Podcasts about scientists

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Person who conducts scientific research

  • 7,552PODCASTS
  • 15,710EPISODES
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  • Oct 19, 2021LATEST
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Best podcasts about scientists

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Latest podcast episodes about scientists

Science Diction
Algebra: From Broken Bones To Twitter Feuds

Science Diction

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 14:23


When high schooler Gracie Cunningham posted a TikTok asking where algebra came from, she probably didn't expect to become a viral sensation. There were the usual Twitter trolls, but some unexpected voices also began piping up, causing a flurry in the math world.Thank you to Chad, the listener who suggested that we do an episode on algebra. If you have a suggestion for a word or episode, leave us a voicemail. The number is 929-499-WORD, or 929-499-9673. Or, you can always send an email to podcasts@sciencefriday.com. Guests:  Steven Strogatz is a Professor of applied mathematics at Cornell, and Visiting Professor at National Museum of Mathematics.Eugenia Cheng is a mathematician and Scientist in Residence at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and the author of x + y: A Mathematician's Manifesto for Rethinking Gender. Footnotes & Further Reading:  Read Eugenia Cheng's full response to Gracie. Take a peek at al-Khwarizmi's The Compendious Book on Calculation by Completion and Balancing. Credits:  This episode was produced by Johanna Mayer and Lauren Young. Our Editor and Senior Producer is Elah Feder. Daniel Peterschmidt is our Composer. Danya AbdelHameid contributed fact checking. Our Chief Content Officier is Nadja Oertelt. 

SBS Macedonian - СБС Македонски
As COP-26 summit approaches, European floods show need for action - Cамит COP-26 - европските поплави покажуваат потреба од акција

SBS Macedonian - СБС Македонски

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 5:53


At the end of the month, world leaders will gather in Glasgow for the COP-26 summit, a vital moment in the effort to limit the rise in global temperatures to 1.5 degrees. Scientists say extreme weather events, like July's deadly flooding across Western Europe, are a vivid reminder of why tougher climate action is needed now. - На крајот на месецот, светските лидери ќе се сpетнат во Глазгов на самитот COP-26 - витален момент во напорите да се ограничи порастот на глобалните температури на 1,5 степени.Научниците велат дека екстремните временски настани, како што се јулските смртоносни поплави низ Западна Европа, се вистинско потсетување зошто сега се потребни построги климатски акции.SBS News слушна од оние кои за малку ќе изгубеа сe во катастрофата, за да види дали се согласуваат.

Unlocking The Fountain
Episode 4: Fountain in a Pill

Unlocking The Fountain

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 37:26


Scientists have identified several drugs that appear to slow aging. Some are already widely used in humans to treat other diseases. But how do you get a cure approved when regulators don't see aging as a disease? And wouldn't it take decades to prove the pill prolongs human lifespan? This episode explores the hits and misses on the path to a fountain-of-youth pill.

YOU The Owners Manual Radio Show
EP 1,066 News of the Week

YOU The Owners Manual Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021


Every week, Dr. Roizen discusses the latest health headlines YOU need to know.In this episode, Dr. Roizen talks about the latest health headlines that YOU need to know. Scientists untangle way diabetes might raize Alzheimers risk  Physical activity reduces cardiovascular mortality substantially  Fruit & veggies - a recipe for mental health wellbeing Asthma, smoking tied to early COPD risk  Is it safe to drink "Profee" to jumpstart your day? FDA unveils proposed changes to OTC sunscreen labeling PLUS so much more...    

Millennialz Anonymous Podcast
Bridge to Understanding

Millennialz Anonymous Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 78:05


Intro (2mins) 2. Millennial Mintunes (11min 12 sec): Colin Powell Dies at 84, The cost of energy above $80 a barrel on Monday for the first time in nearly seven years, Stacey Dash Admits to Being a Drug Addict, Woman attacked on a train in Philadelphia, Golden Globe will not be telecaster in 2022, Scientists detect radio waves from space, Leah Remini vs Wendy Williams, Rory & Mal get big paycheck, You came back on Netflix, Channing Tatum on Dave Chappelle. Interview Replay With Sara Weis: 

The Patriotically Correct Radio Show with Stew Peters | #PCRadio
ANTIFA Assassination Email EXPOSED Includes President Trump, Navy Scientist Blows Whistle on Jab Mandate, Vaxx Victim Tells HORRIFIC Story and MORE

The Patriotically Correct Radio Show with Stew Peters | #PCRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 55:50


EXCLUSIVE: An anonymous ANTIFA infiltrator provided a Germany-based ANTIFA cell's "hit list", which includes specific instructions to assassinate a list of high-profile individuals. The Stew Peters Show has obtained the list, and you'll be SHOCKED about the names included in this email! Jennifer Roames has spent 14 years as a Senior Physicist with the Naval Surface Warfare Center. She's an incredibly intelligent individual, and she's decided against being forced into a shot being falsely referred to as a "vaccine". Roames joined Stew Peters to tell the world what's REALLY going on behind closed doors! Blood Clots, Everlasting Menstruation, Pericarditis, Spinal Injury, Neurological problems, heart issues ALL experienced by a Covid "vaccine" recipient that was threatened with her job if she did not comply with the mandate. Scientists have been examining the nasal swabs that get shoved up your kids' nose at school all day, and the results will shake your soul. Joshua Yoder is a commercial airline pilot, and the founding member of usfreedomflyers.org. Yoder joined Stew Peters to reveal what's happening with the unions that are betraying the pilots they're meant to protect. Dr. Zelenko Protocol: www.zStackProtocol.com Go Ad-Free, Get Exclusive Content, Become a Premium user: https://redvoicemedia.com/premium Follow Stew on social media: http://evrl.ink/StewPeters See all of Stew's content at https://StewPeters.TV Watch full episodes here: https://redvoicemedia.net/stew-full-shows Check out Stew's store: http://StewPeters.shop Support our efforts to keep truth alive: https://www.redvoicemedia.com/support-red-voice-media/ Advertise with Red Voice Media: https://redvoicemedia.net/ads

Flower Power Garden Hour
Flower Power Garden Hour 121: Dr. Cassandra Quave, The Plant Hunter: A Scientist's Quest for Nature's Next Medicines

Flower Power Garden Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 58:09


Dr. Cassandra Quave is a botanist extraordinaire. I was fortunate to chat about her early life, career path, and her new book “The Plant Hunter: A Scientist's Quest for Nature's Next Medicines.” Book Description: In The Plant Hunter, Dr. Quave weaves together science, botany, and memoir to tell us the extraordinary story of her own journey. Traveling by canoe, ATV, mule, airboat, and on foot, she has conducted field research in the flooded forests of the remote Amazon, the murky swamps of southern Florida, the rolling hills of central Italy, isolated mountaintops in Albania and Kosovo, and volcanic isles arising out of the Mediterranean — all in search of natural compounds, long-known to traditional healers, that could help save us all from the looming crisis of untreatable superbugs. And as a person born with multiple congenital defects of her skeletal system, she's done it all with just one leg. Filled with grit, tragedy, triumph, awe, and scientific discovery, her story illuminates how the path forward for medical discovery may be found in nature's oldest remedies.   “The Plant Hunter: A Scientist's Quest for Nature's Next Medicines” can be found at penguinrandomhouse.com   Cassandra can be followed at: Instagram: @quavesthnobot Twitter: @QuaveEthnobot Podcast: foodiepharmacology.podbean.com Website: cassandraquave.com   To ask questions for future shows, submit them at: Facebook Instagram email Marlene at marlenetheplantlady@gmail.com   Find Marlene over on YouTube, Instagram and Facebook

Kottke Ride Home
Mon. 10/18 - Thank Exoplanets For Your iPhone's Display

Kottke Ride Home

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 17:13


How the push to search for signs of life on exoplanets fueled the development of the technology we use in our latest generation of smartphones. Plus, what your punctuation habits can say about you as a writer––and a new website based on a 2016 art project that allows you to visually analyze those findings. And walruses from space! Sponsor:Shopify, Get a 14-day free trial at shopify.com/kottkeLinks:How the Search for Extraterrestrial Life Helped Make Your Smartphone's Screen Possible (Wall Street Journal)NASA Spinoff (NASA)NASA Home & City (NASA)What I Learned About My Writing By Seeing Only The Punctuation (Creators Hub)Punctuation in novels. (Adam J. Calhoun) just the punctuation WWF'S Walrus From Space Project Seeks Volunteer 'Walrus Detectives' (NPR)Where's walrus? Scientists seek public ‘detectives' to spot giant animals from space. (Washington Post)Walrus From Space (WWF) Tech Meme Ride HomeKottke.OrgJackson Bird on TwitterSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Let It In with Guy Lawrence
Why Woo-Woo Works | Dr David Hamilton

Let It In with Guy Lawrence

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 60:55


#191 This week, my wonderful guest is Dr. David Hamilton. David is a writer, speaker, columnist, and scientist. Our conversation today revolves around David's newest book, Why Woo-Woo Works. In his book, David provides scientific explanations to all the “woo woo” things we encounter in our lives. His goal with the book is to not only help practitioners of anything woo woo to have more faith in themselves, but to also educate sceptics and help them understand these things. We talk about the definition of woo woo, how crystals actually work, the placebo effect, and how our perception and way of thinking actually affects our reality. If you're someone who may be feeling stuck in their current trajectory and wish to lead more from the heart, then this is definitely the episode for you. "The world that you experience, is consistent with your thinking and what you believe. It's not that you're actually physically changing things, but you're literally flicking to a world that's entirely consistent with what you've just thought.” About David: David Hamilton is a writer, columnist, speaker & kindness scientist. After completing his PhD in organic chemistry, he worked in R&D in the pharmaceutical industry, developing drugs for cardiovascular disease and cancer. Inspired by the placebo effect, and how some people's conditions would improve because they believed a placebo was a real drug, he left the industry to write books and educate people in how they can harness their mind and emotions to improve their mental and physical health. He is now author of 11 books, including the Amazon bestseller, 'The Five Side Effects of Kindness'. He's also a columnist, the 'Kindness Tsar' for Psychologies Magazine, and has been a featured guest on Channel 4's, 'Sunday Brunch Live' in the UK and CBS Sunday Morning in the USA, as well as on several BBC radio shows and podcasts around the world. David is also the honorary scientific advisor for the charity, 52 Lives. He's an advocate for kindness and work passionately to inspire a kinder world. Dr David's Website: drdavidhamilton.com David's Books:drdavidhamilton.com/books Key points with time stamp: Why Woo-Woo Works (00:00) How can the right and left brain come together? (01:12) Organic chemistry: the Lego building of the sciences (03:25) The Placebo Effect: Do we already have the pharmacy inside of us? (06:25) How powerful are our beliefs? (08:47) Is the medical industry becoming more wholistic? (12:36) Taking back control over your health (16:01) What does woo-woo even mean? (17:03) Do crystals actually work? If so, how? (20:46) Scepticism regarding the woo-woo (31:03) Is consciousness just inside our heads? (36:08) Your experience creates your reality (40:21) How can you change your trajectory and lead from the heart? (45:42) Why Woo-Woo Works: something for both practitioners and sceptics (50:54) What are the impacts of your kind actions? (52:55) Mentioned in this episode: Why Woo-Woo Works, 2021. David's latest book The Magic Power of Your Mind, 1940. A book by Walter Germain Dean Radin Amit Goswami Valentina Onisor Tony Robbins About me: My Instagram: www.instagram.com/guyhlawrence/?hl=en My website: www.guylawrence.com.au www.liveinflow.co

Take This Job And Love It!
Craft & Career with Hanoi Hantrakul ’15, AI Research Scientist, Composer, and Cultural Technologist

Take This Job And Love It!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 35:33


Welcome back to the Craft & Career series, where we connect with professional creatives from the arts, entertainment, and media industries, inviting our guests to discuss the nuances of their craft, the reality of their career, and how, in often surprising ways, these two concerns can work together. This week we'll be discussing the unique … Continue reading Craft & Career with Hanoi Hantrakul '15, AI Research Scientist, Composer, and Cultural Technologist →

Comedians Vs Humanity
Episode #48: ”We Don't Have Much Time, with Jackie Chan”

Comedians Vs Humanity

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 63:24


Scientists are the new rockstars but what in the hell have they done?  This week we debate which scientist is the better butler. PB&J's are staples growing up. But don't you wish there was an adult version? And Eric comes up with a brilliant movie plot to revive Jackie Chan's career.

Nature Podcast
Coronapod: the COVID scientists facing violent threats

Nature Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 17:15


Hundreds of scientists have responded to a survey asking about harassment and abuse during the pandemic. The results paint a picture which is as concerning as it is shocking. In this episode of Coronapod we discuss the kinds of abuse scientists are facing, try to pick apart where it is comes from and ask what can be done about it?News Feature: ‘I hope you die': how the COVID pandemic unleashed attacks on scientistsCareers feature: Real-life stories of online harassment — and how scientists got through itSurvey data tableSubscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Zakir Naik
Why do Non Muslim Scientists Accept Science but do not Accept the Qur'an which Speaks about Science?

Zakir Naik

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 4:44


30 Animals That Made Us Smarter
Horseshoe crabs and vaccines

30 Animals That Made Us Smarter

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 16:24


S2 Ep 17. A new synthetic test to create safe vaccines – based on the secrets of the horseshoe crab and its blue blood. Scientists hope this new technology could mean they no longer need to use the blood to test vaccines for harmful bacteria. Get in touch: www.bbcworldservice.com/30animals #30Animals

Full Story
Ecstasy, LSD and magic mushrooms: are these drugs the future of therapy?

Full Story

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 27:08


Scientists treating depression and a range of other mental illnesses have been running controlled trials using MDMA and psychedelic drugs such as LSD, and the results have been encouraging. Dr Robin Carhart Harris, head the Centre for Psychedelic Research at Imperial College London, discusses his work showing how psilocybin (or magic mushrooms) can be used to assist psychotherapy for difficult-to-treat depression. Dr Rachel Yehuda, director of the Center for Psychedelic Psychotherapy and Trauma Research at Mount Sinai school of medicine in New York, discusses her success in trials using MDMA as a treatment for PTSD

Mental Dialogue
Health Inequities: Why Doctors Won't Listen To Black Women?

Mental Dialogue

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 119:53


Our special guest, ALICIA COULTER, Masters in Public Health (MPH) & Masters in Social Work (MSW) & special guest co-host, Diversity Consultant, LATRICE ROSS drops by to discuss the contentious relationship BLACK WOMEN too often face with their DOCTOR'S and HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS. We ask her about the various health disparities specific to BLACK WOMEN, such as the fact that MATERNAL MORTALITY is two to six times higher for BLACK WOMEN based on where they live in the U.S. In 2021 why are BLACK WOMEN still provided less anesthesia during their surgeries? Why are BLACK WOMEN often turned away, then later diagnosed with a medical complication that could've been discovered with proper screening? What about the COVID 19 VACCINES & BLACK WOMEN'S MENUSTRAL CYCLES? How can the AFRICAN AMERICAN community as whole effectively advocate for EQUITABLE HEALTH CARE? Can pushing more AFRICAN AMERICAN youth to be DOCTORS & SCIENTISTS help level the playing field? MENTAL DIALOGUE asking the questions America's afraid to ask. ALL I ASK IS THAT YOU THINK --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/montoya-smith/message

Marine Mammal Science
MMS 109: Spinner dolphins and becoming a marine mammal scientist

Marine Mammal Science

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 28:19


On this week's episode, Liah McPherson, a graduate student working on Hawaiian spinner dolphins, talks about her research on population abundance and age structure and her experiences entering the field of marine mammal science.

AMiNDR: A Month in Neurodegenerative Disease Research
212 - Synaptic Transmission in Alzheimer's Disease: August 2021

AMiNDR: A Month in Neurodegenerative Disease Research

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 24:21


Want to know more about about how the brain's different neurotransmitter systems aren't functioning properly in Alzheimer's disease and how hippocampal synaptic plasticity impairment contributes to Alzheimer's pathology? Join Glory for the latest updates on research about the mechanisms of synaptic transmission and plasticity that contribute to the Alzheimer's disease pathology. With this month's new papers, August 2021 gives us 12 publications that try to answer all of your questions on the synaptic aspects of AD! You're sure to get your own synapses firing by listening to this episode! Sections in this episode: Neurotransmitters and neuropeptides (3:01) Electrophysiological changes (10:08) Synaptic plasticity (12:28) New AD models (14:24) Cognition and memory (18:58)  -------------------------------------------------------------- You can find the numbered bibliography for this episode by clicking here, or the link below:https://drive.google.com/file/d/193a8sYAFrnvz6buueDNvoY2YSmDgV2n1/view?usp=sharingTo access the folder with all the bibliographies for 2021 so far, follow this link (it will be updated as we publish episodes and process bibliographies), or click the following link below:https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1N1zx_itPkCDNYE1yFGZzQxDDR-NiRx3p?usp=sharingYou can also join our mailing list to receive a newsletter by filling this form. Or tweet at us: @AMiNDR_podcast  --------------------------------------------------------------Follow-up on social media for more updates!Facebook:  AMiNDR  Twitter: @AMiNDR_podcastInstagram: @AMiNDR.podcastYoutube: AMiNDR PodcastLinkedIn: AMiNDR PodcastEmail: amindrpodcast@gmail.com  -------------------------------------------------------------- Please help us by spreading the word about AMiNDR to your friends, colleagues, and networks! Another way you can help us reach more listeners who would benefit from the show is by leaving us a review on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts. It helps us a lot and we thank you in advance for leaving a review! Our team of volunteers works together to bring you every episode of AMiNDR. In particular, this episode was scripted and hosted by Glory Nasseri, edited by Ellen Koch, and reviewed by Anusha Kamesh. The bibliography was made by Lara Onbasi and the wordcloud was created by Sarah Louadi (www.wordart.com). Big thanks to the sorting team for sorting all the papers published in August 2021 into themes for our episodes: Jacques Ferreira, Ellen Koch, Nicole Corso, Kate Van Pelt, Christy Yu, and Dana Clausen. Also, props to our management team, which includes Sarah Louadi, Ellen Koch, Naila Kuhlmann, Elyn Rowe, Anusha Kamesh, and Jacques Ferreira, for keeping everything running smoothly.Our music is from "Journey of a Neurotransmitter" by musician and fellow neuroscientist Anusha Kamesh; you can find the original piece and her other music on soundcloud under Anusha Kamesh or on her YouTube channel, AKMusic.   https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMH7chrAdtCUZuGia16FR4w   -------------------------------------------------------------- If you are interested in joining the team, send us your CV by email. We are specifically looking for help with sorting abstracts by topic, abstract summaries and hosting, audio editing, creating bibliographies, and outreach/marketing. However, if you are interested in helping in other ways, don't hesitate to apply anyways.  --------------------------------------------------------------*About AMiNDR: *  Learn more about this project and the team behind it by listening to our first episode: "Welcome to AMiNDR!" 

A Moment of Science
Scientists observe incredible aurora display known as a "space hurricane"

A Moment of Science

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 2:00


Auroras are always incredible displays of light, and a recently observed phenomenon called a "space hurricane" is no exception.

Mommy Dentists in Business
164: Interview with Corporate Scientist, Joe Oxman Ph.D.

Mommy Dentists in Business

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 28:44


Joe Oxman received his Ph.D. in organic photochemistry from Northwestern University (1983).  He has been employed by 3M for 38 years and is currently a Corporate Scientist. A developer of many dental and non-dental technologies and is considered a global expert in photocurable systems, nanotechnology, structural composites, hard tissue adhesives, glass ionomer materials, orthogonal smart-materials, bioactives and technologies to minimize polymerization shrinkage stress. He has 112 issued US patents, more than 100 publications/abstracts in peer reviewed journals and has been an invited global lecturer for more than 350 keynotes, presentations, and dental school curricula. He has received many international recognitions including induction into the prestigious 3M Carlton Society (2003), two American Chemical Society (ACS) Cooperative Research Awards (2007 and 2020), the University of Colorado Engineering & Applied Science Corporate Advocate Award (2007), the IADR Peyton Skinner Award for Innovation in Dental Materials (2013), ACS Industrial Polymer Science Award (2016) and induction as an ACS Polymer Fellow (2017). He was instrumental in co-establishing the NSF Cooperative Research Center on “Fundamentals Applications of Photopolymerization” (Universities of Iowa and Colorado). He currently serves on the Board of Directors of the AADR, the MinnCResT External Review Board and previously served as the 3M Director of Research for University of Minnesota Dental Research Center for Biomaterials and Biomechanics and as a coach and judge for the Discovery Education/3M Young Scientist Challenge.

Women In STEM Career & Confidence

092 Future You Subscribe to the Women In STEM Career & Confidence Podcast on your favourite platform and stay tuned. Resources: Join hundreds of Scientists and Professional Women in Breakthrough Unleashed on Facebook: www.facebook.com/groups/breakthroughunleashed/ Visit my Website: https://hannahnikeroberts.com/ Connect with me on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/hannahrobertscoaching/ Follow me on Twitter: https://twitter.com/HannahNikeR Follow me on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/drhannahroberts Connect with me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/drhannahroberts/ Download Your FREE Guide: https://drhannahroberts.lpages.co/high-achievers-anxiety

Unsung Science
What Happened to the Mosquitoes in Fresno?

Unsung Science

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 35:02


Mosquitoes are the deadliest creatures on earth; they kill 500,000 people a year—and as the planet warms, more species are spreading North from the tropics. In 2013, a nasty new type, called Aedes Aegypti, arrived in Fresno, California. But traditional tactics, like spraying insecticide and genetic modification, have ugly side effects. So one genius programmer from Google thought up a better solution—that doesn't involve insecticide; doesn't mess around with genes; doesn't require irradiating; makes it impossible for the mosquitoes to develop resistance; can't affect any other species; and costs less than what governments spend now on treating their citizens for Dengue fever. A lot was at stake in the Fresno experiment; if it worked, the technique could save lives around the world. (Spoiler: It worked.)Guests: Linus Upson, VP of Engineering at Verily. Leslie Vosshall, professor of neuroscience at Rockefeller University. Jodi Holeman, Fresno Consolidated Mosquito Abatement District. Peter Massaro, Google director of automation. Jacob Crawford, senior scientist, Verily.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Mainstreet Halifax \x96 CBC Radio
SMU scientist anticipates upcoming James Webb Space Telescope launch

Mainstreet Halifax \x96 CBC Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 11:36


Taking a trip back to the big bang. Astronomer Marcin Sawicki tells us why he's so excited about the Hubble telescope's successor, called the James Webb Space Telescope. After many delays, it's finally set to launch into space this December.

Rock n' Roll English
Trust Me I‘m a Scientist

Rock n' Roll English

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 16:51


This episode is so special I've even given it an episode number! Listen as I speak to RnR Family Member Irina about the wonders of being a scientist! Then if you would like to join the Family, just send me a quick message HERE!

Help 4 HD Live!
HDClarity

Help 4 HD Live!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 43:00


Dr. Wild is a Professor of Neurology at University College London, a Consultant Neurologist at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery in London's Queen Square, and Associate Director of UCL Huntington's Disease Centre. He runs clinics in general neurology, neurogenetic movement disorders and Huntington's disease. He leads a team of researchers aiming to accelerate the development of new therapies to make a real difference for people impacted by Huntington's disease. Dr. Wild believes that “Scientists have a duty to make their work accessible and understandable to the people who need it most.” So in 2010, I co-founded HDBuzz, an online source of reliable, impartial, easy-to-understand information about HD research. HDBuzz is now the world's foremost HD research news source. In recognition of this, he was awarded the 2012 Michael Wright Community Leadership Award by the Huntington Society of Canada and the 2014 Research Award by the Huntington's Disease Society of America (which is where I first met Dr. Wild). He has authored 7 book chapters and over 80 peer-reviewed publications. He serves on the Medical Advisory Panel of the Huntington's Disease Association, the Association of British Neurologists Neurogenetics Advisory Panel, and the Translational Neurology Panel of the European Academy of Neurology. He is the Associate Editor of the Journal of Huntington's Disease and advises the steering committee to the UK All-Party Parliamentary Group on Huntington's disease. He is the co-Lead Facilitator of the European Huntington's Disease Network‘s Biomarkers Working Group. For more information about HDClarity, please visit www.hdclarity.net

Farming Today
Young people in rural areas: outpriced and overlooked; bee foraging research, funeral barrow

Farming Today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 13:41


Young people in rural areas feel outpriced and overlooked, and it's having an impact on their mental health. That's the conclusion of a survey by the countryside charity the CPRE. It surveyed 1,000 people between the ages of 16 and 25 in the countryside, and highlighted house prices, lousy public transport and poor connectivity as problems, all of which increase feelings of loneliness and isolation. Scientists at Royal Holloway College in Surrey have studied bees' waggle dances, which is how bees communicate where pollen can be found. They used them to work out how far a bee is prepared to go. We talk a lot about farms diversifications on the programme, from B&Bs to woodland burials, but a farm in the English midlands has looked back about 2,000 years for inspiration and built a bronze age style funeral barrow as an addition to their 70 acre livestock farm. Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Beatrice Fenton.

Cadillac Jack - My Second Act
Jeff, I think you have my hinkles.

Cadillac Jack - My Second Act

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 62:36


Today we investigate the great hinkle theft of Alpharetta as we welcome back rocking chair season. One thing is for certain, Donna never forgets.  William Schatner went to space. But was it the real space? Scientists have yet to agree. Then we have a grim update on the case of Gabby Petito as we discuss the new autopsy report released just this week. We check in with teen habits according to a recent study before discussing a fresh new country artist that has made PT very upset. And finally, Tim McGraw and Paul McCartney are starting fights. Want to get in touch with Caddy? Call or Text 7704646024.

AMiNDR: A Month in Neurodegenerative Disease Research
211 - Changes to Gene Expression in Alzheimer's Disease: August 2021

AMiNDR: A Month in Neurodegenerative Disease Research

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 17:24


“Changes to the expression of genes may influence the delicate balance between disease and health”. If you want to learn about how that is relevant to Alzheimer's disease, you've come to the right place! Join Marcia for this short episode, as she discusses how & why gene expression, its epigenetic regulation and integrative studies are important in Alzheimer's disease! Sections in this episode: Transcriptome (2:35) Multiomics (8:19) Epigenetics (12:03)  -------------------------------------------------------------- You can find the numbered bibliography for this episode by clicking here, or the link below:https://drive.google.com/file/d/1gMKftjOPDgw4W3acJIR8gTPHZmAfin8u/view?usp=sharingTo access the folder with all the bibliographies for 2021 so far, follow this link (it will be updated as we publish episodes and process bibliographies), or click the following link below:https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1N1zx_itPkCDNYE1yFGZzQxDDR-NiRx3p?usp=sharingYou can also join our mailing list to receive a newsletter by filling this form. Or tweet at us: @AMiNDR_podcast  --------------------------------------------------------------Follow-up on social media for more updates!Facebook:  AMiNDR  Twitter: @AMiNDR_podcastInstagram: @AMiNDR.podcastYoutube: AMiNDR PodcastLinkedIn: AMiNDR PodcastEmail: amindrpodcast@gmail.com  -------------------------------------------------------------- Please help us by spreading the word about AMiNDR to your friends, colleagues, and networks! Another way you can help us reach more listeners who would benefit from the show is by leaving us a review on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts. It helps us a lot and we thank you in advance for leaving a review! Our team of volunteers works together to bring you every episode of AMiNDR. In particular, this episode was scripted and hosted by Marcia Jude, edited by Michelle Grover, and reviewed by Glory Nasseri and Anusha Kamesh. The bibliography was made by Anjana Rajendrani and the wordcloud was created by Sarah Louadi (www.wordart.com). Big thanks to the sorting team for sorting all the papers published in August 2021 into themes for our episodes: Jacques Ferreira, Ellen Koch, Nicole Corso, Kate Van Pelt, Christy Yu, and Dana Clausen. Also, props to our management team, which includes Sarah Louadi, Ellen Koch, Naila Kuhlmann, Elyn Rowe, Anusha Kamesh, and Jacques Ferreira, for keeping everything running smoothly.Our music is from "Journey of a Neurotransmitter" by musician and fellow neuroscientist Anusha Kamesh; you can find the original piece and her other music on soundcloud under Anusha Kamesh or on her YouTube channel, AKMusic.   https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMH7chrAdtCUZuGia16FR4w   -------------------------------------------------------------- If you are interested in joining the team, send us your CV by email. We are specifically looking for help with sorting abstracts by topic, abstract summaries and hosting, audio editing, creating bibliographies, and outreach/marketing. However, if you are interested in helping in other ways, don't hesitate to apply anyways.  --------------------------------------------------------------*About AMiNDR: *  Learn more about this project and the team behind it by listening to our first episode: "Welcome to AMiNDR!" 

Thale-Harate Kannada Podcast
ವಿಜ್ಞಾನ ಮತ್ತು ಜಾಗೃತಿ. Science and Communication With Kollegala Sharma

Thale-Harate Kannada Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 57:40


ಕೊಳ್ಳೇಗಾಲ ಶರ್ಮಾ ರವರು ಪವನ್ ಶ್ರೀನಾಥ್ ಅವರೊಂದಿಗೆ ವಿಜ್ಞಾನ, ವೈಜ್ಞಾನಿಕ ಚಿಂತನೆ ಮತ್ತು ವಿಜ್ಞಾನ ಸಂವಹನ ಕುರಿತು ಮಾತನಾಡುತ್ತಾರೆ.ನಾವು ಸಾಮಾನ್ಯವಾಗಿ ವೈಜ್ಞಾನಿಕ ಕ್ಷೇತ್ರವನ್ನು ಕೇವಲ ವಿಜ್ಞಾನಿಗಳ ಮತ್ತು ಸಂಶೋಧಕರ ಜವಾಬ್ದಾರಿ ಎಂದು ನಂಬಿರುತ್ತೇವೆ. ಆದರೆ, ವೈಜ್ಞಾನಿಕ ಚಿಂತನೆ ಹಾಗು ವಿಜ್ಞಾನದ ಸಾರ್ವಜನಿಕ ಜ್ಞಾನವು ಸಾಮಾಜಿಕ ಪ್ರಗತಿಯಲ್ಲಿ ದೊಡ್ಡ ಪಾತ್ರವನ್ನು ವಹಿಸುತ್ತದೆ. ಹಾಗಿದ್ದರೆ, ವಿಜ್ಞಾನ ಮತ್ತು ಜನರ ಮಧ್ಯೆ ಯಾವ ತರದ ಸೇತುವೆಗಳನ್ನು ನಿರ್ಮಿಸಬೇಕಾಗಿದೆ? ತಲೆ-ಹರಟೆ ಪಾಡ್ಕಾಸ್ಟಿನ 114ನೇ ಸಂಚಿಕೆಯಲ್ಲಿ, ನಿವೃತ್ತವಿಜ್ಞಾನಿ ಮತ್ತು ಜಾಣಸುದ್ದಿ ಪಾಡ್ಕಾಸ್ಟಿನ ಸೃಷ್ಟಿಕರ್ತ ಕೊಳ್ಳೇಗಾಲ ಶರ್ಮ ರವರ ಮಾತನ್ನು ತಪ್ಪದೆ ಕೇಳಿ. ಜಾನಶುದ್ಧಿ ಪಾಡ್ಕಾಸ್ಟ್ ವಿಜ್ಞಾನ ವಿಚಾರ ವಿಸ್ಮಯಗಳ ಒಂದು ಕನ್ನಡ ಧ್ವನಿಪತ್ರಿಕೆ.Kollegala Sharma talks to host Pavan Srinath on science, scientific thinking and science communication. We often confuse science as only a set of fields, that only scientists and researchers need to pursue beyond school. However, scientific thinking and public knowledge of science has a large role to play in the progress of any society. This may sound obvious to many of us -- then why can't communicate science with the Indian public better? Be it the COVID-19 pandemic or climate change, we struggle to communicate science effectively. On Episode 114 of the Thale-Harate Kannada Podcast, Kollegala Sharma helps us understand all this and more. Kollegala Sharma is a passionate science communicator in both Kannada and English, a retired scientist, and the creator of the Janasuddi Podcast (jaaNa-suddi) -- a daily audio magazine in Kannada featuring a feast of scientific knowledge, in a manner accessible to all Kannadigas.ಫಾಲೋ ಮಾಡಿ. Follow the Thalé-Haraté Kannada Podcast @haratepod. Facebook |Twitter | Instagram ಈಮೇಲ್ ಕಳಿಸಿ, send us an email at haratepod@gmail.com or send a tweet and tell us what you think of the show!The Thale-Harate Kannada Podcast is made possible thanks to the support of The Takshashila Institution and IPSMF, the Independent Public-Spirited Media Foundation.You can listen to this show and other awesome shows on the new and improved IVM Podcast App on Android: https://ivm.today/android or iOS: https://ivm.today/ios and check out our website at https://ivmpodcasts.com/ .You can also listen to the podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Gaana, Amazon Music Podcasts, JioSaavn, Castbox, or any other podcast app. We also have some video episodes up on YouTube! ಬನ್ನಿ ಕೇಳಿ!

Whale Scout Podcast
Scientists Respond to the Lone Beluga in Puget Sound

Whale Scout Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 18:33


In October 2021 sightings networks in Puget Sound such as Orca Network, have been buzzing with the bizarre sighting of a lone Beluga whale far from his or her family in Arctic homewaters. The whale has dazzled whale watchers on boats and from home viewing live helicopter footage from a news station. The beluga's brilliant … Continue reading "Scientists Respond to the Lone Beluga in Puget Sound" The post Scientists Respond to the Lone Beluga in Puget Sound appeared first on Whale Scout.

Science & Technology - Voice of America
Scientists Say Soil-Like Material Can Be Used to Produce Batteries - October 13, 2021

Science & Technology - Voice of America

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 3:53


Health Check
Henrietta Lacks Legacy

Health Check

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 26:41


Henrietta Lacks died in 1951 from a virulent cervical cancer. A sample of those cancer cells was taken at the time and the way they behave has changed medical science forever – contributing to everything from the polio vaccine to drugs for Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disease. As the WHO give a posthumous award Claudia discusses how the Henrietta Lacks legacy raises issues of global health equity. Plus with a Malaria Vaccine given a historic green light by the WHO to protect children in Africa, what are the distribution difficulties in countries which carry the greatest burden of disease? And what’s behind the low rate of Covid-19 vaccinations in Taiwan? We hear from one resident about why she’s chosen to have a home-grown Medigen vaccine which hasn’t yet completed all its clinical trials – and another who wants to wait for an alternative. Scientists say that trials about to start in Paraguay should show whether it stimulates enough immunity to protect people in the way the AstraZeneca vaccine does. Presenter: Claudia Hammond Producer: Erika Wright (Picture: Henrietta Lacks, after whom HeLa cells are named, standing outside her home in Baltimore, USA. Photo credit: Getty Images.)

Shadow Moses Cafe
Dr. Emmerich, I presume?: Hal and Huey Emmerich [SMC Entry 006] (Feat. Christopher Randolph)

Shadow Moses Cafe

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 82:04


The same genes but vastly different fates and motivations. The Emmerich's are two of the most iconic Scientists in gaming, building some of the most iconic Mechs in gaming history as well as being the integral core elements of the main story.We couldn't be more proud to have Christopher Randolph, the voice of both Huey and Hal Emmerich, join us for this episode of Shadow Moses Cafe and talk about the ups and downs, highs and lows, and impact these characters had on gaming culture!Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/Shadowmosescafe)

The Pump Station (Turf's Up Radio)
You're the Scientist and the Lab Rat

The Pump Station (Turf's Up Radio)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 48:23


Experimenting with your fitness and nutrition has so many different benefits! Listen LIVE weekdays 9am-10am EST on Turf's Up Radio. Listen online at turfsupradio.com or download the Turf's Up Radio app from your app store. Find us on IG @daniel.personaltraining @theweightroompodcast @turfsupradio

Curiosity Daily
Bacterial Electric Grid, Females Fight Back, Why Tea Leaves Sink

Curiosity Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 13:43


Learn about a bacterial electric grid; traits females have evolved to avoid harassment; and why tea leaves sink.  There's a bacterial electric grid beneath our feet by Grant Currin  Hidden bacterial hairs power nature's “electric grid.” (2021, September). EurekAlert! https://www.eurekalert.org/news-releases/927031  Gu, Y., Srikanth, V., Salazar-Morales, A. I., Jain, R., O'Brien, J. P., Yi, S. M., Soni, R. K., Samatey, F. A., Yalcin, S. E., & Malvankar, N. S. (2021). Structure of Geobacter pili reveals secretory rather than nanowire behaviour. Nature, 597(7876), 430–434. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-021-03857-w  Specktor, B. (2020, September 18). Scientists find “secret molecule” that allows bacteria to exhale electricity. Livescience.com; Live Science. https://www.livescience.com/electron-breathing-geobacter-microbes.html  ‌Basic Biology of Oral Microbes. (2015). Atlas of Oral Microbiology, 1–14. https://doi.org/10.1016/b978-0-12-802234-4.00001-x  Many females have evolved traits to avoid harassment by Cameron Duke Berlin, S. (2021, August 30). Female Octopuses Throw Debris at Unwanted Mates Who Pester Them, Study Shows. Newsweek; Newsweek. https://www.newsweek.com/female-octopuses-throw-debris-unwanted-mates-who-pester-them-study-shows-1624345 Feldblum, Joseph T., Wroblewski, Emily E., Rudicell, Rebecca S., Hahn, Beatrice H., Paiva, T., Cetinkaya-Rundel, M., Pusey, Anne E., & Gilby, Ian C. (2014). Sexually Coercive Male Chimpanzees Sire More Offspring. Current Biology, 24(23), 2855–2860. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2014.10.039 Female hummingbirds avoid harassment by looking as flashy as males. (2021). Female hummingbirds avoid harassment by looking as flashy as males. Phys.org. https://phys.org/news/2021-08-female-hummingbirds-flashy-males.html  Godfrey-Smith, P., Scheel, D., Chancellor, S., Linquist, S., & Lawrence, M. (2021). In the Line of Fire: Debris Throwing by Wild Octopuses. https://doi.org/10.1101/2021.08.18.456805  Hosken, D. J., Alonzo, S., & Wedell, N. (2016). Why aren't signals of female quality more common? Exeter.ac.uk. https://doi.org/http://hdl.handle.net/10871/19606 Male-like ornamentation in female hummingbirds results from social harassment rather than sexual selection. (2021). Current Biology. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2021.07.043 Power Play. (2018). National Wildlife Federation. https://www.nwf.org/Magazines/National-Wildlife/2018/Oct-Nov/Animals/Animal-Aggression Wielgus, R. B., & Bunnell, F. L. (1994). Sexual Segregation and Female Grizzly Bear Avoidance of Males. The Journal of Wildlife Management, 58(3), 405. https://doi.org/10.2307/3809310 Why do tea leaves sink? by Ashley Hamer originally aired June 10, 2018 https://omny.fm/shows/curiosity-daily/the-cutest-kind-of-puppy-rural-happiness-and-the-s  James Norwood Pratt. (2010, August 16). The Ancient and Best Way to Brew Loose-Leaf Tea. The Atlantic. https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2010/08/the-ancient-and-best-way-to-brew-loose-leaf-tea/61479/  Inglis-Arkell, E. (2014, May 6). Why Do Your Tea Leaves Move To The Middle Of The Cup? Gizmodo. https://gizmodo.com/why-do-your-tea-leaves-move-to-the-middle-of-the-cup-1572125743  Ouellette, J. (2016). The Strange Physics of Tea Leaves Floating Upstream. Nautilus. https://nautil.us/blog/the-strange-physics-of-tea-leaves-floating-upstream  Follow Curiosity Daily on your favorite podcast app to learn something new every day withCody Gough andAshley Hamer. Still curious? Get exclusive science shows, nature documentaries, and more real-life entertainment on discovery+! Go to https://discoveryplus.com/curiosity to start your 7-day free trial. discovery+ is currently only available for US subscribers. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Newsy Jacuzzi
Kid News This Week: Battle against mosquitoes, beavers are back, clean cling-film, cow-poo zapper

Newsy Jacuzzi

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 19:57


Kid News This Week: In humanity's battle against mosquitoes – should we swat or swap them? Also, Britain's beavers are back, cleaner cling-film is being developed and how to make cow poo less toxic for the environment? A poo zapper, naturally. All that and more on this week's news pool for curious kids and adults!

Women In STEM Career & Confidence
091 - Recovering From Bad Habits

Women In STEM Career & Confidence

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 3:55


091 Recovering From Bad Habits Subscribe to the Women In STEM Career & Confidence Podcast on your favourite platform and stay tuned. Resources: Join hundreds of Scientists and Professional Women in Breakthrough Unleashed on Facebook: www.facebook.com/groups/breakthroughunleashed/ Visit my Website: https://hannahnikeroberts.com/ Connect with me on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/hannahrobertscoaching/ Follow me on Twitter: https://twitter.com/HannahNikeR Follow me on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/drhannahroberts Connect with me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/drhannahroberts/ Download Your FREE Guide: https://drhannahroberts.lpages.co/high-achievers-anxiety

Built for Change
How ‘New Science' Is Changing Healthcare

Built for Change

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 28:35


If there's one good thing that's come from the pandemic, it's this: Scientists and drug manufacturers came together in record time and with a shared purpose to create a safe and effective Covid-19 vaccine. In doing so, they set a precedent for medical advancements. So, where do we go from here? In this episode, we'll talk about how biopharma companies can learn from last year's disruption and harness what Accenture calls ‘New Science' to rapidly discover and deliver revolutionary treatments and preparing for in the midst of regulatory and economic shifts. We'll speak with Chris Gibson, C.E.O. and Co-Founder at Recursion; Stuart Henderson, Global Industry Lead — Life Sciences at Accenture; and David Coman, C.E.O at Science 37.This week's guests: Chris Gibson, C.E.O. and Co-Founder at RecursionStuart Henderson, Global Industry Lead — Life Sciences at AccentureDavid Coman, C.E.O at Science 37

National Day Calendar
October 13, 2021 – National Fossil Day | Navy Birthday

National Day Calendar

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 2:30


Not All Fossils Give Up Their Stories Right Away. Welcome to October 13, 2021 on the National Day Calendar. Today we celebrate digging up history and our Nation's fighting spirit.  In 1676, a giant leg bone was unearthed in England. Scientists didn't know what it was, or where it came from, but they examined it and decided that it had come from—a giant. They were partially right. While they were envisioning a human-like, fairytale giant, it was actually from a giant lizard that would later come to be known as a dinosaur. Specifically, a Megalosaurus. But no one realized that until nearly 150 years later, when scientist Richard Owen pieced it all together. Today we use fossils to better understand the history of our planet and the evolution of life on it. On National Fossil Day, dig up some cool facts on these links to the past that teach us from the dust. On this day in 1775, the Second Continental Congress formally established what would become the United States Navy.  The most famous American Captain from this era was John Paul Jones.  In 1779, he engaged the British 44 gun Royal Navy frigate, Serapis.  With his ship burning and sinking, Jones refused to surrender and he uttered the now famous words, “I have not yet begun to fight.”  And it turns out he was right!  Three hours after making this declaration, the British ship surrendered to him and Jones took command. On our Navy's Birthday, we celebrate the men and women who carry on the fighting spirit of Captain Jones.   I'm Anna Devere and I'm Marlo Anderson.  Thanks for joining us as we Celebrate Every Day.

The Life Scientific
The Patrick Vallance Interview

The Life Scientific

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 37:04


Could the lessons learnt during the pandemic put us in a stronger position to tackle other big science-based challenges ahead, such as achieving carbon net zero, preserving a diversity of species, and protecting our privacy and slowing the spread of misinformation online? As Chief Scientific Adviser to the government during a pandemic, Patrick Vallance's calm, clear summaries of the state of our scientific understanding of the virus were welcomed by many. But what was going on behind the scenes? In this extended interview with Jim Al-Khalili, Patrick opens up about the challenges involved in presenting scientific evidence to government and together they explore that trickiest of relationships - the one between scientists and politicians. He also looks to the future. Scientists gain prominence during a crisis but the need for scientific input to government is ever present. As head of the new Office for Science and Technology Strategy, based in the Cabinet Office, Patrick hopes to put science and technology at the heart of policy making in government. Science should be as central to government as the economy, he says and tells Jim how he thinks that could be achieved. Producer: Anna Buckley

The David Knight Show
Tue 12Oct21 TEXAS Joins Rebellion Against Biden's BLUFF Mandate

The David Knight Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 181:38


* TX Gov Abbott signs bill from GOP legislature that PROHIBITS PRIVATE COMPANIES' employee #VaccineMandates or customer #VaccinePassports* As BigPharma propaganda ramps up for kid-jabs, 4 & 5 yr old suffer heart issues when given mistakenly* Southwest Airlines employee rebellion against mandates continues and becomes rally point against tyranny as airline denies* Mixed results in court challenges* Great Depression Reset — Biden (and globalists) attempt to kill jobs, kill energy grid, kill supply lines, kill liberty & rule of lawTOPICS by TIMECODE2:04 STOP Mandate BLUFF: It's NOW or NEVER. As “deadline” for jab or job arrives, resistance builds. If we fail, here's what's next…32:57 Nurse fired for no jab, hospital system uses HER PICTURE to recruit her replacement and offer a BONUS to the replacement worker43:54 A Tale of Two Mandate Challenges: Religious & Medical Exemptions. Verdicts on two challenges to jab mandates, two different colleges in Michigan, one religious exemption and one medical exemption — two very different verdicts51:42 Listeners' letters. A cop realizes I'm not anti-cop. Fauci's narcissism on display in his documentary.1:01:11 Rikers Island — the inmates are running the asylum, LITERALLY. Alarming, but perhaps a glimmer of hope ;-)1:09:48 Kids' Psychological Damage “Face Blindness” as Mask War Escalates in Florida. Leftist writer realizes how her kindergartener is being damaged psychologically. Florida & Biden wage war with competing fines & subsidies over school boards' mask policy1:29:45 Perfect storm of climate rules for lockdown, depopulation, energy shortage1:34:52 Charles Runs His Car on “Wine & Cheese”? Globalists Taking Down Power Grid Around the World. In country after country, the globalists are taking down the power grid in the name of “climate change”. USA, Europe, even India & China can't get “demon coal” and are rationing. It's a war.1:53:21 From Bill Maher to Rabobank everyone sees what Biden is doing to jobs, infrastructure and energy — bracing for what's next. Volatility in lumber in housing market, commercial real estate on the rocks1:59:12 Another veteran cop in Australia comes out against the police state2:12:02 Listeners' letters. County patriots organizing, “taking back country, one county at a time”, USDA blackmailing companies to comply with masks & vaccine mandates, and a good source for ivermectin during the shortage2:29:17 Drug Store Gives 4 & 5 yo Kids Pfizer — Heart Issues Ensue. Retail therapy. Drug store mixes up flu shot w Trump shot. Gives adult dose (3x's recommended but adults have been given 6x's with errors)2:38:04 “Operation Warped Screed” and cognitive dissonance. Pastor hates vax, complains about Trump continuing to support taking his shots, will help people with religious exemption — but defends Trump even though he created the jabs and pushed to remove religious exemptions.2:54:46 “BLT Sandwich”: Making “Humanized Mice” with Baby Parts. “Scientists” at UNC, Chapel Hill working with the infamous Robert Baric display a callous disregard for human life in their hideous “research”. Original article: https://collorafi.wixsite.com/tinyhumans/post/unc-researchers-made-blt-sandwich-of-aborted-baby-organs-in-2019-humanized-mice-study Find out more about the show and where you can watch it at TheDavidKnightShow.comIf you would like to support the show and our family please consider subscribing monthly here: SubscribeStar https://www.subscribestar.com/the-david-knight-showOr you can send a donation throughZelle: @DavidKnightShow@protonmail.comCash App at:  $davidknightshowBTC to:  bc1qkuec29hkuye4xse9unh7nptvu3y9qmv24vanh7Mail: David Knight POB 1323 Elgin, TX 78621

Bigger Than Us
#169 Alison Blay-Palmer, UNESCO Chair on Food Biodiversity and Sustainability Studies

Bigger Than Us

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 37:34


Alison Blay-Palmer, the UNESCO Chair on Food Biodiversity and Sustainability Studies, is the founding Director for the Centre for Sustainable Food Systems and a Professor in Geography and Environmental Studies at Wilfrid Laurier University. Her research and teaching combine her passions for sustainable food systems, biodiversity and community viability through civil society engagement and innovative governance. Alison collaborates with academics and practitioners across Canada and internationally including partners in Australia, Brazil, France, Germany, Kenya, South Africa, and the United States . This work gained national recognition in both 2012 and 2019 when her partnership was one of three nominees for a national SSHRC Partnership Impact Award. Alison has been a member of the Royal Society of Canada's College of New Scholars, Artists and Scientists since 2016. https://www.balsillieschool.ca/alison-blay-palmer/ https://nexuspmg.com/

Woman's Hour
Cush Jumbo on playing Hamlet; Reaction to our equality poll; Day of the Scientist

Woman's Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 57:32


Radio DJ Emma Wilson believes that the policeman Wayne Couzens who kidnapped, raped and murdered Sarah Everard exposed himself to her in an alleyway some 13 years ago. Emma reported it to the police at the time – no action was taken, but she has decided to speak out now because when she did report it she was not happy with the response. One of the key findings of our equality poll to mark our 75th anniversary has been the extent to which women don't feel equal when it comes to issues of sexual abuse and exploitation. Almost 70% of the women we asked said it was a concern and the issue is currently front and centre of the news agenda following the murders of Sarah Everard and Sabina Nessa to name just two women. Emma Barnett talks to the writer Joan Smith and the former Victims Commissioner the Conservative Peer Baroness Newlove who is unimpressed by Boris Johnson's unwillingness to recognise misogyny as a hate crime and is trying to change the law on the issue. Probably best known to most for her television role as lawyer Lucca Quinn in The Good Wife and then the follow-up series The Good Fight, Cush Jumbo is currently playing Hamlet at the Young Vic in London. Delayed for a year by the pandemic, the play sold out months before opening. As the first woman of colour to play the part in a major production on a British stage she joins a list that goes back to 1741 of UK female actors playing the Prince of Denmark. Cush joins Emma. On Radio 4's Day of the Scientist, we looks at women's trust in science. The latest Public Attitudes to Science survey found that women are less likely to feel connected to science in their everyday lives; less likely to actively engage with science; and were less trusting of scientists and media reporting of scientific issues. What's going on to put women's faith in science on such shaky ground? Emma speaks to Megan Halpern, assistant professor in the history, philosophy and sociology of science at Michigan State University, and Dr Emily Dawson from University College London, who researches how people learn about and engage with science – and why so many women are being put off. Image: Cush Jumbo in Hamlet at the Young Vic Credit: Helen Murray

Best of Today
What role should Science play in public life?

Best of Today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 9:49


Radio 4's Day of the Scientist explores the role of science in our culture, after its resurgence in public interest over the past 18 months. Has its role changed at all? Amol Rajan speaks to Kate Bingham, leader of the Covid vaccine rollout, shadow Science Minister Chi Onwurah and Professor Sir David Spiegelhalter, the statistician.

The Life Scientific
The Life Scientific at 10: What makes a scientist?

The Life Scientific

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 56:27


How damaging is the stereotype of white males in white coats? Do scientists think differently? Or do the qualities we associate with being a nerd do them a disservice? Is specialism the best way to solve 21st century problems when so many great discoveries are made in the cracks between the disciplines? In short, what makes a scientist, a scientist? Jim and distinguished guests consider the lessons learnt from nearly 250 leading scientists talking with extraordinary honesty about their life and work. And ask: has the job description changed? Success in science is often defined by making discoveries and publishing papers but, as the pandemic made clear, we also need scientists who can interact with decision makers in government and elsewhere. Do scientists need to learn new skills to participate in the decision making process? Do they (or at least some of them) need to be more outward looking, aware of the world beyond their laboratories and ready to engage? Or do the corridors of power need to open their doors to more people with a scientific training? And, if Britain is to become a science superpower, is it time that scientists stopped being squeamish about making money? Jim's guests are Chief Executive of UK Research and Innovation, Prof Dame Ottoline Leyser; Nobel Prize winning biologist and Director of the Crick Institute, Prof Sir Paul Nurse; geologist and Royal Institution Christmas Lecturer, Prof Christopher Jackson; and forensic scientist and member of the House of Lords, Prof Dame Sue Black. Producer: Anna Buckley

Unlocking The Fountain
Episode 3: The 11-Year-Old Scientist

Unlocking The Fountain

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 29:59


Why do we age, and how can we reverse it? We meet a researcher whose discoveries overturned everything we thought we knew about aging. We learn about the levers that cause aging to speed up or slow down. And we meet the 11-year-old scientist at the centre of it all.

Brilliant Balance
Why Change is So Hard with Katy Milkman, Behavioral Scientist

Brilliant Balance

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 44:50


New Year's Eve is the most popular time for people to make goals. For example… the gyms are packed in January and full of motivation.  But by February, the crowd dies off. People become less interested and don't follow through on their resolutions. What happened? Reaching your goals is about making better choices. And if you don't understand the driving forces behind it, you'll always get stuck doing the same thing. In this episode, Dr. Katy Milkman explains the science behind making your goals.  Show highlights include: Why improving your health, financial, and educational choices starts with death data (8:22) How to recreate that New Year's Day motivation and knock out your goals (16:19) How to avoid hurting your progress or losing any momentum with the Baseball Study (22:18) Why being lazier makes you smarter with these ‘default' life hacks (26:25) How to work through tasks and make experiences better with the Temptation-Bundling model (31:13) How to keep the momentum and motivation going (when life gets in the way) (37:02)  ***INCREASE YOUR ENERGY IN 30 DAYS, RESOURCES, & SOCIAL LINKS*** Psst… We have a few spots open for new coaching clients, so if you've ever thought about having a coach, this is your chance to try it on for size and see if you'll benefit. Pick a date and time: www.brilliant-balance.com/schedule Join hundreds of women who increased their energy in 30 days: www.brilliant-balance.com/energy Need a few mini moments of peace? Listen to our free 5 Minute Meditation: www.brilliant-balance.com/breathe/ Book Cherylanne to speak at your next event: www.brilliant-balance.com/speaker Follow us on Instagram: www.instagram.com/brilliant_balance Join our private Facebook Group: www.facebook.com/groups/281949848958057 To see more of Katy Milkman's Behavioral Science work visit: www.katymilkman.com

PBS NewsHour - Segments
A look at the life of A.Q. Khan, scientist behind Pakistan's nuclear weapons program

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 4:16


The father of Pakistan's atomic bomb and a proponent of nuclear proliferation, Abdul Qadeer Khan, died Sunday at the age of 85 after a lengthy battle with COVID-19. He was a figure mired in controversy who launched Pakistan's nuclear weapons program, but also admitted to sharing nuclear technology secrets with Iran, Libya, and North Korea. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 10.11.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 58:37


Can low temperature-aged garlic enhance exercise performance? Korea Univesity & National Institute of Agricultural Sciences (South Korea), October 8, 2021 Scientists from South Korea's National Institute of Agricultural Sciences and Korea University looked at aged garlic to see whether it could help reduce fatigue. To do this, they conducted a study on mice fed with a special low-temperature-aged garlic (LTAG). Their findings were published in the Journal of Medicinal Food. Testing the fatigue-fighting effects of low temperature-aged garlic The researchers chose to use LTAG because it lacked the pungent odor and spicy flavor of regular garlic, making it easier to use for animal testing. To create the LTAG, the researchers stored garlic in a sealed container, aging at 60 C for 60 days. The resulting LTAG was then peeled and pulverized, before being added to 200 milliliters of 70 percent ethanol (EtOH), which was then subjected to ultrasonic extraction three times. This 70 percent EtOH and LTAG extract was then concentrated under a vacuum at 45 C and then lyophilized to create a dry LTAG residue. After the creation of the LTAG, the researchers then separated mice into six groups. The first group was given a low dose of LTAG extract; the second was fed a high dose of LTAG extract; the third was given a low dose of garlic extract; and the fourth was given a high dose of garlic extract. The fifth and sixth groups consisted of normal mice that were given phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) instead of garlic. One of these control groups was made to exercise while the other group was not. The mice in the five groups were forced to run on a treadmill for four weeks. With each passing week, the amount of exercise the mice would have to do on the treadmills would increase. This was done by increasing both the speed that the mice had to run, and the amount of time they had to spend running. (Related: How to alleviate fatigue with herbal medicine.) After 28 days of treatment, five mice from each group were subjected to a final, exhaustive treadmill test. This test increased the treadmill speed from 15 meters per minute (m/min) to 40 m/min every 3 minutes. During this test, the running time was monitored until each mouse failed to follow the increase in speed on three consecutive occasions and lag occurred. At this point, the mouse's total running time was recorded. The effect of the LTAG on the levels of glucose, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), free fatty acid (FFA) and lactate in the mice's blood. Following the final exercise, the mice were killed and blood samples were collected from them. In addition, the mice's gastrocnemius muscles were also isolated and frozen in liquid nitrogen for testing. LTAG treated mice demonstrated less fatigue Following the exhaustive running tests, the researchers found that the mice treated with LTAG extract were able to run for much longer than the control mice. Meanwhile, looking at the blood tests, they noted that the mice treated with LTAG extract exhibited lower levels of glucose, LDH, FFA and lactate. More importantly, the LTAG treated mice had increased amounts of glycogen and creatine kinase (CK) in their muscles. Glycogen storage is an important source of energy during exercise. It serves a central role in maintaining the body's glucose homeostasis by supplementing blood glucose. Because of this, glycogen is seen as an accurate marker for fatigue, with increased glycogel levels closely associated with improved endurance and anti-fatigue effects. CK, on the other hand, is known to be an accurate indicator of muscle damage. During muscle degeneration, muscle cells are dissolved and their contents enter the bloodstream. As a result, when muscle damage occurs, muscle CK comes out into the blood. As such, fatigue tends to lead to lower muscle CK levels and higher blood CK levels. Higher levels of glycogen and muscle CK in the LTAG treated mice indicated that they experienced less fatigue than the other groups. Based on these findings, the researchers believe that LTAG has potential for use as an anti-fatigue agent.       Mindfulness meditation helps preterm-born adolescents University of Geneva (Switzerland), October 7, 2021 Adolescents born prematurely present a high risk of developing executive, behavioral and socio-emotional difficulties. Now, researchers from Geneva University Hospitals (HUG) and the University of Geneva (UNIGE) have revealed that practicing mindfulness may help improve these various skills. The study, published in the journal Scientific Reports, suggests using mindfulness as a means of clinical intervention with adolescents, whether prematurely born or not. Several studies have already shown that very preterm (VPT) children and adolescents are at higher risk of exhibiting cognitive and socio-emotional problems that may persist into adulthood. To help them overcome the difficulties they face, researchers from the HUG and UNIGE have set up an intervention based on mindfulness, a technique known to have beneficial effects in these areas. Mindfulness consists in training the mind to focus on the present moment, concentrating on physical sensations, on breathing, on the weight of one's body, and even on one's feelings and thoughts, completely judgment-free. The mindfulness-based interventions generally take place in a group with an instructor along with invitations to practice individually at home. To accurately assess the effects of mindfulness, a randomized controlled trial was performed with young adolescents aged 10 to 14, born before 32 weeks gestational weeks. Scientists quickly found that mindfulness improves the regulation of cognitive, social and emotional functions, in other worlds, our brain's ability to interact with our environment. Indeed, it increases the ability to focus on the present—on thoughts, emotions and physical sensations, with curiosity and non-judgment. Thanks to this practice, adolescents improve their executive functions, i.e. the mental processes that enable us to control our behavior to successfully achieve a goal. As a result, young people find it easier to focus, manage and regulate their behavior and emotions in everyday life. For eight weeks, the young teens spent an hour and a half each week with two mindfulness instructors. They were further encouraged to practice mindfulness daily at home. Parents were also involved in this study. They were asked to observe their child's executive functions, for example the ability to regulate their emotions and attentional control, their relationships with others and their behavior. The adolescents also underwent a series of computerized tasks to assess their reactions to events. A comparison of their test results with a control group that did not practice mindfulness shows a positive impact of the intervention on the adolescents' everyday life and on their ability to react to new events. "Each teenager is unique, with their own strenghts and difficulties. Through their involvement in this study, our volunteers have contributed to show that mindfulness can help many young people to feel better, to refocus and to face the world, whether they were born preterm born or not," agree Dr. Russia Hà-Vinh Leuchter, a consultant in the Division of Development and Growth, Department of Paediatrics, Gynaecology and Obstetrics at Geneva University Hospitals, and Dr. Vanessa Siffredi, a researcher at the Child Development Laboratory at the Department of Paediatrics, Gynaecology and Obstetrics at the UNIGE Faculty of Medicine, two of the authors of this work. "However, while the practice of meditation can be a useful resource, it is important to be accompanied by well-trained instructors", they specify. The adolescents who took part in the program are now between 14 and 18 years. Scientists are currently evaluating the long-term effects of mindfulness-based intervention on their daily attention and stress. Furthermore, to validate their clinical data with neurobiological measurements, researchers are currently studying the effects of mindfulness on the brain using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).   Iron deficiency in middle age is linked with higher risk of developing heart disease University Heart and Vasculature Centre Hamburg (Germany) 6 October 2021 Approximately 10% of new coronary heart disease cases occurring within a decade of middle age could be avoided by preventing iron deficiency, suggests a study published today in ESC Heart Failure, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).1 “This was an observational study and we cannot conclude that iron deficiency causes heart disease,” said study author Dr. Benedikt Schrage of the University Heart and Vasculature Centre Hamburg, Germany. “However, evidence is growing that there is a link and these findings provide the basis for further research to confirm the results.” Previous studies have shown that in patients with cardiovascular diseases such as heart failure, iron deficiency was linked to worse outcomes including hospitalisations and death. Treatment with intravenous iron improved symptoms, functional capacity, and quality of life in patients with heart failure and iron deficiency enrolled in the FAIR-HF trial.2 Based on these results, the FAIR-HF 2 trial is investigating the impact of intravenous iron supplementation on the risk of death in patients with heart failure. The current study aimed to examine whether the association between iron deficiency and outcomes was also observed in the general population. The study included 12,164 individuals from three European population-based cohorts. The median age was 59 years and 55% were women. During the baseline study visit, cardiovascular risk factors and comorbidities such as smoking, obesity, diabetes and cholesterol were assessed via a thorough clinical assessment including blood samples. Participants were classified as iron deficient or not according to two definitions: 1) absolute iron deficiency, which only includes stored iron (ferritin); and 2) functional iron deficiency, which includes iron in storage (ferritin) and iron in circulation for use by the body (transferrin). Dr. Schrage explained: “Absolute iron deficiency is the traditional way of assessing iron status but it misses circulating iron. The functional definition is more accurate as it includes both measures and picks up those with sufficient stores but not enough in circulation for the body to work properly.” Participants were followed up for incident coronary heart disease and stroke, death due to cardiovascular disease, and all-cause death. The researchers analysed the association between iron deficiency and incident coronary heart disease, stroke, cardiovascular mortality, and all-cause mortality after adjustments for age, sex, smoking, cholesterol, blood pressure, diabetes, body mass index, and inflammation. Participants with a history of coronary heart disease or stroke at baseline were excluded from the incident disease analyses. At baseline, 60% of participants had absolute iron deficiency and 64% had functional iron deficiency. During a median follow-up of 13.3 years there were 2,212 (18.2%) deaths. Of these, a total of 573 individuals (4.7%) died from a cardiovascular cause. Incidence coronary heart disease and stroke were diagnosed in 1,033 (8.5%) and 766 (6.3%) participants, respectively. Functional iron deficiency was associated with a 24% higher risk of coronary heart disease, 26% raised risk of cardiovascular mortality, and 12% increased risk of all-cause mortality compared with no functional iron deficiency. Absolute iron deficiency was associated with a 20% raised risk of coronary heart disease compared with no absolute iron deficiency, but was not linked with mortality. There were no associations between iron status and incident stroke. The researchers calculated the population attributable fraction, which estimates the proportion of events in 10 years that would have been avoided if all individuals had the risk of those without iron deficiency at baseline. The models were adjusted for age, sex, smoking, cholesterol, blood pressure, diabetes, body mass index, and inflammation. Within a 10-year period, 5.4% of all deaths, 11.7% of cardiovascular deaths, and 10.7% of new coronary heart disease diagnoses were attributable to functional iron deficiency. “This analysis suggests that if iron deficiency had been absent at baseline, about 5% of deaths, 12% of cardiovascular deaths, and 11% of new coronary heart disease diagnoses would not have occurred in the following decade,” said Dr. Schrage. “The study showed that iron deficiency was highly prevalent in this middle-aged population, with nearly two-thirds having functional iron deficiency,” said Dr. Schrage. “These individuals were more likely to develop heart disease and were also more likely to die during the next 13 years.” Dr. Schrage noted that future studies should examine these associations in younger and non-European cohorts. He said: “If the relationships are confirmed, the next step would be a randomised trial investigating the effect of treating iron deficiency in the general population.”     Consumption of a bioactive compound from Neem plant could significantly suppress development of prostate cancer National University of Singapore, September 29, 2021   Oral administration of nimbolide, over 12 weeks shows reduction of prostate tumor size by up to 70 per cent and decrease in tumor metastasis by up to 50 per cent   A team of international researchers led by Associate Professor Gautam Sethi from the Department of Pharmacology at the Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine at the National University of Singapore (NUS) has found that nimbolide, a bioactive terpenoid compound derived from Azadirachta indica or more commonly known as the neem plant, could reduce the size of prostate tumor by up to 70 per cent and suppress its spread or metastasis by half.   Prostate cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers worldwide. However, currently available therapies for metastatic prostate cancer are only marginally effective. Hence, there is a need for more novel treatment alternatives and options.   "Although the diverse anti-cancer effects of nimbolide have been reported in different cancer types, its potential effects on prostate cancer initiation and progression have not been demonstrated in scientific studies. In this research, we have demonstrated that nimbolide can inhibit tumor cell viability -- a cellular process that directly affects the ability of a cell to proliferate, grow, divide, or repair damaged cell components -- and induce programmed cell death in prostate cancer cells," said Assoc Prof Sethi.   Nimbolide: promising effects on prostate cancer   Cell invasion and migration are key steps during tumor metastasis. The NUS-led study revealed that nimbolide can significantly suppress cell invasion and migration of prostate cancer cells, suggesting its ability to reduce tumor metastasis. The researchers observed that upon the 12 weeks of administering nimbolide, the size of prostate cancer tumor was reduced by as much as 70 per cent and its metastasis decreased by about 50 per cent, without exhibiting any significant adverse effects.   "This is possible because a direct target of nimbolide in prostate cancer is glutathione reductase, an enzyme which is responsible for maintaining the antioxidant system that regulates the STAT3 gene in the body. The activation of the STAT3 gene has been reported to contribute to prostate tumor growth and metastasis," explained Assoc Prof Sethi. "We have found that nimbolide can substantially inhibit STAT3 activation and thereby abrogating the growth and metastasis of prostate tumor," he added.   The findings of the study were published in the April 2016 issue of the scientific journal Antioxidants & Redox Signaling. This work was carried out in collaboration with Professor Goh Boon Cher of Cancer Science Institute of Singapore at NUS, Professor Hui Kam Man of National Cancer Centre Singapore and Professor Ahn Kwang Seok of Kyung Hee University.   The neem plant belongs to the mahogany tree family that is originally native to India and the Indian sub-continent. It has been part of traditional Asian medicine for centuries and is typically used in Indian Ayurvedic medicine. Today, neem leaves and bark have been incorporated into many personal care products such as soaps, toothpaste, skincare and even dietary supplements.       Review looks at the efficacy of acupuncture in treating insulin resistance Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine (China), October 8, 2021 In their report, researcherss from Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine in China explored the role of acupuncture in treating insulin resistance. The study was published in the journal Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice. Earlier studies have reported the effectiveness of acupuncture in treating insulin resistance and related conditions. The review looked at acupuncture and its effects on clinical outcomes. The researchers searched the following databases for randomized controlled trials involving insulin resistance patients treated with acupuncture: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials Embase Medline (via OVID) China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) Wan Fang and China Science and Technology Journal Database (VIP) The studies show that homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance significantly decreased with acupuncture treatment. Other significant decreases include fasting blood glucose, postprandial blood glucose and fasting insulin. Acupuncture increased insulin sensitivity with very few adverse effects. In sum, acupuncture is a safe and effective alternative treatment for insulin resistance.     Blueberries may improve attention in children following double-blind trial University of Reading (UK), October 10, 2021  Primary school children could show better attention by consuming flavonoid-rich blueberries, following a study conducted by the University of Reading. In a paper published in Food & Function, a group of 7-10 year olds who consumed a drink containing wild blueberries or a matched placebo and were tested on their speed and accuracy in completing an executive task function on a computer. The double blind trial found that the children who consumed the flavonoid-rich blueberry drink had 9% quicker reaction times on the test without any sacrifice of accuracy. In particular, the effect was more noticeable as the tests got harder. Professor Claire Williams, a neuroscience professor at the University of Reading said: "This is the first time that we have seen the positive impact that flavonoids can have on the executive function of children. We designed this double blind trial especially to test how flavonoids would impact on attention in young people as it's an area of cognitive performance that hasn't been measured before. "We used wild blueberries as they are rich in flavonoids, which are compounds found naturally in foods such as fruits and their juices, vegetables and tea. They have been associated with a range of health benefits including antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, and our latest findings continue to show that there is a beneficial cognitive effect of consuming fruit and vegetables, tea, coffee and even dark chocolate which all contain flavonoids." The children were then asked to pay attention to an array of arrows shown on a PC screen and press a key corresponding to the direction that the central arrow was facing. The task was repeated over a number of trials, where cognitive demand was manipulated by varying how quickly the arrows appeared, whether there were additional arrows appearing either side of the central arrow, and whether the flanking arrows were pointing in the same/different direction as the central arrow. Previous Reading research has shown that consuming wild blueberries can improve mood in children and young people, simple memory recall in primary school children, and that other flavonoid rich drinks such as orange juice, can also improve memory and concentration. The Wild Blueberry Association of North America provided a freeze-dried powder made from wild blueberries which was used in the study but did not provide any additional financial support and did not play a role in the design of the study. Wild blueberries are grown and harvested in North America, and are smaller than regular blueberries, and are higher in flavonoids compared to regular varieties. The double-blind trial used a flavonoid-rich wild blueberry drink, with a matched placebo contained 8.9g of fructose, 7.99g of glucose and 4 mg of vitamin C matching the levels of nutrients found in the blueberry drink. The amount of fructose is akin to levels found in a standard pear. This was an executive function task- requiring participants to pay attention to stimuli appearing on screen and responding correctly. The task was a simple one- responding to the direction of an arrow in the middle of a screen (by pressing left/right arrow key) but we then varied how quickly the stimuli appeared, whether there was additional arrows appearing either side of the stimuli and whether those flanking arrows were pointing in the same/different direction as they direction you had to respond. There are 6 main classes of flavonoids: Anthocyanins – found in berry fruits such as the blueberries used in this study and also in red wine. Flavonols - found in onions, leeks, and broccoli Flavones - found in parsley and celery, Isoflavones - found in soy and soy products, Flavanones - found in citrus fruit and tomatoes Flavanols—found in green tea, red wine, and chocolate     Nocebo effect: Does a drug's high price tag cause its own side effects? University Medical Center Hamburg (Germany), October 5, 2021  Pricey drugs may make people more vulnerable to perceiving side effects, a new study suggests—and the phenomenon is not just "in their heads." The study delved into the so-called "nocebo effect." It's the negative version of the well-known placebo effect, where people feel better after receiving a therapy because they expected good things. With the nocebo effect, patients' worries over treatment side effects make them feel sick. In this study, researchers found that people were more likely to report painful side effects from a fake drug when told it was expensive. But it wasn't just something people were "making up." Using brain imaging, the researchers traced the phenomenon to specific activity patterns in the brain and spine. "These findings are a strong argument against the perception of placebo and nocebo effects as being only 'fake' effects—created purely by imagination or delusions of the patient," said lead researcher Alexandra Tinnermann. She is with the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, in Germany. Dr. Luana Colloca, a researcher at the University of Maryland in Baltimore, agreed. "This is not merely a reflection of people's biases," said Colloca, who wrote an editorial published with the study. "Expectations do modulate symptoms and patients' responses to treatment," she said. For the study, Tinnermann's team recruited 49 healthy volunteers and randomly assigned them to test one of two itch-relieving "medical creams." In reality, both creams were identical and contained no active ingredients. However, people in both groups were told that the products could have the side effect of making the skin more sensitive to pain. There was only one apparent difference between the two phony creams: One came in fancy packing with a high price tag; the other was cheap. After participants applied the creams to their forearms, the researchers had them undergo a standard test that measured their tolerance for heat-induced pain. It turned out that people who'd used the expensive cream were more sensitive to pain during the tests. On average, their pain rating hovered around a 15—within the "mild" pain range—whereas people using the cheap cream barely registered any discomfort. It's likely, Tinnermann said, that people expect a pricey medication to be potent—which could also make them expect more side effects. Colloca agreed. We are all "vulnerable" to such outside influences, she said, be it a drug's price or how it's given (by IV versus mouth, for instance). However, we are not just imagining those placebo or nocebo effects, both researchers noted. Using functional MRI brain scans, Tinnermann's team found specific patterns of nervous system activity in people who had a nocebo response to the pricey cream. That included a change in "communication" between certain brain structures and the spinal cord, Tinnermann said. According to Colloca, research like this can have practical uses. Doctors could, for instance, inform patients that drug prices or other factors can sway their expectations about a treatment's benefits and risks—and that, in turn, can influence whether they feel better or develop side effects. There is, however, no research into whether that kind of knowledge helps prevent patients from the nocebo effect, Tinnermann said. But, she added, health professionals can be aware that patients' expectations "play a huge role in medicine"—and be mindful of how they talk about a medication and its possible side effects. It's an important matter, Colloca said, because the nocebo effect can cause people to stop taking needed medications. Colloca pointed to the example of cholesterol-lowering statins. The potential for those medications to cause muscle pain has been widely reported. And one recent study found evidence that this knowledge can make statin users more likely to report muscle pain side effects. Other research, Colloca said, has shown that when people stop taking their statins, their risk of heart attack and stroke rises.

High Intensity Health Radio with Mike Mutzel, MS
Low Carb VS Low Calorie Dieting: What's Best Way to Lose Fat, Scientists Explain

High Intensity Health Radio with Mike Mutzel, MS

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 33:08


When it comes to weight loss, there's two primary models to explain the best strategy: The carbohydrates-insulin model and the calorie imbalance, also known as the CICO model. In this show we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of these models and how to best approach fat loss. Support Healthy Hydration and Exercise Performance with new Electrolyte Stix by MYOXCIENCE Nutrition: https://bit.ly/3uAWrV6 *Buy Buy One-Get-One-Free Pre-Sale now through October 30th 2021* Link to Show Notes, Video and Articles: https://bit.ly/3BxR63o Time Stamps: 01:35 Physicians are taught that weight loss is only triggered by caloric restriction. It is the traditional energy balance model. 02:00 The traditional energy balance model does not consider your circadian rhythm or phenotypes, like those of us who over-excrete insulin, have epigenetic factors, or have adaptive thermogenesis. 02:20 Cyclical dieting down regulates your resting metabolic rate, adaptive thermogenesis. 03:20 The carbohydrate/insulin model of obesity is centered around insulin. Hyperpalatable ultra-processed high glycemic foods increase the energy circulating in your blood, causing a compensatory hyperinsulinemic physiologic state. This causes a decrease in the amount of nutrients in your bloodstream after you eat. Your blood energy reduces to levels below before you ate, causing hunger and over-eating at the next meal. 05:35 Cellular semi-starvation: In a high sugar/high insulin state, fat cells accumulate energy intended for the now insulin resistant muscles, they undergo lipogenesis, storing lots of energy. Therefore, there is a lack of energy in the bloodstream. Your brain believes that your critical tissues are starving. 06:40 Hormones surge in this state of cellular semi-starvation; there is a surge of adrenaline, noradrenaline, and cortisol. 07:10 In drugs that increase insulin, insulin signaling caused fat gain of up to 5 pounds in a 2-month period. 07:35 The energy balance model considers all calories as metabolically equal. 08:05 Hyperpalatable ultra-processed high glycemic foods lend themselves to overconsumption and hormone alteration. 08:20 Energy intake is regulated by insulin, hunger satiety cues from the brain, leptin, ghrelin, and habits. A few nights of poor sleep increases hunger. 09:00 The more lean muscle mass you have, the more you increase your resting metabolic rate. 10:00 Insulin is pleiotropic, meaning it does many different things within your body. 13:50 Biggest Loser 6 year follow up study revealed that many participants continued to gain wait after their participation in the program's rapid weight loss. When they regained their weight, their resting metabolic rates were depressed lower than when they started. 15:45 The energy balance model works best for young fitness competitors and bodybuilders. 16:40 A high glycemic diet increases levels of glucose in the blood, causing alterations in gut hormones and the insulin to glucagon ratio. 17:10 To get into a fat burning physiologic state, you need low glucose, low insulin and elevated glucagon. The insulin to glucagon ratio helps to unlock stored fat, increases your liver's synthesis of ketones, and helps your white fat behave more like brown fat, increasing your resting metabolic rate. 20:00 Weight centered approaches to weight loss does not lead to lasting improvements in muscle mass or cardio-respiratory or favorable changes in overall health risk. 20:43 Sustainable changes are made when focusing on improving fitness, strength, muscle mass, sleep quality, HRV lead, independent of weight loss. 21:00 Physically fit people, no matter their weight, have a significant reduction in all-cause mortality compared to unfit individuals of the same body weight category. 22:34 Weightlifting and interval training are better ways to reduce all-cause mortality and risk for severe COVID, improve cardio-respiratory fitness and better way to help with fat loss. 26:20 Eating less causes adaptive thermogenesis. Instead, you could practice time restricted feeding and eat higher quality food.