Podcasts about Danish

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  • 4,154PODCASTS
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Best podcasts about Danish

Show all podcasts related to danish

Latest podcast episodes about Danish

Gastropod
Reinventing the Eel

Gastropod

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 48:52


Aristotle thought they were born out of mud. A young Sigmund Freud dedicated himself to finding their testicles (spoiler alert, he failed). And a legendary Danish marine biologist spent 18 years and his wife's fortune sailing around the Atlantic Ocean to find their birthplace. The creature that tormented all of these great thinkers? It was the eel, perhaps the most mysterious fish in the world—and one of the most expensive per pound. So why are tiny, transparent, worm-like baby eels worth so much? Why have eels remained so mysterious, despite scientists' best efforts? And how has one pioneering farmer in Maine started raising eels sustainably, despite the species' endangered status? All that this episode, plus a nighttime fishing trip, suitcases full of cash, and a compelling argument that when it comes to the American Thanksgiving dinner plate, we should consider ditching the turkey—and replacing it with eel. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Changing The Climate
Changing The Climate #140 - Tegan Spinner

Changing The Climate

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 52:39


Tegan Spinner is the CEO and Founder of Worthmore, a Danish telecom services company with a mission to develop the simplest way for you to do your part for the planet and our community while providing an exceptional experience. https://worthmore.io/ 

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast
1977: Trustpilot Founder and CEO Peter Holten Mühlmann

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 27:00


Peter Holten Mühlmann founded Trustpilot in 2007. Over the last fourteen years, he has led Trustpilot from a small Danish startup to a global FTSE-250 listed company. Day to day, Peter focuses on business strategy and product development and has overseen Trustpilot's expansion to 800+ employees across six countries. Peter joins me on Tech Talks Daily to talk about the story behind Trustpilot and how they are using techology to remove fake reviews. We talk about a new Consumer Verification tool, an industry first in the world of online reviews. This tool is yet another step in Trustpilot's effort to protect and promote trust online – something that continues to be a struggle, as we've seen with companies like Fashion Nova hiding bad reviews from the public and businesses buying fake reviews. As a result, it's difficult for a shopper to trust what's said online. We also discuss the growing issue of misinformation causing distrust between consumers and businesses and discuss some recent data Trustpilot has uncovered through recent consumer surveys. For example, 84% of Americans say they'd be motivated to prove their identity if it would protect others from misinformation online. We explore how another recent survey about consumer grudges that revealed 66% of Americans aged 45-54 years old are less likely to regret holding a grudge than those aged 25-34 (37%) and 69% of Americans are holding a grudge, while 51% regret holding a grudge.

DanishTube-Kastet: A Learning Danish Podcast
#46 At Bande eller Ikke at Bande? | Part 2

DanishTube-Kastet: A Learning Danish Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 50:18


Brett: USA. Part two of this curse-filled episode on the best learning Danish podcast. With analyse which Danish words are perceived as swear words by the younger and older generation, giving some examples and swearing a lot along the way. To download show notes and more, support me on Patreon HERE For more Danish stuff click HERE To enquire about private Danish lessons write to: danishtuberocks@gmail.com Support the show --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/danishtube/message

Danish with Christina - intermediate Danish language podcast

In this episode, we will be talking (entirely in Danish) about James Clear's 3R model on how to develop new habits that last. The three Rs stand for Reminder (påmindelse), Routine (rutine) and Reward (belønning).  I hope you enjoy the podcast. As always, you are welcome to reach out to me at danishwithchristina@gmail.com   The episode is based on an article from produktivisten.dk.

Project Zion Podcast
480 | Grounds for Peace | Nakba Day

Project Zion Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 61:14


Nakba is Arabic for disaster or catastrophe that happened to Palestinians in 1948 when around about 700,000 Palestinians fled their homes as refugees and Palestinian society and homeland ended. Bilal Al Issa is a third generation Palestinian living in Denmark, a board member of the Danish house in Palestine (DHIP). His grandfather now in his 90s, is still in a refugee camp in Lebanon, yet hopes to return to his village that he left in 1948. Daniel Bannoura, is a Christian Palestinian from Bethlehem, born in Jerusalem, currently working on a PhD on the Qu'ran at Notre Dame in the United States.  Our two guests tell of their experiences, and how Nakba continues and plays out today in the Israel/Palestine conflict. They end by sharing how we as listeners can contribute to peace in the Holy Land.  Guests: Bilal Al Issa and Daniel BannouraHost: Andrew Bolton

How to Live in Denmark
Ballad of the Danish Royal Teenagers

How to Live in Denmark

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 7:39


It's hard to be a teenager no matter who you are or where you live, but spare a thought for the two teenagers of the Danish Royal Family. 16-year-old Christian - the future King Christian XI - and 15-year-old Isabella have to deal with family photo calls and media events, leaked Tik Tok videos, and a TV documentary this week accusing their boarding school of being a toxic environment.

Talk Talent To Me
Worksome VP TA Anabel Morales

Talk Talent To Me

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 21:20


  Bigger and better are aspirations that most companies hold, but scaling a business is complicated and requires a range of expertise to ensure that the culture and values are sustained as the company grows. In today's episode, we speak to Anabel Morales, who is in charge of VP talent acquisitions at Worksome. Worksome is a Danish-based company that offers an end-to-end solution for companies to manage their external workforce. Anabel's approach to her role is centered on forming interpersonal relationships, and upholding company culture and values. In this episode, we learn more about Anabel's role at Worksome, the services that Worksome provides, recruiting in different marketplaces, challenges in the current marketplace, the importance of company values, and much more!   Key Points From This Episode:   An introduction to today's show and some background information on Anabel's career. The journey to Anabel's current role as VP of talent acquisition at Worksome. How income tax works for Americans working and living in Denmark. We find out about the work that Worksome does and Anabel's approach to her role. Current challenges that Anabel sees as a priority within the recruitment sector. Problems that Anabel experienced during the Series A funding round. Hiring capacity of Worksome during the early stages of growth. The importance of hiring local expertise when working in unique markets. The steps that Anabel took to increase capacity at Worksome. How Anabel ensured recruitment was quick and effective. Motivation behind Anabel's idea to change to another ATS for data. The values that Worksome cultivates and how these benefit them as a hiring brand. Why Anabel thinks it is essential for companies to establish a value system. The link between company culture and values, and what the culture at Worksome is like. How Anabel conveys Worksome's values and culture to candidates. Anabel's approach to sustaining company values and culture while scaling. Why Anabel thinks cultivating psychological safety during the interview process is important. Anabel shares some practical examples of how to cultivate psychological safety.   Tweetables:   “My approach was about finding great recruiters in both of those markets that could promote our brand, build relationships and also be cultural ambassadors in those offices.” — Anabel Morales [0:07:08]   “Being a startup, you want to make sure that early on you are able to build a great experience and a good brand in the market, especially for entering new markets.” — Anabel Morales [0:08:22]   “We recognize that the key to scaling successfully, or at least scaling our culture successfully, is going to be to equip our leaders with some tools to really scale this trust, transparency, and inclusion.” — Anabel Morales [0:17:46]   “It's really not possible to expect people to feel comfortable talking about their mistakes if you don't have the leadership to support it.” — Anabel Morales [0:21:29]   Links Mentioned in Today's Episode:   Anabel Morales on LinkedIn Anabel Morales on Instagram Worksome Greenhouse Talk Talent to Me Hired

Johnny Vaughan On Radio X Podcast
318 - A Game of Cancel Chicken

Johnny Vaughan On Radio X Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 59:47


Get ready for the game of Cancel Chicken that gripped the nation. Plus, Johnny's got three lactic tales to make your Danish blur and the Woodman has a big-fanged arachnid, building a funnel in the deadly ‘Down Under' of this heroic little slot. Enjoy! Hear Johnny on Radio X every weekday at 4pm across the UK on digital radio, 104.9 FM in London, 97.7 FM in Manchester, on your mobile or via www.radiox.co.uk

Sex Stories
168 | Building One Huge Orgasm: Josie's Sex Stories

Sex Stories

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 73:23


➡️ DETAILS | Over the past two years, Josie has been feeling more confident in her own sexuality than ever. A playful open communication style (and relationship!) with her long-distance partner is part of it, and she tells us how new and sexy it was to experience explicit consent as a fun, grownup game. She remembers masturbating to the voice of Cher, parents who were open, flirty, and often naked, and feeling a sense of liberation talking to her friends about orgasms, her siblings about sex, and the formative experiences at boarding school, where kids in Denmark usually spend a year sometime between ages 15-17. Early experiences were hard to communicate and Cosmo was little help, and her current partner made hot personalized “instructional” videos about his balls, and she shares learnings of ball play, making everything wet, building to orgasms, her felt experience of inside/outside alternations, and how much she enjoys the Dom/sub dynamic that she is exploring consciously for the first time. She tells a story of a therapist who clearly didn't understand power dynamics, the struggle for partnered poly dating on tinder, threesome wooings, submissives taking turns, and telling her partners juicy details after each time she'd see her couple lovers. Her future bucket list includes more BDSM explorations, clubs, rope, and novel things in general. She wants more spankings, which she gets by being very bratty, but she's not into face hitting or humiliation, though she is super DUPER into struggle fucks, which leans more toward wrestling than CNC fantasies for her, and we also talk the hot taboo of anal, kissing compatibility, and how a really mean Dom is one who withholds kisses. Q for Wyoh: When you're too in your head instead of body, what do you DO? ➡️ STATS | Our guest today is a 30 year old white Danish cis female; she would characterize herself as heteroflexible, is in a monogamish relationship of 2 years with a German man, and is a sensual submissive who loves spanking, intense kissing, anticipation and struggle fucking. Born and rasied in Denmark, where she current live lives and works as a researcher at a university, welcome Josie. ➡️ JOIN THE MISSION | Explore (y)our creativity: https://www.creation.place  ➡️ GET BETTERHELP | Support yourself & Sex Stories: https://www.betterhelp.com/sexstories 

Holy Land Moments
Escape by Boat

Holy Land Moments

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 2:01


Today, The Fellowship's C. J. Burroughs shares one of our “Heroes of the Holocaust,” about two Danish innkeepers who became part of the underground resistance helping Jews escape during World War II.

Sohrab's Movie Queue
Review: Ambulance (2022 film)

Sohrab's Movie Queue

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 5:33


In today's episode, we review action Director Michael Bay's latest movie "Ambulance". This film is a remake of a Danish movie from 2005 of the same name. The cast includes Jake Gyllenhaal, Yahya Abdul-Mateen II and Eiza González. DRONES! DRONES! DRONES! Did I mention this movie has a lot of awesome drone footage in it? While this might be one of Michael Bay's smaller movies budget-wise the energy in Michael Bay films (including this one) is always explosive. He last minute with no prep adds a scene in the LA river with 2 helicopters that secured at the last minute. Why? Because he can! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/sohrabsmoviequeue/message

The Skald's Circle: Stories of Myth, Folklore, and Legend

It's time to relax, grab a drink, pull up a chair by the hearth, and listen to The Tinderbox from Danish Folklore, as told by Casimir. As always, our stories are available to listen to for free! We release our shorter tales on Wednesdays, and we release our longer, chapter-length stories on Saturdays.   If you enjoyed this story, and want to earn great rewards while helping The Skald's Circle produce even better and more frequent content, please consider having a look at our Patreon page.   If you like to hear more of our stories, you can find them in an easy-to-navigate format in the Story Archive on our website here.   This episode is sponsored by Ethereal Gold Dispensary, an online hemp-derived cannabinoids dispensary (that's things like CBD, Delta-8, Delta-9, and other rare cannabinoids). Receive 20% off your order with code SKALDSCIRCLE at checkout (any order, it doesn't even have to be your first!)! Be sure to use our link here — it helps us out as well!

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 05.12.22

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 61:29


Regular blueberry consumption may reduce risk of dementia, study finds University of Cincinnati, May 11, 2022 Researchers found that adding blueberries to the daily diets of certain middle-aged populations may lower the chances of developing late-life dementia. The findings were recently published in the journal Nutrients.  Krikorian said his team has been conducting research on the benefits of berries for people with greater risk for Alzheimer's disease and dementia for several years.  The researchers enrolled 33 patients from around the Cincinnati area between the ages of 50-65 who were overweight, prediabetic and had noticed mild memory decline with aging. Krikorian said this population has an increased risk for late-life dementia and other common conditions.  Over a period of 12 weeks, the patients were asked to abstain from berry fruit consumption of any kind except for a daily packet of supplement powder to be mixed with water and consumed either with breakfast or dinner. Half of the participants received powders that contained the equivalent of one-half cup of whole blueberries, while the other half received a placebo.  Krikorian said those in the blueberry-treated group showed improvement on cognitive tasks that depend on executive control.   Patients in the blueberry group also had lower fasting insulin levels, meaning the participants had improved metabolic function and were able to more easily burn fat for energy.   Krikorian said the blueberry group displayed an additional mild degree of higher mitochondrial uncoupling, a cellular process that has been associated with greater longevity and reduced oxidative stress. Oxidative stress can lead to symptoms like fatigue and memory loss.  Regular exercise with dietary advice linked to better mobility in frail older people Yale University, May 11, 2022 A program of regular exercise along with expert dietary advice is linked to a reduction in mobility problems among frail older people living in the community, finds a trial published by The BMJ today. The combination of aerobic (walking), strength, flexibility, and balance exercises alongside personalized nutritional counseling reduced mobility disability by 22% over three years. Their findings are based on 1,519 men and women (average age 79 years) with physical frailty and sarcopenia (a combination of reduced physical function and low muscle mass) recruited from 16 clinical sites across 11 European countries between 2016 and 2019. Women in the intervention group lost less muscle strength (0.9 kg at 24 months) and less muscle mass (0.24 kg and 0.49 kg at 24 months and 36 months, respectively) than control women, but no significant group differences were seen in men.  Study: Side effects emerge after approval for many US Yale University, May 9, 2022  Almost one-third of new drugs approved by U.S. regulators over a decade ended up years later with warnings about unexpected, sometimes life-threatening side effects or complications, a newanalysis found. The results covered all 222 prescription drugs approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration over ten yers.  The 71 flagged drugs included top-sellers for treating depression, arthritis, infections and blood clots. Safety issues included risks for serious skin reactions, liver damage, cancer and even death. “The large percentage of problems was a surprise,” and they included side effects not seen during the review process, said Dr. Joseph Ross, the study's lead author at Yale University.”We know that safety concerns, new ones, are going to be identified once a drug is used in a wider population. That's just how it is,” Ross said.  While most safety concerns were not serious enough to prompt recalls, the findings raise questions about how thoroughly drugs are tested before approval The study counted black-box warnings for dozens of drugs; these involved serious problems including deaths or life-threatening conditions linked with the drugs. There were also dozens of alerts for less serious potential harms and three drug withdrawals because of the potential for death or other serious harm. Among the drugs with added warnings: Humira, used for arthritis and some other illnesses; Abilify, used for depression and other mental illness; and Pradaxa, a blood thinner. The withdrawn drugs and the reason: Bextra, an anti-inflammatory medicine, heart problems; Raptiva, a psoriasis drug, rare nervous system illness; and Zelnorm, a bowel illness drug, heart problems. Exercise during pregnancy may yield metabolic benefits in grandchildren Harvard University, May 11, 2022 If grandma liked working out, her pain may be your gain. It may seem unlikely, but recent research out of the Joslin Diabetes Center says it just might be the case. Laurie Goodyear, a professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, has found that a grandmother's exercise during pregnancy may make her grandchildren healthier metabolically, with less body fat, better insulin control and, in some, healthier bones. We are looking for epigenetic alterations in the DNA, because epigenetic alterations can be changed as rapidly as two generations. We analyze micro RNAs, some methylation situations in the F1 generation eggs and sperm to see what's going on. We are currently investigating how mothers' exercise affects their children's gametes. I'm confident in saying that women who are pregnant should try to be as physically active as they can, depending, of course, on the condition of their pregnancy. There's strong human data showing that exercise during pregnancy improves the mother's health; numerous animal studies showing improved first-generation health; and now we have evidence that maternal exercise will positively impact the health of the second generation. I'm not an obstetrician, and there are certainly conditions where a woman cannot perform exercise during pregnancy, but, when medically approved, being physically active is important—for the mother, the first generation, and now even the grandchildren. New Study Finds Simply Believing You Can Do Something To Improve It Is Linked With Higher Wellbeing University Of Southern Denmark And University Of Copenhagen, May 11, 2022 The number of people struggling with poor mental health and mental disorders has been rising around the world over the past few decades. Those who are struggling are increasingly facing difficulties accessing the kind of support they need – leaving many waiting months for help, if they even qualify for treatment. In our recent study, we asked 3,015 Danish adults to fill out a survey that asked questions about mental health – such as whether they believe they can do something to keep mentally healthy, whether they had done something in the past two weeks to support their mental health, and also whether they were currently struggling with a mental health problem. We then assessed their level of mental wellbeing using the Short Warwick–Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale, which is widely used by healthcare professionals and researchers to measure mental wellbeing. As you'd expect, we found that mental wellbeing was highest among those who had done things to improve their mental health compared with the other participants. Interestingly, however, we found that – whether or not our respondents had actually taken action to improve their mental wellbeing – people who believed they could do something to keep mentally healthy tended to have higher mental wellbeing than those who didn't have this belief. So while it's most beneficial to take steps to improve your mental health, even just believing that you can improve it is associated with better overall mental wellbeing.The effect of night shifts—gene expression fails to adapt to new sleep patterns McGill University (Quebec).  May 7, 2022  Have you ever considered that working night shifts may, in the long run, have an impact on your health? A team of researchers from the McGill University has discovered that genes regulating important biological processes are incapable of adapting to new sleeping and eating patterns and that most of them stay tuned to their daytime biological clock rhythms. “We now better understand the molecular changes that take place inside the human body when sleeping and eating behaviours are in sync with our biological clock. For example, we found that the expression of genes related to the immune system and metabolic processes did not adapt to the new behaviours,” says Dr. Boivin, a full professor at McGill University's Department of Psychiatry. It is known that the expression of many of these genes varies over the course of the day and night. Their repetitive rhythms are important for the regulation of many physiological and behavioural processes. “Almost 25% of the rhythmic genes lost their biological rhythm after our volunteers were exposed to our night shift simulation. 73% did not adapt to the night shift and stayed tuned to their daytime rhythm. And less than 3% partly adapted to the night shift schedule. “We think the molecular changes we observed potentially contribute to the development of health problems like diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular diseases more frequently seen in night-shift workers on the long term,” explains Dr. Boivin.  Videos: 1. Will the Future Be Human? – Yuval Noah Harari (Start @ 2:13) 2. The Invention Of Whiteness.. (Start @ 0:28) 3. Jonathan Pie's Rant On Cultural Appropriation 4. Breakthrough deaths comprise increasing proportion of those who died from COVID-19 (5:44)

Business Daily
Eurovision: The price of performing

Business Daily

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 17:29


In today's episode of Business Daily we'll see how Eurovision goes so much further than the stage. We head to this year's host city, Turin in Italy, to see whether there's a been boost in local business there. We hear from Ochman who's representing Poland, on how his career has changed since becoming an act, and from Emmelie De Forest who represented Denmark in 2013, who says the competition was both a "blessing, and a curse". Dr Filippos Filippidis, from Imperial College London, tells us about the positive effect that Eurovision can have on a country's mental health. And Dr Adrian Kavanagh from Maynooth University in Ireland, talks about the economic impact of hosting. We also speak to one of the competition's most famous former presenters, Danish actor Pilou Asbaek. Presenter/producer: Izzy Greenfield Image: Getty (Description: Eurovision song contest logo 2022)

English Premier League podcast: EPLpod
Importance of Sleep for Brentford FC

English Premier League podcast: EPLpod

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 28:20


The Legend chats with Danish sleep expert Anna West, founder of Sleep2perform, who has been working with Brentford FC since 2016. The two talk about whether or not players should sleep alone, the benefits of sleep as it relates to athletic performance, and so much more! Don't sleep on this episode, chappies! (So sorry for the terrible pun). 

Derate The Hate
Episode 108: Does Free Speech Mean More Hate Speech?... with Dan Garscia of FAIR Twin Cities

Derate The Hate

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 62:10


In this week's episode, I am joined again by my friend Dan Garscia of FAIR Twin Cities. We're shaking things up a little this week and doing things a bit different. Some current events have been on my mind as they are quite divisive, bringing out the hate in a lot of folks, so I've asked my friend Dan to join me for a conversation on those topics.Our conversation starts with a discussion on Free Speech and Elon Musk's pending purchase of Twitter. The mere thought of an individual proposing a “free speech” environment, purchasing the social media platform has many (of a certain mindset) apoplectic…A whole lot of hate has been on display over the past week regarding the leaked Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe vs. Wade… There are an awful lot of misconceptions and ignorance floating around the internet ecosystem on this topic, and as the DTH listeners know, ignorance tends to lead to a whole bunch of HATE…The perpetual victim mentality was on full display again this past week here in the state in which I live, Minnesota, when the mother of Daunte Wright decided to confront police with some attitude after seeing a high-risk arrest taking place along a Minnesota highway. This is not helpful and just leads to enhanced problems and hate…So grateful to have been joined again by my friend Dan Garscia of FAIR Twin Cities for this conversation. If you're in the Minneapolis/St Paul area and you want to learn more about the great work FAIR (Foundation Against Intolerance and Racism) is doing, FAIR Twin Citie's quarterly event may be of interest…  https://www.eventbrite.com/e/fair-quarterly-meeting-tickets-329699258357Jacob Mchangama ( @JMchangama ). Jacob is a Danish lawyer, author, human-rights / free speech activist, and social commentator. His new book, “Free Speech: A History from Socrates to Social Media” was recently included in a CBS Story ( https://www.cbsnews.com/news/this-week-on-sunday-morning-february-20-2022/. You can see Jacob's info on FAIR facebook, twitter, website.What have you done today to make your life a better life? What have you done today to make the world a better place? The world is a better place if we are better people, and that begins with each of us leading a better life. Be kind to one another, be grateful for everything you've got, and make each and every day the day that you want it to be!Please follow The Derate The Hate podcast on Facebook, MeWe, Instagram, Twitter . Subscribe to us wherever you enjoy your audio. Please leave us a rating and feedback. Send me a message on any media platform or subscribe directly from our sites. Let us know about someone you think should be on our podcast, and if we book them for a conversation, I'll send you a free gift! Not on social media? You can share your thoughts directly with me at wilk@wilksworld.comI look forward to hearing from you!Please check out our affiliates page by clicking HERE!

Science History Podcast
Episode 54. Bohr's Atom: John Heilbron

Science History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 92:56


At the start of the 20th century, physicists probed the structure of nature. Their discoveries changed our fundamental understanding of matter, of life, and of war. At the center of these discoveries stood the Danish physicist Niels Bohr. Bohr approached problems of atomic structure and quantum theory with a philosophical perspective and an ability to skirt paradoxes with his principle of complementarity. Perhaps as important as Bohr's discoveries on the atom was his hosting of international collaborations at his institute in Copenhagen, which in turn led to fundamental insights in physics and chemistry. Bohr also played significant humanitarian and diplomatic roles during World War II in Denmark, Sweden, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Many Jewish refugee scientists passed through Bohr's institute after escaping Nazi Germany, and Bohr then facilitated their immigration to safe harbors. With us to decipher Bohr's complex legacy is John Heilbron. John is a member of the International Academy of the History of Science, for which he served as president from 2001-2005. He is also a member of The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, The American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and The American Philosophical Society. He is the recipient of many awards for his scholarship on the history of science.

HA*K - The Real Sides Podcast
Episode 32 - HA*K - The Real Sides Podcast met up with Micki Stoltt

HA*K - The Real Sides Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 72:40


Heather, Ashley, and Keira chat with the ever so charming, Danish born actor and coach, Micki Stoltt where we discuss his adventure as the character of Rognvaldr and being on set of The Last Kingdom.  Micki also shares some personal experiences throughout his career which allowed us to shed some light on some darker parts of this industry. This interview is full of laughs (try to correctly pronounce his characters name!), serious moments and silly moments (hint - Twinky Winky is involved). Give this episode a listen if you are wanting some behind the scenes stories.  If you like what you watched or heard, It would really help us if you could LIKE this video. Subscribe to our channel and press the bell so you never miss a new episode. To connect, follow us on: Instagram- @realsidespodcast Facebook- The Real Sides Podcast Follow Micki on: Instagram - @mickistolttIMDB - https://www.imdb.com/name/nm4934412/

City of Soccer
S3:E9 - Ryan Gareis and Jimmy Nielsen

City of Soccer

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 62:33


Dash rookie Ryan Gareis joins the pod to talk about her connection with her mom, gameday fits, and an encounter with a raccoon in Dallas. Assistant Dynamo Coach Jimmy Nielsen talks about his go-to meal during his playing days that his girls are sick and tired of and playing for his home town team.

Nordic Football Podcast
Oh My Godset! - S6:E8

Nordic Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 94:19


Join Steve Wyss, Jonathan Fadugba & Henry - @footballinDK as we review the latest goings on in Norway, Denmark & Sweden. In the Eliteserien some strange results have paved the way for an un unsual looking table and hear how Molde won the Norwegian Cup. The Danish season is very close to finishing and just one point separates FCK and FCM. Hear the latest from Henry, and who will win the title? Over in Sweden Hammarby lost for the first time. AIK and MFF are closing in and find out how Degerfors finally managed to end their losing run.

Rhody Radio: RI Library Radio Online
Howard S. Veisz, author of HENNY AND HER BOAT

Rhody Radio: RI Library Radio Online

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 47:16


Join Howard S. Veisz, a dedicated volunteer in the Watercraft Department at the Mystic Seaport Museum since 2009, as he shares the story of Henny Sinding Sundø and Gerda III, the boat Henny used to save Jewish lives during the Nazi occupation of Denmark. Veisz's book, Henny and Her Boat, provides a fresh perspective on the Danes' defense of their Jewish countrymen during years of Nazi occupation and, ultimately, their heroic rescue of the Danish Jews on a fleet of fishing boats and other small craft. This podcast is presented in collaboration with the Sandra Bornstein Holocaust Education Center Baxt Lecture Series, an annual event that brings Holocaust education to the greater Rhode Island community. -- In 2009 Howard S. Veisz left a litigation career and went to sea. After a two-year sailing voyage around the North Atlantic, Howard and his wife settled on Connecticut's Mystic River, and Howard began work as a shipyard volunteer at the Mystic Seaport Maritime Museum. Howard worked in the rigging shop for a massive project: restoring Mystic's 1841 whaling ship, the Charles W. Morgan, and getting it under sail for the first time in 93 years. As the whaling ship project wound down, Howard's interest in Gerda III, also docked at Mystic Seaport Museum, arose. With a father and grandparents who barely escaped Nazi Germany, Gerda III's role in rescuing Denmark's Jews drew Howard in. While helping to preserve Gerda III, Howard began a four-year mission to reconstruct its history. Howard traveled to Denmark to locate and interview descendants of the people who carried out Gerda III's rescue missions; scoured Danish archives; visited the docks from which Gerda III set out; gathered accounts by leaders of the Gerda III rescue group that had never appeared in English; and assembled translators to uncover the fascinating story that had been buried in those writings for over seventy years. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/rhodyradio/message

Creative Peacemeal
From The Archives: Michael "Flip" Yingling, Creative Artist and Senior Product Lead at LEGO

Creative Peacemeal

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 41:38


This archived episode is from July 2021, and remains on of the TOP episodes streamed to date!Creative artist, Michael "Flip" Yingling joins me on the show to talk about how he got into the field, life at LEGO, gets serious about living a creative life, and does a deep dive into Danish food and desserts. Don't miss this insightful look at life in the arts from this talented individual.Michael Yingling, also know as Flip, as  Sr Product Lead at LEGO working on digital experiences for kids. A seasoned creative and voice over performer, Flip has worked in the the theater,  on television, for Walt Disney Imagineering, Club Penguin, and Disney's Photopass Service where their passion for performance and storytelling turned into engaging products for users and inspirational leadership for their teams.To learn more about Creative Peacemeal Podcast, or to check out more episodes, and a corresponding blog featuring small interviews, podcast spotlights, and recipes, click here.Don't forget to follow the podcast on social media for all the latest updates, quotes, and behind the scenes photos!Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/creativepeacemealpod/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/creative_peacemeal_podcast/?hl=enRedBubble Merch Shop: https://www.redbubble.com/people/CPPodcast/shop?asc=u

Tangle
INTERVIEW: Jacob Mchangama on the history of free speech

Tangle

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 37:43


Jacob Mchangama is a Danish lawyer, human-rights advocate, and social commentator. He is the founder and director of Justitia, a Copenhagen-based think tank focusing on human rights, freedom of speech, and the rule of law. He is also the author of Free Speech: A History from Socrates to Social Media, which is why he is here today. You can subscribe to Tangle by clicking here or drop something in our tip jar by clicking here. Our podcast is written by Isaac Saul and produced by Trevor Eichhorn. Music for the podcast was produced by Diet 75. Our newsletter is edited by Bailey Saul, Sean Brady, Ari Weitzman, and produced in conjunction with Tangle's social media manager Magdalena Bokowa, who also created our logo. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/tanglenews/support

New Books in Sociology
Mikkel Bunkenborg et al., "Collaborative Damage: An Experimental Ethnography of Chinese Globalization" (Cornell UP, 2022)

New Books in Sociology

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 59:44


Collaborative Damage: An Experimental Ethnography of Chinese Globalization (Cornell UP, 2022) is an experimental ethnography of Chinese globalization that compares data from two frontlines of China's global intervention—sub-Saharan Africa and Inner/Central Asia. Based on their fieldwork on Chinese infrastructure and resource-extraction projects in Mozambique and Mongolia, Mikkel Bunkenborg, Morten Nielsen, and Morten Axel Pedersen provide new empirical insights into neocolonialism and Sinophobia in the Global South. The core argument in Collaborative Damage is that the different participants studied in the globalization processes—local workers and cadres; Chinese managers and entrepreneurs; and the authors themselves, three Danish anthropologists—are intimately linked in paradoxical partnerships of mutual incomprehension. The authors call this "collaborative damage," which crucially refers not only to the misunderstandings and conflicts they observed in the field, but also to their own failure to agree about how to interpret the data. Via in-depth case studies and tragicomical tales of friendship, antagonism, irresolvable differences, and carefully maintained indifferences across disparate Sino-local worlds in Africa and Asia, Collaborative Damage tells a wide-ranging story of Chinese globalization in the twenty-first century. Adam Bobeck is a PhD candidate in Cultural Anthropology at the University of Leipzig. His PhD is entitled “Object-Oriented Azadari: Shi'i Muslim Rituals and Ontology”. For more about his work, see www.adambobeck.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/sociology

New Books Network
Mikkel Bunkenborg et al., "Collaborative Damage: An Experimental Ethnography of Chinese Globalization" (Cornell UP, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 59:44


Collaborative Damage: An Experimental Ethnography of Chinese Globalization (Cornell UP, 2022) is an experimental ethnography of Chinese globalization that compares data from two frontlines of China's global intervention—sub-Saharan Africa and Inner/Central Asia. Based on their fieldwork on Chinese infrastructure and resource-extraction projects in Mozambique and Mongolia, Mikkel Bunkenborg, Morten Nielsen, and Morten Axel Pedersen provide new empirical insights into neocolonialism and Sinophobia in the Global South. The core argument in Collaborative Damage is that the different participants studied in the globalization processes—local workers and cadres; Chinese managers and entrepreneurs; and the authors themselves, three Danish anthropologists—are intimately linked in paradoxical partnerships of mutual incomprehension. The authors call this "collaborative damage," which crucially refers not only to the misunderstandings and conflicts they observed in the field, but also to their own failure to agree about how to interpret the data. Via in-depth case studies and tragicomical tales of friendship, antagonism, irresolvable differences, and carefully maintained indifferences across disparate Sino-local worlds in Africa and Asia, Collaborative Damage tells a wide-ranging story of Chinese globalization in the twenty-first century. Adam Bobeck is a PhD candidate in Cultural Anthropology at the University of Leipzig. His PhD is entitled “Object-Oriented Azadari: Shi'i Muslim Rituals and Ontology”. For more about his work, see www.adambobeck.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Chinese Studies
Mikkel Bunkenborg et al., "Collaborative Damage: An Experimental Ethnography of Chinese Globalization" (Cornell UP, 2022)

New Books in Chinese Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 59:44


Collaborative Damage: An Experimental Ethnography of Chinese Globalization (Cornell UP, 2022) is an experimental ethnography of Chinese globalization that compares data from two frontlines of China's global intervention—sub-Saharan Africa and Inner/Central Asia. Based on their fieldwork on Chinese infrastructure and resource-extraction projects in Mozambique and Mongolia, Mikkel Bunkenborg, Morten Nielsen, and Morten Axel Pedersen provide new empirical insights into neocolonialism and Sinophobia in the Global South. The core argument in Collaborative Damage is that the different participants studied in the globalization processes—local workers and cadres; Chinese managers and entrepreneurs; and the authors themselves, three Danish anthropologists—are intimately linked in paradoxical partnerships of mutual incomprehension. The authors call this "collaborative damage," which crucially refers not only to the misunderstandings and conflicts they observed in the field, but also to their own failure to agree about how to interpret the data. Via in-depth case studies and tragicomical tales of friendship, antagonism, irresolvable differences, and carefully maintained indifferences across disparate Sino-local worlds in Africa and Asia, Collaborative Damage tells a wide-ranging story of Chinese globalization in the twenty-first century. Adam Bobeck is a PhD candidate in Cultural Anthropology at the University of Leipzig. His PhD is entitled “Object-Oriented Azadari: Shi'i Muslim Rituals and Ontology”. For more about his work, see www.adambobeck.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/chinese-studies

New Books in East Asian Studies
Mikkel Bunkenborg et al., "Collaborative Damage: An Experimental Ethnography of Chinese Globalization" (Cornell UP, 2022)

New Books in East Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 59:44


Collaborative Damage: An Experimental Ethnography of Chinese Globalization (Cornell UP, 2022) is an experimental ethnography of Chinese globalization that compares data from two frontlines of China's global intervention—sub-Saharan Africa and Inner/Central Asia. Based on their fieldwork on Chinese infrastructure and resource-extraction projects in Mozambique and Mongolia, Mikkel Bunkenborg, Morten Nielsen, and Morten Axel Pedersen provide new empirical insights into neocolonialism and Sinophobia in the Global South. The core argument in Collaborative Damage is that the different participants studied in the globalization processes—local workers and cadres; Chinese managers and entrepreneurs; and the authors themselves, three Danish anthropologists—are intimately linked in paradoxical partnerships of mutual incomprehension. The authors call this "collaborative damage," which crucially refers not only to the misunderstandings and conflicts they observed in the field, but also to their own failure to agree about how to interpret the data. Via in-depth case studies and tragicomical tales of friendship, antagonism, irresolvable differences, and carefully maintained indifferences across disparate Sino-local worlds in Africa and Asia, Collaborative Damage tells a wide-ranging story of Chinese globalization in the twenty-first century. Adam Bobeck is a PhD candidate in Cultural Anthropology at the University of Leipzig. His PhD is entitled “Object-Oriented Azadari: Shi'i Muslim Rituals and Ontology”. For more about his work, see www.adambobeck.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/east-asian-studies

New Books in World Affairs
Mikkel Bunkenborg et al., "Collaborative Damage: An Experimental Ethnography of Chinese Globalization" (Cornell UP, 2022)

New Books in World Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 59:44


Collaborative Damage: An Experimental Ethnography of Chinese Globalization (Cornell UP, 2022) is an experimental ethnography of Chinese globalization that compares data from two frontlines of China's global intervention—sub-Saharan Africa and Inner/Central Asia. Based on their fieldwork on Chinese infrastructure and resource-extraction projects in Mozambique and Mongolia, Mikkel Bunkenborg, Morten Nielsen, and Morten Axel Pedersen provide new empirical insights into neocolonialism and Sinophobia in the Global South. The core argument in Collaborative Damage is that the different participants studied in the globalization processes—local workers and cadres; Chinese managers and entrepreneurs; and the authors themselves, three Danish anthropologists—are intimately linked in paradoxical partnerships of mutual incomprehension. The authors call this "collaborative damage," which crucially refers not only to the misunderstandings and conflicts they observed in the field, but also to their own failure to agree about how to interpret the data. Via in-depth case studies and tragicomical tales of friendship, antagonism, irresolvable differences, and carefully maintained indifferences across disparate Sino-local worlds in Africa and Asia, Collaborative Damage tells a wide-ranging story of Chinese globalization in the twenty-first century. Adam Bobeck is a PhD candidate in Cultural Anthropology at the University of Leipzig. His PhD is entitled “Object-Oriented Azadari: Shi'i Muslim Rituals and Ontology”. For more about his work, see www.adambobeck.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/world-affairs

New Books in Anthropology
Mikkel Bunkenborg et al., "Collaborative Damage: An Experimental Ethnography of Chinese Globalization" (Cornell UP, 2022)

New Books in Anthropology

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 59:44


Collaborative Damage: An Experimental Ethnography of Chinese Globalization (Cornell UP, 2022) is an experimental ethnography of Chinese globalization that compares data from two frontlines of China's global intervention—sub-Saharan Africa and Inner/Central Asia. Based on their fieldwork on Chinese infrastructure and resource-extraction projects in Mozambique and Mongolia, Mikkel Bunkenborg, Morten Nielsen, and Morten Axel Pedersen provide new empirical insights into neocolonialism and Sinophobia in the Global South. The core argument in Collaborative Damage is that the different participants studied in the globalization processes—local workers and cadres; Chinese managers and entrepreneurs; and the authors themselves, three Danish anthropologists—are intimately linked in paradoxical partnerships of mutual incomprehension. The authors call this "collaborative damage," which crucially refers not only to the misunderstandings and conflicts they observed in the field, but also to their own failure to agree about how to interpret the data. Via in-depth case studies and tragicomical tales of friendship, antagonism, irresolvable differences, and carefully maintained indifferences across disparate Sino-local worlds in Africa and Asia, Collaborative Damage tells a wide-ranging story of Chinese globalization in the twenty-first century. Adam Bobeck is a PhD candidate in Cultural Anthropology at the University of Leipzig. His PhD is entitled “Object-Oriented Azadari: Shi'i Muslim Rituals and Ontology”. For more about his work, see www.adambobeck.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/anthropology

The Comedy Store Podcast
229: LIVE @ Netflix Is A Joke: The Festival - Danish & O'Neill, Bret Ernst

The Comedy Store Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 44:48


We're live in The Belly Room for Netflix Is A Joke: The Festival and we have a jam-packed show. Part 1 of the show Rick and Eleanor welcome back Danish & O'Neill AND the hilarious Bret Ernst.  CHECK OUT RICK AND ELEANOR ON THE ROAD NOW!

DanishTube-Kastet: A Learning Danish Podcast
#45 At bande eller Ikke at Bande? | To Swear or Not to Swear?

DanishTube-Kastet: A Learning Danish Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 38:34


Brett and Brooke: USA. Welcome to part 1 of this week's super entertaining Danish learning podcast episode on swear words! I chat with Brooke and Brett about common Danish swear words, and we give examples of words we would use in different scenarios. To download shownotes and listen to part 2, support my work on Patreon HERE For more Danish content or to take classes click HERE --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/danishtube/message

The TheatreArtLife Podcast
Episode 118 – Acrobatic performance with Sita Bhuller

The TheatreArtLife Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 52:45


In this episode we are joined by Sita Bhuller, talking all things performance. Born and bred in London, Sita has spent the last 15 years on the road as an acrobat and aerial artist. With a background in gymnastics and a degree in sports and exercise sciences, she fell into the world of performance by happy accident. Her first performance role was as stunt artist for Legoland in Windsor, England. Since then, Sita has travelled the world from Macau to Denmark working with an array of stellar circus and aerial companies. Highlights include working with Franco Dragone Entertainment Group on The House of Dancing Water, a stint in Las Vegas on Le Reve, a role on BBC One's professional gymnast television show Tumble, the Asian tour of Cavalia, Cirque du Soleil's world tour of Toruk and most recently choreographing and directing the aerials and acrobatics for the Danish tour of Tarzan the musical. Sita is a trained yoga teacher and has undertaken a variety of roles throughout the years, from performer to choreographer, director, coach and captain. She now finds herself playing mum, on tour with Cirque du Soleil's Kurios, with her partner Alex (a performer in the show) and their two sons Kody and Otis. We want to hear from YOU and provide a forum where you can put in requests for future episodes. What are you interested in listening to? Please fill out the form for future guest suggestions here and if you have suggestions or requests for future themes and topics, let us know here! @theatreartlife Thanks to David Zieher who composed our music.

Unreached of the Day
Pray for the Danish Jew in Denmark

Unreached of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 1:01


Sign up to receive podcast: https://joshuaproject.net/pray/unreachedoftheday/podcast People Group Summary: https://joshuaproject.net/people_groups/19232/DA Join us for the International Day for the Unreached on Sunday, June 5, 2022 as thousands experience #AThirdofUs https://athirdofus.com/ Listen to "A Third of Us" podcast with Greg Kelley, produced by the Alliance for the Unreached: https://alliancefortheunreached.org/podcast/ Watch "Stories of Courageous Christians" w/ Mark Kordic https://storiesofcourageouschristians.com/stories-of-courageous-christians God's Best to You!  

Danish with Christina - intermediate Danish language podcast

Welcome back to our podcast in intermediate Danish. The podcast is entirely in Danish (although this description is in English). On this episode, we will be talking about the importance of small habits when it comes to success. This is especially true when it comes to learning a language. The episode is based on an excerpt of James Clear's book Atomic Habits that I found on a blog called fertilitetsmentor.dk I hope you enjoy the episode! Christina

Rio Bravo qWeek
Episode 92 - Paleo vs Keto vs Mediterranean

Rio Bravo qWeek

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 17:28


Episode 92: Paleo vs Keto vs Mediterranean. Sapna and Danish explain the main differences between three meal plans: Paleo, Keto, and Mediterranean. Intro about fad diets.Introduction: Fad diets.  By Hector Arreaza, MD.  It is estimated that 2/3 of Americans are overweight or have obesity (73% of men and 63% of women), but only 19% of people claim to “be on a diet”, and 77% of people are trying to “eat healthier”[1]. It seems like many of us are on the weight-loss wagon together, hoping for a cure for this disease.These days it is commonplace to hear about fad diets. Fad diets are short-lived eating patterns that make unrealistic claims about weight loss and improving health, with little to no effort on your part. “The Super-Duper diet will make you lose 100 pounds, eliminate your cellulite, erase stretch marks, remove your wrinkles, and give you extra energy to fly to the moon and back, buy the super-duper diet now!” We surely have a lot of products that make senseless promises, claim many victims, and leave people with empty pockets.   Today is May 6, 2022. Sapna and Danish will enlighten us again with more nutrition discussions. When you go around your grocery store, have you wondered what “keto-friendly” really means? We hope after today, you get a better idea about it. Today we are presenting a brief discussion to compare three common dietary approaches for weight loss: Keto, Paleo, and Mediterranean. I'm sure you have heard some things about these diets, but we want to add to your fund of knowledge. Whether they are fad diets or not, we'll let you decide. Enjoy it!  This is Rio Bravo qWeek Podcast, your weekly dose of knowledge brought to you by the Rio Bravo Family Medicine Residency Program from Bakersfield, California. Our program is affiliated with UCLA, and it's sponsored by Clinica Sierra Vista, Let Us Be Your Healthcare Home. This podcast was created for educational purposes only. Visit your primary care physician for additional medical advice.___________________________Paleo vs Keto vs Mediterranean. Prepared by Sapna Patel, MS4, and Danish Khalid, MS4, Ross University School of Medicine. Comments by Hector Arreaza, MD.Welcome back to our Nutrition series!D: In our previous episode, we talked about calorie balance and macronutrients. The basics of nutrition. So, if you haven't already listened to that, pause this, and go listen to that first. As we will only continue to build on that knowledge. Now, let's begin…S: Whether your goals are to lose fat or gain muscle. Nowadays, we've got so many ways to achieve our nutritional goals. It can be difficult and overwhelming to know which one is best for you. So today,  we will talk about some of the main “diets'' that are well known to all.Comment: People hate the word “Diet”, should we call them meal plans or Nutrition plans?S: The Paleo meal plan. The Ketogenic meal plan. The Mediterranean meal plan. And as we go through each of them, we will compare them and discuss which fit certain nutritional goals.Comment: These meal plans are very trendy right now, some people call them fad diets, but only time can tell if these diets really work long term or not.  D: Let's start with the Paleo meal plan. What is it? Also known as the Paleolithic diet, Caveman diet, or Stone-Age diet, this meal plan revisits the way humans ate almost 2.5 million years ago—The hunter-gatherer lifestyle. Overall, the meal plan is high in protein, moderate in fat (mainly unsaturated fats), low-moderate in carbohydrates (restricting high-glycemic carbohydrates), high in fiber, and low in sodium and refined sugars. It includes mainly lean meats, fish, fruits, vegetables, nuts, and seeds.Comment: It is low in carbs because carbs were so rare and uncommon in nature before agriculture was introduced to humanity. Animals (including humans) had to wait until the season when the fruit was ripe to enjoy something sweet.S: So, what are some of the benefits of the Paleo meal plan? Well, studies have shown that the paleo meal plan produces greater short-term benefits, including-          Greater weight loss-          Reduced waist circumference-          Decreased blood pressure-          Increased insulin sensitivity-          Improved cholesterolD: You must be wondering, what's the catch? Aside from the diminishing long-term effects. Although the meal plan focuses on many essential food groups, it also omits others such as whole grains, dairy, and legumes. This could lead to suboptimal intake of important nutrients. Additionally, the restrictive nature of the meal plan may also make it difficult for people to adhere to such a meal plan in the long run. With these confounding facts, there hasn't been a strong link that the paleo meal plan improves cardiovascular risk or metabolic disease.S: Basically, for those looking for a cleaner meal plan, the paleo meal plan is geared towards eliminating high-fat and processed foods that have little nutritional value and too many calories. Moving on to the Ketogenic Meal plan.D: What is the Ketogenic Meal plan? Basically, the ketogenic meal plan is a high fat, moderate protein, and low carb lifestyle. It's about creating ketones. For example, beta-hydroxybutyrate, acetoacetate, and acetone. Ketones are basically a fourth macronutrient. Although we don't find it in our day-to-day food, it's what our body creates.So why do we need ketones, and why does our body create them in the first place? Our body uses carbohydrates, more specifically glucose, as the major source of energy for its daily needs. So, imagine, when we are in periods of starvation and deprive ourselves of carbohydrates. The body would resort to breaking down protein to create glucose for our demanding body in a process called gluconeogenesis. That seems illogical, right? Why would our body break down muscle?  That is where ketones come in. While our body is trying to keep up with demands, our liver is working on creating another source of energy. A process called ketogenesis, where ketones are made through fat, more specifically medium-chain fatty acids, to fuel our body.S: So, what's so great about the Ketogenic Meal plan? Well, for starters, during ketogenesis due to low blood glucose feedback, the stimulus for insulin secretion becomes low, which sharply reduces the stimulus for fat and glucose storage. Additionally, people will initially experience rapid weight loss up to 10 lbs. in the first 2 weeks or less. Although the first few pounds may be water weight loss due to the diuretic effect of this meal plan, eventually you obtain fat loss.In this meal plan, lean body muscle is largely spared. So those who are overweight individuals with metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, and type II diabetes mellitus, are more likely to see improvements in clinical markers for disease risk. Additionally, reducing weight, mainly truncal obesity, may help improve blood pressure, blood glucose regulation, triglyceride levels, and HDL cholesterol.D: That sounds awesome! What do I have to eat? Well, the dietary macronutrients are divided into approximately 55-60% fats, 30-35% protein, and 5-10% carbohydrates. Specifically, no more than 50 grams of carbohydrates.Comment: The difference between ketosis and ketoacidosis is a frequent question done by patients and medical providers. The main difference is that in ketosis your glucose level is normal or low and your pH is still physiologic, but in ketoacidosis, the pH is lower than 7.35 and glucose is above 250 mg/dL. So, when a person is in ketosis, you will not see the, for example, Kussmaul's breathing pattern, but in ketoacidosis, you will see that breathing pattern. If you want more info about the keto meal plan, you can listen to our episode 59, done by a great medical student Constance.  S: Finally, the Mediterranean meal plan.The hallmark of this meal plan is simple…minimally processed foods. The main characteristic of a Mediterranean meal plan includes a low-moderate protein intake (very low consumption of red meat, moderate consumption of fish and shellfish), moderate-high fat (rich in unsaturated fats, lower in saturated fats), and moderate to high carbohydrates (legumes, unrefined grains). A very different take from the previous two meal plans.D: What is the hype all about? Why year after year does the Mediterranean meal plan come out on top? Well, the reason why it's one of the better options is because of the style of eating. It encourages vegetables and good fats (limiting bad fats) and discriminates against added sugar. No preservation, no packaging, no processing. This style of eating plays a big role in preventing heat disease, and reducing risk factors such as obesity, diabetes, high cholesterol, or high blood pressure.S: In fact, numerous studies have shown that the Med meal plan promotes weight loss and prevents heart attacks and helps with type 2 diabetes by improving levels of hemoglobin A1c, blood sugar levels, and decreasing insulin resistance. No wonder why out of all these meal plans, it's the only one that meets the AHA dietary recommendations.D: In a meta-analysis of randomized trials including the large PREDIMED trial, a Mediterranean meal plan reduced the risk of stroke compared with a low-fat diet (HR 0.60, 95% CI 0.45 to 0.80) but did not reduce the incidence of cardiovascular or overall mortality. By contrast, in observational studies, a Mediterranean meal plan was associated with lower overall mortality and cardiovascular mortality.Following a Mediterranean meal plan may lead to a reduction in total cholesterol. For example, in a 2011 meta-analysis of six randomized trials comparing the Mediterranean approach with a low-fat diet in 2650 individuals with overweight or obesity, a Mediterranean meal plan led to a greater reduction in total cholesterol (-7.4 mg/dL, 95% CI -10.3 to -4.4) but a nonsignificant reduction in LDL cholesterol (-3.3 mg/dL, 95% CI -7.3 to +0.6 mg/dL [5]. A Mediterranean meal plan may also decrease LDL oxidation.S: Additionally, in observational studies, a Mediterranean meal plan was also associated with a decreased incidence of Parkinson disease, Alzheimer disease, and cancers, including colorectal, prostate, aerodigestive, oropharyngeal, and breast cancers. Comment: I am excited to try the Mediterranean meal plan when I visit Spain this coming summer. It will be my first time in Valencia. Keep in mind, with any meal plan, it will work differently for everyone. Just because it worked for an individual doesn't mean it'll work for you. And vice versa. Besides, everyone has different goals we want to achieve, like all of us here.What do you call someone who can't stick with a meal plan?  A deserter. ProteinFatCarbohydratePaleo Meal HighModerateLow-ModerateKetogenic Meal planModerateHighLowMediterranean Meal planModerateModerate-HighModerate-High Conclusion: Now we conclude our episode number 92 “Paleo vs Keto vs Mediterranean.” The take-home messages are: Paleo is a style of eating that encourages unprocessed foods, mainly lean meats, fruits and vegetables in their natural state; Keto consists of eating less than 50 carbs a day and encourages high-fat foods; and the Mediterranean plan promotes good quality fats from vegetable sources, moderate protein and low to moderate carbs. These meal plans have a main goal in common: help your patients lose weight, improve their overall health, and decrease mortality. Even without trying, every night you go to bed being a little wiser.This week we thank Hector Arreaza, Sapna Patel, Danish Khalid, and Shantal Urrutia. Audio edition: Suraj Amrutia. Thanks for listening to Rio Bravo qWeek Podcast. If you have any feedback, contact us by email at RioBravoqWeek@clinicasierravista.org, or visit our website riobravofmrp.org/qweek. See you next week! _____________________References:Weight Loss Industry Analysis 2020, Cost & Trends, franchisehelp.com, https://www.franchisehelp.com/industry-reports/weight-loss-industry-analysis-2020-cost-trends/. Accessed on May 2, 2022. Masood W, Annamaraju P, Uppaluri KR. Ketogenic Diet. [Updated 2021 Nov 26]. In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2022 Jan.Taylor B, Rachel M, Adrien B, et al. The Paleo Diet For Health Professionals. In: University of California, Davis - Nutrition. 2018.Miguel A. Martínez-González, Alfredo Gea and Miguel Ruiz-Canela, originally published on 28 Feb 2019, https://doi.org/10.1161/CIRCRESAHA.118.313348. Circulation Research. 2019;124:779–798.Gerber, M., & Hoffman, R. (2015). The Mediterranean diet: Health, science and society. British Journal of Nutrition, 113(S2), S4-S10. doi:10.1017/S0007114514003912. Colditz, Graham A. “ Healthy Diet in Adults.” UpToDate, 11 Dec 2019, https://www.uptodate.com/contents/healthy-diet-in-adults.Fitó M, Guxens M, Corella D, Sáez G, Estruch R, de la Torre R, Francés F, Cabezas C, López-Sabater MDC, Marrugat J, García-Arellano A, Arós F, Ruiz-Gutierrez V, Ros E, Salas-Salvadó J, Fiol M, Solá R, Covas MI; PREDIMED Study Investigators. Effect of a traditional Mediterranean diet on lipoprotein oxidation: a randomized controlled trial. Arch Intern Med. 2007 Jun 11;167(11):1195-1203. doi: 10.1001/archinte.167.11.1195. PMID: 17563030.

Dan Snow's History Hit
Diving for Lost Slave Shipwrecks

Dan Snow's History Hit

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 36:50


From the 16th to the 19th centuries, European slave traders forcibly uprooted millions of African people and shipped them across the Atlantic in conditions of great cruelty. Today, on the bottom of the world's oceans lies the lost wrecks of ships that carried enslaved people from Africa to the Americas.Justin Dunnavant is an Assistant Professor, archaeologist and National Geographic Explorer. Justin shares with Dan the incredible project that he is a part of - a group of specialist black divers who are dedicated to finding and documenting some of the thousands of slave ships wrecked in the Atlantic Ocean during the transatlantic slave trade. They also unearth the history of a former Danish slave colony in the Virgin Islands and discuss Justin's research about the African Diaspora and Marcus Garvey's Black Star Line.Hey, Assistant Producer Hannah here! A little caveat for this episode, Dan was on his way to record some exciting things for History Hit with the Royal Mint, so you may hear some rain in the background.Produced by Hannah WardMixed and Mastered by Dougal PatmoreIf you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download the History Hit app please go to the Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

A Need To Read
#164 Hygge: The Danish philosophy of happiness and coziness

A Need To Read

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 21:40


I went to Copenhagen for the weekend and found out about Hygge. Hygge is the Danish art of happiness and coziness, it's a philosophy that encourages connection, simplicity and mindfulness.   I read a book on the topic and spoke to some Danish people, this podcast is a collection of my thoughts on Hygge.    Books mentioned Hygge by Barbara Hayden The Little Book of Hygge by Meik Wiking   Support   The best thing you can do is share the podcast with a friend, or sign up for my new weekly newsletter.   If you want to learn to understand your behavior or emotions with the help of a professional you can get 10% off your first month of therapy by heading to www.betterhelp.com/aneedtoread from there you'll just need to run through a 5-minute questionnaire and you'll be matched with a therapist within 48 hours.   You can get an additional 5 free travel packs and a year's supply of Vitamin D3 with your Athletic Greens subscription at www.athleticgreens.com/aneedtoread    I am reachable here: www.aneedtoread.co.uk/contact       

Rania Khalek Dispatches
How Sweden & Denmark Ride the Imperialist Wave, w/ Torkil Lauesen

Rania Khalek Dispatches

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 95:14


When most people think of Sweden, or more broadly, the Scandinavian countries, they imagine a more egalitarian and advanced model to which we should aspire. Some assume without investigating that Sweden and the other Scandinavian countries, Denmark and Norway, have figured out how to be prosperous “socialist” countries.But this Swedish model is uglier than it might appear to be, with a brutal history and a dangerous present. To discuss the imperialism on which Scandinavian living standards are built, Rania Khalek was joined by Torkil Lauesen, a long-time anti-imperialist activist and writer, who spent years in prison for his militant activities as a member of a clandestine Danish communist cell. Torkil is also the author of many books, including “Riding the Wave: Sweden's Integration into the Imperialist World System.”A good book on Torkil's political activism: "Turning Money into Rebellion: The Unlikely Story of Denmark's Revolutionary Bank Robbers” https://snylterstaten.dk/turning-money-into-rebellion/TIME CODES0:00 Intro1:38 The global perspective 3:38 Scandinavian integration in the imperialist core 9:00 Swedish settlerism 14:43 Sweden, Denmark & the slave trade19:43 Sweden, Belgium, Congo & Dag Hammarskjöld25:20 1986 Assassination of Swedish PM Olof Palme29:03 Formation of the social welfare state34:06 Racism & national chauvinism 40:40 How social reforms strengthened European imperialism46:32 What radicalized Torkil into leftist anti-imperialism?57:26 Global neoliberalism in the last 50 years 1:08:15 The future after covid-19 & Ukraine1:12:53 End of capitalism?1:15:57 Opportunity for the revolutionary left?1:19:58 The Scandinavian military-industrial complex1:28:34 How to view Russia's war in Ukraine

Poppin' Bottles
Baked Boys: Cheese Danish with Kate Cohen

Poppin' Bottles

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 117:54


The always amazing Kate "Cake" Cohen joins us to share her budding romance with Cheese Danish. She lets us know why she's all about the flour and she's in a half-dipped family. We try roughly 8 danishes, talk Broadway, and some dream D. Hopefully brought to you by Lutz Pastry Shop and Chicago Bakery 

GLT's The Leadoff
WGLT's The Leadoff - Thursday 5/5/22

GLT's The Leadoff

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 8:40


WGLT's the Leadoff is everything you need to know for Thursday, May 5. A judge decided Wednesday to strike down a ruling from the McLean County Electoral Board and remove 5 Republican County Board Candidates from the June primary ballot. Plus, Colene Hoose Elementary School broke ground Wednesday morning on the new “world class” playground designed by Danish architect. The new playground will teach kids to care about the environment in the long-term.

The History of Literature
405 Kierkegaard Falls in Love

The History of Literature

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 64:45


The nineteenth-century Danish philosopher Søren Kierkegaard (1813-1855) is well known as the father of existentialism and one of the great Christian thinkers of all time. But it is in his relationship with Regine Olsen - his love for her, their brief engagement, and the horrible breakup, in which he left her for a life devoted to the pursuit of knowledge - where we see his true literary gifts. In this episode, Jacke looks at Kierkegaard's life and writing, with a special focus on the agonizing relationship with a young woman that perhaps brought out his truest self. Additional listening suggestions: Episode 169 - Dostoevsky Episode 95 - The Runaway Poets - The Triumphant Love Story of Elizabeth Barrett Browning and Robert Browning HOL Episode on Albert Camus Help support the show at patreon.com/literature or historyofliterature.com/shop. The History of Literature Podcast is a member of Lit Hub Radio and the Podglomerate Network. Learn more at www.thepodglomerate.com/historyofliterature. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Manchester Football Social
Liverpool clinch Champions League final spot after Villarreal thriller, Man City head to Real Madrid and Christian Eriksen faces Brentford future call

Manchester Football Social

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 48:08


Feargal Brennan, Marley Anderson and Matt Pidd on duty reviewing and previewing two huge Champions League games this week. Liverpool have sealed a third Champions League final under Jurgen Klopp after an incredible second half fightback away at Villarreal to secure their place in Paris. Pep Guardiola's Manchester City will be aiming to join their Premier League rivals as they head to Real Madrid in a crunch Champions League semi final second leg tonight. In Premier League news, Brentford boss Thomas Frank is confident of retaining Danish star Christian Eriksen this summer, as Bournemouth clinch promotion back to the top-flight. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

FT News Briefing
Federal Reserve poised to raise rates a half-percent

FT News Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 9:19


Amazon workers at a warehouse in New York have rejected efforts to form a union, the US Federal Reserve is poised to make its first half-percentage point rise since 2000, and Danish turbine maker Vestas reported bigger than expected losses and confirmed the impact of the war in Ukraine on the industry. Mentioned in this podcast:Amazon union dealt a setback as it loses vote at second NY warehouseFed reaches for its ‘hatchet' as it attacks galloping inflationVestas warns war in Ukraine will add to wind industry slowdownShipping heavyweight Japan tables carbon tax proposal for the industryThe FT News Briefing is produced by Fiona Symon and Marc Filippino. The show's editor is Jess Smith. Additional help by Peter Barber, Michael Lello, David da Silva, and Gavin Kallmann. The show's theme song is by Metaphor Music. Topher Forhecz is the FT's executive producer. The FT's global head of audio is Cheryl Brumley. Read a transcript of this episode on FT.com See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Cycling Podcast
S10 Ep28: The Giro d'Italia preview

The Cycling Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 106:42


The opening bars of our theme tune – Cozze by Amaraterra – can mean only one thing. The 2022 Giro d'Italia is nearly here. Join us for Girovagando as we cover the race from Budapest to Verona. Daniel Friebe and Lionel Birnie are joined by Danish journalist Brian Nygaard – who featured in last year's coverage – for this bumper Giro preview, in which we look at the route, weigh up the potential winners and anticipate the culinary and cultural highlights along the way. We hear from Simon Yates of Team Bike Exchange, who is riding his fifth consecutive Giro and who has unfinished business with the race after coming within a couple of days of winning in 2018 and ended up on the podium last year. His sports director Matt White also gives his verdict on a very open GC race. Laura Meseguer of our Spanish cousin El Cycling Podcast assesses the hopes of Alejandro Valverde, Pello Bilbao, Mikel Landa, Richard Carapaz and Miguel Angel Lopez among others and there's a cameo from La Gazzetta dello Sport's Ciro Scognamiglio too. This will be the seventh Giro d'Italia The Cycling Podcast has covered daily from start to finish – the eighth if you also count Our Giro, our virtual journey round Italy during the COVID lockdown. However, it will be our first without our leader Richard Moore, although Daniel and Lionel have vowed to channel their inner Spirito di Bufalo. Our coverage kicks off on Friday (May 6) with – appropriately enough – the first of nine episodes of Kilometre 0, followed by nightly recaps of the race action. Join Daniel and Lionel in Hungary on Friday.  The Cycling Podcast is supported by Supersapiens and Science in Sport. Supersapiens Supersapiens is a continuous glucose monitoring system that helps you make the right fuelling choices. See supersapiens.com Science in Sport For 25% off all your SiS products, go to scienceinsport.com and enter the code SISCP25 at the checkout. MAAP The Cycling Podcast has a new collaboration with MAAP. See: maap.cc Hammerhead Karoo 2 This episode is also supported by the Hammerhead Karoo 2 cycling computer. For a limited time, listeners can get a custom colour kit and premium water bottle with every purchase of a Karoo 2 at hammerhead.io. Just use the promo code CYCLE Giro dei Vini To order the Selezione Simpatica, head to DVine Cellars. Stacy Snyder's cups These will go on sale on Saturday May 7 from Stacy's Etsy page. Friends of the Podcast Sign up as a Friend of the Podcast at thecyclingpodcast.com to listen to more than 60 exclusive episodes. The Cycling Podcast is on Strava The Cycling Podcast was founded in 2013 by Richard Moore, Daniel Friebe and Lionel Birnie.

Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™
270 Free Speech with Jacob Mchangama, Author of “Free Speech: A History from Socrates to Social Media” 

Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 85:40


Free speech is often called the first freedom and the bedrock of democracy. Our guest today says that on one hand, free speech around the world has never been better. But right now, we are experiencing a free speech entropy in the United States. On this episode of Christopher Lochhead, we have a deep dialogue about Free Speech with Jacob Mchangama. Jacob Mchangama is a global expert on free speech. Political satirist PJ O'Rourke says that his new book is. “The best history of free speech ever written, and the best defense of free speech ever made.” That book is called Free Speech: a history from Socrates to social media, and it is out now. Jacob is a Danish lawyer, and the founder of Justicia, a Copenhagen-based think tank that focuses on human rights, freedom of speech, and the rule of law. So if you want to learn more about free speech, how it has evolved through history, and what it will look like in the future, stay tuned to this episode. Jacob Mchangama on Free Speech The conversation begins on Jacob's work on free speech, and his new book about it. He was then asked about what his thoughts on the current state of free speech in the world today. According to Jacob, we've never had it better. It may not be as apparent in the US, but if you consider the rest of the world, people get to speak out more than ever before. Most of which was born with the proliferation of the internet, and the wide reach it provides. “You and I can speak there's no censor, making sure that we don't say inappropriate things. And you know, so technology, internet has given us unprecedented opportunities.” – Jacob Mchangama Recession of Free Speech It is really the golden age of free speech. Though according to Jacob, it is an age that is currently in decline. As things enter a more stable period after a boom of ideas, a state of entropy starts to set in. It is no different with free speech, as Jacob explains: “Every time there's a period in history where free speech is now sort of secure and we've turned the corner, a process of free speech entropy sets in. “ – Jacob Mchangama This comes after the European Union is in the process of adopting a law which would, which says that social media companies have to remove your illegal content within a short timeframe or risk huge fines. Social media themselves are almost self-censoring to a point, restricting certain content from appearing on people's search results and feeds. The Evolution of Free Speech in the US Moving the topic to the US side of things, Jacob finds the US and its take on free speech fascinating. According to him, it seems that free speech has evolved and grown over the years, and yet the first amendment and its wording has remained the same. The evolution stems on how the US society interprets these words, leading to the growth of its scope and reach. As Jacob puts it, nowadays it's difficult to imagine what you could say to a sitting US president that would get you in jail, short of direct threats or incitement of violence. Yet in the old days, you could go to jail for making a snide remark about an incumbent president. But this same flexibility and reach is what's putting free speech in a tight spot. With the wide reach of the internet also comes rampant misinformation. The issue is some of the people peddling misinformation is hiding behind the notion of free speech, which makes it difficult to remove once and for all. Though for Jacob, it will all boil down to how we, as a society, will decide on what's acceptable or not. “Ultimately, I think that the culture of free speech is probably more important than the legal language, or a legal statute, or constitutional protection. Because ultimately, the culture of free speech is what will inform where we draw the limits, and how we interpret the legal protections that we have.” – Jacob Mchangama To learn more about Jacob Mchangama and the current state of free speech in the US and around the world,

Healthy Wealthy & Smart
589: Prof Michael Rathleff: Barriers Between the Research and Implementation

Healthy Wealthy & Smart

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 28:55


In this episode, Aalborg University Professor, Prof Michael Rathleff, talks about his role at the upcoming WCSPT. Today, Michael talks about how he organized the congress, creating tools for clinicians to educate their patients, and his research on overuse injuries in adolescents. What are the barriers between the research and implementation in practice? Hear about the mobile health industry, exciting events at the congress, and get his advice to his younger self, all on today's episode of The Healthy, Wealthy & Smart Podcast.   Key Takeaways “The clinicians out there have a hard time both finding the evidence, appraising the evidence, and understanding [if it's] good or bad science.” “There's a lot a clinician can do outside of a one-on-one interaction with a patient.” “It's our role to understand the needs of the individual patient, then make up something that really meets those needs.” “It's okay to say no. You have to make sure to say yes to the right things.”   More about Michael Rathleff Prof Michael Rathleff coordinates the musculoskeletal research program at the Research Unit for General Practice in Aalborg. The research programme is cross-disciplinary and includes researchers with a background in general practice, rheumatology, orthopaedic surgery, physiotherapy, sports science, health economics and human‐centered informatics. He is the head of the research group OptiYouth at the Research Unit for General Practice. Their aim is to improve the health and function of adolescents through research.   Suggested Keywords Healthy, Wealthy, Smart, Healthcare, Physiotherapy, Sports, Research, Injuries, WCSPT, Education,   IFSPT Fourth World Congress of Sports Physical Therapy   To learn more, follow Michael at: Website:          https://vbn.aau.dk/en/persons/130816 Research:       https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Michael-Rathleff Twitter:            @michaelrathleff   Subscribe to Healthy, Wealthy & Smart: Website:                      https://podcast.healthywealthysmart.com Apple Podcasts:          https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/healthy-wealthy-smart/id532717264 Spotify:                        https://open.spotify.com/show/6ELmKwE4mSZXBB8TiQvp73 SoundCloud:               https://soundcloud.com/healthywealthysmart Stitcher:                       https://www.stitcher.com/show/healthy-wealthy-smart iHeart Radio:               https://www.iheart.com/podcast/263-healthy-wealthy-smart-27628927   Read the Full Transcript Here:  00:02 Hello, Professor Ratliff, thank you so much for coming on the podcast today to talk a little bit more about your role at the fourth World Congress is sports, physical therapy in Denmark, August 26, to the 27th. So, as we were talking, before we went on the air, we were saying, man, you're wearing a bunch of hats during this Congress, one of which is part of the organizing committee. So my first question to you is, as a member of the Organising Committee, what were your goals? And what are you hoping to achieve with this Congress?   00:35 I think my role is primarily within the scientific committee. And one of the things we discussed very, very early on was this, like, you know, when you go for a conference, you go up to a conference, you hear a bunch of interesting talks, and you feel like, I'm motivated, I'm listening, I'm taking in new things. But then Monday morning, when you see the next patient, it's not always that all the interesting stuff that you saw, is actually applicable to my patient Monday morning. So we wanted to try and emphasize more. How can we use this conference as a way to translate science into practice? So the whole program and the like, the presentations will be more about clinical applicability, and less about more p values and research methodology. So not that the research is not sound, but there'll be more focused on how can we actually apply it in the context that were working. That's why also, we had the main title of translating research into practice, which I think will be hopefully a cornerstone that people will see, well, if there's really interesting talk about, it could be overuse injuries in kids, which will be a lecture that I'm having, then they'll also be a practical workshop afterwards to kind of use that what's been presented, and then really drill down on how we can use it in in clinical practice. So the goal is to, to get people to reflect in your network, but also take a lot of the things and think, Wow, this is something that I can use next Monday for clinical practice.   02:09 And aside from a lot of lectures and talks, you've also got in informatics competition. And so could you explain that a little bit and why you decided to bring that into the Congress?   02:23 Yeah, so this was a major, not a debate, but an interesting discussion on how we can even in the early phases of the conference, when people submit an abstract, make sure that the abstract can actually also reach more end users target audiences for that case. So we decided that people actually had to submit an infographic together with their the abstract. So normally, you send in like, 250 words, for a conference, but for this conference, we wanted them to submit the abstract, but also the visual infographic to go along with Olympic Well, am I making an infographic that is tailored to patient? Is that a patient aid that I'm trying to make? Is it something that's aimed but other researchers? Or is it clinicians, so they have to tick off? Which box Am I infographic actually intended for? So when the audience or the participants come and join the conference, they can actually take these infographics for those that want to print them they can use in the clinic afterwards, just another layer of trying to make some of this research more easily communicated to the audience, but also, the things that can be used in clinical practice, like some of the people have submitted abstract, have some really, really nice infographics that I expect will be printed and hang on, on a few clinic doors around the world afterwards, I hope.   03:48 And when it comes to dissemination of research and information from the clinician, to the patient, or even to the wider public, where do you think clinicians and researchers get stuck? Like where is the disconnect between that dissemination of information as we the information as we see, and by the time it gets to the consumer or to let's say, a mass media outlet? It's like, what happened?   04:15 Yeah, that's a big a big question. Because it's almost like why are we not better at implementing new research into our clinical practice? And I think there's heaps of different barriers. We've we've done a couple of studies, something new was also in the pipeline where we look specific, get the official context, and we can see that this barriers in terms of understanding the research, that's actually one of the major barriers that the clinicians out there have a really hard time both finding the evidence, appraising the evidence, and also actually understanding is this good or bad science. And then you have the whole time constraints on a clinical practice because who's going to pay you to sit and use two hours On reading this paper, and remember, this is just one paper on ACL injuries. But in my clinical practice, I see a gazillion different different things. So how am I going to keep up with the with the evidence? Is it intended that I'm reading original literature? Or how am I going to keep up with it? So I think there's a lot of different barriers. But at least one of the ways I think we can overcome some of these barriers is that researchers climb out of the ivory tower and think of other ways that we can communicate, research, evidence synthesis, it could be infographics, it could be sort of like decision age for clinical practice, at least that's one of the routes we're taking in terms of also the talk I'm giving at the conference that we're trying to think of, Can we somehow develop AIDS that will support clinical practice something that scene but the physiotherapist something that's aimed at the patient, that will sort of make it easier to deliver evidence based practice? So we've done one, one tool that's being developed at the moment is called the Makhni, which is something that can assist clinicians in the diagnosis, the communication of how do you communicate to kids about chronic knee pain? How do I make sure that they have the right expectation for what my management can be? And how can we engage in a shared decision making process. And we have a few other things in the pipeline as well, where we want to, to build something, build something practical that you can take in use in clinical practice to to support you in delivering good quality care, because just publishing papers is not going to change clinical practice, I think,   06:45 yeah, and publishing papers, which are sometimes wonderful papers. But if they're not getting out to the clinicians, they're certainly not going to get out to the patients and to people, sort of the mass population.   07:02 I completely agree. It's a bigger discussion, I'm really focused on how to reach clinicians, because I see the clinicians as the entry point to delivering care to patients and parents and, and the surrounding surrounding community. But if you think of, like wider public health interventions, we have the same problem as well. And also we create this sort of like, No, this inequality in healthcare, but that's another   07:30 line, although there can of worms. Yeah, we could do a whole series of podcasts on that. Yeah, yeah. And I agree with you that it needs to come from the clinician. So creating these tools to help clinicians better educate their patients, which in turn really becomes their community. Because there's a lot a clinician can do outside of just a one on one interaction with the patient. And so having the right tools can make a big difference.   07:58 Like in, if you look at a patient that comes to you for an ACL injury, or long standing musculoskeletal complaint, they're going to spend maybe 0.1% of their time together with you and 99.9%, they're out on their own. And I think it's important that we when we're one on one with them, sort of like make them develop the competencies so they can do the right decisions for their health in the 99.9% of the time that they're out there alone, when they're not with with us, I completely agree with you that there's a lot of things we can do to make them more competent in thriving despite of knee pain, or shoulder pain or whatever it might, it might be. And I think that's one of the most important tasks, I think, for us as clinicians is to think about the everyday lives they have to live when they leave us and say see you next time.   08:51 Yeah, and to be able to clearly communicate whatever their diagnosis by might be, or exercise program or, or any number of, of 10s of 1000s of bio psychosocial impacts that are happening with this person. Because oftentimes, and I know I've been guilty of this in the past, I'm sure other therapists would agree that they've this has happened to them as well as you explain everything to the patient, and then they come back and it's, they got nothing zero. And it might be because you're not disseminating the information to them in a way that's helpful for them or in a way that's conducive with their learning style. So having different tools, like you said, maybe it's an infographic that the patient can look at and be like, Oh, I get it now. So having a lot of variety makes a huge difference.   09:48 And I think you touched on a super important point there that patients are very different, that they have different learning styles, they have different needs. And I think it's our role to enlist Send the needs of the individual patient and make up something that really meets those needs. So more about listening, asking questions and less about thinking that we have the solution to it, because I think within musculoskeletal health or care, whatever we call it, some clinicians would use their words to communicate a message that might be good for some other patients would prefer to have a folder or leaflet. Others would say, I want a phone, I want an app on my phone, something that's like learning on demand, because at least that's something we see regularly. Now that we have the older population that wants a piece of paper, we have the younger population that wants to have something that they can sort of like, rely on when they're out there on their own one advice on how do I manage this challenging situation to get some good advice when you're not there? When I'm all on my own? So, so different?   10:57 Yeah, and I love those examples. I use apps quite frequently. And I had a patient just the other day say, Oh, my husband put this, the app that that you use, because I was giving her PDFs, and she's like, Oh, my husband put the app on my phone. Now it's so much easier. So now I know exactly what to do if I have five minutes in my day. So it just depends.   11:21 And I think the whole like mobile health industry, there's a lot of potential there. But I also see, at least from a Danish context, that there's a lot of apps that is very limited. It's not not developed on a sound evidence base, or it's just sort of like a container of videos with exercises. And I think there's a huge potential in like thinking of how can we do more with this? How can we make sure that it's not just the delivery vehicle for a new exercise, but it's actually the delivery vehicle for improving the competencies for self management for individuals? I think there's, yeah, I'm looking forward to the next few years to see how this whole field develops. Because I think there's really big potential in this.   12:12 Yeah, not like you're not doing enough already. But you know, maybe you've just got your next project now. Like, you're not busy enough already. So as we, as you alluded to a few minutes ago, you've got a couple of different talks you're chairing, so you've got a lot going on at the World Congress. So do you want to break down, give maybe a little sneak peek, you don't have to give it all away, we want people to go to the conference to listen to your talks. But if you want to break down, maybe take a one or two of your topics that you'll be speaking on, and I give us a sneak peek.   12:48 I think the talk that will be most interesting for me to deliver and hopefully also to listen to is is the talk that I'm giving on overuse injuries in adolescence, because I think it's we haven't had a lot of like conferences in the past couple of years. So it will be one of these talks will be meaty in terms of of new date, and some of the things I'm most interested go out and present is all the qualitative research we've done on understanding adolescents and their parents, in terms of what are the challenges they experience? How can we help them and also, we've done a lot of qualitative works on what are the challenges that face us experience when dealing with kids with long standing pain complaints, we've developed some new tools that can sort of like, help this process to improve care for these young people. And I really look forward trying to Yeah, to hear what people think of, of our ideas and, and the practical tools that we've that we've developed. So that's at least one of the talks, that's going to be quite interesting, hopefully, also, we're going to actually have the data from our 10 year follow up of so I have a cohort that I started during my PhD. They were like 504 kids with with knee pain. And now I follow them prospectively for 10 years. And this time period, I've gotten a bit more gray hair and gray beard. But this wealth of data that comes from following more than 500 kids for 10 years with chronic knee pain is going to be really, really interesting. And we're going to be finished with that. So I'm also giving a sneak peek on unpublished data on the long term prognosis of adolescent knee pain and at the conference. So that's going to be the world premiere for for that big data set as well.   14:36 Amazing. And as you're talking about going through some of the qualitative research that you've done, and you had mentioned, there were some challenges from the physio side and from the child side in the patient and the child's parents side. Can you give us maybe one challenge that kind of stuck out to you that was like, boy, this is really a challenge that is maybe one of the biggest impediments in working with this population.   15:06 I think I think there's multiple one thing that I'm really interested in these in this moment is the whole level of like diagnostic uncertainty and kids, because one of the things we've understood is that if the kids and the parents don't really understand why they have knee pain, what's the name of the knee pain, it becomes this cause of them seeking care around the healthcare system on who can actually help me who can explain my pain. So so at the moment, we're trying to do a lot of things on how we can reduce this, what would you call diagnostic uncertainty and provide credible explanations to the kids and then trying to develop credible explanation for both kids and parents? That's actually not an easy task, because what is a credible explanation of what Patellofemoral Pain is when we don't have a good understanding of the underlying pathophysiology? So there, we're doing a lot of work on combining both clinical expertise, what the patient needs, what we know from the literature, and then we're trying to solve, iterate and test these credible explanations with the kids. And yeah, at the conference, we'll have the first draft of these, what we call credible explanation. So that's going to be at least one barrier one challenge, I hope that some of the practical tools we've developed can actually help   16:25 i for 1am, looking forward to that, because there is it is so challenging when you're working with children, adolescents, and their parents who are sort of call it doctor shopping, you know, where you're, like you said, you're going around to multiple different practitioners, just with their fingers crossed, hoping that someone can explain why their child is in pain or not performing are not able to, you know, be a part of their peer group or, or or engage in what normal kids would would generally do. Exactly. Yeah. Oh, I'm definitely looking forward to that. So what give us one other sneak peek? Because I know you've got the, you're also chairing a talk on the first day. But what else I shouldn't say I don't want to put words in your mouth. What else? Are you looking forward to even maybe if it's not your talk, are you looking forward to maybe some other presentations,   17:26 I'm actually looking forward to to the competitions we have as well, because I've had a sneak peek of some of the research that's been submitted as abstracts, and the quality is super high. So both the oral presentations but also the presentation that the best infographics because they'll also get time to actually rip on the big screen and present their infographic. And I look forward to see how people can communicate the messages from these amazing infographics. And I think these two competitions are going to be to be a blast and going to be really, really fun to, to look at. And amazing research as well. So I really look forward to the two events as well. And then of course, oh no, go ahead. No, I was just talking about look forward to meeting with friends and new friends and be out talking to people once again in beautiful new ball in Denmark in the middle of summer. It's hard to be Denmark in the summer. We don't have a lot of good weather, but Denmark in August is just brilliant.   18:31 Yes, I've only been there in February. So I am definitely looking forward to to Denmark and August as well. Because I've only been there for sports Congress when it's a little chilly and a little damp. So summer sounds just perfect. And I've one more question. Just kind of piggybacking off of your comments on the amazing research within these competitions. And since you know you have been in the research field, let's say for a decade plus right getting your PhD a decade ago. How have you seen physio research change and morph over the past decade? Have you seen just it better research coming from specifically from the physio world?   19:20 I think it's the first time someone said it's actually more than a decade. So, but that gives me a time perspective. But yeah, I've actually seen that. My perception is that physiotherapy research in general but also sports physiotherapy research went from being published in smaller journals we published in our own journals to now there's multiple example of sport fishers performing really, really nice trials that have reached the best medical journals that have informed clinical practice. So I think we see this both there's more good research Basically out there. And I also see that we've moved from, like a biomechanical paradigm to being more user a patient center, we see more qualitative research, we see that physiotherapist, sport physiotherapist, they sort of have a larger breadth of different research designs, they used to tackle the research. I think, like looking even at the ACL injuries, if you go back 10 years in time, looking at the very biomechanically oriented research that was primarily also joined by orthopedic surgeons to a large extent. Now, today where fishers have done amazing research, they understand all the the fear of reentry, they're trying to do very broad rehabilitation programs, ensuring that people don't return to sport too rapidly. And and also understanding why they shouldn't return back to his board now developing tools that you can use when you sit with a patient to try and and educate them on what are the phases, we need to go through the next nine to 12 months before you can return to sport and so on. So I think I'm just impressed by, by the research. And when I see the even the younger people in my group now, they start at a completely different level when they start their PhD compared to what we did. So I can only imagine that the quality is going to improve over the years as well, because they're much more talented, they're still hard working. And they have a larger evidence base to sort of like stand on. And they already from the beginning, see the benefit of these interdisciplinary collaborations with the whole medical field and who else is is relevant to include in these collaborations? So yeah, the future is bright. I see. Yeah,   21:50 I would agree with that. And now as we kind of start to wrap things up here, where can people find you? So websites, social media, tell the people where you're at.   22:04 So I think if you just type in my name on Google, there'll be a university profile at the very top where you can see all my contact information. Otherwise, just feel free to reach out on LinkedIn or Twitter, search for my name. And you'll find me, I try to be quite rapid and respond to the direct messages when, when possible, at least   22:25 perfect. And we'll have all the links to that in the show notes at podcast at healthy, wealthy smart.com. So you can just go there, click on it'll take you right to all of your links. So is there anything that you want to kind of leave the listeners with when it comes to the world congresses, sports physiotherapy or physical therapy, sorry.   22:52 Be careful not to miss it, it's going to be one of these conferences with a magical blend of practical application of signs, it's going to be a terrific program in terms of possibilities to to network and engage in physical activity, whatever it's running, or mountain biking, and with an amazing conference dinner as well. So I think it's, so this would come to be one of one of the highlights for me this year. So and I think the whole atmosphere around this conference is also that if you come there, as a clinician, you don't know anybody, that people will be open and welcoming and happy to engage in conversation. There's no speakers, that wouldn't be super happy to grab a beer or walk to discuss some of the ideas that's been presented at the conference. So I think it's going to be quite, quite good.   23:45 Yeah. So come with an open mind come with a lot of questions and come with your workout clothes. Is is what I'm hearing?   23:56 Yes, definitely. Definitely.   23:59 And final question, and it's one that I asked everyone is knowing where you are now in your life and in your career? What advice would you give to your younger self, and you can pick whatever time period your younger self is.   24:13 So I think in if I had to give myself one advice when I was in my sort of like, MIT Ph. D, time coming towards the end, I would say to myself, that it's okay to say no, you have to make sure to say yes to the right things because it's very easy to say yes to everything. And then you create these peak stress periods for yourself that would prohibit you from from doing things that is value being with friends or family and so on. You don't have to say yes to everything because there will be multiple opportunities afterwards. So practice in saying no and do it in a in a polite way. People actually have a lot of respect for people that say, No, I don't have a time or I'm I'm going to invest my time on this because this is what I really think is going to change the field. And this is my vision. So So young Michael, please please practice in saying no.   25:11 I love that advice. Thank you so much. So Michael, thank you so much for coming on the podcast. And again, just a reminder, I know we've said this before, but the World Congress is sports, physical therapy, we'll be in Denmark, August 26 and 27th of this year 2022. So thank you so much for coming on the podcast and thank you for all of your hard work and getting making this conference the best it can be.   25:36 Thank you, Karen, thank you for the invitation to the podcast.   25:39 Absolutely. And everyone. Thank you so much for tuning in. Have a great couple of days and stay healthy, wealthy and smart.

The Finish More Music Podcast
FMM173 Azpecialguest : Flipping the Switch From Spinning Your Wheels to Accelerating Towards Success

The Finish More Music Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 53:49


We continue this week with our second special episode hearing about the journeys and lessons from the producers inside of the FMM community.   And today I'm delighted to be speaking to Jonas Klugel who produces and DJs under the name Azpecialguest. Jonas has had an incredible 12 months, a very accomplished DJ, recently nominated best new Danish artist 2022 and rubbing shoulders on stage with Hans Bieger. He's now following suit with his productions, hitting the top spots in the Beatport charts and has over 100 finished tracks in the bag. But rewind just a few short years and things were quite different… After attending various courses, Jonas imagined he would be able to write music to play out… …but never really learned how to finish a track, and was finding things slow going. Dug into a hole of frustration and confusion and a mess on the production front, his music came to a stop. He had learned some skills but ultimately without the process to consistently put them into pratice. Meanwhile his friends were releasing music, getting bookings and leveling up. Jonas felt like a failure, stuck on the starting grid, not knowing how to get moving.  In this episode we dig into his journey so that you can hear what flipped the switch for Jonas, and what he changed to get to where he is today. If you want to know what it takes to progress from being completely stuck with your music to becoming a prolific artist who's able to create with ease and consistently level up the quality of your music, you are going to LOVE this episode.

KEXP Song of the Day
Rigmor - Det er lige meget

KEXP Song of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 2:56


Rigmor - "Det er lige meget" from the 2022 album Glade blinde børn on Mermaid Records. This week's Songs of the Day were selected by KEXP DJ Kevin Cole, host of Drive Time, spotlighting artists playing the SPOT Festival in Aarhus, Denmark, May 6-7th.  This past February, two years after they dropped the Rebel EP, Danish indie pop band Rigmor unveiled their debut record Glade blinde børn. In English the title translates to “Happy Blind Children” which is telling of the poetic melancholy the band paints through their lyrics and dramatic, airy soundscapes. Our Song of the Day “Det er lige meget” translates to “It Doesn't Matter” but rather than being a narrative of cynicism, it's simply admittance that, when looking out at the stars and nature and the vastness of the universe, our petty little bullshit is just not that important. Frontwoman Sarah Wichmann's celestial vocals paired with shimmering guitars serve well as angelic advisors, whispering in our ears, “It doesn't matter.” The song comes with a video directed by Peter Sørensen in which our protagonist seemingly has this revelation. Watch it at the link below. Read the full post on KEXP.org Support the show: https://www.kexp.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Jeselnik & Rosenthal Vanity Project

A Danish man was caught with 21 vaginas in his freezer, a Washington woman is rescued after falling face first into toilet to retrieve her phone and a Florida Bride and caterer are charged with lacing wedding food with weed. Right now Allform is offering 20% off all orders for our listeners at ALLFORM.COM/jrvp Visit athelticgreens.com/jrvp for a FREE 1 year supply of Vitamin D AND 5 FREE travel packs with your first purchase. Head to titan.com/JRVP to get $50 when you invest with Titan. Go to drinktrade.com/jrvp and take their quiz to find coffee you love See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.