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Best podcasts about researchers

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Latest podcast episodes about researchers

Connections with Evan Dawson
Researcher Valery Perry on trends in political violence and extremism across the globe

Connections with Evan Dawson

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 51:41


In the second hour of "Connections with Evan Dawson" on Wednesday, May 18, 2022, researcher Valery Perry, based in Bosnia, discusses trends in political violence and extremism across the globe.

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 05.18.22

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 58:16


Majority of acne sufferers have diminished levels of omega-3 Ludwig-Maximilian University (Germany), May 16 2022.  A study reported during the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology Spring Symposium suggests a protective role for omega-3 fatty acids against acne. The study revealed that 94% of 100 acne patients whose blood samples were analyzed for red blood cell omega-3 fatty acid levels had lower than the recommended concentrations. Higher omega-3 fatty acid levels were found among people who regularly consumed legumes and among those who supplemented with omega-3.  Omega-3 fatty acids lower inflammation that occurs in acne by stimulating anti-inflammatory eicosanoids and decreasing levels of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). Patients with omega-3 fatty acids below the recommended levels had lower serum IGF-1 concentrations than patients who were not deficient in omega-3. Those with severe deficiencies had even greater levels of IGF-1. Nuts and peanuts may protect against major causes of death Maastricht University (Netherlands), May 11, 2022 A paper published in the International Journal of Epidemiology confirms a link between peanut and nut intake and lower mortality rates, but finds no protective effect for peanut butter. Men and women who eat at least 10 grams of nuts or peanuts per day have a lower risk of dying from several major causes of death than people who don't consume nuts or peanuts. The reduction in mortality was strongest for respiratory disease, neurodegenerative disease, and diabetes, followed by cancer and cardiovascular diseases. The effects are equal in men and women. Peanuts show at least as strong reductions in mortality as tree nuts, but peanut butter is not associated with mortality, researchers from Maastricht University found. In this new study, it was found that mortality due to cancer, diabetes, respiratory, and neurodegenerative diseases was also lowered among users of peanuts and nuts. Project leader and epidemiologist Professor Piet van den Brandt commented: “It was remarkable that substantially lower mortality was already observed at consumption levels of 15 grams of nuts or peanuts on average per day (half a handful).  People more likely to trust, cooperate if they can tolerate ambiguity, study finds Brown University, May 12, 2022  Can a new colleague be trusted with confidential information? Will she be a cooperative team player on a critical upcoming project? Assessing someone's motives or intentions, which are often hidden, is difficult, and gauging how to behave toward others involves weighing possible outcomes and personal consequences. New research published in Nature Communications indicates that individuals who are tolerant of ambiguity—a kind of uncertainty in which the odds of an outcome are unknown—are more likely to cooperate with and trust other people. Tolerance of ambiguity is distinct from tolerance of risk. With risk, the probability of each future outcome is known. The many unknowns inherent in social situations make them inherently ambiguous, and the study finds that attitudes toward ambiguity are a predictor of one's willingness to engage in potentially costly social behavior. Overall, being able to tolerate ambiguity predicted greater prosocial behavior, which prioritizes the welfare of other people and not just one's own self-benefit. By contrast, there was no association between risk tolerance and social decision-making. When subjects were allowed to gather information about others—through gossiping about, engaging with or observing another person, for instance—and reduce the amount of ambiguous uncertainty around their social choices, the link between ambiguity tolerance and willingness to trust disappeared, according to the study. High-fat diet linked to nitric oxide levels, cancer development Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, May 17, 2022 It has long been hypothesized that dietary habits can precede and even exacerbate the development of cancer. Researchers at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology proved that a direct link exists between the amount of fat included in one's diet and bodily levels of nitric oxide, a naturally occurring signaling molecule that is related to inflammation and cancer development. “Inflammation can play a significant role in this environment. Certain inflammatory response comes from highly processed foods, which are high in calories and high in fat. Yadav and coauthors are familiar with existing research linking increased nitric oxide levels to inflammation, and inflammation to cancer.  The researchers used the probe to design a diet study comparing the tumorigenicity of the breast-cancer-carrying mice on a high-fat diet (60% of calories coming from fat) with mice on a low-fat diet (10% of calories coming from fat) by measuring the nitric oxide levels in both groups. “As a result of the high-fat diet, we saw an increase in nitric oxide in the tumor microenvironment,” said Michael Lee, a lead coauthor on this study. “The implication of this is that the tumor microenvironment is a very complex system, and we really need to understand it to understand how cancer progression works. A lot of factors can go into this from diet to exercise—external factors that we don't really take into account that we should when we consider cancer treatments.” Blood pressure drugs EXPOSED for increasing the risk of pancreatic cancer in women  Baylor College of Medicine, May 12, 2022 Arguably, some blood pressure medications may be necessary and offer a benefit for those suffering with cardiovascular issues. But, of equal importance is, research out of the Baylor College of Medicine that has determined some of these drugs – like calcium channel blockers (CCBs) – can raise the risk of pancreatic cancer in menopausal women. CCBs work by preventing calcium from entering blood vessel walls and heart cells, reducing blood pressure and decreasing cardiac workload and stress. The study examined a large group of over 145,000 postmenopausal women from the Women's Health Initiative study between ages 50 and 79 years old. By 2014, over 800 had developed pancreatic cancer, with elevated risk among those taking a short-acting CCB. WARNING: Blood pressure drugs can double the risk of pancreatic cancer Of the participants, those who had taken a CCB (short-acting calcium channel blocker) had a 66 percent increased chance of getting pancreatic cancer. Those who took short-acting CCBs (as compared with other blood pressure drug types) for over three years had a doubled risk of pancreatic cancer. The drugs in question include short-acting nifedipine, brand names Adalat CC nicardipine (Cardene IV), Procardia and diltiazem (Cardizem). The short-acting varieties of blood pressure drugs were the only ones linked to higher pancreatic cancer risk; other types did not seem to increase the risk Heightened dream recall ability linked to increased creativity and functional brain connectivity University of California, Berkeley, May 14, 2022 People who can frequently recall their dreams tend to be more creative and exhibit increased functional connectivity in a key brain network, according to new research published in the journal Nature and Science of Sleep. The findings provide new insights into the neurophysiological correlates of dreaming. “I think that dreaming is one of the last frontiers of human cognition — a terra incognita of the mind if you will,” said study author Raphael Vallat, at the Center for Human Sleep Science at the University of California, Berkeley. “Although we all spend a significant amount of our lives dreaming, there are still so many basic research questions related to dreams that are unanswered, which obviously makes it such a fascinating topic to study! For his new study, Vallat and his colleagues used brain imaging techniques to examine whether neurophysiological differences exist between individuals who frequently recall their dreams and those who do not. The researchers found that high dream recallers and low dream recallers had similar personalities, levels of anxiety, sleep quality, and memory abilities. However, high dream recallers scored significantly higher than low dream recallers, indicating that they had greater creative abilities. Vallat and his colleagues also observed increased functional connectivity within the default mode network in high dream recallers compared to low dream recallers. The brain network “is known to be active during day-dreaming, mind-wandering (e.g. getting lost in your thoughts), and has been further suggested to promote creativity and dreaming,” Vallat explained. The increased connectivity was specifically found between the medial prefrontal cortex and the temporo-parietal junction, in line with clinical reports that have shown lesions to these brain regions result in a cessation of dream recall. Video : 1. This pandemic treaty is the greatest power grab any of us has seen in our lifetime – Neil Oliver (8:35)  2. Theresa Long MD, MPH, FS Opinion on Vaccines Expert Panel on Federal Vaccine (start @ 0:04) 3.  Douglas Kruger –  “You will OWN NOTHING, and you will be HAPPY” (start @ 0:47) (interview with Douglas Kruger conducted by David Ansara of The Centre For Risk Analysis (CRA) 4. Elizabeth Question

Let's Talk AI
New Google AI Features, Enzyme Discovery, Clearview AI Ban, Kendric Lamar Deepfakes

Let's Talk AI

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 43:08


Our 97th episode with a summary and discussion of last week's big AI news! Sponsor: This episode is sponsored by Zencastr, our go-to tool for recording the podcast. It is super easy to use, and there is nothing to download. Go to http://zen.ai/lastweekinai and get 30% off your first three months with a PRO account! Outline: (00:00) Intro (01:25) Hugging Face reaches $2 billion valuation to build the GitHub of machine learning (4:30) Google ups the AI ante with new features for Voice, Assistant, Maps and more (09:33) How machine learning is speeding up Formula 1  (10:02) China to build AI-powered 3D printed hydroelectric dam in Tibet  (11:00) Intel debuts new chips for AI workloads, data center acceleration and laptops (11:30) $62.5M Fundraise Values Self-Checkout System Mashgin at $1.5B -  (12:20) Scientists Discover Method to Break Down Plastic in Days, Not Centuries (16:25) This deep learning technique solves one of the tough challenges of robotics (21:33) Researchers now able to predict battery lifetimes with machine learning  (22:34) How Do Patients Feel About AI in Health Care? It Depends  (23:22) Meta AI Introduces ‘Make-A-Scene': A Deep Generative Technique Based On An Autoregressive Transformer For Text-To-Image Synthesis With Human Priors (24:32) Ad break (25:50) A quick guide to the most important AI law you've never heard of (30:40) Clearview AI banned from selling its facial recognition software to most US companies  (34:20) Justice Department and EEOC Warn Against Disability Discrimination  (35:23) U.S. civil rights enforcers warn employers against biased AI  (36:12) Kendrick Lamar uses deepfakes in latest music video  (38:23) Humans vs. DALL·E  (41:52) Outro

RNZ: Checkpoint
Antibody testing underused to help long Covid sufferers - expert

RNZ: Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 3:16


Experts say antibody testing is being under-utilised as a tool to help long Covid sufferers - who never tested positive on a RAT. One in five people who've had Covid are still experiencing symptoms three months on. Researchers and lab workers say antibody testing needs urgent funding. Louise Ternouth reports.

Narcissistic Abuse Recovery with Angie Atkinson
Psychopaths, Sociopaths and Contagious Laughter - Researchers Find a Surprising Connection #shorts

Narcissistic Abuse Recovery with Angie Atkinson

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 1:01


All in the Mind
Manifestation; Overconfidence; Radio drama changing attitudes

All in the Mind

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 27:56


Instagram is awash with people sharing dream homes, holidays, partners and jobs which they claim to have 'manifested' into being. Proponants of manifestation say that thinking positive thoughts attracts tangible positive things into your life. They believe that 'asking the universe' for what you want via journaling, mood boards, and mantras can have a powerful real-world impact. Hayley Sparkes is a successful TV presenter and model but when the pandemic started she found herself with no work or income and turned to manifestation to try to improve her situation. Now she credits manifestation with bringing her a dream partner, home, and job, and all in under a year. Claudia Hammond and her studio guest David Robson ask whether there is any research evidence that manifestation really can change your life. Last week a passenger in Florida landed a place safely after the pilot become unresponsive. Do you think you could do the same thing in an emergency? Researchers in New Zealand found that people are surprisingly confident about their ability to fly a plane with no training. Claudia talks to one of the researchers, Kayla Jordan from the University of Waikato. Finally, new research showing a radio soap opera in Burkina Faso changed attitudes towards violent insurgency. Psychologist Rezarta Bilali from New York University talks to Claudia about the power of radio to change minds. Producer: Lorna Stewart Air Traffic Control Source: Liveatc.net

Spaced Out Radio Show
May 16/22 - UFOs and the US Congress

Spaced Out Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 174:03


Tonight, we have a great, professional panel looking into the coming public hearings of UFOs in the United States Congress. Joining us are Communications Specialist, Bruce Claggett, Dr. Bob McGwier, scientist and former CIA, MUFON Board of Directors Member, Tom Whitmore, Researcher and author, Michael Huntington, and from Zland Communications, activist Victor Viggiani.

RealTalk MS
Episode 246: The High Cost of MS Medications with Steffany Stern

RealTalk MS

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 33:42


When my wife was diagnosed with MS in 1997, the annual cost of her MS medication was $9,000. Today, the annual cost of that same medication is $110,000. We cannot allow the insanity associated with the cost of MS medications to continue. Joining me to discuss the impact of the outrageously high cost of MS medications -- and what each of us can do about it -- is the National MS Society's Vice-President of Advocacy, Steffany Stern. We're also talking about a Phase 1 clinical trial for an investigational Epstein-Barr Virus vaccine (and why that matters to everyone living with MS). We'll tell you about a study that may have identified a biomarker for MS-related fatigue. We're also sharing the results of a study that identified which stress-reducing activities can help reduce MS-related depression and fatigue. And we'll tell you about a study that identified the economic benefits of starting MS medications early. We have a lot to talk about! Are you ready for RealTalk MS??! The (HIGH!) Cost of MS Medications   :22 NIH Announces Phase I Clinical Trial of Investigational EBV Vaccine 4:21 Study identifies a potential biomarker for MS fatigue  6:04 Study identifies stress-reducing activities that lower MS-related depression and fatigue    8:37 Study shows the economic benefits of starting MS medications early  11:25 Steffany Stern discusses the impact of the cost of MS medications   14:16 Share this episode  32:10 Download the RealTalk MS app for your iOS or Android device   32:30 SHARE THIS EPISODE OF REALTALK MS Just copy this link & paste it into your text or email: https://realtalkms.com/246 ADD YOUR VOICE TO THE CONVERSATION I've always thought about the RealTalk MS podcast as a conversation. And this is your opportunity to join the conversation by sharing your feedback, questions, and suggestions for topics that we can discuss in future podcast episodes. Please shoot me an email or call the RealTalk MS Listener Hotline and share your thoughts! Email: jon@realtalkms.com Phone: (310) 526-2283 And don't forget to join us in the RealTalk MS Facebook group! LINKS If your podcast app doesn't allow you to click on these links, you'll find them in the show notes in the RealTalk MS app or at www.RealTalkMS.com National MS Society COVID-19 Vaccine Guidance for People Living with MS https://www.nationalmssociety.org/coronavirus-covid-19-information/multiple-sclerosis-and-coronavirus/covid-19-vaccine-guidance National MS Society: You Can Help Bring MS Medications Into Reach https://nationalmssociety.org/Treating-MS/Medications/Make-MS-Medications-Accessible/Take-Action RealTalk MS Ep.229: Evidence Shows MS Is Triggered by the Epstein-Barr Virus with Dr. Kassandra Munger and Dr. AJ Joshi https://realtalkms.com/229 RealTalk MS Episode 231: Evidence Shows EBV Triggers MS: Understanding this Breakthrough Research with Dr. Bruce Bebo https://realtalkms.com/231 Cerebrospinal Fluid Amyloid Precursor Protein as a Potential Biomarker for Fatigue in Multiple Sclerosis: A Pilot Study https://sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2211034822003583 SURVEY: Undertaking Specific Stress-Reducing Activities are Associated with Reduced Fatigue and Depression, And Increased Mastery, in People with Multiple Sclerosis https://sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2211034822003169 Early vs Late Treatment Initiation in Multiple Sclerosis and Its Impact on Cost of Illness: A Register-Based Prospective Cohort Study in Sweden https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35496759 iConquer MS Survey for MS Caregivers https://survey.alchemer.com/s3/6823942/Caregiver-Survey-MS-Caregivers iConquer MS Survey for Researchers and Healthcare Providers https://survey.alchemer.com/s3/6823815/Caregiver-research-survey-HCPs-and-researchers Join the RealTalk MS Facebook Group https://facebook.com/groups/realtalkms Download the RealTalk MS App for iOS Devices https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/realtalk-ms/id1436917200 Download the RealTalk MS App for Android Deviceshttps://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=tv.wizzard.android.realtalk Give RealTalk MS a rating and review http://www.realtalkms.com/review Follow RealTalk MS on Twitter, @RealTalkMS_jon, and subscribe to our newsletter at our website, RealTalkMS.com. RealTalk MS Episode 246 Guests: Steffany Stern Tags: MS, MultipleSclerosis, MSResearch, MSSociety, RealTalkMS Privacy Policy

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 05.16.22

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 57:55


Cocoa may enhance skeletal muscle function University of California at San Diego, May 3, 2022 A small clinical trial led by researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine and VA San Diego Healthcare System (VASDHS) found that patients with advanced heart failure and type 2 diabetes showed improved mitochondrial structure after three months of treatment with epicatechin-enriched cocoa. Epicatechin is a flavonoid found in dark chocolate. The study published by the journal Clinical and Translational Science looked at profoundly ill patients with major damage to skeletal muscle mitochondria. The trial participants consumed dark chocolate bars and a beverage with a total epicatechin content of approximately 100 mg per day for three months. Biopsies of skeletal muscle were conducted before and after treatment. After the three-month treatment, the researchers looked at changes in mitochondria volume and the abundance of cristae, which are internal compartments of mitochondria that are necessary for efficient function of the mitochondria, and measurable by electron microscopy. After three months, we saw recovery – cristae numbers back toward normal levels, and increases in several molecular indicators involved in new mitochondria production.” Healthy habits may improve longevity, prevent Alzheimer's disease Rush University Medical Center, May 14, 2022 Everyday habits that serve as the backbone of a healthy lifestyle may keep your brain sharp and help you live longer, according to new research from aging experts at RUSH. A study recently published in the British Medical Journal found that people ages 65 and older who had a healthy lifestyle lived longer—3.1 years longer for women, 5.7 years longer for men—than their peers who didn't have the same healthy lifestyle. They also spent more of their remaining years without Alzheimer's disease. What constitutes a healthy lifestyle?Eating the Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurogenerative Delay (MIND) diet Staying engaged in cognitive activities like reading and puzzles Being physically active for at least 150 minutes a week Not smoking Limiting alcohol use (no more than one drink a day for women and two drinks a day for men) This latest study builds on ongoing research from RUSH showing that lifestyle factors can potentially reduce the risk for Alzheimer's disease and dementia by up to 60%, says Kumar Rajan, Ph.D., professor of epidemiology and director of the Rush Institute for Healthy Aging. Ozone treated water v. lethal microbial material   University of Alberta,  May 9, 2022 A University of Alberta research team has discovered that technology commonly used to decontaminate food industry equipment can also rid meat processing plants of lethal microbial material responsible for the human version of the ailment Mad Cow disease. U of A microbiology professors Mike Belosevic and Norm Neumann and engineering professor Mohamed Gamal El-Din demonstrated that infectious proteins found in the brain matter of cattle can be eradicated from water treated with ozone. The discovery could have applications in decontaminating wastewater in settings such as slaughterhouse effluents where infected neural material known as prions may be present. The ozone decontamination procedure can potentially be used to sterilize instruments used for neurosurgery, and prevent the transfer of infectious prions during surgical procedures. Prions are able to destroy and can still be infectious after being incinerated at heats of 850o C. In the wild, soil contaminated by a carcass of a deer that died of Chronic Wasting Disease can remain a source of infection for many years. The U of A research team's technique of using water treated with ozone to destroy prions is an improvement on current prion decontamination methods. Tai Chi Benefits Patients With Parkinson's Oregon Research Institute, May 13, 2022 Tai chi, an ancient martial art characterized by slow, flowing movement and meditation, helps improve balance and movement control for people with Parkinson's disease. The finding, published in The New England Journal of Medicine, is the latest study to show the benefits of tai chi for people with chronic health problems. Past studies have shown that tai chi reduces falls and depression among the elderly, and lessens pain for patients with arthritis and fibromyalgia. In the latest research, 195 people with movement and balance problems caused by Parkinson's disease were recruited from four Oregon cities. The patients were divided into three exercise classes that met for an hour a day, twice a week. One group took part in an extensive stretching class, another was taught resistance training, and the third group performed tai chi. After six months, patients in the tai chi group performed better on a number of measures related to strength, movement control, balance, stride length and reach. Resistance training also offered some benefits, and both the tai chi and resistance training groups had fewer falls than the stretching group. Vitamin B12 shows promise against ALS Tokushima University (Japan), May 13 2022.  An article appearing on May 9, 2022 in JAMA Neurology described a randomized trial in which men and women with the progressive neurologic disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) exhibited improvement in their condition after receiving a high dose of a form of vitamin B12 known as methylcobalamin.  Among the 126 patients who completed the trial, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Functional Rating Scale  scores declined by an average of 2.66 points for those who received the vitamin and by 4.63 in the placebo group—a difference of 43%. (Lower scores indicate increased severity of symptoms.)  This randomized clinical trial demonstrated that use of ultrahigh-dose methylcobalamin resulted in a 43% reduction in clinical deterioration as evaluated with the ALSFRS-R total score throughout the 16-week treatment period in the patients with early-stage ALS, Diabetes risk from sitting around University of Leicester (UK), May 12, 2022 A new study has found that women who stay seated for long periods of time every day are more prone to developing type 2 diabetes, but that a similar link wasn't found in men. Researchers from the University of Leicester Departments of Health Sciences and Cardiovascular Sciences revealed that women who are sedentary for most of the day were at a greater risk from exhibiting the early metabolic defects that act as a precursor to developing type 2 diabetes than people who tend to sit less. The team assessed over 500 men and women of the age of 40 or more about the amount of time spent sitting over the course of a week. It was found that the women who spent the longest time sitting had higher levels of insulin, as well as higher amounts of C-reactive protein and chemicals released by fatty tissue in the abdomen, leptin, and interleukin6, and which indicate problematic inflammation. This study provides important new evidence that higher levels of sitting time have a deleterious impact on insulin resistance and chronic low-grade inflammation in women but not men and that this effect is seen regardless of how much exercise is undertaken. This suggests that women who meet the national recommendations of 30 minutes of exercise a day may still be compromising their health if they are seated for the rest of the day. Videos: 1. Fauci Clip Surfaces, As Incoherent In 1985 As He Is Now: Spreads Diabolical Lie That “HIV” Could Spread To Children Via Casual Contact In Household (0:35) 2. Margaret Heckler & Robert Gallo – 1984 Press Conference (0:38) 3. Melissa Ciummei Clip  (9:52) 4. A terrifying prediction for 2030 (the Great Reset) (start @ 1:12) 5. New Rule: American Carnage | Real Time with Bill Maher (HBO) (7:48)

Secure Freedom Radio Podcast
With James Roguski and Monica Crowley

Secure Freedom Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 53:00


JAMES ROGUSKI, Author, Researcher, Publisher of STOPTHEWHO.com Research into the WHO Roguski has done What was the initial charter of the World Health Organization? Who at the WHO declared the U.S. is currently under an "emergency"? MONICA CROWLEY, Former United States Assistant Secretary of the Treasury for Public Affairs Monica's new podcast, "The Monica Crowley Podcast" Federal government employees retirement funds going towards the CCP The increasing threat China poses to the U.S.

RN Drive - Separate stories podcast
UNSW researchers pave way for 'night solar panels'

RN Drive - Separate stories podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 11:06


It's the device which could see solar panels generate energy at night, and it's been made possible by UNSW researchers. They've developed a thermoradiative diode to capture photons leaving Earth along the infrared spectrum and converted them into electricty.

Demystifying Science
Ministry of Truth Has Come for My Medical License - Dr. Meryl Nass, Physician/Researcher

Demystifying Science

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 105:15


!!!Support independent media at our Patreon: https://bit.ly/3lcAasB !!! The Ministry of Truth wants Dr. Meryl Nass' medical license, but she's not going to give it up without a fight. In this week's episode we talk about the manmade fingerprints of epidemics, the large-scale clampdown on medicines that have been considered safe for widespread use for decades, and the social changes that have happened over the last few years that look like they're here to stay. Support us by becoming a patron of the sciences: https://bit.ly/3lcAasB And by checking out Meryl Nass' work ªº¬˚∆≤≥≤≥ https://merylnass.substack.com/≤≥≤≥∆˚¬ºª ªº¬˚∆≤≥≤≥ http://anthraxvaccine.blogspot.com≤≥≤≥∆˚¬ºª #MinistryOfTruth #InfoPolice #BioWar Check our short-films channel, @DemystifySci: https://youtu.be/1OCL5Lq8m6s ªº¬˚∆≤≥ ≤≥ Join the mailing list https://bit.ly/3v3kz2S​ ≤≥≤≥∆˚¬ºª PODCAST INFO: Anastasia completed her PhD studying microbial communication at Columbia University. When not talking to brilliant people or making movies, she spends her time painting and exploring the woods. Michael Shilo also did his PhD at Columbia studying the elastic properties of molecular water. When he's not in the film studio, he's exploring sound in music. They are both freelance professors at various universities. Blog: http://DemystifySci.com/blog RSS: https://anchor.fm/s/2be66934/podcast/rss Donate: https://bit.ly/3wkPqaDSwag: https://bit.ly/2PXdC2y SOCIAL: - Discord: https://discord.gg/MJzKT8CQub - Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/DemystifySci - Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/DemystifySci/ - Twitter: https://twitter.com/DemystifySci --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/demystifying-science/support

Something for Nothing: A RUSH Fancast
Ep. 142: Morgan Woolsey, Researcher/Cataloger of Alex Lifeson Sale at Julien's Auctions

Something for Nothing: A RUSH Fancast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 32:48


We interrupt our scheduled Hold Your Fire Redux for one week to bring you Morgan Woolsey, the specialist at Julien's Auctions who researched and catalogued the upcoming Alex Lifeson sale! Morgan tells us about the months of research that went into writing the catalog descriptions and finding photos and video stills of Alex with his guitars! It's a fascinating discussion!

Bright Side
Strict Mothers Raise More Successful Daughters

Bright Side

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 11:18


When you're a teen, you roll your eyes and let out a big sigh every time your parents nag you. But studies show you should be thanking them. It turns out your parents' nagging is good for you. Researchers say that girls whose moms were always on to them that are more likely to succeed in life! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

We Are Paradox Media
5/13/2022 Mae Brusse63ll Political Researcher AKA "The Queen Of Conspiracy

We Are Paradox Media

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 175:00


If it wasn't for Mae and 10 other researchers, we may know nothing about the Kennedy Assassination, Watergate, SLA, and numerous other important news events that have occured since 1963. Join us tonight while we take an inside look at the life of Mae Brussell.

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 05.13..22

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 61:59


Nutmeg's hidden power: Helping the liver  Nan-Jing University (China), May 9, 2022 Smelling nutmeg evokes images of fall, pumpkin pie and hot apple cider. But the spice has been used for years in traditional Chinese medicine to treat gastrointestinal illnesses. Now one group reports in ACS' Journal of Proteome Research that they have figured out how nutmeg helps other organs, specifically the liver. Nutmeg is the seed of the Myristica fragrans tree, which is commonly found in Indonesia, and has been used to treat asthma, rheumatic pain, toothaches and infections. In the laboratory, researchers have shown that nutmeg can fight hyperlipidaemia, hyperglycemia, heart tissue damage and hepatotoxicity.  The researchers used a mouse animal model of liver toxicity to test the mechanism behind nutmeg's protective effects. Metabolomics analyses showed that nutmeg likely protected against liver damage by restoring the mice to more healthy levels of various lipids and acylcarnitines. In addition, the team found that a specific compound in nutmeg, myrislignan, had a strong protective effect against liver damage. Research shows numerous health benefits of Modified Citrus Pectin Miami Childrens Hospital and Dharma Biomedical, April 29, 2022 New research published in the journal BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine shows Modified Citrus Pectin (MCP) packs a powerful immune punch. The study uses human blood samples to demonstrate the ability of a specific form of Modified Citrus Pectin to very significantly induce and enhance the benefits of T-cytotoxic cells and human Natural Killer (NK) cells. The NK-cell's cancer killing activity was demonstrated in live leukemia cancer cells, uncovering yet another mechanism of MCP's powerful anti-cancer actions.  Immune researchers said: “The Modified Citrus Pectin we researched has potential for altering the course of certain viral diseases such as the common cold or other upper respiratory tract viral infections based on the mechanisms of action that were observed in this study. We also found that MCP significantly outperformed other known immune enhancing agents such as medicinal mushrooms.”  Specifically, this study highlights MCP's ability to selectively increase cytotoxic immune activity against cancer and infections.  B complex may protect against diabetic kidney disease Ain Shams University (Egypt), May 3, 2022 New findings show a protective effect for B vitamin supplementation on the kidney function of children with type 1 diabetes.  These findings suggest vitamin B supplementation, in addition to traditional angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor therapy may be a simple, safe and cost-effective strategy for early protection of kidney function, which may improve the long-term quality of life for type-1 diabetes patients.” In the current study, 80 type 1 diabetics between the ages of 12 and 18 years with early signs of diabetic kidney disease and deficient levels of vitamin B12 were given vitamin B complex supplements or no treatment for 12 weeks. At the study's conclusion, children who received B complex exhibited improvement in blood markers of glucose regulation and kidney function. “After 12 weeks of vitamin B complex supplementation in children and adolescents with diabetic kidney disease, we detected lower levels of markers that indicate poor kidney function, suggesting that it had a protective effect and could slow progression of the disease,” Dr Elbarbary reported.  Zinc is cancer's worst enemy: This mineral is key to preventing cancer, scientists conclude University of Texas Arlington, May 12, 2022 Consuming zinc might be something that you only think about when cold season approaches given its stellar performance in keeping the common cold at bay, but its value extends far beyond preventing this relatively innocuous problem to something far more serious: fighting cancer. Researchers from the University of Texas at Arlington have discovered the important role zinc can play in preventing cancer, especially the esophageal variety. Although past studies had indicated zinc had a protective effect on the esophagus when it comes to cancer, it wasn't clear why. They found that zinc has the incredibly useful ability to selectively stop the growth of cancerous cells while leaving normal esophageal epithelial cells intact. The researchers say their finding could help improve treatment for esophageal cancer and even provide some insight into how it might be prevented. Pan pointed out that many cancer patients have a zinc deficiency. Dad's involvement with baby early on associated with boost in mental development Imperial College London, King's College London and Oxford University, May 9, 2022 Fathers who interact more with their children in their first few months of life could have a positive impact on their baby's cognitive development.In a study, published in the Infant Mental Health Journal, researchers from Imperial College London, King's College London and Oxford University looked at how fathers interacted with their babies at three months of age and measured the infants' cognitive development more than a year later.They found that babies whose fathers were more engaged and active when playing with them in their initial months performed better in cognitive tests at two years of age. Even as early as three months, these father-child interactions can positively predict cognitive development almost two years later, so there's something probably quite meaningful for later development, and that really hasn't been shown much before.”What's more, the positive link between involved dads and higher infant MDI scores were seen equally whether the child was a boy or a girl, countering the idea that play time with dad is more important for boys than girls, at an early age. Depression linked to memory problems and brain aging University of Miami School of Medicine, May 9, 2022Depression in older adults may be linked to memory problems, according to a study published in the online issue of Neurology. The study also showed that older people with greater symptoms of depression may have structural differences in the brain compared to people without symptoms.The study involved 1,111 people who were all stroke-free with an average age of 71. The majority were Caribbean Hispanic. At the beginning of the study, all had brain scans, a psychological exam and assessments for memory and thinking skills. Their memory and thinking skills were tested again an average of five years later. Researchers found after adjusting for age, race, anti-depressive medications, and other variables, greater symptoms of depression were linked to worse episodic memory. Scores on tests were lower by 0.21 of a standard deviation compared to those without greater symptoms of depression. Episodic memory is a person's ability to remember specific experiences and events.Researchers also found those with greater symptoms of depression had differences in the brain including smaller brain volume as well as a 55 percent greater chance of small vascular lesions in the brain. Videos: https://globalcovidsummit.org/news/declaration-iv-restore-scientific-integrity 1. Will the Future Be Human? – Yuval Noah Harari (part 2) 2. The Great Reset | Dystopian Sci-Fi Short Film 3. Max Blumenthal: US is Arming Neo-Nazis in Ukraine 4. Lara Logan blows the lid off Ukraine 5. Charlie Chaplin – Final Speech from The Great Dictator 6. What It's Like Being a Millennial (Give Me the Respect I Didn't Earn)

Cyber and Technology with Mike
13 May 2022 Cyber and Tech News

Cyber and Technology with Mike

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 8:45


In today's podcast we cover four crucial cyber and technology topics, including: 1.Zyxel fixes critical flaw in firewall product 2.Researchers find hundreds of WordPress sites compromised 3.Ukrainian man sentenced to four years in prison for cyber crime 4.Iran detected targeting Jordan in sophisticated attack I'd love feedback, feel free to send your comments and feedback to  | cyberandtechwithmike@gmail.com

Parents Tip of the Day
Exercise Has Long-Term Benefits for Kids' Moods, Research Finds

Parents Tip of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 2:53


Researchers have found exercise has long-term benefits for kids' and may help prevent depression.

Quirks and Quarks Complete Show from CBC Radio
Ancient oyster mounds, seagrass' sweet secret, saving the Mekong delta, reading minds to produce sound and next-gen COVID-19 vaccines

Quirks and Quarks Complete Show from CBC Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 54:09


Oyster shell mountains show history of sustainable Indigenous fisheries; Seagrass is hiding a submerged sweet CO2 secret; Saving the Mekong delta in six (not) easy steps; Researchers can read a bird's brain to tell what it's about to sing; The first COVID-19 vaccines were a medical miracle – the next ones could be even better.

The Carl Nelson Show
Futuristic Researcher Sadiki Bakari & Mike Africa l The Carl Nelson Show

The Carl Nelson Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 150:49


Futuristic Researcher Sadiki Bakari checks in to the WOL classroom this afternoon. Brother Sadiki will provide an update on the latest AI, Artificial Intelligence developments. Sadiki will discuss Trauma and its connection to the Central Nervous System & the Neurological System. Sadiki will also explain intuition and its' relationship to AI, Algorithms, and Synthetic Systems. In Addition, Brother Sdiki will talk about Programming, Pathology, New-Age-ism, and what you should be doing now. Before Brother Sadiki, Mike Africa from the Move Organization on tomorrow's 37th anniversary of the bombing of the group's home in Philadelphia. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

High Intensity Health Radio with Mike Mutzel, MS
Exercise Turns COVID Into a Cold, New Study Finds

High Intensity Health Radio with Mike Mutzel, MS

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 14:23


Researchers in Europe find that exercise habits in the year prior to COVID exposure decrease severity of symptoms. Crush your next workout or sauna session with the new Electrolyte Stix by MYOXCIENCE:  Use code podcast to save 15% OFF at checkout Link to show notes and video: https://bit.ly/3wiMcqZ Malisoux, L., et al (2022). Associations between physical activity prior to infection and COVID-19 disease severity and symptoms: results from the prospective Predi-COVID cohort study. BMJ Open, 12(4), e057863.  Time Stamps: 00:02 Physical activity is protective against both moderate and severe COVID 19-like illness. 01:00 People who are physically active are less likely to experience common classic symptoms. 01:53 Exercise is a key therapeutic intervention. It does not need to be structured recreational fitness. 03:45 There are now 7 studies showing that regular exercise and physical activity saves lives. 05:43 MET = Metabolic Equivalent Task. 06:15 Fewer than 30 MET hours per week means that you more likely to have moderate to severe symptoms. 09:45 80 MET hours per week garnered the fewest symptoms. 10:50 40 – 60 MET hours per week is ideal. 12:00 Even walking and gardening are protective. 12:40 There is reduced odds of death.  

Black Op Radio
#1094 – Abraham Bolden, Cherise Williams, Jim DiEugenio

Black Op Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 108:46


  News: Abraham Bolden: Ex-Secret Service agent pardoned by Biden Abraham Bolden was the first African-American secret service agent on the White House detail Bolden applied for pardon back in 1972 under President Nixon and later under Obama and Trump Abraham Bolden interviewed on Black Op Radio: episode 378 (2008) Book: The Echo from Dealey Plaza by Abraham Bolden: Kindle FREE Borrowable Ebook: The Echo from Dealey Plaza by Abraham Bolden We can only exist as long as truth exists Stream/buy the documentary series JFK: Destiny Betrayed: Amazon Prime, iTunes, Vudu Bolden reveals information that is not present in his book A high official threatened Kennedy in 1961 in the Oval Office as witnessed by Bolden How Bolden met President Kennedy for the first time The Secret Service planned and schemed to thwart the truth of the assassination Bolden urges President Biden to release all the remaining JFK files Bolden wants to testify on record The Secret Service (SS) was involved in the assassination by being negligent The SS knew about the assassination plots in Chicago, Tampa and Dallas The SS made no effort to increase the protection of President Kennedy even after they learnt of these threats Bolden was said defamed as being insane We should stand for the truth even if it hurts us The judge in Bolden's trial instructed the jury that he was guilty even before the deliberations began Part B: Cherise Williams; beginning at 23:48 Cherise Williams is part of Abraham Bolden's legal team She also drafted the clemency petition Book: The Echo from Dealey Plaza by Abraham Bolden: Kindle Pardons are seldom granted Convictions are not expunged following a pardon Bolden's clemency petition was filed solely on the basis of innocence Part C: Jim DiEugenio; beginning at 35:04 Barrack Obama's disappointing presidency The attempted assassination of Jimmy Carter Raymond Lee Harvey and Osvaldo Espinosa Ortiz Movie: Watch The Parallax View (1974) online: iTunes, Prime, Vudu, Google Play, Microsoft The price we pay for not facing the truths about the assassinations of the 1960s Researchers often get lost in the minutia and lose sight of the big picture Video: Jim Garrison meets Mr. X (Oliver Stone's JFK) Gerald Posner's crappy book Case Closed Watch Oliver Stone's Snowden (2016): Netflix, Microsoft, Prime, Google Play, Vudu Documentary: Citizenfour by Lauru Poitras (2014): Prime, Vudu, Microsoft, Google Play Jim Gochenaur, Elmer Moore and Abraham Bolden The Chicago Plot to Kill JFK: Read Online, Download PDF Kennedy was not getting out of 1963 alive No mention of Roberto Lopez or Thomas Arthur Vallee At Kennedys and King Article: JFK VS LBJ: The MSM in Overdrive by Jim DiEugenio One of the talking heads in the series LBJ: Triumph and Tragedy is Mark Updegrove Updegrove's new book Incomparable Grace Updegrove goes into the Cuban missile crisis, Vietnam war and civil rights issues He says that no military person knew about Kennedy's withdrawal program “I always thought it was foolish for you to make any statements about withdrawing. I thought it was bad psychologically. But you and the president thought otherwise, and I just sat silent.” - LBJ to Mcnamara Stream/buy JFK: Destiny Betrayed: Amazon Prime, iTunes, Vudu Jim's 90-minute interview on JFK and Civil Rights (Aaron Good's American Exception podcast) The Kennedys and Civil Rights: How the MSM Continues to Distort History by Jim - Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4 FREE Borrowable Ebook: Of Kennedys and Kings: Making Sense of the Sixties by Harris Wofford Kennedy began affirmative action Robert Kennedy's Law Day (1961) address Documentary: Crisis: Behind a Presidential Commitment (1963): iTunes, Prime, Google Play, Vudu RFK advised his brother John to deliver an address to the nation on the issue of civil rights June 11 1963,

RNZ: Morning Report
Large ships' anchors damaging port seabeds - researcher

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 3:11


New research shows the anchors of large ships are damaging the seabed at busy ports, which could threaten some marine species. Researchers from NIWA, Auckland University and Auckland University of Technology have used sonars and ship-tracking data to document the effects of anchoring outside Picton. They say it's revealed an extensive and persistent impact. NIWA marine geophysicist Dr Sally Watson spoke to Corin Dann.

The Avid Reader Show
Episode 660: Stephanie D. Preston - The Altruistic Urge: Why We're Driven to Help Others

The Avid Reader Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 68:27


Ordinary people can perform acts of astonishing selflessness, sometimes even putting their lives on the line. A pregnant woman saw a dorsal fin and blood in the water--and dove right in to pull her wounded husband to safety. Remarkably, some even leap into action to save complete strangers: One New York man jumped onto the subway tracks to rescue a boy who had fallen into the path of an oncoming train. Such behavior is not uniquely human. Researchers have found that mother rodents are highly motivated to bring newborn pups--not just their own--back to safety. What do these stories have in common, and what do they reveal about the instinct to protect others? In The Altruistic Urge, Stephanie D. Preston explores how and why we developed a surprisingly powerful drive to help the vulnerable. She argues that the neural and psychological mechanisms that evolved to safeguard offspring also motivate people to save strangers in need of immediate aid. Eye-catching dramatic rescues bear a striking similarity to how other mammals retrieve their young and help explain more mundane forms of support like donating money. Merging extensive interdisciplinary research that spans psychology, neuroscience, neurobiology, and evolutionary biology, Preston develops a groundbreaking model of altruistic responses. Her theory accounts for extraordinary feats of bravery, all-too-common apathy, and everything in between--and it can also be deployed to craft more effective appeals to assist those in need.Get the book here: https://wellingtonsquarebooks.indiecommerce.com/book/9780231204408

Papa Phd Podcast
Podcasting and Science Communication as a Researcher – Do We Have the Time? With Federica Bressan

Papa Phd Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 60:22


Hi! If you find value in Papa PhD and in the content I bring you every week, click on one of the buttons below and send some of that value back to me

Innovation Now
Blowing Ash

Innovation Now

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022


Researchers from across the country have gathered at NASA Armstrong Flight Center in California to find a solution to the unavoidable hazard of volcanic ash.

Design Lab with Bon Ku
EP 72: Designing on the Front Lines, Part 3 | Safer Spaces

Design Lab with Bon Ku

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 54:11


This is part 3 of a special 3-part virtual talk in partnership with Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum and the Health Design Lab at Thomas Jefferson University. Architects are reimagining the places where we live, work, and gather. Many modern indoor spaces are sealed shut and climate-controlled. The pandemic prompted people to open the windows, move activities outside, and control the flow of indoor air. From plastic sneeze guards to graphics for social distancing, new norms sprang quickly into place. What worked and what didn't? How can everyone have access to healthier spaces? Panelists include Jennifer D. Roberts, University of Maryland School of Public Health; Jennifer Tobias, Researcher, New York City Streateries; and Andrew M. Ibrahim, University of Michigan and HOK The panel was moderated by Morgan Hutchinson and Ellen Lupton. Video archives of the series are also available at CooperHewitt.org. Watch videos of previous episodes of DOTFL Season 1 and Season 2 Episode website link: https://mailchi.mp/designlabpod/dotfl3 More episode sources & links Sign-up for Design Lab Podcast's Newsletter Newsletter Archive Follow @DesignLabPod on Twitter Instagram and LinkedIn Follow @BonKu on Twitter and Instagram Check out the Health Design Lab Production by Robert Pugliese Cover Design by Eden Lew Theme song by Emmanuel Houston

Grant Writing & Funding
Ep. 218: Top Tips from a Researcher: How to Write a Logic Model Template

Grant Writing & Funding

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 44:54


Top Tips from a Researcher: How to Write a Logic Model Template What We Discuss In This Episode: ✨ What a logic model is ✨ All the elements in a logic model ✨ The difference between outcome and output ✨ How a logic model can help create your evaluation plan ✨ Added logic model samples and examples James Pann received his Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting from the University of Texas at Austin. He obtained his M.S.Ed. in Mental Health Counseling and Ph.D. in Counseling Psychology from the University of Miami. Dr. Pann completed his clinical internship at Nova Southeastern University Community Mental Health Center in neuropsychology, behavioral medicine, and adult and child psychotherapy. Additionally, he had a postdoctoral fellowship in pediatric behavioral medicine at the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Miami/ Jackson Memorial Medical Center. He also completed a Family Therapy Externship at the Center for Family Studies at the University of Miami. —------------------------------------------------------ ✨

Think Out Loud
Study chronicles Oregon farmworkers' challenges during the pandemic

Think Out Loud

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 22:38


A recent study takes an in-depth look at the unsafe and often dehumanizing conditions Oregon farmworkers have endured during the COVID-19 pandemic. Researchers from Oregon universities collaborated with advocacy organizations and farmworkers themselves to understand the challenges these essential workers have faced and what policies they want to see changed to improve conditions in the future. We hear from Sandra Martin, an Oregon farmworker and COVID-19 emergency response coordinator for Bienstar, an organization that provides housing and other resources to farm workers and their families. Also joining us are Jennifer Martinez-Medina, a PhD candidate at Portland State University and Anabel Hernandez-Mejia, communications and advocacy coordinator for Farmworker Housing Development Corporation. Interpretation for our interview with Sandra Martin was provided by Victor Shepherd with Passport to Languages.

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 05.11.22

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 54:16


Diets high in fiber associated with less antibiotic resistance in gut bacteria United States Department of Agriculture, May 10, 2022 Healthy adults who eat a diverse diet with at least 8-10 grams of soluble fiber a day have fewer antibiotic-resistant microbes in their guts, according to a study published by Agricultural Research Service scientists and their colleagues in mBio. Microbes that have resistance to various commonly used antibiotics such as tetracycline and aminoglycoside are a significant source of risk for people worldwide, with the widely held expectation that the problem of antimicrobial resistance (AMR)—the term that refers to bacteria, viruses, and fungi that are resistant to antibiotics—is likely to worsen throughout the coming decades.  In this study, the researchers were looking for specific associations of the levels of antibiotic resistance genes in the microbes of the human gut with both fiber and animal protein in adult diets. The researchers found regularly eating a diet with higher levels of fiber and lower levels of protein, especially from beef and pork, was significantly correlated with lower levels of antimicrobial resistance genes (ARG) among their gut microbes. Those with the lowest levels of ARG in their gut microbiomes also had a greater abundance of strict anaerobic microbes, which are bacteria that do not thrive when oxygen is present and are a hallmark of a healthy gut with low inflammation. Bacterial species in the family Clostridiaceae were the most numerous anaerobes found. The strongest evidence was for the association of higher amounts of soluble fiber in the diet with lower levels of ARGs. Soluble fiber, as its name suggests, dissolves in water and is the main type of fiber found in grains like barley and oats; legumes like beans, lentils and peas, seeds (like chia seeds) and nuts; and some fruits and vegetables like carrots, berries, artichokes, broccoli and winter squash. Probiotics stop menopause-like bone loss in mice Emory and Georgia State universities, May 6, 2022 Probiotic supplements protected female mice from the loss of bone density that occurs after having their ovaries removed, researchers at Emory University School of Medicine and Georgia State University have shown  The findings suggest that probiotic bacteria may have potential as an inexpensive treatment for post-menopausal osteoporosis. However, clinical evidence that probiotics can have a lasting effect on the mix of bacteria in the body is limited. Emory and Georgia State researchers found that in mice, the loss of estrogen increases gut permeability, which allows bacterial products to activate immune cells in the intestine. In turn, immune cells release signals that break down bone. Probiotics both tighten up the permeability of the gut and dampen inflammatory signals that drive the immune cells, the team found. Researchers led by Pacifici treated female mice twice a week with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG), a type of bacteria found in some yogurts, or with a commercially available mix of eight strains of bacteria known as VSL#3. Good nutrition positively affects social development, research shows University of Pennsylvania, May 6, 2022  Proper nutrition during childhood can positively affect a child's social behaviors and development. It's a unique take on a field that often focuses on how poor diet negatively influences early childhood development. For this study, the scientists analyzed a sample of 1,795 3-year-old children from Mauritius, an island off the eastern coast of Africa with a population of about 1.3 million people. They focused on four aspects of physical health related to nutrition and four indicators of social development. Physical health factors included anemia expressed by low hemoglobin levels, reflecting iron deficiency; angular stomatitis revealed by cracked lips and a lack of vitamin B2 and niacin; and insufficient protein intake indicated by thin or sparse hair and hair discoloration.  The researchers considered a child with just one of the quartet as “suffering from nutritional deficits.” However, children with more malnutrition indicators showed more impaired social behavior. Social interactions studied included friendliness, extent of verbalization, active social play and exploratory behavior.  Examining the relationship between these components after the fact, they teased out a neurocognitive link between nutrition and comprehensive social behavior. It's a connection undiscovered to this point. “The bigger message is give children good nutrition early on,” Liu said. “Not only will it enhance cognitive function but, importantly, promote good social behavior,” which is essential to brain development and intelligence. “In the same study,” Raine said, “we've shown that children with positive social behavior, eight years later, they have higher IQs.” Diabetes almost doubles risk of death from COVID University of Aberdeen, May 10, 2022 People with diabetes were almost twice as likely to die with COVID and almost three times as likely to be critically or severely ill compared to those without diabetes. However, the study conducted by researchers from the University of Aberdeen, which reviewed data from hundreds of thousands of people from all over the world, also found that good management of the condition can mitigate against the risks.  Specifically, the collaboration with King's College, London, found that while diabetes presents a significant risk of severe illness and death with COVID, good control of blood sugar in these patients can significantly reduce this risk.  The researchers reviewed findings from 158 studies that included more that 270,000 participants from all over the world to determine how COVID affects people living with diabetes.  Eating nuts linked to lower risk of colon cancer Seoul National University College of Medicine (Korea), May 6, 2022 Eating nuts has been linked to a number of health benefits, such as a reduced risk of obesity, diabetes and heart disease. Now, new findings from South Korea suggest that a nut-rich diet may also reduce a person's risk of colon cancer.  The researchers found a reduction in this risk for both men and women. Eating a serving of nuts three or more times a week appeared to have a big effect on risk. In the study, a serving of nuts was considered to be 15 grams (0.5 ounces). That's a smaller amount than what's considered a serving in the United States (A serving in the U.S. is 28 g, or 1 oz.) Although the researchers included many types of nuts in their analysis, peanuts were the most widely consumed nuts among people in the study. This may be due to the availability of peanuts in South Korea, the researchers said. The researchers found that men who reported eating three or more servings of nuts a week had a 69 percent lower risk of colon cancer than those who reported eating no nuts. Women who ate three or more servings had an 81 percent lower risk than those who ate no nuts, according to the study. Nicotinamide riboside repairs features of Alzheimer's disease NIH's National Institute on Aging, May 6, 2022 Researchers have found that an NAD+ precursor helped mice with features of Alzheimer's disease perform better on learning and memory tests… The brain's usual DNA repair activity is impaired in Alzheimer's disease, leading to inflammation and dysfunction. A compound that the brain needs to regulate DNA repair and other key signalling pathways is known as nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+). Because NAD+ declines with age, scientists have wondered whether boosting the level of NAD+ could help ageing brain cells (neurons) to function better. One way to increase the cellular level is by giving an NAD+ precursor compound, such as nicotinamide riboside (NR). NR is a form of vitamin B3. The team found that the NR-treated mice had less DNA damage, lower levels of neuron damage and death, increased production of new neurons, and lower brain inflammation than control mice. Mice who received NR had reduced tau in their brains, too, but amyloid-beta levels were unchanged. The NR-treated mice performed better than control mice on many learning and memory tests, such as a water maze. In addition, NR-treated mice had better muscle strength and endurance than controls. The research team also tested human cells from people with and without Alzheimer's disease. As in the mouse studies, NR decreased DNA damage in the cells from people with Alzheimer's. Videos: 1. Sensational Charge Against Global Pharma Lobby, Government Hints At Vax Lobby Role In W.H.O Report (4:55) 2. ‘Zelensky is a puppet'; Col. Douglas Macgregor upsets Fox host. (2:18) 3. The Clinton & Gates Foundation were brokers for Big Pharma (4:43)

Hudson Mohawk Magazine
The Brothers: The Forgotten Struggle for Civil Rights in Albany

Hudson Mohawk Magazine

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 11:20


On April 28, 2022, Hudson Mohawk Magazine Roaming Labor Correspondent Willie Terry covered a story at the Arbor Hill/West Hill Public Library in Albany on "The Brothers: The Forgotten Struggle For Civil Rights in Albany." In this labor segment, Willie interviews Persell McDowell, one of the Brothers, and Brian Keough, a Researcher at the University at Albany Library-Archives who co-sponsored the event.

RNZ: Our Changing World
Business not as usual for heart health

RNZ: Our Changing World

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 28:20


Pūtahi Manawa / Healthy Hearts for Aotearoa has an ambitious goal - to close the inequity gaps in heart health. Researchers in this Centre of Research Excellence explain the gaps that exist & how they plan to address them.

SkyWatchTV Podcast
Five in Ten 5/11/22: Biden Caves to Rage Mob

SkyWatchTV Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 23:00


The White House has declined to condemn the leak of a draft opinion from the Supreme Court or the doxxing of pro-life justices, instead deferring to the pro-abortion rage mob that intends to intimidate the court. 5) Signals from both sides that chemical weapons may be deployed in Ukraine; 4) White House Correspondents Association dinner was a superspreader event; 3) Pro-abortion activists turn to intimidation tactics; 2) Oregon schools installing tampon dispensers in boys' restrooms; 1) Researchers find that staying off social media for a week leads to significant improvement in mental health.

Quanta Science Podcast
New Map of Meaning in the Brain Changes Ideas About Memory

Quanta Science Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 19:42


Researchers have mapped hundreds of semantic categories to the tiny bits of the cortex that represent them in our thoughts and perceptions. What they discovered might change our view of memory. The post New Map of Meaning in the Brain Changes Ideas About Memory first appeared on Quanta Magazine

This Academic Life
Ep.32 – Social Media in Academia

This Academic Life

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 24:46


In this episode we discuss how social media sites and academics go hand in hand. Whether it's promoting your work, making connections, or helping get your students names out there every platform has its benefits and drawbacks. Reference list: Wired Academia: Why Social Science Scholars Are Using Social Media LINK Social Media in Academia LINK Social media for professional development and networking opportunities in academia LINK Academia goes social media, MOOC, SPOC, SMOC and SSOC LINK The social media in academia and education LINK Social media for scientists LINK Sponsor: De Gruyter: This episode is sponsored by De Gruyter and its portfolio in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics. For “Students and Researchers in Mathematics” De Gruyter's 2022 catalog is now available on This Academic Life website. Contact list: If you have any comments about our show or have suggestions for a future topic, please contact us at info@thisacademiclife.org. You can also find us on the webpage https://thisacademiclife.org and on Facebook group “This Academic Life”. Cast list: Prof. Kim Michelle Lewis (host) is a Professor of Physics and Associate Dean of Research, Graduate Programs, and Natural Sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences at Howard University. Prof. Pania Newell (host) is currently an Assistant Professor in the Mechanical Engineering Department at The University of Utah. Prof. Lucy Zhang (host) is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering in the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). Editing team: Music by RuthAnn Schallert-Wygal (schallert.wygal@gmail.com) Edited by Angella Chen Edited by Jared Duffy Artwork is created using Canva (canva.com) Support This Academic Life by contributing to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/this-academic-life

ThePrint
Pure science: Allergic asthma seems to lower the risk of Covid infection

ThePrint

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 9:04


Researchers have discovered that those who suffer from allergic asthma specifically, who have an increased production of the protein interleukin-13, seem to be relatively protected from the SARS-CoV-2 virus due to its effects. ThePrint's Sandhya Ramesh explains the science behind the new findings. Brought to you by @Kia India   Subscribe to the Pure Science Telegram Channel https://t.me/PureScienceWithSandhyaRamesh Supplementary reading: Morrison et al., PNAS (2022) SARS-CoV-2 infection of airway cells causes intense viral and cell shedding, two spreading mechanisms affected by IL-13 https://www.pnas.org/doi/10.1073/pnas.2119680119

Angel Invest Boston
Sean Kevlahan, PhD - Polymers, Pivots and Exits

Angel Invest Boston

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 39:55


Angels helping biotech startups: Learn More Exited founder Sean Kevlahan, PhD tells the story of Quad Technologies and how an interesting polymer contributed to the explosion of cell therapies in the last decade. Sean gives great advice for biotech founders and investors, and joins Armon Sharei in my pantheon of chemical engineers who are gifted communicators. Sponsored by Purdue University entrepreneurship and Peter Fasse, patents attorney at Fish & Richardson. Highlights: Sal Daher Welcomes Sean Kevlahan, PhD, Founder of Quad Technologies “...how do you release a cell from a substrate [underlying substance] without killing a cell?” “Magnetic beads have been around for a while. Researchers use them to separate cells.” How Do You remove the Magnetic Beads without Killing the Cell? Quad Technologies' Polymer Made It Possible to Remove the Magnetic Beads “When we first started out Quad, we focused on the academic markets.” The Success of CAR T-cell Therapies Opened Up an Opportunity for Quad -Help Multiply the CAR T-cells Emily Whitehead, the First Patient Treated with CAR T-cell Therapy, Is in Remission for Ten Years The Aha Moment that Put Quad Technologies on the Map Sean Kevlahan's Epiphany Led to a Pivot and Product/Market Fit Ran Into Someone from Bio-Techne at the JP Morgan Conference & Discovered the Strategic Fit Bio-Techne Acquired Quad Technologies in July of 2018 – Investors Did Very Well Sal Daher Is Eager to Learn About Sean Kevlahan's Stealth Startup “Even in biotech winter exited founders who have had this kind of success are very much in demand.” Sean Kevlahan's Grandfather Was an Entrepreneur, a Successful Restauranteur Sean's Entrepreneurship Activated by Hitting the “3-Year Wall” Doctoral Students Experience Quad's Polymer Used to Be Just Coating for Microfluidics Chips; Sean and Adam Hatch Imagined Many More Uses “We went from obviously, biotech, which just makes the most sense to coating the undersides of boats for marine biofouling.” Due to MassChallenge, Quad's Tech Was Used in the International Space Station Sean Kevlahan Speaks Well of Northeastern University's Tech Transfer Office Quad Raised $ 6 Million Which Qualifies as Angel-Scale The Vital Importance of Clear Messaging by Life Science Founders – Lose the Jargon! “...I have to do a mental check, and making sure that I'm not being too jargony.” Biotechnologies Are Multiplying and Creating a Cascade of Opportunities Quad Raised $ 6 Million from Fifteen Angel Investors Siamab Raised $ 14 Million from More than Forty Angels Going from Biotech Founder to Biotech Executive: Compare and Contrast Jeff Behrens Recommends that Prospective Biotech Founders Get Experience at Big Biotech Companies Parting Thoughts from Sean Kevlahan, PhD Topics: biotech, partnerships with strategics, pivot, returns, IP / patents, Mass Challenge

Earth Wise
Capturing Carbon Dioxide With Plastic | Earth Wise

Earth Wise

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 2:00


The world is awash in both waste plastic and in carbon dioxide emissions.   Researchers at Rice University have discovered a chemical technique for making waste plastic into an effective carbon dioxide absorbent for industry. Chemists at Rice reported in the journal ACS Nano that heating plastic waste in the presence of potassium acetate produces particles […]

Youth Culture Today with Walt Mueller
Selfies, Self-Perception, and Nose Jobs

Youth Culture Today with Walt Mueller

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 1:00


The official journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons is called Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. In the April issue of the journal, researchers report on a study that found that the selfies we snap don't offer us an accurate perception of our facial features. For example, the length of one's chin decreases in our selfie photos, while our noses appear larger than they actually are. So, what's the big deal? Researchers say that there is a noted relationship between the increase in selfie photographs and an increase in rhinoplasty requests, particularly among younger patients. In other words, being dissatisfied with what we see of ourselves in our selfies, we now try to fix what we interpret as a socially unacceptable appearance through getting a nose job. Physicians are concerned that selfie facial distortions are contributing to adolescent mental health concerns. We are far too consumed with our appearances. God is most concerned with the state of our hearts, we should be as well.

Cal Ag Roots Podcast
Seeds Of Change Episode 1

Cal Ag Roots Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 34:02


SEEDS OF CHANGE EPISODE 1 "United We Stand: Race, Religion, and the Politics of Food Justice in Black Los Angeles's Victory Markets." In WWII era Los Angeles a young Black preacher, Rev. Clayton D. Russell, and Black businesswoman, Charlotta Bass, launched the Los Angeles Negro Victory Commitee. In doing so, they not only helped plant seeds of today's food justice movements. They also helped radically alter the political landscape of the city with implications that continue to this day. (Photo Credit: Charlotta Bass [third from right] and Rev. Clayton D. Russell [second from right] with other African American leaders in Los Angeles, 1949. Courtesy of the Southern California Library [Los Angeles, California]). Seeds of Change Episode 1 features interviews from Dr. Analena Hope Hassberg (Cal Poly Pomona) and Dr. Lorn Foster (Pomona College). It was written and produced by Dr. Caroline Collins (Postdoctoral Fellow at UC San Diego and Cal Ag Roots Producer at the California Institute for Rural Studies) and edited by Li Schmidt (Associate Associate Storyteller and Researcher at the California Institute for Rural Studies). This project was made possible with support from the 11th Hour Project at the Schmidt Family Foundation. Archival Audio of Rev. Clayton D. Russell Courtesy of Cal State Long Beach Special Collections and oral historian Sherna Berger Gluck. Music Credits for Episode 1: "Strange Persons" by Kicksta; "Petit Gennevilliers (Celesta") by MagnusMoone; "Summer Breeze" and "Inward" by HansTroost, "Tiger Rag" by Friars Society Orchestra; "All American News 10" by William Alexander, E.M. Glucksman, and Claude Barnett; and "Symphony in black—a rhapsody of Negro life" by Duke Ellington. Tribe of Noise licensing information can be found here: prosearch.tribeofnoise.com/pages/terms. Pixabay terms terms of service can be found here: https://pixabay.com/service/terms/. Library of Congress disclaimers can be found here: https://www.loc.gov/legal/. #seedsofchange #blackhistory #california #calagroots #blacklivesmatter #rural #americanwest #blackculture #black #foodjustice #blackfood #blm #history #blackpeople #blackisbeautiful #blackpride #africanamerican

60-Second Science
Two-Headed Worms Tell Us Something Fascinating About Evolution

60-Second Science

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 6:08


Researchers looked back at more than 100 years of research, and they found a fascination with annelids with mixed up appendages was strong--and that research still has relevance today. 

Brofessional Development Podcast
Roe vs Wade, Fed Raises Rates, and BMI affecting Sexual Perfomance!

Brofessional Development Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 23:12


In this episode, we dive deep into what's trending in business and entertainment.  From Drake's getting revenge on an internet troll by sliding into his Wife's DM, the Roe versus Wade deal, and the impact of the Fed announcing interest rate hikes with the high inflation rate and GDP numbers being 1% on the negative. Besides, we take a look at Dave Chappelle's attack on stage with a knife and how your BMI might influence your sexual performance. In this Episode [00:19] What's happening in our life and business [02:11] Drake's troll on Twitter [02:53] Jake Paul and McGregor's wife [04:12] The internet  post drake commented on [05:00] Roe versus Wade deal [09:31] Fed announcing interest rate hikes [14:31] Dave Chapelle getting tackled on stage [15:09] The video of the guy attacking Dave Chappelle afterward [17:15] BMI & Sexual performance [22:15] How many times you can get to knock it out Notable Quotes “As a father, when you go in for that first ultrasound, and you have no idea what a kid even is, and you hear that heartbeat for the first time, it definitely changes your opinion about everything.” “The US Department of Justice shows children from fatherless homes account for 90% of all homeless and runaway children.” “But by definition, two quarters in a row with a negative GDP is a recession.” “Low-interest rates shoot up, and the pricing of houses and higher interest rates shoot down. “ “Researchers in Turkey did a year-long study on BMI and sexual performance. So what it says is that men with a higher BMI last 7.3 minutes. But leaner men hardly make it to 108 seconds.”         Please help us by liking, sharing, and subscribing to our podcast if you enjoy this content.   Follow us on Instagram Facebook Twitter   Listen to the Brofessional podcast on: Our Website Apple Podcasts Spotify iHeartRadio Audible

The Scoop
Crypto researcher unpacks why UST broke down and what happens next

The Scoop

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 32:27


Bitcoin traded below $30,000 on Monday, amid market uncertainty brought about by the ‘depegging' of UST—an algorithmic stablecoin whose value is supposed to remain equivalent to $1. At publication, UST is trading at $0.92, although the ‘stablecoin' saw lows of $0.6050 on the Binance UST/USDT trading pair. In this breaking episode of The Scoop, host Frank Chaparro spoke with crypto researcher Mika Honkasalo, who appeared on the podcast to provide a detailed look at how the UST drama is unfolding. As Honkasalo explained, while UST has experienced depegging before, this time around is structurally different: “I think people at first didn't really realize that it would be a real thing, because they had seen something similar before and they didn't realize that the structure of the market had become a lot more averse to UST than it previously had. And I think what you're seeing today is sort of that just escalating or going further.” Although the Luna Foundation Guard announced plans yesterday to support the UST peg with $1.5 billion worth of assets, whether or not UST returns to its peg will likely come down to whether the buyers or sellers win out. As Honkasalo noted during the interview, “Whether or not it maintains the peg today is very much a question of: if the sellers sort of run out of tokens and the buyers have more, the buyers will live to fight another day here in the mid-term.” As for the future fate of Luna and UST, Honkasalo thinks much of its success will rest on macro forces outside of its control. “I think that if the market turns positive, it will be much easier to keep the whole Luna ecosystem going. But if it continues to be more negative than this, the next wave of sells could be even much worse.” Episode 41 of Season 4 of The Scoop was recorded remotely with The Block's Frank Chaparro and Mika Honkasalo, Cry