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  • 128PODCASTS
  • 177EPISODES
  • 31mAVG DURATION
  • 1EPISODE EVERY OTHER WEEK
  • Dec 17, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about economic co

Latest podcast episodes about economic co

Scott Thompson Show
Update from CityKidz as Christmas nears, Canadian makes reality TV history, What non-essential travel means, 2022 Ticats schedule gets released, OECD predicts bad future for Canada, COVID-19 precautions being taken by post-secondary schools, Quebec separa

Scott Thompson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 78:01


Hamilton Today with guest host Scott Radley. As we enter the holiday season, we get an update from CityKidz on their initiatives and the results of their Giving Tuesday campaign. Last night reality TV history was made – no, we are not talking about the absolute nightmare fuel that was the finale of Masked Singer – a Canadian won Survivor for the first time! With travel restrictions falling back into place, what will that mean for Canadians over the Holidays, and what does non-essential travel mean? The 2022 Ticats schedule has been released! The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development has predicted that Canada will be the worst-performing advanced economy over the next decade. Hamilton's major post-secondary schools are laying out precautions and modifications prior to a resumption of classes in January amid a COVID-19 surge tied to the more infectious Omicron variant. How could this affect students after winter break? Quebec separatists are taking advantage of the Bill 21 backlash, to pitch... well... separating. What is the cost of the Inquiry into the Red Hill Valley Expressway? And although we may have taken the long way to get Scott Radley back into his regular time slot… that doesn't mean we have to change out one of his regular feature segments, Ben's Story of the Day! Guests: Laura Carmichael, Associate Executive Director of CityKidz Bill Brioux, TV critic and pop culture expert, brioux.tv Caleigh Alleyne, editor, journalist and media consultant Rick Zamperin, Host of The 5th Quarter after every Ticats game, host of Good Morning Hamilton every weekday morning Ian Lee, Associate Professor with the Sprott School of Business at Carleton University Paul W. Bennett, Education commentator, consultant and author.  Specialist in decoding edubabble Peter Graefe, Professor of Political Science with McMaster University Brenda Johnson, Councillor for Ward 11, City of Hamilton, Glanbrook Ben Straughan, Technical Producer with Global News Radio 900 CHML, Actor and Voice Actor Lisa Polewski, reporter and anchor with Global News Radio 900 CHML Ken Mann, reporter and anchor with Global News Radio 900 CHML William P. Erskine, producer with Global News Radio 900 CHML   Host - Scott Radley Content/Technical/Podcast Producer - William P. Erskine Podcast Co-Producer - Ben Straughan News Anchors - Lisa Polewski and Ken Mann Want to keep up with what happened in Hamilton Today? Subscribe to the podcast! https://omny.fm/shows/scott-thompson-show See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

All Things Policy
Importance of Financial Literacy for Jobs

All Things Policy

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 25:48


The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) describes financial literacy as “a combination of awareness, knowledge, skill, attitude and behaviour necessary to make sound financial decisions and ultimately achieve individual financial wellbeing.” The economic impact of financial literacy has often been ignored. In this episode, Aarushi Kataria and Sridhar Krishna discuss the impact of financial literacy on women, entrepreneurship, and the economy in light of Takshashila's 20 Million Jobs project.Follow Aarushi on Twitter: https://twitter.com/aarushi_katariaFollow Sridhar on Twitter: https://twitter.com/sridhar_kri Reading List:1. The Economic Importance of Financial Literacy: Theory and Evidence by Lusardi and Mitchell2. National Strategy for Financial Education: 2020-2025 by Reserve Bank of India3. Financial Literacy Programs Improve Productivity, Performance by Mohney 4. The Effects of Financial Literacy on Sustainable Entrepreneurship by Burchi et al. 5. Financial Literacy and Economic Outcomes: Evidence and Policy Implications by Mitchell and Lusardi.Sign up for Takshashila's courses - school.takshashila.org.inYou can listen to this show and other awesome shows on the new and improved IVM Podcast App on Android: https://ivm.today/android or iOS: https://ivm.today/iosYou can check out our website at https://www.ivmpodcasts.com

The EdUp Experience
363: LIVE from the WISE Summit 2021 - with Dr. Tracey Burns, Chief of Research, Centre for Educational Research & Innovation at Organisation for Economic Co-operation & Development (OECD)

The EdUp Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 18:54


We welcome YOU back to America's leading higher education podcast, The EdUp Experience! It's YOUR time to #EdUp In this episode, recorded LIVE & in person from the 2021 World Innovation Summit for Education (WISE), YOUR guest is Dr. Tracey Burns, Chief of Research, Centre for Educational Research & Innovation at The Organisation for Economic Co-operation & Development (OECD), YOUR host is Dr. Joe Sallustio, aka THE Voice of Education, & this is all brought to YOU by WISE! Thank YOU so much for tuning in. Join us on the next episode for YOUR time to EdUp! Connect with YOUR EdUp Team - Elvin Freytes & Dr. Joe Sallustio ● Learn more about what others are saying about their EdUp experience ● Join YOUR EdUp community at The EdUp Experience! ● YOU can follow us on Facebook | Instagram | LinkedIn | Twitter | YouTube Thank YOU for listening! We make education YOUR business!

Marketplace All-in-One
COVID-19 vaccines a key to next year’s economic recovery, says the OECD

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 10:16


From the BBC World Service: The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development says increasing vaccine access must be a priority to help tackle the health crisis and alleviate bottlenecks at ports, factories and borders by allowing them to re-open. And, is the EU’s new “Global Gateway” strategy designed to rival China’s global influence?

Marketplace Morning Report
COVID-19 vaccines a key to next year’s economic recovery, says the OECD

Marketplace Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 10:16


From the BBC World Service: The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development says increasing vaccine access must be a priority to help tackle the health crisis and alleviate bottlenecks at ports, factories and borders by allowing them to re-open. And, is the EU’s new “Global Gateway” strategy designed to rival China’s global influence?

IFPRI Podcast
Disciplining Domestic Support

IFPRI Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 61:13


POLICY SEMINAR Disciplining Domestic Support NOV 30, 2021 - 09:00 AM TO 10:00 AM EST The upcoming WTO Ministerial in late November will provide yet another opportunity to address and reform agricultural domestic support. The domestic support pillar has been at the heart of the agricultural negotiations since they began in 2000, but it has proven challenging to achieve consensus on how to advance reforms. In fact, domestic support levels remain high and have risen in recent years. This event will discuss a recent report by IFPRI researchers that suggests that new disciplines could both reduce distortions and provide significant protection in the event of a subsidy war by reducing "leakage" in domestic support disciplines. Welcome Remarks: Johan Swinnen, Director General, IFPRI Speakers: Joseph Glauber, Senior Research Fellow, IFPRI David Laborde Debucquet, Senior Research Fellow, IFPRI Discussants: Nelson Illescas, Director en Fundación, Instituto Para Las Negociaciones Agrícolas Internacionales (INAI) Lee Ann Jackson, Head of Division, Agro-food Trade and Markets, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Moderator: Valeria Piñeiro, Senior Research Coordinator, IFPRI RELATED PUBLICATIONS • Harmonizing And Reducing Trade Distorting Domestic Support: An Analysis Of The Impacts Of New Domestic Support Disciplines At The WTO (https://www.ifpri.org/publication/harmonizing-and-reducing-trade-distorting-domestic-support-analysis-impacts-new-domestic) • The Road To The WTO Twelfth Ministerial Conference: A Latin American And Caribbean Perspective (https://www.ifpri.org/publication/road-wto-twelfth-ministerial-conference-latin-american-and-caribbean-perspective) More on the seminar: https://www.ifpri.org/event/disciplining-domestic-support Subscribe IFPRI Insights newsletter and event announcements at www.ifpri.org/content/newsletter-subscription

Lowy Institute: Live Events
2021 Owen Harries Lecture: The Hon. Mathias Cormann

Lowy Institute: Live Events

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 55:26


Since 2013, the annual Owen Harries Lecture has honoured the significant contribution made to the international debate in Australia and the United States by Mr Harries, who was a Nonresident Fellow at the Lowy Institute. The 2021 Owen Harries Lecture was given by former Australian Finance Minister and Secretary-General of the OECD Matthias Cormann. Mr Cormann will speak on “Levelling the playing field – an agenda for growth, climate and a rules-based international order”. His lecture was followed by a conversation with Lowy Institute Executive Director Dr Michael Fullilove. The Hon. Mathias Cormann is the 6th Secretary-General of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Prior to his appointment, he served as the Australian Minister for Finance, Leader of the Government in the Senate, and as a Senator representing Western Australia. Dr Michael Fullilove AM is the Executive Director of the Lowy Institute. He writes widely on global affairs in publications such as The New York Times, Financial Times, The Atlantic and Foreign Affairs. Recorded on November 24, 2021

Roundtable
Norway election aftermath: Climate change shift?

Roundtable

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 26:00


Norway's left-wing opposition has ended the centre-right's eight year tenure in Norway after a campaign dominated by the future of the oil industry. But the question remains - can the country move away from its oil-based economy? GUESTS: Lars-Henrik Michelsen Director of the Norwegian Climate Foundation Espen Moe Professor of Political Science Havard Halland Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Roundtable is a discussion program with an edge. Broadcast out of London and presented by David Foster, it's about bringing people to the table, listening to every opinion, and analysing every point of view. From fierce debate to reflective thinking, Roundtable discussions offer a different perspective on the issues that matter to you. Watch it every weekday at 15:30 GMT on TRT World.

IFPRI Podcast
The Road Towards the WTO MC12: A Latin America and the Caribbean Perspective

IFPRI Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 65:33


BOOK LAUNCH The Road Towards the WTO MC12: A Latin America and the Caribbean Perspective Co-Organized by IFPRI and Instituto Interamericano de Cooperación para la Agricultura (IICA) OCT 27, 2021 - 12:00 PM TO 01:00 PM EDT In the run-up to the 12th WTO Ministerial Conference, major challenges face the governance of agricultural and food trade. In today's context of change and uncertainty, the relative importance and urgency of traditional agricultural trade issues (including domestic support and market access) and the possibilities to progress with a multilateral strategy seem to have diminished. With the growing global focus on the environmental and nutritional dimensions of food systems and the global responsibility of all countries to contribute to food system transformation, attention must be paid to new agricultural trade issues that have gained greater urgency. The WTO, as the primary institution overseeing multilateral negotiations and trade, must identify the main elements and issues that can define its new roles, functions, and institutional organization. The papers in this new publication from IFPRI and IICA look at these challenges and what they mean for Latin America. Join us to hear from the book's authors and discussants on the main agricultural trade negotiation issues for the next WTO Ministerial Conference from a Latin American perspective. Some of the underlying work for this presentation was funded by the CGIAR Research Program on Policies, Institutions, and Markets (PIM). Welcome: Johan Swinnen (https://www.ifpri.org/profile/johan-swinnen), Director General, IFPRI Presenter: Valeria Pineiro(https://www.ifpri.org/profile/valeria-pineiro), Senior Research Coordinator, IFPRI Discussants: Lee Ann Jackson (https://ch.linkedin.com/in/jacksonleeann), Head of Division, Agro-food Trade and Markets, The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Maximo Torero (https://www.fao.org/about/leadership/Torero), Chief Economist, Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) Q&A Panel: Eduardo Bianchi (https://grupogpps.org/en/nuestra-red-miembros/), Professor and Researcher, Instituto Universitario Escuela Argentina de Negocios, Consultant, Instituto Interamericano de Cooperación para la Agricultura (IICA) Antoine Bouet (https://www.ifpri.org/profile/antoine-bouet), Senior Research Fellow, IFPRI Adriana Campos Azofeifa (https://cr.linkedin.com/in/adriana-campos-azofeifa-183522183), International Trade Specialist, Instituto Interamericano de Cooperación para la Agricultura (IICA) Adriana García Vargas (https://www.linkedin.com/in/adrianagv/), Consultant on Trade and Trade Policy Matters, Instituto Interamericano de Cooperación para la Agricultura (IICA) Joseph Glauber (https://www.ifpri.org/profile/joseph-glauber), Senior Research Fellow, IFPRI Nelson Illescas (https://ar.linkedin.com/in/nelson-illescas), Director en Fundación, Instituto Para Las Negociaciones Agrícolas Internacionales (INAI) David Laborde Debucquet (https://www.ifpri.org/profile/david-laborde-debucquet), Senior Research Fellow, IFPRI Sabine Papendieck (https://www.linkedin.com/in/sabine-papendieck-1b320624/?originalSubdomain=ar), Partner, Estrateco Consultants Martin Piñeiro (https://ictsd.iisd.org/about-us/martin-pi%C3%B1eiro), Director, Agricultural Affairs Committee, Argentine Council of International Relations (CARI) Agustín Tejeda Rodriguez (https://ar.linkedin.com/in/agust%C3%ADn-tejeda-rodriguez-a6a92642), Chief Economist, Bolsa de Cereales de Buenos Aires Moderator: Eugenio Diaz-Bonilla (https://www.ifpri.org/profile/eugenio-diaz-bonilla), Head of Latin American and Caribbean Program, IFPRI LINKS Instituto Interamericano De Cooperación Para La Agricultura (IICA): https://www.iica.int/en/about-us/main More on the seminar: https://www.ifpri.org/event/road-towards-wto-mc12-perspective-latin-america-and-caribbean Subscribe IFPRI Insights newsletter and event announcements at www.ifpri.org/content/newsletter-subscription

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 600 (10-25-21): The Wide Reach of Viruses, Including Through Water

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:50).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 10-22-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of October 25, 2021.  This episode is part of a series this fall about water connections to the human body and human biology.  We start this week with three mystery sounds, all related to a very numerous group of disease-causing, or pathogenic, microbes that have enormous impacts on human health.  Have a listen for about 20 seconds, and see if know this microbial group.  And here's a hint: big hits on social media are said to spread like this group. SOUNDS – ~19 sec If you guessed viruses, you're right!  You heard a person coughing due to a viral disease; handwashing, an important method of reducing viral transmission; and a spray bottle of isopropyl alcohol, an effective disinfectant against many kinds of viruses.  With attention focused this fall both on the COVID-19 coronavirus and the annual influenza virus season, we explore in this episode some basic information about viruses and some viral connections to water.  Here are 10 key points about viruses. 1.  Viruses are one of four groups of microbes responsible for human disease, along with bacteria, fungi, and protozoa, which are single-celled animals.  As a group, viruses are the smallest of these microbes, although some are larger than some bacteria. 2.  Viruses aren't made up of cells, but instead exist as particles composed primarily of molecules of protein and nucleic acids, that is, DNA or RNA.  They require a cellular host for reproduction, called replication. 3.  Viruses are more abundant than all of the cellular-based living things on earth. 4.  All living things are infected by viruses. 5.  Viruses don't always cause disease in infected hosts, but many kinds do cause significant diseases in humans, other animals, and plants. 6.  Viral disease can result from viruses taking over or inhibiting their host's cellular biochemical processes, or by cell destruction as new virus particles exit cells after replication. 7.  Depending on their type, viruses can be spread through air, in water, from surfaces, by animal vectors, or through exchange of blood or other body substances. 8.  Water-related spread of viruses can occur through water contaminated with human waste, and through animal vectors connected to water, particularly mosquitoes. 9.  Significant human diseases from water-borne viruses include intestinal disease, particularly diarrhea; hepatitis, or liver inflammation; inflammations of the brain, spinal cord, or heart; and possibly cancer.  Viral diseases spread by mosquitoes include Yellow Fever, Dengue, West Nile, and others. And last, but not least, handwashing with clean water and soap is important for reducing the spread of viruses through objects and surfaces—collectively called fomites—with which humans come into contact. Thanks to Freesound.org user n__audioman for making the coughing sound available for public use.  Here's hoping we all hear less of that sound and more of the handwashing and other preventative measures that keep viruses—water-borne and otherwise—somewhat at bay. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Thanks to Dr. Sally Paulson, Virginia Tech Department of Entomology, for her help with this article. The coughing sound was recorded by user n__audioman (dated December 14, 2015), and made available for public use by Freesound.org, online at https://freesound.org/people/n_audioman/sounds/331068/, under the Creative Commons Attribution License 3.0  For more information on Creative Commons licenses, please see https://creativecommons.org/licenses/; information on the Attribution License specifically is online at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/. The handwashing and alcohol spraying sounds were recorded by Virginia Water Radio on October 21, 2021. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Female Aedes japonicus mosquito (also known as Ochlerotatus japonicas), photographed from a colony at Notre Dame University.  Photo by Frank Collins, accessed from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Public Health Image Library, online at https://phil.cdc.gov/default.aspx; specific URL for this photo was https://phil.cdc.gov/Details.aspx?pid=7886, as of 10-25-21.  According to CDC caption for this photo, this Asian mosquito, first collected in the United States in New York and New Jersey in 1998, is a suspected transmitter for West Nile virus. “Wash Your Hands in 24 Languages” poster from the Minnesota Department of Health, online at https://www.health.state.mn.us/people/handhygiene/wash/washyourhands.html. SOURCES Used for Audio John B. Carter and Venetia A. Saunders, Virology: Principles and Applications, Second Edition, John Wiley & Sons Ltd., Chichester, United Kingdom, 2013. Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, “Tracking the COVID-19 Economy's Effects on Food, Housing, and Employment Hardships,” updated October 13, 2021, online at https://www.cbpp.org/research/poverty-and-inequality/tracking-the-covid-19-economys-effects-on-food-housing-and. Dorothy H. Crawford, Viruses: A Very Short Introduction, Second Edition, Oxford University Press, Oxford, United Kingdom, 2018. Aimee M. Gall et al., “Waterborne Viruses: A Barrier to Safe Drinking Water,” PLOS Pathogens Vol. 11, No. 6 (June 25, 2015), online at https://journals.plos.org/plospathogens/article/authors?id=10.1371/journal.ppat.1004867. Johns Hopkins University & Medicine/Coronavirus Resource Center, “Global Map,” online at https://coronavirus.jhu.edu/map.html. Microbiology Society, “Microbes and Disease,” online at https://microbiologysociety.org/why-microbiology-matters/what-is-microbiology/microbes-and-the-human-body/microbes-and-disease.html. Minnesota Department of Health, “Waterborne Illness,” online at https://www.health.state.mn.us/diseases/waterborne/index.html. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), “Global economic recovery continues but remains uneven, says OECD,” News Release, September 21, 2021. University of New Hampshire/Casey School of Public Policy, “COVID-19 Economic Crisis: By State,” by Michael Ettlinger and Jordan Hensley, October 1, 2021, online at https://carsey.unh.edu/publication/COVID-19-Economic-Impact-By-State. U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), “Chemical Disinfectants,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/infectioncontrol/guidelines/disinfection/disinfection-methods/chemical.html. U.S. CDC, “Mosquito-Borne Diseases,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/outdoor/mosquito-borne/default.html.  U.S. CDC, Principles of Epidemiology in Public Health Practice, Third Edition: An Introduction to Applied Epidemiology and Biostatistics, November 2011, “Glossary,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/csels/dsepd/ss1978/glossary.html. U.S. CDC, “Water-related Diseases and Contaminants in Public Water Systems,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/healthywater/drinking/public/water_diseases.html. Virginia Department of Health, “Waterborne Hazards Control Programs,” online at https://www.vdh.virginia.gov/waterborne-hazards-control/. Water Quality Association, “Bacteria and Virus Issues,” online at https://www.wqa.org/learn-about-water/common-contaminants/bacteria-viruses. World Health Organization (WHO), “Waterborne Pathogens and Their Significance in Water Supplies” (table), online (as a PDF) at https://www.who.int/water_sanitation_health/gdwqrevision/watpathogens.pdf. WHO, “Emerging Issues in Water and Infectious Disease,” 2003, online (as a PDF) at https://www.who.int/water_sanitation_health/emerging/emerging.pdf. WHO, “Microbial Fact Sheets,” online (as a PDF) at https://www.who.int/water_sanitation_health/dwq/GDW11rev1and2.pdf. For More Information about Water and the Human Body Isabel Lorenzo et al., “The Role of Water Homeostasis in Muscle Function and Frailty: A Review,” Nutrients, Vol. 11, No. 8 (August 2019, accessed online at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6723611/(subscription may be required for access). Mayo Clinic Health System, “Water: Essential to your body,” online at https://www.mayoclinichealthsystem.org/hometown-health/speaking-of-health/water-essential-to-your-body. U.S. Geological Survey, “The Water in You: Water and the Human Body,” https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/water-you-water-and-human-body?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Science” subject category. Following are links to other episodes on connections of water to human biology.  Please note that some of these episodes are being redone in fall 2021; in those cases, the respective links below will have information on the updated episodes. Overview of water's roles in the body – Episode 592, 8-30-21.Disease: COVID-19 – Episode 517, 3-23-20 and Episode 519, 4-6-20.Disease: influenza – Episode 598, 10-11-21.Circulatory system connections to water – Episode 593, 9-6-21.Muscular system connections to water – Episode 596, 9-27-21,Neurological system connections to water – Episode 594, 9-13-21.Skeleton system connections to water – Episode 595, 9-20-21.Water intake and exercise – Episode 466, 4-1-19.Water thermodynamics – Episode 195, 1-6-14. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-4: Living Systems and Processes 4.3 – Organisms, including humans, interact with one another and with the nonliving components in the ecosystem. Grade 6 6.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment, including that water is important for agriculture, power generation, and public health.6.9 – Humans impact the environment and individuals can influence public policy decisions related to energy and the environment, including that major health and safety issues are associated with air and water quality, Life ScienceLS.2 – All living things are composed of one or more cells that support life processes, as described by the cell theory, including that cell structure and organelles support life processes.LS.3     – There are levels of structural organization in living things, including that similar characteristics determine the classification of organisms.LS.10 – Organisms reproduce and transmit genetic information to new generations. BiologyBIO.4 – Bacteria and viruses have an effect on living systems. 2015 Social Studies SOLs United States History: 1865-to-Present CourseUSII.9 – Domestic and international issues during the second half of the 20th Century and the early 21st Century. Civics and Economics CourseCE.10 – Public policy at local, state, and national levels. World Geography CourseWG.2 – How selected physical and ecological processes shape the Earth's surface, including climate, weather, and how humans influence their environment and are influenced by it. Virginia and United States History CourseVUS.14 – Political and social conditions in the 21st Century. Government CourseGOVT.9 – Public policy process at local, state, and national levels.Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels. Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rdgrade.Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade.Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten.Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade.Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5thgrade.Episode 403, 1-15-18 – on freezing and ice, for kindergarten through 3rd grade.Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4ththrough 8th grade.Episode 406, 2-5-18 – on ice on rivers, for middle school.Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics, for high school.Episode 483, 7-29-19 – on buoyancy and drag, for middle school and high school.Episode 524, 5-11-20 – on sounds by water-related animals, for elementary school through high school.Episode 531, 6-29-20 – on various ways that animals get water, for 3rd and 4th gradeEpisode 539, 8-24-20 – on basic numbers and facts about Virginia's water resources, for 4th and 6th grade.CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:50).

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Learn Irish & other languages with daily podcasts
20211006_IRISH_dochas_ag_ryan_faoi_chonradh_nua_canach_corparaide

Learn Irish & other languages with daily podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 7:03


jQuery(document).ready(function(){ cab.clickify(); }); Original Podcast with clickable words https://tinyurl.com/y4zreya8 Ryan hopes for new corporation tax contract. Dóchas ag Ryan faoi chonradh nua cánach corparáide. Minister for Transport, Environment, Climate and Communications Éamon Ryan has said he is hopeful that this country will join a new international tax agreement. Dúirt an tAire Iompair, Comhshaoil, Aeráide agus Cumarsáide Éamon Ryan go bhfuil dóchas aige go mbeidh an tír seo páirteach i gcomhaontú nua idirnáisiúnta cánach. Éamon Ryan has indicated that the Government will make a final decision on the matter tomorrow. Thug Éamon Ryan le fios go ndéanfaidh an Rialtas cinneadh deiridh faoin gceist arú amárach. He said Finance Minister Paschal Donohoe had done an excellent job on the issue and said this country should join the agreement because of its reputation. Dúirt sé go raibh obair fíormhaith déanta ar an gceist ag an Aire Airgeadais Paschal Donohoe agus dar leis gur chóir don tír seo páirt a ghlacadh sa chomhaontú de gheall a dea-chlú. According to the agreement, drawn up by the Organization for Economic Co - operation and Development, the corporation tax rate in this country could be raised from 12.5% to 15%. De réir an chomhaontaithe, atá curtha i dtoll a chéile ag an Eagraíocht um Chomhar agus Fhorbairt Eacnamaíochta, d'fhéadfaí ráta cánach corparáide na tíre seo a ardú ó 12.5 faoin gcéad go dtí 15 faoin gcéad . 130 countries and jurisdictions have so far signed the agreement but Ireland is one of nine countries that have not yet signed up. Tá an comhaontú sínithe ag 130 tír agus dlínse go nuige seo ach tá Éire ar cheann de naoi dtír nár chuir a n-ainm leis fós. It is stated that the aim of the treaty is to modernize and regularize the method of calculating corporation tax worldwide in the interests of international justice. Maítear gurb é is aidhm don chonradh an modh a ríomhtar cáin chorparáide ar fud an domhain a nuashonrú agus a thabhairt chun rialtachta ar son na córa idirnáisiúnta. Paschal Donohoe has often stated that he is determined to maintain the 12.5% rate in Ireland. Tá sé ráite go minic cheana ag Paschal Donohoe go bhfuil sé meáite ar an ráta 12.5 faoin gcéad in Éirinn a choinneáil.

Stories of Impact
The Role of Education in Human Flourishing with The Honorable Shirley Ann Jackson and Andreas Schleicher

Stories of Impact

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 40:48


In today's episode, we hear from The Honorable Shirley Ann Jackson, the first African-American woman to lead a top-ranked research university — Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute — and Andreas Schleicher, Director for Education and Skills and Special Advisor on Education Policy to the Secretary-General at the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, an intergovernmental economic organisation with 38 member countries who stimulate economic progress and world trade.  These two global leaders in education speak of nuanced, experiential, community-centered learning opportunities offered within a moral and ethical framework as a key component of human flourishing. Our guests offer their insights on how education can support students' efforts to become the wisest, happiest, healthiest, and most capable version of themselves. Learn more: The Honorable Shirley Ann Jackson Andreas Schleicher Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development US Nuclear Regulatory Commission   Subscribe to Stories of Impact wherever you listen to podcasts Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube Comments, questions and suggestions info@storiesofimpact.org Supported by Templeton World Charity Foundation

EURACTIV Events
Responsible sourcing: The case of batteries

EURACTIV Events

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 76:00


Over the last decade, responsible sourcing has become a topic of broad interest. Policymakers, consumers and companies have all referred to it as a way to address the sustainability risks of global mineral supply chains, but the term has also been used to refer to a wide range of other sustainability objectives.An industry that is particularly susceptible to the issue is battery manufacturing, as it is largely dependent on critical raw material imports. In the past few years, stakeholders have highlighted supply chain risks related to raw materials in batteries, comprising environmental, social and governance risks.To work towards responsible sourcing, the European Union has been investing in several initiatives, most of which are aligned with the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development’s (OECD) “Due Diligence Guidance for Responsible Supply Chains of Minerals from Conflict-Affected and High-Risk Areas”.In the field of batteries, the European Commission is taking concrete actions. In its Proposal for a regulation concerning batteries and waste batteries, it has outlined responsible sourcing as a means to achieve the objective of reducing environmental and social impacts. The proposal highlights the essential role of batteries to achieve the EU objective of decarbonisation of the economy and other challenges related to sustainable development.Apart from responsible sourcing, the Commission is also working to improve the EU regulatory framework on sustainable corporate governance in general. The framework would enable companies to focus on long-term sustainable value creation rather than short-term benefits. It would also help companies to better manage sustainability-related matters in their own operations and value chains in regards to social and human rights, climate change and the environment.Relisten to this EURACTIV Virtual Conference to find out about sustainable governance, responsible sourcing and the importance of due diligence in the battery supply chain.

每日一經濟學人 LEON x The Economist
*第五季*【EP. 219】#603 經濟學人導讀 feat. 國際時事 feat. 新聞評論【經濟合作暨發展組織 (OECD) 也嘴通脹;加拿大總理杜魯道囧一回;習大大 ft. 聯合國大會;拜登的疫苗峰會 > 說的比唱的好聽

每日一經濟學人 LEON x The Economist

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 25:04


❗⁠您的一杯咖啡錢 = 我們遠大的目標!捐款支持我們:https://pse.is/3jknpx ❗10/2 (週六) 線上職場實戰力培訓工作坊,名額僅25名,報名至9月29日截止 誠摯邀請你/妳來參加 (學生免費):https://forms.gle/za2YUVND6PtyBSU59

Business Drive
US Calls On G7 To Quickly Implement Global Tax Reform

Business Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 1:03


US Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen urged countries in the G7 group of richest nations to quickly implement a global tax reform aimed at curbing tax avoidance.The Treasury says G20 finance ministers backed the deal in July, followed by 134 Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development member countries representing more than 90 per cent of the world's GDP.Treasury in a statement following a meeting of G7 finance ministers held virtually says Secretary Yellen expressed support for ongoing efforts to improve the international tax system and the importance of swift implementation of the new system. Yellen says the policy will generate funding for a sustained increase in critical investments in education, research, and clean energy.

Projectified with PMI
Cities of the Future: The New Urban Development

Projectified with PMI

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 24:46


When the pandemic hit, many hallmarks of city life—public transportation, skyscrapers with shared amenities, bustling streets—flipped from pros to cons. But don't count cities out. We discuss how project teams are reimagining the urban environment with:Jun Huang, partner, Wei Yang & Partners, London: Huang discusses the aspects of urban life most strained during the pandemic—and how cities can change in response. He also shares ways project leaders can best collaborate with multiple stakeholders to keep citizen needs at the forefront.Zhengkai Jiang, PMP, senior project manager, CRRC Zhuzhou Locomotive Co. Ltd., Zhuzhou, China: Jiang discusses rail transit trends and his project to design and manufacture fully autonomous trains. Soo-Jin Kim, head of the urban policies and reviews unit, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, Paris: Kim discusses how cities can become more sustainable, walkable and resilient, plus how digital transformation is changing urban life. Key themes[01:13] The growth—and evolution—of cities[03:33] COVID-19's stress test on urban life[06:15] Urban development trends: creating sustainable, inspiring cities[09:15] Collaborating with stakeholders while keeping citizens' needs at the forefront[12:18] Next-gen public transit: autonomous rail[17:04] Three steps for a more resilient city[19:15] Urban digital transformations [20:54] Making cities more adaptable, walkable and eco-friendly

The Fintech Blueprint
Sheila Warren of the World Economic Forum on the 4th Industrial Revolution, the role of Law, Government, and DAOs, and the Creator Economy

The Fintech Blueprint

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 52:01


In this conversation, we are so lucky to tap into the brilliant mind of none other than Sheila Warren who sits on the Executive Committee of the World Economic Forum and is a key member in the executive leadership of the Forum's Centre for the Fourth Industrial Revolution (C4IR), in which she oversees strategy across the entire C4IR Network, consisting of centers in 13 countries. Sheila also holds board member and advisory positions at multiple institutions and organizations including The MIT Press (Cryptoeconomic Systems), The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), NGO network TechSoup and she is a Member of The Bretton Woods Committee. More specifically, we discuss her professional journey from small claims court to NGO Aid to refugees to corporate law to The WEF, touching on rational choice theory, corporate personhood and its correlation to the growth around ESG, new substrates, DAOs and protocols, artificial intelligence, the purpose of The World Economic Forum and its impact on governments and society alike, and just so much more!

Rumi Forum Podcast
Book Talk: Peace in The Age of Chaos

Rumi Forum Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2021 69:31


Working on an aid program in one of the most violent places in the world, North East Kivu in the Democratic Republic of Congo, philanthropist, and business leader Steve Killelea asked himself, ‘What are the most peaceful nations?' Unable to find an answer, he created the world's leading measure of peace, the Global Peace Index, which receives over 16 billion media impressions annually and has become the definitive go-to index for heads of state. Steve Killelea then went on to establish a world-renowned think tank, the Institute for Economics and Peace. Today its work is used by organizations such as the World Bank, United Nations, and Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and taught in thousands of university courses around the world. "Peace in The Age of Chaos" tells of Steve's personal journey to measure and understand peace. It explores the practical application of his work, which is gathering momentum at a rapid pace. In this time when we are faced with environmental, social, and economic challenges, this book shows us a way forward where Positive Peace, described as creating the optimal environment for human potential to flourish, can lead to a paradigm shift in the ways societies can be managed, making them more resilient and better capable of adapting to their changing environments. Speaker Steve Killelea is the Founder and Executive Chairman of the Institute for Economics and Peace (IEP), one of the world's most impactful think tanks on peace and what creates it. Steve is also the creator of the Global Peace Index, the world's leading measure of peace that ranks 163 countries and independent territories by their levels of peacefulness each year, and is used by major organizations such as the World Bank, OECD, UN, as well as governments and thousands of universities worldwide. Over the last two decades, Steve has applied his business skills as one of Australia's leading entrepreneurs to his many global philanthropic activities, including his private family charity, The Charitable Foundation, which now has over three million direct beneficiaries. In recognition of his contribution to the global peace movement, Steve has twice been nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize and was awarded the Luxembourg Peace Prize in 2016. He has also been recognized by the Action on Armed Violence group as one of the 100 most influential people in the world on reducing armed violence. "Today, Steve serves on the President's Circle for Club de Madrid, the largest forum of former world leaders working democratic former Presidents and Prime Ministers working to strengthen democracy, and is an honorary president for Religions for Peace, the largest organization in the world working on inter-religious challenges. Discussant Chic Dambach is an adjunct faculty member at Johns Hopkins and American Universities, and he is a Woodrow Wilson Visiting Fellow. He was President and CEO (currently President Emeritus) of the National Peace Corps Association; former President of the Alliance for Peacebuilding, and former Chief of Staff for Congressman John Garamendi. Previously, he held executive positions in the arts, sports, and health, and he was an “expert” advisor to the director of the Peace Corps. He serves as Chair of the Mali Affinity Group, and he has served on dozens of nonprofit boards. He lectures regularly at colleges and universities and at conferences, and he was a senior consultant with BoardSource where he helped write two books on nonprofit governance.

ACTEC Trust & Estate Talk
Taxes Emerging in the Europe to Pay the Cost of COVID

ACTEC Trust & Estate Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 12:48


An overview of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, OECD, report and debate on inheritance tax. The American College of Trust and Estate Counsel, ACTEC, is a professional society of peer-elected trust and estate lawyers in the United States and around the globe. This series offers professionals best practice advice, insights and commentary on subjects that affect the profession and clients. Learn more in this podcast.

Midnight Train Podcast
Aokigahara Forest, AKA The Suicide Forest

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2021 128:32


Today we're taking a trip to Japan. Today's episode may contain some talk that could be hard for some to listen to. We will be discussing suicide in parts of today's episode. While we normally have a pretty lax, “we don't care who we piss off or trigger” kind of attitude, we all agree that mental health and suicide are serious issues and we do not want anyone who may already have some problems to listen to something we are discussing and to make any said problems worse. We joke around and have fun and there will be jokes and fuckery in this episode, BUT, we will not make jokes about suicide or mental health. We will try and find some levity to shake off the darker situations, but will do our best to also be respectful when needed. We say this all the time and this is another great spot for this message, please if you are having any sort of thoughts of suicide and depression please reach out to someone that you can talk to. There are many many excellent resources for those who need them.   With that being said, in today's episode we are talking about Japan's Aokigahara Forest, also known as the suicide forest. We are going to go through the history of the forest and we are also going to talk about some of the tales of spirits and monsters in the forest. Also we'll get into some spooky stories, of course, because that's what we do here!    Due to the high level of stress faced by the Japanese, Japan is seen as one of the top countries with high suicide rates. According to a report by The Guardian, depression, serious illness and debt are among the common reasons one seeks to end their life.    Historically suicide has been viewed differently in Japan than the way we see it now. Most people today will remark how selfish or cowardly suicide is. Japan historically has had the view that suicide was an honorable thing.   Back in the feudal era in Japan, committing suicide was seen as an act of honour. Samurai warriors would rather commit suicide, or known as seppuku sometimes referred to as Harakiri (ritual disemboweling) than fall into the hands of their enemy – a way to uphold their honor and dignity. It was also used as a form of capital punishment for samurai who had committed serious offenses, or performed because they had brought shame to themselves. It  was later practiced by other Japanese people during the Shōwa period (particularly officers near the end of World War II) to restore honor for themselves or for their families. The ceremonial disembowelment, which is usually part of a more elaborate ritual and performed in front of spectators, consists of plunging a short blade like a tantō into the belly and drawing the blade from left to right, slicing the belly open. Some practitioners of seppuku allowed themselves to die slowly, but they usually enlisted the help of a “kaishakunin,” or second, who would lop off their head with a katana as soon as they made their initial cut. The goal was generally not to take the head off in one swing, rather most of the way off on the first swing with the second bringing down a very light cut allowing the head to fall into the hands of the deceased. Among other rituals, the doomed individual often drank sake, they were only allowed a specific number of sips, and composed a short “death poem” before taking up the blade. In each case, it was considered an act of extreme bravery and self-sacrifice that embodied Bushido, the ancient warrior code of the samurai. There was even a female version of seppuku called “jigai,” which involved cutting the throat using a tanto. Japanese Tanto knives (or short swords) are characterized by their dagger-like design. The tanto knife first appeared around the year 900. Seppuku fell out of favor with the decline of the samurai in the late-19th century, but the practice didn't disappear entirely. Japanese General Nogi Maresuke disemboweled himself in 1912 out of loyalty to the deceased Meiji Emperor, and many troops later chose the sword over surrender during World War II. Perhaps the most famous case in recent history concerns Yukio Mishima, a renowned novelist and Nobel Prize nominee who committed ritual seppuku in 1970 after leading a failed coup against the Japanese government. On October 25, 1944, the Empire of Japan employed kamikaze bombers for the first time. (Kamikazi bombers were named after the “divine wind” that had destroyed the Mongol fleet in the thirteenth century, thus saving Japan from invasion.) The tactic was part of the ferocious Battle of Leyte Gulf, the largest naval battle in history, which took place in the Pacific Ocean near the Philippines. Kamikaze strikes against Allied warships continued throughout World War II.   Kamikaze pilots deliberately crashed specially made planes directly into enemy warships, which resulted in suicide. It was a desperate policy. Motoharu Okamura, who commanded a kamikaze squadron, remarked that by 1944, “I firmly believe that the only way to swing the war in our favor is to resort to crash-dive attacks with our planes. There is no other way. Provide me with 300 planes and I will turn the tide of war.” In these kamikaze attacks, more than 3,000 Japanese pilots were killed, and there were more than 7,000 casualties among American, Australian, and British personnel. Flight Lieutenant Haruo Araki wrote the following letter to his wife before his last flight:                                Shigeko,   Are you well? It is now a month since that day. The happy dream is over. Tomorrow I will dive my plane into an enemy ship. I will cross the river into the other world, taking some Yankees with me. When I look back, I see that I was very cold-hearted to you. After I had been cruel to you, I used to regret it. Please forgive me.   When I think of your future, and the long life ahead, it tears at my heart. Please remain steadfast and live happily. After my death, please take care of my father for me.   I, who have lived for the eternal principles of justice, will forever protect this nation from the enemies that surround us.   Commander of the Air Unit Eternity   Haruo Araki   WOW!   The reason we wanted to include this letter is that last line. He referred to himself as living for the eternal principles of justice. He says he will forever protect his nation from the enemies that surround them. This goes to show that there was still a sense of pride in the fact that you are committing suicide for the cause. It was seen as a strength not a weakness historically. On the other side of the coin, the Allies, steeped in the Judaeo-Christian tradition of the sanctity of life, the apparent willingness of Japanese servicemen like Araki to carry out suicide attacks was profoundly shocking. But then, as scholars of the kamikaze point out, the word suicide in Japanese does not always have the same “immoral connotation” that it has in English. Two versions—jiketsu (self-determination) and jisai (self-judgement)—“suggest an honorable or laudable act done in the public interest.” There is, moreover, no ethical or religious taboo regarding suicide in Japan's traditional religion of Shintoism.  To surrender, on the other hand, was seen as dishonourable, hence the contempt the Japanese felt for prisoners of war. Japanese soldiers believed that when they fell on the field of battle they would become kami, or gods, and join the nation's spirits at the Shinto shrine of Yasukuni in Tokyo. Hence the typical farewell from members of the Shimpū (Divine Wind) Special Attack Corps: “I'll meet you at the Yasukuni Shrine!”  Nowadays, many have chosen to end their life not for honourable reasons, but mainly because they could not fit into society. In Japan today, suicide is considered a major social issue. In 2017, the country had the seventh highest suicide rate in the OECD, at 14.9 per 100,000 persons, and in 2019 the country had the second highest suicide rate among the G7 developed nations.  The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) is “an international organisation that works to build better policies for better lives.”, as per their website. Seventy percent of suicides in Japan are male, and it is the leading cause of death in men aged 20–44. After peaking in 2003, suicide rates have been gradually declining, falling to the lowest on record (since 1978) in 2019. Monthly suicide rates in Japan increased by 16% between July and October 2020, due to a number of reasons attributed to the COVID-19 pandemic. What is driving these big divide rates?  As of 2020, the leading motive, with 49% of suicides was "Health issues". However because the category for health issues includes both mental (like depression) and physical issues, it is not possible to distinguish between the two. The second most commonly listed motive for suicides was "Financial/Poverty related issues" (e.g., Too much debt, Poverty), which was a motive in 17% of suicides. The third motive is "Household issues" (e.g., disagreements in the family) listed in 15% of suicides.   By occupation, 59.3% of suicide victims were in the broad "Not Employed" category, which is not to be confused with the colloquialism "unemployed" (as in those who are seeking but unable to find a job). The "Not Employed" category also includes pensioners, homemakers and others. While the teenage suicide rate in Japan is lower than the OECD country average, teenage suicide rates have been the only category to increase slightly in recent years, despite the significant drop in overall suicide rates over the past decade.   Many who decide to commit suicide will chose a place where it is hidden and not easy to be found to spend their last moment. And for the Japanese, Aokigahara Forest is one of the most common locations. It is also known as the world's second-most common location to commit suicide. The most common location is the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco, California, in the US. Aokigahara is located at the northwest base of the country's highest mountain, Mount Fuji. Due to its high density of trees, Aokigahara is also known as a Jukai – which simply means a “sea of trees'. The tree cover is so thick that, even at noon, you will hardly find a bright spot in the forest. Aokigahara is also known as Japan's Demon Forest, and the “perfect place to die”. Many Japanese believe that the forest is haunted and dare not go nearby. This 35-sq km, around 14 sq mile, forest is cold, rocky, and contains some 200 caves, of which a few, such as the Ice Cave and Wind Cave, have been popular among tourists. Because of the rocky area and thick trees, Aokigahara's surroundings are almost identical, making it the perfect journey for those who are making a one-way trip. For trekkers and hikers, they often carry along plastic tape to mark their way so that they will find the way out again.    Let's find out a bit more about the forest itself, because well, nerd shit. It formed out of a devastating volcanic eruption that occurred in the year 864. Which was ironically, chainsaw's second birthday. The nickname “Sea of Trees" captures the full grandeur of how this wind-swept forest appears from the mountain with its treetops rolling like waves. The trees in the forest do bear an exotic, gnarled appearance because they grew out of hardened lava. Their roots could not penetrate to the usual depth. The flow of the lava left the ground with an uneven surface before hardening, where it is not unusual to see trees partially uprooted, along with gaping holes—cave-like recesses—that have formed in the ground. Aokigahara has been falsely portrayed as a place where navigational compasses go haywire. Needles of magnetic compasses will move if placed directly on the lava, aligning with the rock's natural magnetism, kind of like moody, except the exact opposite, which varies in iron content and strength by location. However, a compass behaves as expected when held at a normal height. The forest has a variety of conifers and broadleaf trees and shrubs. Deeper in the forest there are many aromatic flowering plants. There are also many mosses, liverworts and ferns. Aside from the immense savings of plant life that choke the forest, it is home to plenty of wildlife. Some of the animals you may encounter include the Asian black bear, deer, fox, Japanese mink and Japanese squirrel, boar, and wild rabbit. Also the forest is a great place to see tits! That's right my friends, they have many kinds of tits including willow tits, long tailed tits, and of course the great tits.   So why is this such a popular place for people to end their lives? Well as stated earlier it is a very quiet place that offers up dense cover to help conceal things that are going on. Essentially it's peaceful and you can be alone away from prying eyes. Not only that, there was a mystery novel called “Kuroi Jukai” (translated as Black Sea of Trees) written by Seicho Matsumoto in 1960. The novel ends romantically with the lovers committing suicide in the forest, which revitalized the Suicide Forest's popularity among those who wanted to end their life. Also Wataru Tsurumui's controversial 1993 bestseller, The Complete Suicide Manual, is a book that describes various modes of suicide and even recommends Aokigahara as the perfect place to die. Apparently this book is also a common find in the forest, usually not too far away from a suicide victim and their belongings. Undoubtedly, the most common method of suicide in the forest is hanging. It's not uncommon for officials to find abandoned cars at the trail heads, empty campsites throughout the forest, strings and ropes left by people who venture off path to help find their way back, and sadly the body's of those who decided to enter the first and never come out. There are signs along the trails urging people to seek help if they are having issues and contemplating suicide. The signs read, “Your life is something precious that was given to you by your parents” and “Think about your parents, siblings, and children once more. Do not be troubled alone.” The signs end with a helpline telephone number, hoping the lost souls who seek to die would call for help. There are people who hike the forest in hopes of finding people and stopping them before it's too late. One man has found over 100 bodies in his time in the forest. With all of this death surrounding it, is it any wonder that there are tales of Hauntings and strange things happening here. There are also stories of demons that inhabit the forest. And with that being said and most of the heavy lifting being done, let's get into what we come here for every week… Creepy shit!    The most common tale of the forest being inhabited by something evil had to do with the Yurei. Yurei are thought to be spirits barred from a peaceful afterlife. Ukiyo-e artist Maruyama Ōkyo created the first known example of the now-traditional yūrei, in his painting The Ghost of Oyuki. Ukiyo-e is a genre of Japanese art which flourished from the 17th through 19th centuries. The Zenshō-an in Tokyo houses the largest single collection of yūrei paintings which are only shown in August, the traditional month of the spirits. Yurei are seen in white clothing believed to signify the white burial kimono used in Edo period burial rituals. They have long black wild hair. They generally lack legs and feet and the haha typically dangle at the wrists. The arms are usually held stretched out or at the sides stretched out at just the elbow. The Yurei are often accompanied by hitodama, which are floating flames. They can be various colors such as blue, green or purple. So Yurei is actually somewhat of a catch all phrase for ghosts. There are actually different types of Yurei. There's Onryo, which are vengeful ghosts who come back to scene a wrong doing done to them, Goryo, which are spirits of the high class and aristocrats which are also vengeful usually for having been martyred. There are Ubume which are mother ghosts who either died in childbirth or left children behind when they passed, they come back to care for the child and often bring sweets to them. There are several others as well including Funayurei which are the ghosts of those who died at sea and Zashiki-warashi which are the ghosts of children. There are more but you get the point. According to legend, people bring their family members during famine to the forest and leave them to die there, in order to save their food for other family members. Those left in the forest would slowly die due to starvation, turning them into yurei. The belief in yurei continues to today. When a body is found in Aokigahara, forest guardians place it in a room next to the forest before being sent to authorities. Legend has it that if the body is left alone in the room, its yurei move around screaming in the room. Hence, forest guards will play rock-paper-scissors to determine who the unlucky companion to the body is.    Also in Japanese legend, aside from the Yurei, the forest is said to be haunted by demons. So there's that. Demons are always good to have around. So knowing that there are possibly ribs of ghosts and demons hanging around, let's get into some creepy stories from the forest!    During a VICE documentary that takes a tour of the forest, an extremely creepy curse is found. There's a Jack Skellington-like doll with his face cut off, nailed upside down to a tree as a sort of inverted crucifixion. According to the documentary's guide, Azusa Hayano, "They nailed this character upside down as a symbol of contempt for society. No, it's more like a curse. The curse is nailed in." Apparently, it's not that uncommon for visitors to leave a curse on the world they're leaving behind.   This next story was written for a Japanese newspaper:   Jun 26, 2011 I am walking through Aokigahara Jukai forest, the light rapidly fading on a mid-winter afternoon, when I am stopped dead in my tracks by a blood-curdling scream. The natural reaction would be to run, but the forest floor is a maze of roots and slippery rocks and, truth be told, I am lost in this vast woodland whose name, in part, translates as “Sea of Trees.”   Inexplicably, I find myself moving toward the sound, searching for signs of life. Instead, I find death.   The source of that scream remains a mystery as, across a clearing, I see what looks like a pile of clothes. But as I approach, it becomes apparent it's more than just clothes I've spotted.   In a small hollow, just below a tree, and curled up like a baby on a thick bed of dead leaves, lies a man, his thinning gray hair matted across his balding cranium. His pasty upper torso is shirtless, while his legs are covered only by black long johns — with blue-striped boxers sticking out above the waistband — and a pair of woolly socks.   Under his bent legs a pair of slacks, a white shirt and a jacket have been spread out as a cushion at his final resting place. Scattered around are innumerable documents, a briefcase and other remnants of a former life. Nearer to him are items more closely related to his demise: empty packets of prescription pills, beer cans, and bottles of liquor…   The article goes on but this is the end of the story for our creepy purposes...   The man had been dead for some time so there's no way he could have produced the scream. So where did it come from? A demon or Yurei trying to draw the man in?   The destination truth television show filmed an episode in the forest and may have caught a Yurei on camera. A man was hanging out in a spot alone and in a clip on you tube he says that he thought he saw something so he checked the camera. After checking the camera he notices a shape that seems to rise up from the ground. It's white and human-like. It's there for a couple seconds and then send to disappear back into the ground. Now what it was we can't say, it could have been a yurei or honestly it looks just as much like someone dressed in white standing up from behind a bush then crouching back down. Given the forest legend though… We won't rule out ghosts.    We found this next story buried in a message board. There have been many stories of people who have had their guide lines cut while they were exploring the forest. This is an account of one of those incidents. It was written by an anonymous person so take it how you will!         "While on vacation me and my friend decided to check out the suicide forest. We were told the best thing to do would be to get on a tour and check out the caves as well. We didn't really want to do a touristy thing though. We decided to hike out there ourselves. We read up on dinner things about the area and decided we would bring along a bunch of Paracord to string along so we wouldn't get lost. We got there in the late afternoon and found a trailhead and parked. Immediately we were struck with an eerie feeling and the signs at the beginning of the trail and in various places saying not to commit suicide and get help didn't help. We set off on the trail to check it out. We walked for about 15 minutes and found a spot in the dense forest that we thought would be a good spot to head in. My friend tied the Paracord to a tree a few feet in and we set off. The further we got in the creepier it got. It was very quiet. You couldn't hear animals or birds or other people. There was not much light coming through but we could still see ok. After about an hour of exploring and letting out our line, which actually ended up being two large bundles of Paracord tied together, we decided to head back. We reeling in the line and heading back the way we came. At some point we started to hear a rustling. We thought this was strange cus we hadn't seen any animals but hey .. We're in a forest so who knows. But it soon became evident that something was actually following us! We were both spooked and picked up the pace. The rustling got louder but then whatever it was it seemed to take off ahead of us. We were both somewhat relieved… That is until a few minutes later when we got to a point where the Paracord had been shredded and the shredded end wrapped around a random tree! We couldn't find the other end of the cord and we started to freak out. Then… We heard the rustling again, but we could not see anything. We started to look around for the other end of the cord. As we were looking the rustling seemed to come from all around us. We kept getting more scared and my friend started crying and freaking out about being lost and telling about how we're going to end up dead like the rest of them. The rustling got louder and louder and then all of a sudden… Nothing. No rustling, no noise, nothing. We both stood there looking around. That's when I saw it. I saw a shadowy white figure off a little into the first. I thought I was seeing things at first. I rubbed my eyes and looked again and it was still there. At this point I lost it and started screaming. My friend turned around to see what I was screaming at and saw it too. It started to move towards us. It wasn't walking though it was like… Floating. As it came closer I see that the figure had no bottom half… It was basically a floating torso. You couldn't see the face as whatever it was had long wild hair. My friend started screaming as well and we both started frantically looking for the other end of our line. As the figure came closer we finally found the end of the cord and started moving as fast as we could. The figure continued to follow us, matching our speed. After what seemed like hours of moving as fast as we could through the forest with thing following us we finally came to where we started and could see the main trail. We ran on to the main trail and ran all the way to the car without looking back. Neither of us said a word on the way back to the hotel. To this day we don't talk about it. In my head I truly think that whatever that figure was trying to trap us in that forest. That figure still haunts me"   Creepy!!!   Locals in the area that reporters have spoken too, classic they have become used to the stories and they are not worried for the most part. Despite these statements there are still reports of locals hearing blood curdling screams at all hours from the forest. Some locals claim to see Nthe Yurei from time to time as well.    There are numerous stories of people that may not have necessarily seen anything but definitely get the heavy sad feeling when they visit as well as the feeling that something or someone is watching them. Then of course there are those with the unfortunate story of coming upon a body which is probably the worst story you can bring home.    By all accounts the forest is a beautiful place to visit and most people have no issues there. Regardless, take heed when exploring and please be respectful to the place that many have lost their lives.    Movies: https://www.imdb.com/search/title/?countries=jp&keywords=japanese-horror-film&sort=user_rating&title_type=feature

PwC's accounting and financial reporting podcast
Forecast 2021: Demystifying Biden's new tax proposals

PwC's accounting and financial reporting podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2021 42:05


In our Forecast 2021 podcast series, we're focused on offering insights to help you better understand and manage some of the opportunities and challenges that your company might face—think policy, technology, and other big picture topics. In this week's episode, we highlight the “Green Book,” which is the Treasury's explanation of the tax proposals in the proposed FY2022 Federal budget. We focus on the proposals that will have a significant impact on corporate income tax policies. Heather Horn sat down with Jenn Spang, PwC's National Office income tax accounting leader, and Pat Brown, co-leader of PwC's Washington National Tax Services group, to discuss the big changes on the horizon. Tax leaders are already scenario planning - we break it down so CFOs can do the same.Topics include:1:03 - “Green Book.” The Treasury Department released the annual tax budget, or the “Green Book,” last month. Pat and Jenn highlight the significant corporate tax proposals and their financial statement impacts.11:07 - GILTI. Pat digs deeper and explains the proposed changes to the global intangible low-taxed income (GILTI) tax policy. Jenn tells us the accounting ramifications.18:30 - BEAT and SHIELD. The Biden administration has proposed to replace the base erosion and anti-abuse tax (BEAT) with a new provision called stopping harmful inversions and ending low-tax developments (SHIELD). Pat and Jenn explain what this all means.23:37 - FDII. Pat fills us in on the proposal to repeal the deduction for foreign derived intangible income (FDII) tax, and the plan to use the resulting revenue to expand research and development investment incentives. 26:08 - The OECD framework. We discuss the proposed global minimum tax as part of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) framework and what it means for multinationals and international tax. 34:39 - Other key proposals. Pat highlights a number of other proposals affecting corporate income taxes, and Jenn provides takeaways from a financial statement perspective. The key is scenario planning - be prepared. 37:24 - What's next? It's up to Congress now. Pat and Jenn expect the increase in corporate taxes to be enacted by the end of 2021, with changes to international tax law having a longer runway.Want to learn more? Read our related PwC Tax Insight, Treasury ‘Green Book' describes Biden's tax proposals for businesses Listen to our Podcast: What global tax initiatives could mean for your company Listen to the cross-border tax talks Podcast: Explaining the explanation: Biden's GreenbookPat Brown is PwC's Washington National Tax Services co-leader. Prior to joining PwC, he spent 16 years in the private sector, including a role as the director of tax policy for a Fortune 50 company. Pat has also served in the US Treasury's Office of Tax Policy as an attorney-advisor and as Associate International Tax Counsel.Jennifer Spang is PwC's National Office income tax accounting leader specializing in tax accounting under US GAAP and IFRS. She has over 25 years of experience helping companies in a variety of industries navigate complex tax accounting matters.

RealAgriculture's Podcasts
OECD report outlines run up in global agriculture support programs

RealAgriculture's Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2021 20:17


The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) recently published its annual report on estimates of support to agriculture, titled the “Agricultural Policy Monitoring and Evaluation 2021.” The report monitors and evaluates agricultural policies in 54 countries, including the 38 OECD countries, five non-OECD EU Member States, and 11 emerging economies. Between 2018 to 2020,... Read More

BizNews Radio
Flash Briefing: SA won't recover from Covid for at least 4 years - OECD; SARB governor protests school racism

BizNews Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2021 2:28


* South Africa has tightened up measures aimed at curbing the spread of Covid-19. * South Africa, forecast to have one of the slowest economic recoveries in the world, is unlikely to recover before 2025, according to the to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. * In markets from South Africa to Mexico and South Korea, traders are penciling in a faster pace of interest-rate hikes than what economists say is currently warranted based on the inflation outlook. * South Africa's central bank governor has entered the fray over pupil diversity at schools.

BizNews Radio
Flash Briefing: SA won't recover from Covid for at least 4 years - OECD; SARB governor protests school racism

BizNews Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2021 2:28


* South Africa has tightened up measures aimed at curbing the spread of Covid-19. * South Africa, forecast to have one of the slowest economic recoveries in the world, is unlikely to recover before 2025, according to the to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. * In markets from South Africa to Mexico and South Korea, traders are penciling in a faster pace of interest-rate hikes than what economists say is currently warranted based on the inflation outlook. * South Africa's central bank governor has entered the fray over pupil diversity at schools.

Highlights from Newstalk Breakfast
Inheritance Tax Reform Recommendations From The OECD

Highlights from Newstalk Breakfast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2021 4:48


Kids could be stiffed of their inheritance if the OECD has their way.  The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development says that reforming inheritance tax, particularly exemptions for children, would ease Ireland’s covid deficit and address inequality.   Pascal Saint-Amans, Director of the OECD’s Centre for Tax Policy and Admin joined us this morning. Listen and subscribe to Newstalk Breakfast on Apple Podcasts or Spotify.     Download, listen and subscribe on the Newstalk App.    You can also listen to Newstalk live on newstalk.com or on Alexa, by adding the Newstalk skill and asking: 'Alexa, play Newstalk'.

The Niall Boylan Show
Is it time the Government introduced a charge for water wastage?

The Niall Boylan Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2021 33:07


The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development says Ireland needs massive investment in water services and suggests the Government reconsiders the issue of domestic water charges. We want to know - how would you feel about the introduction of water charges? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

401(k) Fridays Podcast
Preston Rutledge: EBSA Stories, SECURE 2.0 & More!

401(k) Fridays Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2021 58:08


What a treat, today I am please to welcome Preston Rutledge, Founder and Principal of the Rutledge Policy group and previously Assistant Secretary of Labor for the EBSA and prior to that, senior tax and benefits counsel for Chairman Orrin Hatch on the US Senate Finance Committee. During our conversation we hit on a few good stories from his civil service days, talk about the concepts behind the SECURE Act and where we go from here, potential tax changes and the impact on retirement plans and much more. Definitely a good one to check out and share!   On that note, if you have been enjoying the podcast, please do take a minute to mention to a friend, colleague or networking group. As our audience continues to grow, it makes it easier for me to find high quality guests like Preston.    That’s it, I hope your enjoy our conversation!   Guest Bio Preston Rutledge is the Founder and Principal of Rutledge Policy Group, LLC. With an uncommon combination of expertise both in legal and tax matters, he is a sought-after consultant and speaker in the areas of retirement, health plans, taxation, and environmental, social and governance (ESG) investing.  Prior to founding Rutledge Policy Group, Preston was the Assistant Secretary of Labor for the Employee Benefits Security Administration (EBSA). At EBSA, he led the drafting and publication of guidance to implement retirement, health, and workplace benefits policies and oversaw a nationwide team of over 800 employee benefits professionals. In international affairs, Preston led the U.S Delegation on private pension policy at the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) in Paris, France. Preston was a member of the OECD Insurance and Private Pensions Committee, and served as Chair of the OECD Working Party on Private Pensions. Preston also worked closely with the OECD affiliated International Organization of Pension Supervisors (IOPS).  Before joining the Department of Labor, Preston served as senior tax and benefits counsel for Chairman Orrin G. Hatch (R-UT) on the Majority Tax Staff of the US Senate Finance Committee. Preston had the retirement, non-profit, and insurance tax portfolio during tax reform in 2017, and he drafted the Chairman’s primary retirement initiatives: the Secure Annuities for Employee (SAFE) Retirement Act and the Retirement Enhancement and Savings Act (RESA). RESA became the SECURE Act, the most sweeping reform of retirement savings policy in over a decade.  Prior to joining the Finance Committee, Preston served as a senior tax law specialist for retirement and non-profit policy on the Headquarters Staff of the Tax Exempt and Government Entities Division of the Internal Revenue Service. Earlier in his career he served as a law clerk on the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit and worked in private law practice as an employee benefits counselor and ERISA litigator.  Preston earned a BS in business, cum laude, from the University of Idaho; JD, with high honors, from the George Washington University School of Law, where he was a member of the Law Review; and an LLM – taxation, with distinction, including a certificate in employee benefits law, from the Georgetown University Law Center. Prior to law school Preston was a Naval Officer, and served on the U.S.S. Bagley (FF-1069)    401(k) Fridays Podcast Overview Struggling with a fiduciary issue, looking for strategies to improve employee retirement outcomes or curious about the impact of current events on your retirement plan? We've had conversations with retirement industry leaders to address these and other relevant topics! You can easily explore over 200 prior on-demand audio interviews here. Don't forget to subscribe as we release a new episode each Friday!

FUTURATI PODCAST
Ep. 30: Andreas Schleicher on educational policy in the 21st century.

FUTURATI PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 24, 2021 57:57


Andreas Schleicher is Director for Education and Skills at the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development. He initiated and oversees the Program for International Student Assessment and has worked for over 20 years with ministers and education leaders around the world to improve quality and equity in education. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Healthcare360
HC360 #083 Medical Bankruptcy in America with CSO Roger Jansen, PhD

Healthcare360

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2021 50:33


2/3rds of Americans who file bankruptcy actually cite medical issues as a key or main contributor to their financial downfall? That’s roughly 530,000 American families a year. Nation, glad you’re here and welcome to another episode of Healthcare360, the only Healthcare podcast, where you can listen to both sides of the story, fairly! Folks, this medical bankruptcy discussion has to be addressed, so we decided to tackle this topic in three parts. In part one of the discussion, Roger Jansen a Neuropsychologist and Chief Science Officer for a $6B healthcare system shares his experience and insights surrounding the pitfalls of the current business model of healthcare, and the radical disruption needed before significant improvements can be made. You will be shocked by the stats you will hear in this episode, it’ll probably upset you at the same time. Yet my hope is that this conversation will be built on, continued to be discussed, and we all become aware and better informed patient consumers moving forward. Thank you for being open minded and curious about our healthcare options! Healthcare360 Host: Scott E. Burgess www.ScottEBurgess.com Burgess@ScottEBurgess.com youtube.com/healthcare360withscotteburgess Healthcare360 Magic Maker: Michelle Burgess MagicMaker@ScottEBurgess.com Guest Info: Roger Jansen, PhD linkedin.com/in/rogerjansenphd Healthcare 360 Affiliates: The Root Brands: https://www.therootbrands.com/healthcare360, create an account and add Healthcare360 in the referral code BodyChek Wellness: https://www.bodychekwellness.com/ PROMO CODE: Healthcare360 at checkout for 20% off all purchases. VoxxLife: https://healthcare360.voxxlife.com/ Referenced Links: CNBC Article: This is the real reason most Americans file for bankruptcy by Lorie Konish https://www.cnbc.com/2019/02/11/this-is-the-real-reason-most-americans-file-for-bankruptcy.html HC #073 Future of Healthcare - this Medical Futurist's Vision with Dr. Mesko https://youtu.be/xAjVzAzcfvE HC360 #064 Wake Up Call for MedTech with CEO Joe Mullings of The Mullings Group https://youtu.be/AXRlDLod_E0 HC360 #035 The Rapid Change of Healthcare with CEO Lonny Stormo https://www.scotteburgess.com/podcast-episodes/the-rapid-change-of-healthcare-with-ceo-lonny-stormo CMS Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services https://www.cms.gov/ OECD Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development http://www.oecd.org/unitedstates/ The Price We Pay by Dr. Marty Makary https://www.amazon.com/Price-We-Pay-American-Care/dp/1635574110 HC360 #071 Body's Great RESET! Therapeutic WATER-Only Fasting to naturally heal your body: Dr Alan Goldhamer https://youtu.be/NQ30X2WpUWw HC360 #068 The Truth About Virus & Bacteria with Dr. Tom Cowan https://youtu.be/9NB3e8dfvEU Music provided by: IMMEX - Blue Shark https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r1pmz9IJ1CA Graphic Design by: Waqar Mughal waqarstudio92@gmail.com Disclaimer: The information provided is for educational purposes - not intended as medical advice. It is always the advice of Healthcare360 to consult with a doctor or other health care professional(s) for medical advice. Some of these links go to one of my websites and some are affiliate links where I'll earn a small commission if you make a purchase at no additional cost to you.

Highlights from Newstalk Breakfast
Reimagining Ireland: Education In The 21st Century

Highlights from Newstalk Breakfast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2021 4:58


As part of our series Reimagining Ireland, we're today taking a look at education. Is our current system getting the most from our young people? Are we overly focused on wrote learning? What changes can we make to take our education system forward?  To discuss this, we were joined by Andreas Schleicher, Director for Education and Skills for the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. Listen and subscribe to Newstalk Breakfast on Apple Podcasts or Spotify.     Download, listen and subscribe on the Newstalk App.    You can also listen to Newstalk live on newstalk.com or on Alexa, by adding the Newstalk skill and asking: 'Alexa, play Newstalk'.

KBS WORLD Radio Korea 24
Korea 24 - 2021.03.19

KBS WORLD Radio Korea 24

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 19, 2021


Korea24 – 2021.03.19. (Friday) News Briefing: The government has identified an additional 28 civil servants and public employees in its ongoing probe of the land speculation scandal gripping South Korea. They were found to have purchased property in areas included in the government's urban development project. (Eunice Kim) In-Depth News Analysis (Weekly Economy Review): Professor Yang Jun-suk from the Catholic University of Korea discusses the continuing trend in job losses amid the pandemic, the latest figures from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development(OECD) showing South Korea's economy possibly ranking 10th in the 2020 GDP rankings, and U.S. investment bank Morgan Stanley’s plan to offer its wealth management clients access to bitcoin funds. Korea Trending with Alex Sigrist: Drivers tamper with their scooters to travel at high speeds deemed unsafe(시속 50km까지 불법개조 킥보드…법 공백에 사고 증가), China requires certain visa applicants to get Chinese COVID-19 vaccines(中 백신 맞아야만 ‘비자 신청 간소화’…입국 대기자들 ‘발동동’), and Olympic short track champion Shim Suk-hee announces her desire to make the national team(쇼트트랙 심석희 "태극마크 다시 달고 싶다..간절하고 그리워“). Movie Spotlight: Film critics Darcy Paquet and Jason Bechervaise share Jero Yun's(윤재호) "Fighter(파이터)," on a North Korean defector reigniting her talent as a professional boxer. They also discuss "The Mauritanian(모리타니안)," based on events that occurred at Guantanamo Bay. Next Week from Seoul: Mark Wilson-Choi brings us stories and events to look out for the following week, including the start of COVID-19 inoculations for South Korean citizens 65 and older, including President Moon Jae-in.

Please Explain
What is the OECD and why does Mathias Cormann's appointment matter?

Please Explain

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2021 10:50


Mathias Cormann has been elected the next secretary-general of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development in a strategic coup for the Australian government. Cormann emerged victorious after a six month contest pitted him against nine other candidates, much to the surprise of numerous domestic critics. Today on Please Explain, Tory Maguire and Europe correspondent Bevan Shields discuss how Mathias Cormann pulled off his bid to become secretary general of the OECD and why it’s important for Australia. Subscribe to The Age & SMH: https://subscribe.smh.com.au/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Please Explain
What is the OECD and why does Mathias Cormann's appointment matter?

Please Explain

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2021 10:50


Mathias Cormann has been elected the next secretary-general of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development in a strategic coup for the Australian government. Cormann emerged victorious after a six month contest pitted him against nine other candidates, much to the surprise of numerous domestic critics. Today on Please Explain, Tory Maguire and Europe correspondent Bevan Shields discuss how Mathias Cormann pulled off his bid to become secretary general of the OECD and why it’s important for Australia. Subscribe to The Age & SMH: https://subscribe.smh.com.au/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

True Crime New Zealand
INVESTIGATES II: Suicide Prevention

True Crime New Zealand

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2021 16:36


Friends, suicide and depression are destressing topics. However, it is also for some; a bleak reality. Within our own lives, in the past couple of weeks, we've known of two people who took their own lives.  As you may be aware, NZ has one of the highest rates for sucide in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), in particular youth suicide.  For these reasons, as well as feeling extremely troubled and saddened by these numbers, we are going to do the only thing a podcast can do, talk about it. As such, True Crime NZ has decided to investigate the growing problem and see what we as a collective can do, if anything, to prevent further suicide attempts.  If you are suffering from depression, suicidal ideation or just need someone to talk to; resources are available: FOR NZ: Free call or text 1737 any time for support from a trained counsellor Lifeline 0800 543 354 or 09 522 2999 or free text 4357 (HELP) Suicide Prevention Helpline 0508 828 865 (0508 TAUTOK0) Youthline 0800 376 633 or free text 234 Samaritans 0800 726 666. IF ELSEWHERE: Visit https://yourlifecounts.org/find-help/ to find your country.

Money For the Rest of Us
Should You Invest in Farmland?

Money For the Rest of Us

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 10, 2021 26:45


How much can you earn investing in farmland and what are the risks? What are the ways to invest in farmland?Topics covered include:What determines farmland investment returnsHow much has U.S. farmland appreciated historicallyHow much income does farmland investing generateWhy the amount of U.S. farmland is shrinkingHas another commodity supercycle startedWhy U.S. farmers are dependent on exportsWhat are farmland investing risksWhat farmland investment vehicles are availableHow to evaluate a farmland investment opportunityThanks to LinkedIn and Policygenius for sponsoring the episode.Show NotesFarmland Values, Land Ownership, and Returns to Farmland, 2000-2016 by Christopher Burns, Nigel Key, Sarah Tulman, Allison Borchers, and Jeremy Weber—United States Department of AgricultureLand Values 2020 Summary—United States Department of AgricultureFarming and Farm Income—Economic Research Service United States Department of AgricultureAgricultural Markets and Prices: Towards 2025—Organisation for Economic Co-operation and DevelopmentU.S. Agricultural Trade at a Glance—Economic Research Service United States Department of AgricultureWhy Invest In Farmland?—AcreTraderFarmTogetherFarmland Index Posts First Negative Return in 19 Years by Mike Walsten—Pro FarmerNCREIF Farmland Property IndexLumber Prices Are Soaring. Why Are Tree Growers Miserable? by Ryan Dezember and Vipal Monga—The Wall Street JournalPistachio industry looks to reposition product amid supply boom by John Cox—The Bakersfield California

KBS WORLD Radio Korea 24
Korea 24 - 2021.03.10

KBS WORLD Radio Korea 24

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 10, 2021


Korea24 – 2021.03.10. (Wednesday) - News Briefing: South Korea and the United States have reached an agreement on Seoul's share of the burden in maintaining U.S. troops on the Korean Peninsula. Under the new deal, South Korea will pay one-point-183 trillion won this year in shared defense costs, up nearly 14 percent from the last deal. (Eunice Kim) - In-Depth News Analysis Part One: Rajiv Biswas, the Asia Pacific chief economist at IHS Markit, discusses what it means for the South Korean economy after the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development(OECD) raised Korea's growth forecast to 3.2% for 2021 and nine major investment banks predicted that South Korea's economy would expand to an average of 3.6% this year. - In-Depth News Analysis Part Two: Ken Buesseler, senior scientist at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, gives his thoughts on the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant disaster as Thursday marks 10 years since the catastrophic event. He also discusses the disaster's consequences and the lessons that can be learned from it. - Korea Trending with Lee Ju-young: South Korean short track star Lim Hyo-jin's chances to compete at the Beijing Winter Olympics become unclear(‘중국 귀화’ 임효준, 베이징올림픽 못 나갈 듯…“규정에 발목”), a dinosaur fossil is discovered off the South Korean coast(안산 대부도 탄도항서 1억2천만 년 전 공룡화석 발견), and Rosé of BlackPink is will perform on The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon to promote her upcoming solo album(블랙핑크 로제, 美 '지미 팰런쇼'서 솔로 무대). - Korea Book Club: Barry Welsh shares "Off to Battle at Dawn(새벽출정)" by Bang Hyeon-seok(방현석), set during Korea's rapid development in the 1980s made on the backs of underpaid and undervalued laborers. Barry talks about how the short novel portrays the human cost of the conflict between factory owners and workers. - Morning Edition Preview: Mark shares a story from the Korea Times that talks about an exhibition at the National Palace Museum of Korea that displays how military power and tactics were used during the Joseon Dynasty. He also talks about the Korea Herald's feature on violinist Yang In-mo as his latest album was released on Wednesday.

ICCWBO
ICC Trading Thoughts with Cecilia Malmström

ICCWBO

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 9, 2021 16:41


The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, or OECD, is celebrating it’s 60 anniversary this year. Since entering into force in 1961, the OECD has played a critical role in advancing multilateral solutions to global challenges. As the world continues to grapple with the COVID-19 crisis and other policy challenges, like climate change and global inequality, the OECD is in the process of selecting its next Secretary General. ICC speaks with one of the finalists for that position, the former European Union Trade Commissioner Cecilia Malmstrom.

The Knowledge Group Podcasts
Transfer Pricing And COVID - 19 Implications - Before The Show #177

The Knowledge Group Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 5, 2021 10:27


* Use coupon code PODCAST25 for 25% off this webcast * Webcast URL: https://knowledgewebcasts.com/know-portfolio/transfer-pricing-and-covid-19-implications-cle-cpe/ The economic downturn brought by the COVID-19 pandemic has profoundly impacted the transfer pricing landscape. Multinational enterprises (MNEs) are dealing with serious transfer prices issues, supply chain disruptions, and restructuring expenses. In response to these growing repercussions, the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) recently published guidance on transfer pricing policies and clarified the application of the arm's length principle. It also underscored the compliance challenges faced by MNEs. With the changing tides, businesses must make sound management decisions to navigate transfer pricing consequences. Furthermore, business and tax authorities must be thorough in assessing pricing arrangement adjustments to mitigate potential tax disputes. Listen as transfer pricing experts Shaun T. MacIsaac Q.C. (PMR Law) and Anna Soubbotina (Charles River Associates) examine the latest trends and updates in transfer pricing. Speakers will present common transfer pricing issues and tax challenges companies face today. They will also offer best practices in documentation and calculation amid the COVID-19 pandemic. For any more information please click on the webcast URL at the top of this description.

Friday Podcasts From ECSP and MHI
Episode 240: A Conversation with Steven Gale on USAID’s New Foresight Unit

Friday Podcasts From ECSP and MHI

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 25, 2021 23:46


“I think most people will agree today that the development landscape is, well, it’s highly uncertain, it's increasingly complex,” says Steven Gale, Lead of the Futures/Foresight Team at the U.S Agency for International Development (USAID), in this week’s Friday Podcast. “I think the future is even going to be more complex.” “Foresight is probably the most common technique in the futures area,” says Gale. The tool has been primarily used by the private sector, the military, and the intelligence community when looking at what a possible future would look like. Foresight helps planners and decision-makers better prepare for the unexpected by not just looking at one future, but by looking at a range of futures. “The tools of foresight are especially helpful,” says Gale, “when the future you want to explore is highly uncertain, ambiguous, increasingly complex.” Another “futures” technique often used that is similar to foresight, but much more precise, is prediction. “It's a statement of what will likely occur in the future using existing data and analytic models,” says Gale. Prediction is what you expect to happen when your hypothesis is true, data highly accurate and consistent, variables are known and agreed upon, and the future you want to predict is essentially an extension of the past, he says. “The net result is most of our professionals prefer foresight over prediction because of uncertainty and complexity.” Foresight isn’t unique to USAID. For example, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development’s (OECD) Development Assistance Committee (DAC) also houses a Strategic Foresight Unit. Gale says that as both entities are focused on foresight for development, the USAID Foresight Unit has a lot in common with the OECD DAC. In March 2021, the U.S. and Switzerland will co-chair the DAC foresight unit’s annual event, Friends of Foresight. A number of the issues addressed will revolve around COVID-19, green and digital COVID-19 recovery, and examining what socioeconomic recovery from the pandemic will look like, says Gale. In response to why foresight is taking on a higher profile at USAID, Gale says, “the short answer is COVID-19.” Once the World Health Organization declared COVID-19 a pandemic, USAID created a task force to assess and manage the more immediate challenges of COVID-19. As the task force began to look at these challenges, he says, it began to think about the next COVID-19 and established the Over the Horizon Strategic Review to not just look at the immediate impacts of COVID, but to look at a range of other possibilities. Gale’s book on over-the-horizon development scenarios, “The Future Can’t Wait,” addresses the future of foresight, scenario planning, and what it means for development. Quoting an excerpt from former USAID Administrator, Andrew Natsios, he says, “Perhaps, the most embarrassing failure of international development agencies has been their excessive focus on programming for the past problems, for the past challenges, instead of anticipating the challenges of the future.” That shortcoming, Gale says, “is precisely what foresight seeks to address.”

The Greek Current
Greece's Anna Diamantopoulou and her vision for the OECD

The Greek Current

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 19, 2021 12:56


Greece's Anna Diamantopoulou is one of four candidates left in the race to become the next head of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). If her candidacy is successful, then she would be the first woman to lead the OECD, one of the world's most influential multilateral organizations. Anna Diamantopoulou joins The Greek Current to discuss the importance of the OECD and the key issues she is focusing on in her candidacy to lead the multilateral organization - from tackling climate change to confronting the challenges posed by China.Four candidates vie to lead the OECDOECD Candidate Diamantopoulou: "It's the Climate Change, Stupid!"HALC expresses concern over reports DFC might close Belgrade officeTurkey hires Washington lobbyists in bid for return to F-35 programTurkey hires U.S. lobbying firm to return to F-35 jet programme

Simply Tax
2021 Tax Filing Season Begins! #118

Simply Tax

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 12, 2021 42:47


The American Institute of CPAs (AICPA) Tax Policy & Advocacy Team and volunteer members continually monitor and advocate on legislative, regulatory, and administrative tax matters. The team has been off to an active 2021, following a remarkably busy 2020. Guests Amy Wang and Alex Scott of the AICPA Tax Policy & Advocacy Team join host Damien Martin to share updates and provide insight into the current areas the team is closely watching and working in. Here’s what’s covered: [03:20] Update on virtual currency-related tax issues and the AICPA comment letter on IRS virtual currency guidance (February 28, 2020) [07:45] Insights on partnership tax basis capital reporting and the AICPA comment letter on Notice 2020-43 regarding tax capital reporting (September 15, 2020) [16:07] Form 1065 instruction updates and the AICPA comment letter on the draft Form 1065 instructions (December 7, 2020) [17:47] The latest on the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) digital tax developments and AICPA advocacy efforts AICPA policy paper: Taxation of the digitized economy(Revised May 2019) AICPA comment letter on key elements essential to modification of the international tax system (May 2019) AICPA comment letter on Pillar One and income allocations between jurisdictions (October 2019) [22:33] Forms 5471 and 5472 penalty issues [26:14] Section 163(j) guidance and AICPA advocacy efforts AICPA comment letter on final and proposed regulations – pass-through issues (December 21, 2020) AICPA comment letter on Section 163(j) international and exempt organization issues (December 21, 2020) [36:20] Advice on the 2021 tax filing season Learn more about our guests and get additional resources here. GET MORE “SIMPLY TAX” We’re excited to also provide video content to strengthen your tax mind! Check it out on our YouTube channel. A complete archive of our episodes is available on our website and YouTube playlist. We’d love to hear from you! Email feedback and questions to SimplyTax@bkd.com. Connect with Damien on social media! LinkedIn | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube

每日一經濟學人 LEON x The Economist
*第三季*【EP. 63】#341 經濟學人新聞評論【德國戴姆勒公司、賓士車、零碳排放的汽車、自動駕駛車技術、歐元區、通貨膨脹、2% 通膨目標、貨幣政策、財政措施、經濟合作暨發展組織 (OECD)、

每日一經濟學人 LEON x The Economist

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 10, 2021 33:18


The OMFIF Podcast
Financial stability in Europe 2021

The OMFIF Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2021 41:27


Dimitri Demekas, visiting senior fellow at the Institute of Global Affairs at the London School of Economics and special adviser to the Bank of England, and Ludger Schuknecht, former chief economist of the German ministry of finance and deputy secretary-general at the Organisation of Economic Co-operation and Development, join Danae Kyriakopoulou, chief economist and director of research at OMFIF, to discuss European financial stability. They explore the need for high public spending because of Covid-19 and what comes next, the intricate relationship between the real economy and financial markets, the risks faced by central banks in the current crisis and more. Ludger Schuknecht also discusses his latest book, Public Spending and the Role of the State - History, Performance, Risk and Remedies.

Wiki Politiki with Steve Bhaerman
Dr. Susan Rogers - Separate And UNEQUAL

Wiki Politiki with Steve Bhaerman

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2021 56:21


Dr. Susan Rogers – Separate And UNEQUALCultural Segregation and Universal Health CareAired Tuesday, January 12, 2021 at 2:00 PM PST / 5:00 PM ESTAn Interview with Dr. Susan Rogers, Director of Physicians for a National Health Program“Our health care system needs to be healthier and more caring.” — Swami BeyondanandaAmerica’s health care system is seriously ill. And maybe instead of seeing a doctor, we need to see a paradox. Here are some paradoxical “irony supplements” to munch on. Did you know…• The U.S. spends more on health care as a share of the economy — nearly twice as much as the average industrial country — yet has the lowest life expectancy and highest suicide rates among the 11 Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) nations.• The U.S. has the highest chronic disease burden and an obesity rate that is two times higher than the OECD average.• Americans had fewer physician visits than peers in most countries, which may be related to a low supply of physicians in the U.S.• Compared to peer nations, the U.S. has among the highest number of hospitalizations from preventable causes and the highest rate of avoidable deaths.Do the math.Do the aftermath. The chronic illness of our health care system impacts all segments of society and the economy. And perhaps the greatest negative impact is on people of color. Compared to whites, they are more likely to be uninsured, face discrimination that creates barriers to care, and suffer from preventable health conditions and early death.Our guest this week is Dr. Susan Rogers, director of Physicians for a National Health Care Program. As an African-American and a medical doctor, she has seen first hand how health care for people of color can be – second-hand. This not only has to do with health care delivery, but also prevention, nutrition and other factors that negatively impact health. Dr. Rogers is recently retired from Stroger Hospital of Cook County, but continues as a volunteer attending hospitalist and internist there. While at Stroger Hospital, she was co-director of medical student programs for the Department of Medicine and received numerous teaching awards from medical students and residents. She is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Rush University, where she continues to be an active member of the Committee of Admissions.Dr. Rogers received her medical degree from the University of Illinois College of Medicine and completed her residency at Cook County Hospital, where she served an additional year as Chief Resident. She is a national board member of Physicians for a National Health Program and a past co-president of Health Care for All Illinois. She previously was Medical Director of the Near North Health Service Corp, a FQHC in Chicago, and remained on their board for many years after she left her directorship there. Dr. Rogers is a Fellow of the American College of Physicians, and a member of the National Medical Association.If you’re interested in how we deal with health care inequities, and INIQUITIES, please join us this Tuesday, January 12th at 2 pm PT / 5 pm ET.To find out more about Dr. Susan Rogers and PNHP, please go here: https://pnhp.org/about/Support Wiki Politiki — A Clear Voice In the “Bewilderness”If you LOVE what you hear, and appreciate the mission of Wiki Politiki, “put your money where your mouse is” … Join the “upwising” — join the conversation, and become a Wiki Politiki supporter: http://wikipolitiki.com/join-the-upwising/Make a contribution in any amount via PayPal (https://tinyurl.com/y8fe9dks)Go ahead, PATRONIZE me! Support Wiki Politiki monthly through Patreon!Visit the Wiki Politiki Show page https://omtimes.com/iom/shows/wiki-politiki-radio-show/ Connect with Steve Bhaerman at https://wakeuplaughing.com/#DrSusanRogers #SteveBhaerman #WikiPolitiki

Quick News Daily Podcast
"And Mitch McConnell is PT Barnum" - 12/17/2020

Quick News Daily Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2020 18:35


Today, we have a lot to get through on the last episode of Quick News Daily for the week. We discuss another allergic reaction to the COVID vaccine, the extra doses found in the vials for the vaccine, and French President Emmanuel Macron testing positive for the coronavirus. We also discuss Biden's latest nominee, why you shouldn't be worried about Republicans objecting Electoral College votes in the House, MacKenzie Scott, and more!----more----Find Quick News Daily on your favorite podcast player: https://rebrand.ly/QuickNewsSources:Alaskan has allergic reaction after getting Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccineFDA says Pfizer vaccine vials hold extra doses, expanding supply McConnell warns GOP off Electoral College brawl in CongressSales top 3 million for Barack Obama's "A Promised Land'MacKenzie Scott Has Donated More Than $4 Billion In Last 4 MonthsFrench President Emmanuel Macron tests positive for Covid-19 Biden expected to nominate North Carolina environmental official to run EPA (Mostly Accurate) Transcript: OPEN  Today is Thursday, December 17th, thanks for listening once again. There were actually a ton of really interesting stories out there today, so it was tough to narrow them down. I tried to choose the ones that would be most relevant to our lives, just like the mission of this show is supposed to be, so you’ll have to let me know how I do with that. *WILLY WONKA EFFECT* There are some pretty hot takes in here, so it’s going to be a fun one. To amend those words of Willy Wonka, let’s get caught up right away. COVID REACTION AND EXTRA DOSES So, here’s the deal: I’m going to talk about this first story because we all need to be informed and aware of the risks. That said, we should keep this in perspective. I’ll explain more about what I mean in just a second.  The story I’m talking about is the news from Alaska yesterday that a health worker who received the COVID vaccine had a severe allergic reaction. It happened within minutes of getting the shot, they had to give him a shot of epinephrine, and then he was fine after that. The health officials there said that this reaction was similar to the ones in the UK last week. The only problem is that this patient did not have a history of allergic reactions, whereas the two from last week did. In that way, those made sense, and it’s why this one is scarier. It’s human nature to fear the unknown. It’s why we’re afraid of the dark.  So the caution and perspective that I want to give is that I feel like all of these reactions wouldn’t be big stories if this was a typical disease instead of COVID. If we only heard about 3 severe reactions to even something like the regular flu vaccine, I’m sure doctors would be thrilled. The data isn’t real easy to find, but a study from 2009 showed thousands of really serious side effects from the flu vaccine, so I just want to emphasize that the actual news story here is that there are only 3 news-making allergic reactions.  The other side of that coin is that millions of flu vaccines go out every year, whereas, realistically, there have maybe been a couple hundred thousand COVID vaccines that have been given to the regular public. That same argument I just made about “only 3” is the same one that the idiots used this spring to justify why we shouldn’t be in lockdowns. They always said “the flu kills more people per year” after like 2 weeks of knowing about the coronavirus. It’s comparing apples to oranges. I guess, what I’m trying to say is that we should acknowledge these cases, we should study them, we should be cautious, but don’t let this scare you out of getting the vaccine altogether. Talk to an actual doctor, don’t just take my word for it.  But hey, let’s hear some good news about the vaccine, which is actually more of a story about how our pharmacists are pretty smart people. As early as Monday, and for sure by Tuesday, pharmacists nationwide began noticing that there was still quite a bit of vaccine left over in the vials that were shipped out. Originally, I talked about how there were 5 doses per vial of vaccine, and we went through all of that math. Well, to prevent against spills and other waste, the vials are always filled more than is needed. For example, if 5 doses is 5 ounces, then they probably fill the vials up to like 5.5 or something like that. In this case, the pharmacists are finding that there are 1-2 extra doses per vial, which experts say is unusual. I’m not sure what could make them overshoot the target so much, but it’s a lucky break for us.  If we do some more quick math, 1 extra dose is 20% more, and 2 is 40% more. This means our expected vaccine totals could be as much as 40%, which would help tremendously with our supply problems. It could mean that shortage that’s coming in the spring might not be as bad. Not everyone will be at 40%, and temporarily, some places still have to strictly follow protocols, so they can only use 5 no matter what. Realistically, maybe we’ll be in the 25-30% range, which is phenomenal.  I was just trying to figure out why they could have miscalculated so much, and the biggest things I thought of were: they didn’t know how much would be lost to spilling or the environment because no vaccine has ever had to be kept this cold, or they didn’t want their shortage problem to be even worse than they were already projecting, so they wanted to be damn sure there were 5 doses in there, or maybe because these are being so closely monitored in terms of their climate and having the GPS sensors and all that, maybe there’s a lot less waste because everyone’s watching them like hawks. Whatever it is, we’re lucky for it.  Alright, last point here since it’s just my own hearsay at this point, but I guess I can sort of see why Trump supporters would think there’s some conspiracy against him these days. First, the vaccine effectiveness results get released the weekend after the election, all of these vaccines are super effective, they can be distributed in less than a month’s time, and then we find out that we can get up to 40% more and maybe our shortage problem won’t be as bad? Man, that is a very good stretch of luck, I have to say.  I don’t believe in these conspiracies, but since my whole ending theme song is inspired by a movie where a guy takes down a fascist government that rose to power using a virus they created and a secret cure that they had the whole time, I’d be remiss not to mention it at all. In reality, humans are always looking to make these everyday events have special meaning. For some reason, we have this sense that there’s something bigger at play out there. Maybe it’s because we think we’re the only intelligent life that exists in our universe. Whatever it is, we try to make things make sense, and random luck just doesn’t add up for us like a good, old-fashioned conspiracy does. I’ll leave you with the best example: the JFK assassination. Nobody believes that a nobody, dumb guy like Lee Harvey Oswald could kill the beacon of hope for an entire generation and change the course of world history, but he probably did. Oh boy, I have to stop before we get too far into that, because even I believe something funny happened there.  BIDEN EPA Another day, another nomination for the Biden Administration. Today, the lucky nominee is Michael Regan, and he has been chosen to lead the Environmental Protection Agency. Currently, he’s the secretary of the North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality, and in the past he’s worked at the Environmental Defense Fund, as well as the Clinton and George W. Bush administrations. Apparently, Regan is only 44 years old, which is insane. He must have started working for Clinton right out of high school or something. Also, he looks like he’s in his late 30s, tops, which is impossible. I don’t know what his skin care regimen is, but it’s working.  I feel like I’ve been saying this a lot, which is a good thing, but if he’s confirmed by the Senate, Regan will become the first Black American to lead the EPA.  MACRON Sort of coming back around to another story from last week, French president Emannuel Macron has tested positive for the coronavirus. He did it with style, which I respect. His motto was “go big or go home”, because in just the past few days, he’s met with a ton of other European leaders, so now they have to quarantine as well.  Let me tell you what I mean. Here’s his schedule: Last Thursday and Friday, the European Council met in Brussels, and 25 of 27 leaders of EU nations were there. On Monday, he helped mark the 60th anniversary of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, where he met the Spanish prime minister, as well as the leader of the OECD. Tuesday, he met with the president of the International Committee of the Red Cross. Then, just yesterday, he had lunch with the prime minister of Portugal, and he met with his own cabinet.  The Spanish prime minister tested negative today, but he said he’s still quarantining until Christmas Eve, December 24th (honestly, if you didn’t get the coronavirus but were exposed, what better reason is there for taking the week off before Christmas? That’s a power move right there).  European Council president Charles Michel said he was quarantining as a precaution. France’s prime minister also tested negative today but is still quarantining as a precaution, as is the President of France’s National Assembly, which sounds like their version of Speaker of the House to me. The prime ministers for Portugal and Spain also said they’d be self-isolating as precautions.  Lastly, Macron’s wife, Brigitte, has proactively started her quarantine, but she has not had any symptoms so far. Since they say “proactively”, I’m guessing she’s still waiting for her test results. She has a little more to worry about than Macron since she’s 67 years old compared to his 42. That’s an interesting story between them, by the way. Look up their history together if you’re bored and have some spare time.  Obviously, I wish President Macron well. Like I said last week, I have a soft spot for the guy, but I wasn’t thrilled with that police law he backed down from. Again, I’m hoping he can turn a corner and salvage his legacy. And all kidding aside, it was pretty crazy how he met with pretty much anyone who’s powerful in Europe while he was potentially contagious. It’s great that everyone so far is testing negative, and it gives me some confidence in basic COVID precautions like masks, social distancing, and hand washing. It’s a good thing they didn’t invite any Republicans, I’ll say that much.  MCCONNELL WARNING There has been some talk recently, at least in the media, that some Republicans are going to try to object to certifying at least some Electoral Votes, which the House is going to certify on January 6th. I went over this shortly after Biden was actually declared the winner in November, but to object, you need one Representative and one Senator to formally request it. I can’t remember exactly, but I think that the whole House then votes on whether to accept the votes, and if a majority does, they certify them anyway. Since the Democrats still have a majority in the House, the votes are all going to be certified.  In a private teleconference with GOP Senators, Mitch McConnell and the rest of the leadership team warned Republicans against doing this because of the reason I just said: the House is never going to throw out these votes. Now, do I think that some representative and some senator are going to team up to do this? Of course I do; you can definitely find two clowns in a circus, and Mitch McConnell is basically PT Barnum. Not to mention the fact that the Republicans are all about the show and don’t actually care about results. It’s all theater for Fox News or OANN or Newsmax or whatever propaganda network is going to be the new leader.  So, my guidance to you is to not stress out about this, even if there are objections on January 6th. Nancy Pelosi is still Speaker, and she’ll shut that stuff down right away.  OBAMA BOOK SALES Just because Donald Trump is an avid listener of Quick News Daily (maybe...I really have no idea), I want to mention that former President Barack Obama’s first presidential memoir has already sold 3.3 million copies in the US and Canada in just one month. That’s already 3rd best for presidents, and that’s total. Bill Clinton and George W. Bush are basically tied since they each have sold between 3.5 and 4 million total, so Barack basically caught them in a month.  For history nerds, Ulysses S. Grant’s memoirs are most likely the best-seller of all time for presidents, but the records just aren’t good enough to know for sure. We can make a pretty good guess though since those have been in publication for like 130 years, and when they were originally sold, there were hundreds of thousands of verified sales (and there were a heck of a lot fewer people on Earth back then).  But you just know that this really makes Trump mad, don’t you? He knows he’ll never have a book that successful. Even his claim to fame, The Art of the Deal, has only sold about a million copies.  Honestly, I’d be surprised if he lives long enough to get a memoir out. With his legal troubles, all of that debt, and I think it’s clear that he’s pretty far into cognitive decline, so when he doesn’t have the presidency to protect him, I think he’ll go downhill quickly. If you gave me the option of betting on if he’d be running again in 2024 or that he won’t even make it to 2022, I’d take that second option in a heartbeat. MACKENZIE SCOTT      I want to end on what I think is a good, positive note. It’s the news that billionaire MacKenzie Scott has given away more than $4B in the last 4 months alone. First of all, if you’re not quite familiar with who Mackenzie Scott is, she’s the ex-wife of Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos. As part of their divorce, which went final last year, she got 4% ownership of Amazon, which was worth $37B at the time. That was in Amazon stock, which has taken off even more this year, meaning she could be worth a lot more than that. That same 4% is worth $62B these days.  She explained part of her reasoning for this in an op-ed on Medium, saying "Economic losses and health outcomes alike have been worse for women, for people of color, and for people living in poverty. Meanwhile, it has substantially increased the wealth of billionaires."  She and her team chose 384 organizations to give this money to, and she even designated these funds as unrestricted gifts, meaning the organizations who got them didn’t even have to agree to any conditions, which is where they can get you sometimes.  By July of this year, she had already given away about $1.7B to a bunch of different causes, but focused mainly on historically black colleges and universities, and women’s and LGBTQ equity organizations.  For these last few months, she asked her advisers to figure out ways to give away more money faster so that she could help with the COVID fallout. She says “They took a data-driven approach to identifying organizations with strong leadership teams and results, with special attention to those operating in communities facing high projected food insecurity, high measures of racial inequity, high local poverty rates, and low access to philanthropic capital.”  By the way, can you imagine having a whole team who’s entire job is to vet these organizations that you’re going to give billions too? That is a goal.  The CEO of Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors, told Bloomberg that Scott's nearly $6 billion in donations this year "has to be one of the biggest annual distributions by a living individual", and the director of the Program on Inequality and the Common Good at the Institute for Policy Studies wrote that "She still has a long way to go in her stated intention of giving away all the wealth. But she's now made two bold moves, putting to shame the other 650 U.S. billionaires who haven't figured out comparable ways to boldly share”. He’s referring to the Giving Pledge that she signed last year, which is a promise that she’ll give the majority of her wealth to charity. Oddly enough, Jeff Bezos didn’t sign the pledge, although he did commit $10B to fighting climate change earlier this year.  I’ll admit, it feels a bit strange to be praising these billionaires so much for giving the rest of us some help, when regular people helped build those fortunes. At the same time, when you have one person giving away $6B in just one year, and the experts on the subject are saying that’s a record and puts other billionaires to shame, I think it’s newsworthy and shows that some people can handle that much wealth fairly responsibly.  I also don’t think it’s a coincidence that she is a she. Maybe we don’t keep track of every billionaire’s donations to charity, but I think it’s definitely notable that she’s new to being a billionaire and is giving away her wealth at this rate.  Here comes another opinion, but it seems like the people who suddenly gain such an insane amount of wealth are the ones who realize how fortunate they are and how lucky they had to be to get to that point, whereas the people who built their wealth by starting a business or something are more likely to keep it.  END Alright everybody, and that’s the way it is. Like I mentioned yesterday, there won’t be a new show tomorrow. I realized that I never played you Joe Biden’s victory speech after being certified by the Electoral College on Monday, so I think I’m going to send that out as the show tomorrow, so you’ll be able to hear that wherever you’re listening right now. It’ll just be like when I played their victory speeches when the race was called by the media back in November.  As for next week, I plan on having at least one show on Monday or Wednesday. I have a sneaky suspicion that folks might be taking a break from listening to podcasts next week, but I’m not sure. All the big podcasts seem to take the week off, which I’m always hesitant about. I’m thinking about putting together a mini “best of” show, but now I’m thinking maybe I should save that for the week after and make it like a “year in review” show. Who knows, it’s just an idea I’m playing around with.  I’d mention I’m still designing new merchandise, but I’ve been saying that for the last couple weeks, so I’ll just let you know when it’s actually available at this point.  Anyways, that’s the lay of the land. Stay safe, and I’ll see you on the next episode. 

KBS WORLD Radio Korea 24
Korea 24 - 2020.12.04

KBS WORLD Radio Korea 24

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2020


Korea24 – 2020.12.04. (Friday) - News Briefing: President Moon Jae-in carried out a Cabinet reshuffle on Friday, replacing four ministers - the ministers of land and transport, interior and safety, health and welfare and gender equality. Justice Minister Choo Mi-ae, who is locked in a fierce battle with Prosecutor General Yoon Seok-youl, was not included in the reshuffle. (Sam Len) - In-Depth News Analysis(Weekly Economy Review): Professor Yang Jun-suk from the Catholic University of Korea talks about the Korea Composite Stock Price Index(KOSPI) breaking the 2700 mark for the first time ever and discusses the possibility of that number getting even higher. He also talks about the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development(OECD) reducing its 2020 growth outlook for South Korea to a 1.1% contraction, citing fallout from the resurgence of COVID-19. - Korea Trending with Alex Sigrist: Samsung Electronics hands out over 200 promotions as part of an executive reshuffle(삼성전자 임원승진), Tottenham Hotspur Son Heung-min scores his 12th goal of the season (손흥민), and BTS's Jin unveils his new single, "Abyss"(방탄소년단, 진). - Movie Spotlight: Film critics Jason Bechervaise and Marc Raymond share "Lucky Monster(럭키 몬스터)," the directorial debut of Bong Joon-young(봉준영). They also give their thoughts on the star-studded adaptation of the Broadway hit, "The Prom(더 프롬)." - Next Week from Seoul: Mark Wilson-Choi brings us stories and events to look out for the following week, including details being announced on South Korea's deal to purchase COVID-19 vaccines.

Finance & Fury Podcast
What is the real economy and why should this be left alone?

Finance & Fury Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2020 22:45


Welcome to Finance and Fury, the Furious Friday edition. Two weeks ago on Furious Friday, we went through an intro to the great reset. This episode we will look further into this topic, at some of the proposals and break these down further. I managed to talk to someone involved with the WEF in the interim which provided some good insights If you haven’t heard - The great reset is all about resetting the economy and society – resetting in the way that a handful of individuals at the top of entities like the WEF, UN deem to be in the world’s populations interest To start with – we need to get to the bottom of the best way to actually think about the economy - it is useful to think of an economy in real terms versus the purely financial terms I have said it many times in this podcast that the real economy is what is important – and that is you and I – our economic interactions, where we work, what we buy or how we consume or save, every one of our interactions at the aggregate level is the total sum of economic output – The economy when left to its own devices for economic growth can create a situation where the whole is greater than the sum of its parts Through specialisation and effects of real economic growth leading to a greater output overall – all about an equilibrium being reached over time through having free economic interactions Everything that is a final product tends to have a greater value when compared to the sum of its parts – we process martials and they are transported and transformed into other physical goods, which are transported from point A to point B and consumed– Think about a pencil – there is a good essay called I, Pencil – by Leonard Read – talks about the complexity in making this – where no one person can actually produce a pencil – the gathering of the components and the trying to turn these components into one item as simple as a pencil – quote from it – “The absence of a master mind, of anyone dictating or forcibly directing these countless actions which bring me (the pencil) into being. No trace of such a person can be found. Instead, we find the invisible hand at work.” This is very much akin to the metabolism that maintains a living body – which is a very complex system So when we are thinking about the economy – important to think of the economy as total system which encompasses the total body of humanity - all cultures, nations and families of the world and how they function on a day to day basis – Where economists and elites then step in – this can be very dangerous – their first step is that our economic interactions then gets measured – analysed and statistical representations are created – based around the models that are chosen by them – and what they choose to include or exclude in these models – hence we are relying on their interpretation of data and statistical measurements to get these aggregate economic indicators then – a handful of people analyse these data sets – then they believe that they know how to best maximise outputs based around a statistical representation – even though they had nothing to do with the output in the first place – However - they have studied for years and have come up with theories and therefore know better This brings into question the concept of economic specialised knowledge versus common knowledge – no handful of individuals can know what is best when compared to the common knowledge (each of whom have their own forms of specialised knowledge, which may not be economic) However - Even though economists or policy makers haven’t lived the same life as you – they still think they know what is best for you - they have different priorities and different personal economic situation – most of the people coming up with these plans are very connected and affluent individuals – on very good salaries that are not going to be affected by their proposals – if anything they will get more income Disappointing to see economists and policy makers believing that humans are stagnate representations of the outputs of these measurements They forget that humans are dynamic – we adapt – and tend to try and maximise for our own situation – there are lagged time periods depending on those who adapt first and those that actually never adapt They very nature of adaption comes back to creative destruction through a technological progress – however – those with the most power often don’t want this – their products are at the top currently – they are in power – in addition – for policies to work as intended there needs to be as little adaption as possible – the assumptions are based around individuals being stagnant after all so creative destructions that are population driven through the supply of new goods and services get stifled – And a greater focus is on demand – if no new supply beyond monopolies can exist – then you have to work with the existing supply and the only path to economic growth is seen through demand side That creates a situation that actually fails to meet the optimised results for the growing needs of humanity – hence the population concerns are ignored when looking at the actual outcome – This brings up back to the core concept of the great reset is that the WEF and their strategic partners – where they want to remake the economy and systems as they see are in our best interest – covid is used as an excuse push polices changes through whilst the population is malleable to change   This isn’t some out there theory – they are literally telling us - Simple manner of reading what they write – many people don’t – they are busy which is understandable – and many of these concepts do sound utopian on paper – but I am more focused on the likely outcome – not the proposals From the previous episode covering this – went through the strategic partners – on top of this – the great reset is also favoured by the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) - an intergovernmental economic organisation with 37 member countries which we are a member of – as well as the UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres who is the former president of the Socialist International organisation You also have influential induvial like Prince Charles and the IMFs chief economist Gina Gopinath as well as having the backing from corporations including Microsoft, Google, Facebook and, many of the biggest banks and MasterCard backing these plans But Prince Charles stated that “We have a golden opportunity to seize something good from this crisis. Its unprecedented shockwaves may well make people more receptive to big visions of change,” His Father Prince Philip said in 1988 when speaking to German news agency “In the event that I am reincarnated, I would like to return as a deadly virus, to contribute something to solving overpopulation.” A lot of this reset has to go with the alignment of the economy to the emission-reduction goals, including net-zero greenhouse gas emissions. It recommends stimulus measures to ensure “social development … is fully integrated with environmental objectives such as those in UN Sustainable Development Goals that form part of Agenda 2030 – but this is another topic for another day – that has already been covered in length on the podcast in the past – there is a series about 15 episodes long – on the website under the series called by any other name – united nations, socialism, fascism There is a disturbing trend through history – and that is leaders who think they possess the power to change the course of history through reshaping the economy and the social contracts that we would otherwise try to optimise The more that they have undemocratic control – the worse things tended to get - These individuals who believe they control the destiny of the population are not only deluded – but to enforce their plans things invariably become violent when human nature gets in the way – the more they wish to mould human nature to their utopian world – the greater the control is needed – and the greater control the state has over people – the worse the persons life tends to get – not only economically but at the very basis of freedom of choice I know that a lot of people can switch off here – as the thinking goes – this could never happen to us – you will probably be right – but what about future generations? Remember – in the world today – North Korea exists, Venezuela exists – looking back not that far – going back to the 90s the USSR existed, as well as Vietnam, Cambodia, China under Mao, Cuba under Castro – many countries have gone through the removals of freedoms of choice in economic interactions – never works well – and all of these previously mentioned countries - before this they were relatedly free countries when compared to what they turned into – but the turning point was once the population gave enough power to governments that the enforcement could be implemented – in the west I see it as more so a will of the government and not the ability – they have the ability in most western nations to enforce anything they want in population centres – seen it in the recent lock down enforcements   Getting to the core of the proposal - The Great Reset agenda would have three main focuses – with 6 components to achieve this and 52 sub components -   For the top-level focuses that the WEF have – The first would steer the market toward fairer outcomes – the core of this focus is to create global governance to improve policy coordination on policies for taxation and at the regulatory level, as well as fiscal policy This includes upgrading trade arrangements, and create the conditions for a “stakeholder economy.” It is a fancy way of saying a centrally planned socialist economy – where profits should no longer be the focus but these should be given back to the people In the current environment they are – if you own a state in the company – but under this model – it sounds like what Marx was proposing back to factory workers – even though he never worked in a factory The WEF states that these proposals need governments to implement long-overdue reforms that promote more equitable outcomes. Depending on the country, these may include changes to wealth taxes, the withdrawal of fossil-fuel subsidies, and new rules governing intellectual property, trade, and competition The second component of a Great Reset agenda would ensure that investments advance shared goals, such as equality and sustainability This one confuses me a bit – it calls for large-scale Government spending programs – they say that “rather than using these funds, as well as investments from private entities and pension funds, to fill cracks in the old system, we should use them to create a new one that is more resilient, equitable, and sustainable in the long run. This means, for example, building “green” urban infrastructure and creating incentives for industries to improve their track record on environmental, social, and governance (ESG) metrics” This last part has something to do with sustainability – but the equality component may have something to do with UBI proposals – but there is too little information to know at this stage The third and final priority of a Great Reset agenda is to harness the innovations of the Fourth Industrial Revolution to support the public good A lot of these align with the SDGs – the more I read about the proposals – the more I see the exact same vague proposals that the UN came out with For the six components to help achieve this – you have a lot of sub-components – and these normally relate to 2 or 3 of each Shaping the economic recovery – Taxation, gender parity, inclusive economic designs Redesigning social contracts, skills and jobs – LGBTI inclusion, human rights, future of mobility (immigration) Restoring the Health of the Environment – focus on climate change, the circular economy Developing sustainable business models – focused on climate change as well, employment in the workplace Harnessing the Fourth Industrial revolution – internet governance, digital identities, AI, digital economy and identities Strengthening regional development Revitalizing global cooperation – focused on global governance, globalisation trade, global financial and monetary systems When looking at these - Again – they have some detail of what their proposals are but not how they are gong to achieve this – especially around the equality elements The only system which can eliminate inequality is one where every citizen lives equally in tragedy – you have to reduce society to the lowest common denominator – obviously those who are proposing these changes from Davos – very nice area in Switzerland will be unaffected – as well as political leaders – you are paying their exorbitant salaries after all – no risk of the free market coming in the way of this But every time political leaders with the backing of the enforcement side of a Government wish to enforce equality – it doesn’t work well for us - Those living in Ukraine discovered this in the early 1930s when the Holodomor occurred - between 3 million and 12 million people starved to death after the Soviets convinced people to turn on their village’s farmers and the government confiscated all of the food – as they were apparently hoarding it – they went through their own form of lock downs – as they weren’t allowed to leave In the process – the breadbasket of the Soviet union no longer could provide food – so a lot of the USSR starved to death Looking at the top level proposals – a lot of this reeks of Marxist ideology - Marxist logic dictates that if someone profits from a sale of a good, or if the individual who has taken all the risk and put up their own capital to create a company to employer others – they are robbing people As there is an inequality due to them getting more out of the economic truncations – hence – if there is inequality, a crime has been committed and the population (or the government) has the right to commit a crime back in the form of violent enforcement This notion in the hands of Governments has prompted the most horror ever seen by humanity – even both of the world wars death tolls are less than communist death tolls – A free market does create inequality – but at the same time the living standards and wealth of those left behind are still vastly better than under a purely equal system - this is because wealth creation is not a zero-sum game There is not a finite amount of money or wealth - Money can be created, jobs can be created and people can be pulled out of tragedy and despair by a free market – might not be as easy as getting free money – but this is a ceiling trap – or welfare trap – where people can be trapped in poverty But individuals at the WEF are set to try and repeat the mistakes of the pass – if you view it as a mistake from a population level – for those at the top – these styles of governments are not a mistake – their lifestyles get better, whilst those under them get worse as Karl Marx would say: “History repeats itself, first as tragedy, second as farce”.   Important thing – don’t buy into the rhetoric around these proposals – they all sound good – but so did communism to those at the centre of the political spectrum - Nobody can know what you goals are but you – giving in control is sacrificing to those who don’t know you – don’t care about you – do not have the same shared goals – They say they want better for the world – but this is in their own vision – The best thing for their world may be to reduce the population to 500m and have a serf class with full automation – but that is not the best thing for us - Maybe next ep – might focus on some of the economic resets – especially the currency side of things towards a digital currency – but have covered this topic in the past – like the monetary resets to digital currencies – so let me know if you want to hear more and can do another episode - Thank you for listening to today's episode. If you want to get in contact you can do so here: http://financeandfury.com.au/contact/

NextWave Private Equity
What private equity needs to know about investing in APAC: Part II

NextWave Private Equity

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2020 19:03


In this episode of the NextWave Private Equity Podcast, Josh Lewsey, EY-Parthenon Strategy & Transactions Partner, and John Levack, Vice Chairman, Hong Kong Venture Capital and Private Equity Association, join Winna Brown to help private equity investors understand how new regulations will impact the current and future private equity ecosystem in APAC. Visit ey.com to read our latest private equity perspectives. The global trade environment has increased geopolitical uncertainty, making forecasting difficult. The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) is predicting 2020 will see a 4% global contraction in GDP with only one G20 country having a positive GDP: China. It is possible that a bifurcation between US/Europe and Asia of both markets and products will occur as a result of politics rather than consumer requirements. This combined with the region’s growth potential and faster post-pandemic recovery can potentially result in Asia as a more promising market in which to deploy private capital. Hong Kong is the biggest cross-border center for private equity (PE) in Asia. While the National Securities Law in Hong Kong has caused significant discussion, the impact on Hong Kong-based PE firms has been nominal: this is because China is already a major investment market for these firms and anyone investing in China is already subject to the Chinese national security law, which is quite similar.  The Hong Kong Government recently passed the following three landmark laws that solidify Hong Kong as an ideal base for private equity operations: Unified Fund Exemption Regime: extends the profits tax exemption to all funds, whether or not the fund's central management and control is exercised in Hong Kong. New Limited Partnership Fund Law: allows a limited partnership to be set up in Hong Kong so a PE fund vehicle can be based there. New concessionary tax rate on carried interest starting in 2020. Over the next three to five years, PE in Asia-Pacific (APAC) will see: Fee pressures and low yields in developed markets will push more capital allocation to APAC. Funds that drive sustainable returns through operational value creation and prioritize ESG will emerge as market leaders. Bifurcation of funds into financial conglomerates and small specialist funds. Minority stakes in local SME companies coming to market as new generations explore exit opportunities. An influx of capital from pension (defined contribution) investors will increase dry powder and exacerbate the challenge of deploying it successfully and responsibly.

World Economic Forum
The Great Reset Dialogues - 26.08.20, Building Back Business

World Economic Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2020 58:48


With: - Tharman Shanmugaratnam, Senior Minister, Prime Minister’s Office, Singapore - Angel Gurría, Secretary General, Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) - Brian Moynihan, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Bank of America, USA. Chair of the World Economic Forum International Business Council - Stacey Cunningham, President and Chief Executive Officer, NYSE, USA - Li Xin, Managing Director, Caixin Global, Caixin Media, People's Republic of China