: www.facebook.com/focusgroupradioTwitter: www.twitter.com/focusgroupradioInstagram: www.instagram.com/focusgroupradio

Curiosity Daily
Talkers Are Leaders, DNA Evidence Myth, Thinking Sans Brain

Curiosity Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 13:48


Learn about a key trait in group leaders; why DNA evidence is overrated; and a brainless slime mold that can “think.” The "babble hypothesis" of leadership says people who talk more are seen as leaders by Steffie Drucker Dolan, E. W. (2021, July 17). New study finds people who speak more are more likely to be viewed as leaders. PsyPost; PsyPost. https://www.psypost.org/2021/07/new-study-finds-people-who-speak-more-are-more-likely-to-be-viewed-as-leaders-61540  MacLaren, N. G., Yammarino, F. J., Dionne, S. D., Sayama, H., Mumford, M. D., Connelly, S., Martin, R. W., Mulhearn, T. J., Todd, E. M., Kulkarni, A., Cao, Y., & Ruark, G. A. (2020). Testing the babble hypothesis: Speaking time predicts leader emergence in small groups. The Leadership Quarterly, 31(5), 101409. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.leaqua.2020.101409  Contrary To Popular Belief, DNA Evidence Is Far From Perfect by Ashley Hamer  Shermer, M. (2015). Forensic Pseudoscience. Scientific American, 313(3), 95–95. https://doi.org/10.1038/scientificamerican0915-95  Shaer, M. (2016, May 17). The Atlantic. The Atlantic; theatlantic. https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2016/06/a-reasonable-doubt/480747/  ‌Dolan, M. (2019, January 29). The danger of DNA: It isn't perfect. Chicagotribune.com; Chicago Tribune. https://www.chicagotribune.com/la-me-dna26-2008dec26-story.html  There's a brainless slime mold that can do things often associated with thinking by Cameron Duke Greenberg, A. (2020, September 21). Eight smart things slime molds can do without a brain. Pbs.org; Nova. https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/article/slime-mold-smart-brainless-cognition/  Murugan, N. J., Kaltman, D. H., Jin, P. H., Chien, M., Martinez, R., Nguyen, C. Q., Kane, A., Novak, R., Ingber, D. E., & Levin, M. (2021). Mechanosensation Mediates Long‐Range Spatial Decision‐Making in an Aneural Organism. Advanced Materials, 2008161. https://doi.org/10.1002/adma.202008161  Thinking without a brain. (2021, July 15). EurekAlert! https://www.eurekalert.org/news-releases/762793  Follow Curiosity Daily on your favorite podcast app to learn something new every day withCody Gough andAshley Hamer. Still curious? Get exclusive science shows, nature documentaries, and more real-life entertainment on discovery+! Go to https://discoveryplus.com/curiosity to start your 7-day free trial. discovery+ is currently only available for US subscribers. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

60-Second Science
COVID, Quickly, Episode 13: Vaccine Approval, Breakthrough Infections, Boosters

60-Second Science

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 6:26


Today we bring you a new episode in our podcast series COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks, Scientific American ’s senior health editors Tanya Lewis and Josh Fischman catch you up on the essential developments in the pandemic: from vaccines to new variants and everything in between. You can listen to all past episodes here .

The Kyle Thiermann Show
#286 Trouble Sleeping? Get Some Sun - Mariana Figueiro, Ph.D.

The Kyle Thiermann Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 59:27


Mariana G. Figueiro, Ph.D., is Director of the Lighting Research Center (LRC) and Professor of Architecture at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Dr. Figueiro is well known for her research on the effects of light on human health, circadian photobiology, and lighting for older adults.  Her research is regularly featured in national media including The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and Scientific American. Dr. Figueiro has also brought attention to the significance of light and health as a topic of public interest through her TEDMED talk. Contact Dr. Figueiro If you dig this podcast, would you be please leave a short review on Apple Podcasts? It's takes less than 60 seconds and makes a difference when I drop to my knees and beg hard-to-get guests to come on the show.  Learn about my work at kyle.surf Brought to you by Santa Cruz Medicinals, and RPM Training. Listen to Sourgrass RPM Training is a Norcal based active lifestyle brand founded on the idea that legit, purposeful functional training is the foundation of a truly full, adventurous life. I love their workout equipment and use it daily. Use the code KYLE10 at checkout and get 10% off any order.  Santa Cruz Medicinals CBD has supported this podcast from day one. Their founder actually convinced me to start the podcast! They make a range of potent CBD products and my personal favorite is the Peppermint Tincture, which I use most nights before before I go to bed. Use the code KYLE10 at checkout, and get 10% off any order. Sore muscles, be gone! Please consider supporting my work on Patreon. If you are financially strapped, just keep listening and give lots of high-fives. That's all the payment I need.  Connect with Kyle on Instagram | Twitter | YouTube Contact: info@kyle.surf The Motherfucker Awards Intro music by Nashe Howe “Life moves pretty fast ... if you don't look around once and a while, you could miss it.” - Ferris Buller

The Yours Chewly Podcast
Episode 144: Fighting Fatphobia in Parenting with Virginia Sole-Smith

The Yours Chewly Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 45:25


Dear Listener, This week on the pod, I'm talking to the one and only Virginia Sole-Smith about the ways fatphobia can show up in parenting. Virginia is the author of The Eating Instinct: Food Culture, Body Image and Guilt in America and the forthcoming Fat Kid Phobia. Her reporting on diet culture, health and parenting has appeared in the New York Times, Scientific American, and many other publications. She also writes the newsletter Burnt Toast. In our conversation she talks about why a child's body size is not a problem to solve, shares tips for handling conversations about a child's weight, and describes a few ways to create a more positive environment around food for the young people in your life. If you'd like to connect with Virginia, check out all of her information below: Website: virginiasolesmith.com Twitter: @v_solesmith (https://twitter.com/v_solesmith) Instagram: @v_solesmith (https://www.instagram.com/v_solesmith/) Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/virginiasolesmith/ Newsletter: https://virginiasolesmith.substack.com/ As always, thank you for listening and don't forget to tap those five stars if you enjoy today's episode! Yours Chewly, Claire

Can You Survive This Podcast?

Michael Easter is the author of The Comfort Crisis. He is also a contributing editor at Men's Health magazine, columnist for Outside magazine, and professor at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. His work has appeared in more than sixty countries and can also be found in Men's Journal, New York, Vice, Scientific American, Esquire, and others. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The Jordan Harbinger Show
545: Rachel Nuwer | Inside the Dark World of Wildlife Trafficking

The Jordan Harbinger Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 80:29


Rachel Nuwer (@RachelNuwer) is an award-winning freelance journalist who reports about science, travel, food, and adventure for The New York Times, National Geographic, Scientific American, and more. Her multi-award-winning first book, Poached: Inside the Dark World of Wildlife Trafficking, is out now. What We Discuss with Rachel Nuwer: What drives the global demand for resources cruelly derived from endangered wildlife. Why poachers and smugglers are willing to risk their own lives to meet this demand. The pros and cons of solutions proposed to stem the tide of this illicit trade -- from legalizing it for sustainable sourcing to synthesizing alternatives. Why governments are shy to throw the book at the worst offenders, and how the most clever, wealthy, and well-connected usually (but don't always) bypass legal repercussions for their trafficking transgressions. What we can do here and now to promote policies for preserving these species before they vanish forever. And much more... Full show notes and resources can be found here: jordanharbinger.com/545 Sign up for Six-Minute Networking -- our free networking and relationship development mini course -- at jordanharbinger.com/course! Like this show? Please leave us a review here -- even one sentence helps! Consider including your Twitter handle so we can thank you personally!

The Viall Files
E301 Dr. Alexandra Solomon - A Clinical Look At The Break - Up of Katie & Greg

The Viall Files

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 81:01


Welcome to a bonus episode of The Viall Files. Today we are joined by Dr. Alexandra Solomon. Over the last two decades, Dr. Alexandra H. Solomon has become one of today's most trusted voices in the world of relationships, and her work on Relational Self-Awareness has reached millions of people around the world. Dr. Solomon is a licensed clinical psychologist at The Family Institute at Northwestern University, and she is on faculty in the School of Education and Social Policy at Northwestern University where she teaches the internationally renowned course, Building Loving and Lasting Relationships: Marriage 101. In addition to writing articles and chapters for leading academic journals and books in the field of marriage and family, she is the author of two bestselling books, Loving Bravely and Taking Sexy Back. Dr. Solomon regularly presents to diverse groups that include the United States Military Academy at West Point and Microsoft, and she is frequently asked to talk about relationships with media outlets like The Today Show, O Magazine, The Atlantic, Vogue, and Scientific American.   On this episode Dr. Soloman clinically breaks down the fight between Katie and Greg, while discussing gaslighting and emotional abuse. She helps us to understand whether we saw these actions on screen and why it might be triggering to so many watching at home.  Please make sure to subscribe so you don't miss an episode and as always send in your relationship questions to asknick@kastmedia.com to be a part of our Monday episodes.  For merch please visit www.viallfiles.com today! Episode Socials:  @viallfiles @nickviall @dr.alexandra.solomon See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.