Podcasts about Genetic

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  • 2,124PODCASTS
  • 3,497EPISODES
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  • Nov 26, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about Genetic

Show all podcasts related to genetic

Latest podcast episodes about Genetic

UK Low Carb
Do Genetic's Decide Our Weight? - Dr Giles Yeo

UK Low Carb

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 74:27


AMiNDR: A Month in Neurodegenerative Disease Research
228 - New Variants & Genetic Insights in Alzheimer's Disease: September 2021

AMiNDR: A Month in Neurodegenerative Disease Research

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 37:26


Join Glory to learn about the newest genetic variants and mechanisms that have been linked to Alzheimer's disease. In this episode, we'll cover protective and pathogenic AD variants in genes, potential genetic biomarkers for AD, and differential gene expression that can be observed in individuals with AD. With 19 papers from September 2021, you'll hear about some genes that will be worth following up on in the near future to advance our understanding of the disease!  Sections in this episode:  Genetic variants (3:11)  Genetic biomarkers (13:58)  Differential gene expression and mRNA (18:05)  miRNA regulations (22:55)  New methods (26:42)  Regulatory pathways (30:00)  Other (33:49) --------------------------------------------------------------To access the folder with all the bibliographies for 2021 so far, follow this link (it will be updated as we publish episodes and process bibliographies), or click the following link below:https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1N1zx_itPkCDNYE1yFGZzQxDDR-NiRx3p?usp=sharingYou can also join our mailing list to receive a newsletter by filling this form. Or tweet at us: @AMiNDR_podcast  --------------------------------------------------------------Follow-up on social media for more updates!Facebook:  AMiNDR  Twitter: @AMiNDR_podcastInstagram: @AMiNDR.podcastYoutube: AMiNDR PodcastLinkedIn: AMiNDR PodcastEmail: amindrpodcast@gmail.com  -------------------------------------------------------------- Please help us by spreading the word about AMiNDR to your friends, colleagues, and networks! Another way you can help us reach more listeners who would benefit from the show is by leaving us a review on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts. It helps us a lot and we thank you in advance for leaving a review! Our team of volunteers works tirelessly each month to bring you every episode of AMiNDR. This episode was scripted by Marcia Jude and Glory Nasseri, hosted by Glory Nasseri, edited by Michelle Grover, and reviewed by Alexandra Pavel and Ellen Koch. The bibliography was made by Lara Onbasi and the wordcloud by Sarah Louadi (www.wordart.com). Big thanks to the sorting team for taking on the enormous task of sorting all of the Alzheimer's Disease papers into episodes each month. For September 2021, the sorters were Jacques Ferreira, Ellen Koch, Christy Yu, Sarah Louadi, Kate Van Pelt, Nicole Corso, Eden Dubchak, Kira Tosefsky, Dana Clausen, and Elyn Rowe.Also, props to our management team, which includes Sarah Louadi, Ellen Koch, Naila Kuhlmann, Elyn Rowe, Anusha Kamesh, Jacques Ferreira, and Shruti Kocchar for keeping everything running smoothly.Our music is from "Journey of a Neurotransmitter" by musician and fellow neuroscientist Anusha Kamesh; you can find the original piece and her other music on soundcloud under Anusha Kamesh or on her YouTube channel, AKMusic.   https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMH7chrAdtCUZuGia16FR4w   -------------------------------------------------------------- If you are interested in joining the team, send us your CV by email. We are specifically looking for help with sorting abstracts by topic, abstract summaries and hosting, audio editing, creating bibliographies, and outreach/marketing. However, if you are interested in helping in other ways, don't hesitate to apply anyways.  --------------------------------------------------------------*About AMiNDR: *  Learn more about this project and the team behind it by listening to our first episode: "Welcome to AMiNDR!"

The Carnivore Yogi Podcast
When the best diet doesn't heal you....LIGHT & the QUANTUM REALM with Matt Maruca - RA Optics Founder

The Carnivore Yogi Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 185:30


This episode is sponsored by Optimal Carnivore “CarnivoreY” to receive 10% off all products- Grassfed Organ Meat Complex https://amzn.to/3Dp1R9e Grassfed Beef liver https://amzn.to/3clgONz This episode is sponsored by Upgraded Formulas - Get your HTMA with Upgraded Formulas - use my code YOGI12 for a discount! - https://www.upgradedformulas.com/?rfsn=4637317.2071db5&utm_source=refersion&utm_medium=affiliate&utm_campaign=4637317.2071db5 RA OPTICS BLUE BLOCKERS - CODE CARNIVOREYOGI FOR 15% OFF http://www.raoptics.com/discount/carnivoreyogi?redirect=%2F%3Fafmc%3Dcarnivoreyogi Timestamps 0:00 Introduction and sponsors 4:15 Matt Maruca/RA Optics intro 5:20 Light Diet book 5:28 How Matt got to where he is 10:28 Matt's take on diet 15:28 Dr. Jack Kruse and light 19:25 Joe Dispenza and spirituality 36:13 thoughts on where we are in space-chosing to be alive 38:21 Where are we/who are we? 52:28 Choosing to look differently at time 53:18 Only choosing to do things in the present moment 1:02:10 The feeling of being “ahead” 1:04:33 Making ourselves busy Dr. Disprenza 1:05:58 Creating your own reality 1:06:58 Do we choose illness? 1:37:35 Energy 1:51:35 Emotional vs physical realm 1:55:35 Genetic variability (male vs female) 2:14:35 Difference between men and women and their light needs 2:16:35 Thoughts on Dr. Hattar - Light scientist 2:18:35 Sun timing through the day 2:20:35 Skin tone, cloud cover, elevation, humidity and season all determine time in the sun 2:21:32 Dminder app 2:22:65 Optimal meal timing 2:23:35 Brain functioning up in the morning 2:25:35 The experience of one human day 2:27:05 80/20 principle 2:32:35 Sleeping separately from your partner 2:33:25 RA Optics 2:36:20 Sleep lenses 2:36:16 Dr. Douglas Wallace - Mitochondria 2:40:35 Why we need to consider blue blockers 2:46:29 Alcohol & Melatonin abuse 2:40:29 Coffee addiction & circadian disruption 2:53:29 Overeating & Why food isn't the solution to all your problems 2:59:29 How to support Matt & more about RA Optics

#AskDrWilson | The Detox Lifestyle
EP 116: Is Cancer Really Genetic?

#AskDrWilson | The Detox Lifestyle

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 12:57


In this episode, Dr. Wilson and Dr. Traci sit down to discuss cancer. They talk about what cancer truly is and if your body is actually doing the right thing at the right time.

Discovery
Genetic Ddeams, genetic nightmares

Discovery

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 27:13


Biologist Matthew Cobb presents the first episode in a series which looks at the 50-year history of genetic engineering, from the concerns around the first attempts at combining the DNA of one organism with the genes of another in 1971 to today's gene editing technique known as CRISPR. The first experiments to combine the DNA of two different organisms began at Stanford University in California in 1971. The revolutionary technique of splicing genes from one lifeform into another promised to be a powerful tool in understanding how our cells worked. It also offered the prospect of a new cheap means of manufacturing life-saving drugs – for example, by transferring the gene for human insulin into bacteria, growing those genetically engineered microbes in industrial vats and harvesting the hormone. A new industrial revolution based on biology looked possible. At the same time some scientists and the public were alarmed by disastrous scenarios that genetic engineering might unleash. What if microbes engineered with toxin genes or cancer genes escaped from the labs and spread around the world? In early 1974, responding to the public fears and their own disquiet about how fast the techniques were developing, the scientists leading this research revolution called for a global moratorium on genetic engineering experiments until the risks had been assessed. This was followed by an historic meeting of 130 scientists from around the world in February 1975 in California. Its purpose was to decide if and how the genetic engineering research could be done safely. It was a rancorous affair but the Asilomar conference is held up as an idealist if imperfect example of scientists taking responsibility as they developed a powerful new technology. (Picture: DNA molecule, Credit: KTS Design/Science Photo Library/Getty Images)

Stars End: A Foundation Podcast
Stars End S2E10 - Under the Genetic Dynasty There is Only Room for One Podcast

Stars End: A Foundation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 54:44


Haven't watched Episode 10, "The Leap" yet? We'll be here when you're done. Astoundingly, here we are at the end of Foundation's Season 1. We're all about to experience the teevee equivalent of empty nest syndrome. But not yet! There are two more episodes of Stars End for this season! There's this one, where we talk about Episode 10 and then there will be one more in about two weeks where we give an overview of Foundation's epic first season! Also a special guest! Also also some surprises! And we're here for the duration! It might feel like it will be 30,000 years until there will be new content on Apple TV+ but we'll be here through this new interregnum to make sure that it feels like far less than 1000 years! You've come with us this far! Let's keep moving forward together!

Hot Goss
F**kTonne of Vitamins - with Blair Dawson

Hot Goss

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 58:43


Comedian and host of the It's Genetic podcast, Blair Dawson comes on the pod to talk Elephants. An unofficial sequel to the Dumbo episode. Blair is great. Honestly just go here and check her out. It's a blast. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/hotgosswithtrashcomedy/message

Nourish Balance Thrive
The Clot Thickens: Malcolm Kendrick on the Enduring Mystery of Heart Disease

Nourish Balance Thrive

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 87:51


If you've followed the NBT podcast for a while you probably heard Dr. Malcolm Kendrick talking about the tenuous connection between cholesterol levels and cardiovascular disease. Malcolm has published with The International Network of Cholesterol Skeptics on this topic, including a recent review paper entitled LDL-C does not cause cardiovascular disease. In the paper, they include both total cholesterol and LDL-C in their discussions, and if you look at epidemiological data, I think they make a good point. For instance, total cholesterol had almost no effect on mortality in the HUNT-2 study in Norway, and higher levels were associated with lower mortality risk in women. Or the ESCARVAL-RISK study, where higher LDL-C is associated with lower all-cause mortality until it's well above 200 mg/dl. Or the In-Chianti study, where people over 64 had the lowest mortality rates if they had an LDL-C greater than 130mg/dl. The question then becomes, if not cholesterol, then what? To answer that we must resist monomania and acknowledge the very notion of causation in a complex system is suspicious. Ask not what but how. Malcolm argues in his new book The Clot Thickens that if you maintain metabolic health, manage stress, and mind your endothelial function, cholesterol levels become largely irrelevant. Simple enough, but as you'll discover in this interview, the devil is in the details. Here's the outline of this episode with Malcolm Kendrick: [00:00:24] Previous NBT podcasts with Malcolm Kendrick: Why Cholesterol Levels Have No Effect on Cardiovascular Disease (And Things to Think About Instead) and A Statin Nation: Damaging Millions in a Brave New Post-health World. [00:00:42] Book: The Clot Thickens: The enduring mystery of heart disease, by Malcolm Kendrick. [00:03:04] 5-part series with lipidologist Thomas Dayspring (Part 1, 2, 3, 4, 5);  2-hour interview with Ron Krauss on The Drive Podcast. [00:04:23] Book: Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine. [00:06:12] LDL Cholesterol - challenging mainstream thought. [00:17:16] Fatty streaks never become atherosclerotic plaques; Review: Velican, C., M. Anghelescu, and D. Velican. "Preliminary study on the natural history of cerebral atherosclerosis." Medicine interne 19.2 (1981): 137-145. [00:18:54] Genetic influences; familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) and high clotting factors; Case study of patient with untreated FH but no presence of atherosclerosis: Johnson, Kipp W., Joel T. Dudley, and Jason R. Bobe. "A 72-year-old patient with longstanding, untreated familial hypercholesterolemia but no coronary artery calcification: a case report." Cureus 10.4 (2018). [00:21:22] Clotting factors more important than high LDL; Paper: Ravnskov, Uffe, et al. "Inborn coagulation factors are more important cardiovascular risk factors than high LDL-cholesterol in familial hypercholesterolemia." Medical hypotheses 121 (2018): 60-63. [00:25:03] UK Biobank Study: Mora, Samia, Seth S. Martin, and Salim S. Virani. "Cholesterol Insights and Controversies From the UK Biobank Study: Three Take-Home Messages for the Busy Clinician." (2019): 553-555. [00:25:51] Machine learning used to predict cardiovascular disease; Study: Weng, Stephen F., et al. "Can machine-learning improve cardiovascular risk prediction using routine clinical data?." PloS one 12.4 (2017): e0174944. [00:30:54] FOURIER PCSK9-inhibitor study: More deaths in the treatment group; Study: Sabatine, Marc S., et al. "Evolocumab and clinical outcomes in patients with cardiovascular disease." New England Journal of Medicine 376.18 (2017): 1713-1722. [00:31:26] Evolocumab also reduces Lp(a); Study: O'Donoghue, Michelle L., et al. "Lipoprotein (a), PCSK9 inhibition, and cardiovascular risk: insights from the FOURIER trial." Circulation 139.12 (2019): 1483-1492. [00:34:02] APOA-1 Milano and HDL cholesterol. [00:38:45] Lp(a) and Vitamin C, plasminogen and clotting. [00:47:02] Rudolf Virchow, the father of the cholesterol hypothesis. [00:48:42] So what causes CVD? [00:49:53] Biomechanical stress; High blood pressure. [00:52:16] Endothelial and glycocalyx damage. [01:02:19] Steroids, immunosuppressants. [01:03:52] Avastin (bevacizumab) increases the risk of CVD; Study: Totzeck, Matthias, Raluca Ileana Mincu, and Tienush Rassaf. "Cardiovascular adverse events in patients with cancer treated with bevacizumab: a meta‐analysis of more than 20 000 patients." Journal of the American Heart Association 6.8 (2017): e006278. [01:06:07] Clotting disorders. [01:10:41] Sickle cell anemia - 50,000% increased risk of CVD. [01:11:36] Case study of 14-year old boy: Study: Elsharawy, M. A., and K. M. Moghazy. "Peripheral arterial lesions in patient with sickle cell disease." EJVES Extra 14.2 (2007): 15-18. [01:13:25] Air pollution, smoking, lead. [01:15:57] Biggest risk factors for CVD. [01:20:09] Supplements that strengthen the glycocalyx; Chondroitin Sulfate. [01:22:12] Malcolm's blog.

GES Center Lectures, NC State University
#12 – Denise Costich – Germplasm banks and global food security

GES Center Lectures, NC State University

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 61:34


Genetic Engineering and Society Center GES Colloquium - Tuesdays 12-1PM (via Zoom) NC State University | http://go.ncsu.edu/ges-colloquium GES Mediasite - See videos, full abstracts, speaker bios, and slides https://go.ncsu.edu/ges-mediasite Twitter - https://twitter.com/GESCenterNCSU The Role of Germplasm Banks in Global Food Security Dr. Denise E. Costich, Retired Senior Scientist and Head of the Maize Germplasm Bank at The International Center for Maize and Wheat Improvement (CIMMYT) Profile article The goal is to have fully secure and accessible Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture where there is the potential for a multi-lateral flow of germplasm and knowledge among the participants, basically, all human beings on Earth. Abstract Crop germplasm banks the world over provide a formal security back up system for the plant genetic resources upon which our future food security relies. At the same time, smallholder, mostly indigenous, farmers, also conserve the seed of their crop plants. For the most part, these communities do not act as partners, even though they are collectively the guardians of the genetic diversity that all humans depend upon to survive. This seminar will focus on the case of maize, a critical component of the diets of millions of people globally. Research projects in maize seed conservation in smallholder farming communities in Mexico and Guatemala illustrate how to create stronger links, via seed and technology transfer. Seed longevity research in the germplasm collection at the headquarters of the International Center for Maize and Wheat Improvement (CIMMYT) in Mexico enables the maintenance of a secure source of high quality seed for the future. Related links: Genetic diversity and selection signatures in maize landraces compared across 50 years of in situ and ex situ conservation McLean-Rodríguez, F.D., Costich, D.E., Camacho-Villa, T.C. et al. Heredity 126, 913–928 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41437-021-00423-y. PDF Enhancing seed conservation in rural communities of Guatemala by implementing the dry chain concept Guzzon, F., Bello, P., Bradford, K.J., Costich, D.E., et al. Biodivers Conserv 29, 3997–4017 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10531-020-02059-6. PDF The abandonment of maize landraces over the last 50 years in Morelos, Mexico: a tracing study using a multi-level perspective McLean-Rodríguez, F.D., Camacho-Villa, T.C., Almekinders, C.J.M., Costich, D.E.  et al. Agric Hum Values 36, 651–668 (2019). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10460-019-09932-3. PDF Seed longevity of maize conserved under germplasm bank conditions for up to 60 years Guzzon, F., Gianella, M., Velazquez Juarez, J.A., Sanchez Cano, C., Costich, D.E. Annals of Botany, Volume 127, Issue 6, 7 May 2021, Pages 775–785, https://doi.org/10.1093/aob/mcab009. PDF Crop genetic erosion: understanding and responding to loss of crop diversity Khoury, C.K., Brush, S., Costich, D.E., Curry, H.A., et al. (2021). New Phytol. https://doi.org/10.1111/nph.17733. PDF Speaker Bio Dr. Denise E. Costich is a passionate defender of maize genetic resources, devoting the past two decades to research topics related to its taxonomy, evolution and conservation. She received her B.S. in Biology with a Concentration in Ecology and Systematics from the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences of Cornell University. In the middle of her undergraduate studies, she went to Kenya with Friends World College and ended up as a field assistant on a baboon research project. She eventually went on to graduate school at the University of Iowa, after another field research assistant gig in another exotic location—the Brazilian Amazon. In pursuit of a better understanding of plant breeding systems, she did her Ph.D. thesis research as a Fulbright Scholar in Spain on the ecology and evolution of dioecy in a wild cucurbit. Through a series of postdoctoral positions, Denise's research interests became more genetically oriented, and she landed in her first maize lab in 2000, at the Boyce Thompson Institute, back on the campus of her alma mater. Interest in crop evolution and plant population biology lead her to join the USDA-ARS lab of Dr. Ed Buckler, where she spent six fascinating and productive years. In 2012, the opportunity to apply her diverse knowledge and skills in an international agricultural research-for-development setting presented itself, and she became the fourth Head of the Maize Collection of the Germplasm Bank at the International Center for Maize and Wheat Improvement (CIMMYT) near Mexico City. In October 2020, she retired from that position, and returned to Ithaca, where she continues to pursue her interests in seed conservation and maize wild relatives. GES Center - Integrating scientific knowledge & diverse public values in shaping the futures of biotechnology. Find out more at https://ges-center-lectures-ncsu.pinecast.co

Summit For Wellness Podcast
165- Using Your Genetic Blueprint To Optimize Health with Teri Cochrane

Summit For Wellness Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 45:25


Teri Cochrane teaches how to use genes to create an optimal health plan.

Answers TV Daily
Answers News: Did That Baby Have a Tail?

Answers TV Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 32:10


Mojo sells toys with evolutionary misinformation; "Race Cars" helps 7-year-olds adopt Critical Race Theory; VP Harris asks if NASA satellite data on trees shows environmental justice; Evolutionists try again with homology; College students sue school over discrimination against guest speaker; Abortion advocates decline to answer lawmakers' questions about human life; "Tail" surgically removed from newborn . . . and other stories reviewed during this November 17, 2021, broadcast of Answers News. - - - - - - - - - - - For YOU formed my inward parts; YOU knitted me together in my mother's womb. I praise YOU, for I am fearfully and wonderfully made. Wonderful are YOUR works; my soul knows it very well. - - - - - - - - - - - Psalm 139: 13-14 Articles: Mojo sells toys with evolutionary misinformation http://www.mojofun.eu/product/billy-goat/ "Race Cars" helps 7-year-olds adopt Critical Race Theory https://notthebee.com/article/the-childrens-book-race-cars-wants-your-kid-to-be-a-good-critical-race-theorist-and-a-minnesota-school-is-apparently-sending-it-home-with-7-year-olds VP Harris asks if NASA satellite data on trees shows environmental justice https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2021/11/07/black-trees-matter-vp-kamala-harris-asks-nasa-can-track-trees-race-environmental-justice/ Genetic analysis uncovers shared evolutionary history of fish fins and vertebrate limbs https://phys.org/news/2021-11-genetic-analysis-uncovers-evolutionary-history.html College students sue school over discrimination against guest speaker https://www.christianpost.com/news/christian-group-sues-university-for-denying-speaker-funding.html Abortion advocates decline to answer lawmakers about human life https://www.foxnews.com/politics/abortion-johnson-texas-law "Tail" surgically removed from newborn https://www.foxnews.com/health/shocking-human-tail-surgically-removed-newborn Earth may have grown around a rock from an alien star system https://newscientist.com/article/2296379-earth-may-have-grown-around-a-rock-from-an-alien-star-system/ - - - - - - - - - - - Photo Credit: Amorn Suriyan Getty Image # 1335692804 --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/answerstv/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/answerstv/support

Eye Know - Do You?
Understanding Genetic Test Results

Eye Know - Do You?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 15:00


After discussing how genetic testing has evolved, Stephen Daiger, PhD, Director of the Laboratory for Molecular Diagnosis of Inherited Eye Diseases at the University of Texas at Houston, and Emily Place, MS, LCGC, a genetic counselor from Boston's Massachusetts Eye and Ear, talk about the process of interpreting the results of a genetic test—and how empowering it can be for the person, their family, and their future. Learn more from Stephen Daiger on the importance of genetic testing at EyeWant2Know.com.

Power Hour Optometry's Only Live Radio Show
Incorporating Genetic-Based Testing Into Your AMD Treatment Plan

Power Hour Optometry's Only Live Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 29:42


Visible Genomics, is on a mission to arm you with critical information that helps you and your patients look into the future.  Learn more about DNA Testing for Macular Degeneration from Dr. Barry Eiden.

The Habit Coach with Ashdin Doctor
How to find out our self-worth? Hot Seat with Manisha Jena (Listener Special)

The Habit Coach with Ashdin Doctor

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 8:37


In this listener special episode of #TheHabitCoach Podcast, Host Ashdin answers an interesting question from Manisha Jena - She asks, 'Many times, I get this huge wave of self-doubt that I start questioning myself about what is my worth? I feel like I am just an average human being, there is no such unique quality within me that would make me special or different from others. I feel that whatever characteristics I possess, everybody else possesses that. So what am I really good for? Hence, I don't understand how to move forward in life and I just feel so clueless about everything.'Ashdin answers by explaining the feeling of stagnation and shares a fresh perspective about a 'blank canvas'. Further, he talks about how to prioritize our goals for the long run and shares a habit to deal with cluelessness. Do listen to this awesome episode and know more about self-worth. You can listen to The Habit Coach Kannada Podcast here: ( https://ivm.today/3j0Libf )Send questions to Ashdin Doctor for The Habit Coach Hot Seat Below: ( https://forms.gle/13vgf4MAk7zYKBd38 )Check out the Awesome180 website: ( http://awesome180.com/ ) You can follow Ashdin Doctor on social media:Twitter: ( https://twitter.com/Ashdindoc )Linkedin: ( https://www.linkedin.com/in/ashdin-doctor/ )Instagram: ( https://www.instagram.com/ashdindoc/ )Facebook: ( https://www.facebook.com/ashdin.doc.9 )You can listen to this show and other awesome shows on the IVM Podcasts app on Android: https://ivm.today/android or iOS: https://ivm.today/ios, or any other podcast app.

The Larry Meiller Show
Genetic counseling and your health care

The Larry Meiller Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021


Genetic factors can play an important part in today's approach to health care. With the help of genetic counselors, patients can use genetic information to get better treatment results. We talk about what genetic counselors do and the training they receive.

Essential Ingredients Podcast
009: Moving Towards a More Humane Food System with Josh Balk

Essential Ingredients Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 23:52


“The vast majority of animals who are raised in cages can barely move at the end of their life. They're in constant pain and constant suffering… Make an impact in the lives of so many animals to make their lives better!”  - Josh Balk   Episode Description:  Billions of factory farm animals suffer beyond the imaginable degree. Genetic modification, inhumane treatments, confinement, and other cruel ways are utilized to ensure high production at the lowest cost. Because of the high demand, these animals are often killed in large numbers in a very short time. A few months after they're born, they are already on their way to the slaughter house while their meat is tender. They are forced to forget their animal instincts as they only learned how painful it is to be born. They never see the sun nor how beautiful the world is.    This is the reality of our world today. Profit comes before welfare. Animals are treated as commodities, as objects exploited by a greedy system. In this episode, we will uncover how grim this practice is for the animals, humans, and the environment.  Josh Balk, co-founder of Eat JUST, Inc., relates his undercover assignments inside farm factories and how the industry contributes to the disturbing state we are in. As a passionate advocate for animal welfare, Josh also talks about what's currently being done to address this problem. Our goal should be to have tangible progress for the animals. Like us, they deserve to enjoy their lives.  As stewards of the earth, we hold the biggest responsibility to make this world a better place for the animals under our care. Tune in to learn how you can be a part of moving towards a more humane food system.  Connect with Josh: Josh Balk is the Vice President of Animal Welfare at the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), Farm Animals Division. He has led efforts to enact animal welfare policies with many of the world's largest companies, including Walmart, Wendy's, Kroger, Denny's and dozens more. These policies have helped shift the food industry's reliance on veal crates, gestation crates, battery cages and cruel methods of raising chickens in the meat industry. He's also been a leader in creating and supporting start-up animal-friendly companies, including co-founding JUST, and guiding investment firms and high net worth individuals to invest in this space. Balk also led discussions with the largest food service companies in creating the world's first partnerships on shifting their focus to plant-based foods. On legislative priorities, he was a leader on successful campaigns passing laws for farm animals, including in California, Massachusetts, and Maine. Prior to coming to The HSUS, Balk worked at Compassion Over Killing (COK) where he conducted investigations into factory farms and slaughterhouses, and launched one of our nation's first advertising campaigns on farm animals. Balk's work has been covered by the Associated Press, Fortune, CNN, New York Times, Washington Post and dozens of other outlets. He was inducted into the Animal Rights Hall of Fame in 2015. Website - EAT JUST  Email  Facebook  Twitter  Twitter - JUST Egg Twitter - GOOD Meat LinkedIn    Connect with Justine:  Website Facebook Instagram LinkedIn   Connect with NextGenChef: Website  Facebook  Twitter  Instagram  YouTube NextGenChef App (Apple) NextGenChef App (Android)    Episode Highlights: 01:06 Humane Society United States Role, Making A Difference To  Animal's Lives 08:44 Transformational Campaign That Can Change The World 11:55 Companies Mandating Better Welfare For Animals 15:05 How We Can Better Help Animal's Condition 21:56 How to Make an Impact

Kings and Generals: History for our Future
History of the Mongols SPECIAL: Chinggis Genetic Legacy

Kings and Generals: History for our Future

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 22:25


At the start of the twenty-first century, a study was released which brought the thirteenth century starkly into the present. A 2003 study led by Chris Tyler-Smith published in the American Journal of Human Genetics simply titled “The Genetic Legacy of the Mongols,” determined that an alarming number of men across Asia, from China to Uzbekistan, carried the same haplotype on their Y-chromosome, indicating a shared paternal lineage. 8% of the studied group, just over 2100 men from 16 distinct populations in Asia shared this haplotype, which if representative of the total world population, would have come out to about 16 million men. This was far beyond what was to be expected of standard genetic variation over such a vast area. The researchers traced the haplogroup to Mongolia, and with the BATWING program determined that the most recent common ancestor lived approximately 1,000 years ago, plus or minus 300 years in either direction. The study determined that this could only be the result of selective inheritance, and there was only man who fit the profile, who had the opportunity to spread his genes across so much of Asia and have them be continually selected for centuries to come; that was Chinggis Khan, founder of the Mongol Empire. Identifying him with the Y-Chromosome haplogroup, the C3* Star Cluster, the image of Chinggis Khan as the ancestor of 0.5% of the world population has become irrevocably attached to his name, and a common addition in the comment sections on any Mongol related topic on the internet will be the fact that he is related to every 1 in 200 men in Asia today. Yet, recent studies have demonstrated that this may not be the case, and that Chinggis Khan's genetic legacy is not so simple as commonly portrayed. I'm your host David, and this is Kings and Generals: Ages of Conquest.       Inside each human being are the genes we inherit from our parents. Distinct alleles within the thousands of genes of our 23 chromosomes affect the makeup of our bodies, from our physical  appearances to blood type. Each allele is inherited from our parents, who inherited from their parents, and so on, leaving in each human being a small marker of every member of their ancestry. Due to interbreeding and mixing over time, people living in a certain region will share  alleles, given that various members of their community shared ancestors at some point. A collection of these alleles is a haplotype, and a group of similar haplotypes with shared ancestry is a haplogroup. Tracing specific haplogroups attached to the Y-Chromosome, for instance, allows us to trace paternal ancestry of selected persons. It was the haplogroup dubbed the C3*star cluster that the researchers identified as Chinggis Khan's haplotype, though later research has redefined it to the C2* star cluster. Thus, while you may see it somewhat interchangeably referred to as C3 or C2, depending on how recent the literature you're reading is. Whoever carried the markers on their chromosome associated with this haplogroup, according to the study, was therefore a descendant of Chinggis Khan. The lineage, it should be noted, does not start with Chinggis Khan; it is detectable in the ancestors of the Mongols dating back at least to the fifth century BCE, to the Donghu people in eastern Mongolia and Manchuria. It is found in high frequencies in populations which had close contact with Mongols from Siberia to Central Asia, as as the Buryats, Udeges, Evens, Evenks, Kazakhs, and in lower frequencies in places conquered by the Mongol Empire. As demonstrated by the 2003 study, a map of these haplogroups lines up rather neatly with a map of the Mongol Empire at the time of Chinggis Khan's death.        The 2003 study found that 8% of the men sampled had high frequencies of haplotypes from a set of closely related lineages, the C2*  star cluster. With the highest numbers of this cluster found in Mongolia, it was the logical origin point for this cluster. Its frequencies in so many populations of the former Mongol Empire seemed to suggest it spread with Mongol imperial expansion. The researchers therefore identified Chinggis Khan and his close male-relatives as the likely progenitors. While the public has understood this as Chinggis Khan and his family raping a massive percentage of the thirteenth century human population, this was not quite what the study implied. Rather, the selective marriage into the Chinggisid royal family, with each son having high numbers of children, and so on for generations due to prestige associated with the lineage, was the cause for the haplogroup's spread.        The study decided that, since the haplogroups showed up in high frequencies among the Hazara of Afghanistan and Pakistan, and as they were deemed to be direct descendants of Chinggis Khan, then this must have meant no one else other than the Great Khan himself was the most recent common ancestor for this haplogroup. The high frequencies across Asian populations, an origin point in Mongolia, an estimated common ancestor approximately a thousand years ago, and association with the supposed Chinggisid Hazaras was the extent of the evidence the study had to make Chinggis Khan the progenitor.       When released, this study made headlines around the world. You'll find no shortage of articles stating that “Genghis Khan was a prolific article,” with the underlying, thought generally unstated, assumption that these genes were spread by a hitherto unimaginable amount of rape, “backed up” by the medieval sources where Chinggis is described taking his pick of conquered women after the sack of a city. It's a useful addition to the catalogue of descriptions to present the Mongols as mindless barbarians, with this study being essentially the scientific data to back up this presentation.  It's now become one of the key aspects of Chinggis Khan's image in popular culture.       However, as more recent studies have demonstrated, there are a number of problems with this evidence presented in the 2003 study. Firstly, later researchers have pointed out how indirect the evidence is for the connection of Chinggis Khan to the C2 lineage. The estimates for the most recent common ancestor can vary widely depending on the methods used; while some estimates can place a figure within Chinggis Khan's epoch, other estimates put the most recent common ancestor for the C2* cluster over 2,000 year ago. Even going by the 2003 study, it still gives a 600 year window for the most recent common ancestor, who still could have lived centuries before or after Chinggis Khan.   One of the most serious assumptions in the study was that the Hazara of Afghanistan were direct descendants of Chinggis KhanThis is an assumption which rests more on misconception than medieval materials. In fact, the thirteenth and fourteenth century sources indicate that Chinggis Khan spent only a brief time in what is now Afghanistan, only from late 1221 and throughout much of 1222, which he largely spent campaigning, pursuing Jalal al-Din Mingburnu and putting down local revolts before withdrawing. There is no indication that a Mongol garrison was left in the region by Chinggis, and it is not until the 1230s that Mongol forces returned and properly incorporated the region into the empire. Still, it was not until the end of the thirteenth century were Chinggisid princes actually staying in the region, when Chagatayid princes like Du'a's son Qutlugh Khwaja took control over the Negudaris. The sources instead describe waves of Mongol garrisons into Afghanistan which began almost a decade after Chinggis Khan's death, from the initial tamma garrisons under Ögedai Khaan's orders to Jochid troops fleeing Hulegu to Afghanistan in the 1260s. Later, from the late fourteenth century onwards, Afghanistan was the heart of the Timurid realm, and while the Timurids shared some descent from Chinggis through marriage, it's not exactly the process which would have led to high percentages of Chinggisid ancestry.Together, this strongly suggests that the Hazara would not bear Chinggisid ancestry in any considerable quantity.   Perhaps most prominently, there is little evidence that connects the C2* star cluster to known descendants of Chinggis Khan. The fact that no tomb of Chinggis Khan or any other known members of his family has been found, means that there is no conclusive means to prove what haplogroups he possessed. Without human remains which undeniably belong to one of his close male relatives or himself, Chinggis Khan's own haplogroup can not ever be reliably identified. Most royal Chinggisid lineages in the western half of the empire, such as that of the Ilkhanate or Chagatais, disappeared long before the advance of genetic sciences. You might think that looking in Mongolia, you'd find a lot of Chinggisids running about, but this is not the case. Even during the empire, many members of the Chinggisid family were spread across Asia, leaving by the end of the fourteenth century largely lines only from his brothers, and of his grandsons Ariq Böke and Khubilai. In the fifteenth century, a massive massacre of the royal family was carried out by the leader of the Oirats and the true master of Mongolia, the non-Chinggisid Esen Taishi. Mongolia was reunified some fifty years later under the Khubilayid prince Dayan Khan, and it was the descendants of his sons who made up the Chinggisid nobility for the next centuries. Then, in the 1930s Soviet supported purges resulted in the near annihilation of the Chinggisid princes, Buddhist clergy and other political enemies. From 1937-1939, over 30,000 Mongolians were killed, and the Dayan Khanid nobility nearly extinguished.   While it is true that today in Mongolia, you can find many people who claim the imperial clan name of Borjigin, this is largely because after democratization in Mongolia in 1990, Mongolians were encouraged to take clan names- a fact that, as many commenters have pointed out, historically the Mongols did not do, unless they were actually members of the Chinggisid royal family. While the 1918 census in Mongolia recorded only 5.7% of the population as being Borjigid, during the recent registering of clan names some 50% chose, of course, the most famous and prestigious name for themselves. Therefore, it's rather difficult to find a lot of a Chinggisids today.   The 2003 study relied on a random selection of people from across Asia, rather than looking specifically for individuals who claimed Chinggisid descent. Other studies which have sought out people who claim Chinggisid ancestry do not support the C2* Star cluster hypothesis of the 2003 study. A 2012 study by Batbayar and Sabitov in the Russian Journal of Genetic Genealogy of Mongolian individuals who could trace their lineage back to Chinggis Khan's fifteenth century descendant, Dayan Khan, found none of them matched the Star cluster proposed by the 2003 study. To overcome the previously mentioned issues about finding Chinggisids, to quote Batbayar and Sabitov, “In this study, seven patrilineal descendants of [...] Dayan Khan and two of Chinggis Khan's brothers' descendants were chosen for Y-chromosome DNA sequencing. Rather than testing a multitude of subjects, for the sake of accuracy, the most legitimate and proven descendants of Dayan Khan were selected. The DNA donors were selected based upon their official Mongol and Manchu titles and ranks, which were precisely recorded in Mongolian, Manchu, and Soviet documents.” Essentially, as close as you can get to a definite, unbroken paternal line from Chinggis Khan, given the 800 years since his death. When they compared the Dayan Khanid descendants, the descendants of Chinggis' brothers, and those who could reliable claimed ancestry from Chinggis' son Jochi, Batbayar and Sabitov demonstrated that essentially each lineage bore different haplogroups, and none, except for a small branch of the Jochids, bore the C2* star cluster of the 2003 study.    Study of the bodies of medieval Mongol burials have likewise yielded contrasting results when their DNA has been examined.  One of the most notable burials which has been studied is the Tavan Tolgoi suit, from eastern Mongolia. Essentially it was a burial of an extremely wealthy family, dated to the mid-thirteenth century. Adorned with jewelry and buried in coffins made of Cinnamon, which would have had to be imported from southeastern Asia, the researcher suggested due to such obvious wealth and power that they must have been Chinggisid. Their bodies showed haplogroups associated, interestingly enough, with western Asia populations, with effectively no descendants in modern Mongolian populations, and most definitely, not the C2* star cluster. This led to the 2016 study by Gavaachimed Lkhagvasuren et al., titled “Molecular Genealogy of a Mongol Queen's Family and her Possible kinship with Genghis Khan,” to suggest Chinggis must have borne this haplogroup, and possibly, western Asian ancestry. He also pointed to supposed descriptions of Chinggis Khan having red hair as possible supporting literary evidence.    But this is not reliable evidence. Firstly, none of the graves conclusively can be identified as Chinggisid.  The Chinggisid's known preference for burials on Burkhan Khaldun seems unlikely to make the Tavan Tolgoi burials a close relation.  Further, the “red hair” description of Chinggis Khan comes from a mistranslation of a phrase from Rashid al-Din's Compendium of Chronicles, where Chinggis remarks that young Khubilai lacked his grandfather's ruddy features, indicating not red hair, but a face red in colour; hardly uncommon for a man who spent his lifetime in the harsh winds of the steppe. Therefore, the Tavan Tolgoi burials seem more likely to represent a family, possibly of Qipchaq origin, taken from western Asia, incorporated into the Mongol military and gaining wealth and power- hardly unusual in the Mongol army, but revealing nothing of Chinggis' haplogroups. Other wealthy burials of nobility from the Mongol Empire in Mongolia and northern China have revealed differing chromosomal haplogroups, providing no answer as of yet to the question of the Great Khan's own genetic lineage.   Much like the 2003's study erroneous identification of the Hazaras as direct descendants of Chinggis Khan, a more recent study demonstrates the pitfalls of attempting to connect historical figures to genetic data. A 2019 study by Shao-Qing Wen et al. in the  Journal of Human Genetics looked at the y-chromosomal profiles of a family from northwestern China's Gansu-Qinghai area, who traced their ancestry back to Kölgen, a son of Chinggis Khan with one of his lesser wives. Importantly, this family also backed up their claims in genealogical records, and had inhabited the same region for centuries. After the expulsion of the Mongols, they had been made local officials [tusi 土司] by the succeeding Ming and Qing dynasties. This family, the Lu, did not match the C2* Star Cluster, but actually showed close affinity to other known descendants of Chinggis Khan, the Töre clan in Kazakhstan. The Töre  trace their lineage to Jani Beg Khan (r.1473-1480), one of the founders of the Kazakh Khanate and a tenth generation descendant of Chinggis Khan's first born son Jochi. Jochi, as you may recall, was born after his mother Börte was taken captive by Chinggis Khan's enemies, and was accused, most notably by his brother Chagatai, of not being their father's son. Chinggis, for the record, always treated Jochi as fully legitimate. As the Lu family in China traced themselves to Kölgen, who shared only a father with Jochi, then the fact that the Lu and the Töre belong to the same C2 haplogroup, with a  genealogical separation of about 1,000 years, would suggest that if this is in fact the Y-chromosomal lineage of Chinggis Khan, then Jochi's uncertain paternity could be laid to rest, and that he was a true son of Chinggis Khan.   This theory is comfortable and convenient, but other scholars have noted that the connection of the Lu to Toghan, the descendant of Kölgen, is very tenuous. The sources connecting the Lu clan to Kölgen's family were not compiled until the late Qing Dynasty, some four to five centuries after Toghan's death. The sources more contemporary to Toghan's life do not match the description of his life described in the histories used by the Lu clan, leading scholars to argue that, while the Lu clan does have Mongolian origin, and likely did have an ancestor with the very common medieval Mongolian name of Toghan, it seems likely that at some point the Lu clan's family compilers decided to associate their own ancestor with the more well known Chinggisid of the same name, and therefore claim for themselves Chinggisid ancestry and prestige- hardly an unknown thing by compilers of Chinese family trees. Therefore, the matter of Jochi's paternity still remains uncertain.       Perhaps the final nail in the coffin comes in the 2018 study by  Lan Hai-Wei, et al. in the European Journal of Human Genetics. Compiling data from previous studies that found issue with the 2003 hypothesis, they looked at groups with high frequencies of the C2* Star clusters like the Hazara or the Daur, a Mongolic-speaking people from Northeastern China who, based off of historical records, make no claims of Chinggisid descent. Newer estimates also suggest the most recent common ancestor for this lineage was over 2,600 years ago. In the most recent hypothesis then, it seems more likely that the star cluster identified by the 2003 study does not represent the lineage of Chinggis Khan, but was simply an incredibly common paternal lineage among ordinary inhabitants of the Mongolian plateau. Its presence in other peoples across Asia was not evidence of selective breeding into the Golden Lineage, but simply the movement of Mongolian troops into a region, and intermixing with the local population. In the case of the Hazaras, this is the exact scenario demonstrated by the historical sources, with waves of Mongol troops rather than a host of Chinggisids descending into the Hazarajat. The possibility cannot be excluded however, that while C2* was a dominant haplotype in thirteenth century Mongolia, that before 1200 it had already been spread across Central Asia by earlier nomadic expansions of Mongolia-based empires like the Göktürk Khaghanates or the Uighur. The Mongol expansion in the thirteenth century, then, would only be another wave of the spread of C2* across Eurasia.       While it is possible that Chinggis Khan and his close male relatives did in fact, carry the C2* star cluster, there is no evidence which directly or conclusively connects him to it. His known descendants through the line of Dayan Khan are of a different Y-chromosomal haplogroup. The descendants of Dayan Khan, himself a descendant of Chinggis Khan's grandson Khubilai, and the Kazakh Töre, descendants of Chinggis Khan's son Jochi, bear haplotypes so distant that their most recent common ancestor is estimated to have lived 4,500 years ago, which does not fair well for the likelihood of Jochi being Chinggis' son. A third known and tested branch, of the Shibanids in Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan, does match the C2* star cluster, but has less than 1,000 known members and again, are descended from Chinggis Khan via Jochi. Chinggis Khan then cannot be said to be the ancestor of 0.5% of the world's population, since his y-chromosomal marking remains unknown. Any attempts at identifying it conclusively can never be more than mere assumptions without finding the bodies of either the Khan or any of his close-male relatives- a prospect highly unlikely, given the Chinggisids' preference for secret graves. Thus, it seems that his haplotypes are but one more secret that Chinggis will keep with him.       Our series on the Mongols will continue, so be sure to subscribe to the Kings and Generals podcast to follow. If you enjoyed this, and would like to help us keep bringing you great content, please consider supporting us on patreon at www.patreon.com/kingsandgenerals, or sharing this with your friends. This episode was researched and written by our series historian, Jack Wilson. I'm your host David, and we'll catch you on the next one.  -SOURCES- Abilev, Serikabi, et al. “The Y-Chromosome C3* Star-Cluster Attributed to Genghis Khan's Descendants is Present at High Frequency in the Kerey Clan from Kazakhstan.” Human Biology 84 no. 1 (2012): 79-99.   Adnan, Atif, et al. “Genetic characterization of Y-chromosomal STRs in Hazara ethnic group of Pakistan and confirmation of DYS448 null allele.” International Journal of Legal Medicine 133 (2019): 789-793.   Callaway, Ewen. “Genghis Khan's Genetic Legacy Has Competition.” Scientific American. January 29th, 2015.   Derenko, M.V. “Distribution of the Male Lineages of Genghis Khan's Descendants in Northern Eurasian Populations.”  Russian Journal of Genetics 43 no. 3 (2007): 3334-337.   Dulik, Matthew C. “Y-Chromosome Variation in Altaian Kazakhs Reveals a Common paternal Gene Pool for Kazakhs and the Influence of Mongolian Expansions.” 6 PLoS One no. 3 (2011)   Gavaachimed Lkhagvasuren et al. “Molecular Genealogy of a Mongol Queen's Family and her Possible kinship with Genghis Khan.” PLoS ONE 11 no. 9 (2016)   Kherlen Batbayar and Zhaxylyk M. Sabitov. “The Genetic Origins of the Turko-Mongols and Review of The Genetic Legacy of the Mongols. Part 1: The Y-chromosomal Lineages of Chinggis Khan.” The Russian Journal of Genetic Genealogy 4 no. 2 (2012):    Lan-Hai Wei, et al. “Whole-sequence analysis indicates that the  Y chromosome C2*-Star Cluster traces back to ordinary Mongols, rather than Genghis Khan.” European Journal of Human Genetics 26, (2018): 230-237.   Lan-Hai Wei et al.  “Genetic trail for the early migrations of Aisin Gioro, the imperial house of the Qing Dynasty.” Journal of Human Genetics 62 (2017): 407-411.   Shao-Qing Wen et al., “Molecular genealogy of Tusi Lu's family reveals their apternal relationship with Jochi, Genghis Khan's eldest son.” Journal of Human Genetics 64 (2019): 815-820.   Ye Zhang et al. “The Y-chromosome haplogroup C3*-F3918, likely attributed to the Mongol Empire, can be traced to a 2500-year-old nomadic group.” Journal of Human Genetics 63 (2018): 231-238.   Yi Liu. “A Commentary on molecular genealogy of Tusi Lu's family reveals their paternal relationship with Jochi, Genghis Khan's eldest son.” Journal of Human Genetics 66 no. 5 (2020): 549–550.    Zakharov, I.A. “A Search for a “Genghis Khan” Chromosome.” Russian Journal of Genetics 46 no. 9 (2010): 1130-1131.     Zerjal, Tatiana, et al. “The Genetic Legacy of the Mongols.” American Journal of Human Genetics 72 (2003): 717-721.  

Living Lean
Q+A W/ Andrea: When To End A Building Phase, Determining Genetic Potential, Best Programs For Beginners, And More

Living Lean

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 51:30


Apply for coaching with our team: https://jeremiahbair.typeform.com/to/ubUfJiEuApply for online coaching with our team: https://jeremiahbair.typeform.com/to/ubUfJiEu

Cyber Security Inside
66. Will Sharing Genetic Info Haunt Us Later? Evolutions in Security

Cyber Security Inside

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 25:57


The kinds of personal information we put out there may seem safe today, but what about five, ten, twenty or thirty years down the line? On this episode of #CyberSecurityInside, Tom and Camille are joined by guest Alex Ionescu, a founder of Windsider Seminars & Solutions Inc. and the previous VP of Endpoint Engineering at CrowdStrike, to talk about how privacy concerns change and evolve over time, and how what we deem acceptable now could quickly become outdated.    They cover: -  Examples of how the cybersecurity landscape has changed and evolved over the years -  The major vulnerabilities that still exist in the endpoint, and where some advancements may happen -  Why the shift to virtualization in cloud environments is helping to harden security -  How even the word “security” itself has evolved over the years, and now includes things like privacy and ethics under its umbrella -  Why the kinds of data and information we share online today might be cause for concern in the future -  The current reasonable applications of artificial intelligence in cybersecurity -  Buzzwords that should raise red flags ... and more.  Tune in now!   The views and opinions expressed are those of the guests and author and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of Intel Corporation.   Here are some key takeaways: -  Even a decade ago, you couldn't necessarily do much with someone's information, whereas now, the information we share can be much more easily exploited. -  Security has become a major part of the marketing lingo, because people care just as much about that as they do speed; this was not true ten years ago, and is an example of how cybersecurity has entered the public consciousness in a big way. -  As we increasingly conduct our personal and professional lives online, the concept of security has come to include things like honesty and integrity. -  People should start thinking more critically about the information they share, because while a lot of it might not be exploitable today, it very well could be in the future. -  An example of something that we might really frown upon in the future is sharing our genetic information via services like 23andMe. -  For now, we absolutely still need a human element when it comes to security; we might not one day, but at this point there are no systems sophisticated enough that no double-checking or audits are required.   Some interesting quotes from today's episode: “10 years ago it was science fiction for most folks. So a lot of little things have changed, but I think that societal changes is the one that marks me the most.” “I think in some ways behavior is changing, but a related question would be: is the change in behavior mounting to anything?” “I'm not saying we're fighting a losing battle, but I do think we're swimming against the current, so to speak. And there's a lot more swimming that needs to be done.” “The cloud is not a panacea; it's obviously got its own issues as well, but it's a more modern set of systems that can be secured a little bit better than the average endpoint.” “Artificial Intelligence. If you hear those two words, it's time to run away.”

Brains and Gains with Dr. David Maconi
Mike Israetel - Resensitization, Debating Joel Seedman and Doug Brignole, Placebo Effect

Brains and Gains with Dr. David Maconi

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 67:45


Dr. Mike Israetel is back on to discuss the following: 0:00- Intro 0:30- Operation Smile 1:30- My decision to work with Steve Hall 2:30- Mike's perspective on an advanced trainee switching to a methodical training system 8:30- How do you actually GET stronger for reps to cause muscle growth 15:05- Why Mike believes beginner naturals argue against traditional hypertrophy methods 17:45- Ego within lifting 25:00- Genetic predisposition to strength vs size 26:45- Injuries from more strength focused lifting 28:10- Different beneficial rep ranges 33:00- Resensitzation 35:50- Is the size vs strength discrepancy greater in enhanced lifters 42:00- Preferences toward training methods 43:00- Steroid placebo studies and my fake steroid study 50:20- Novelty as a stimulus 53:30- Doug Brignole and Joel Seedman 58:45- Back to placebo 1:01:30- Genetics vs effort 1:04:10- Where to find MikeMike's new IG: https://www.instagram.com/drmikeisrae...Mike's YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/Renaissance...Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/DaveMaconi Smile Fund: https://secure.operationsmile.org/sit...

Scar Bearers
#79: How to use your strength to empower others with Dr. Joe Rinaldi!

Scar Bearers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 31:04


Joe Rinaldi is a husband, friend, physical therapist, performance coach, inspirational writer, motivational speaker, and CEO of Project Endure, LLC based out of Philadelphia, PA. He was born with a genetic eye condition called Best Disease which causes a progressive loss of central eyesight. While it wasn't always the case, Joe chooses to view his struggle as an immense source of strength and he hopes to help others develop the same perspective through his content, stories and actions. Care warning: Genetic conditions and indomitable perseverance will be discussed in this episode. Joe's links Blog: joerinaldi.blog Twitter: https://twitter.com/joearinaldi LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/joe-rinaldi-pt-dpt-0354b27a/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCy7YJ4Vhk7Ph74bLIFBy-rA Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/joearinaldi Newsletter: https://www.patreon.com/joerinaldi Podcast (iTunes): https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-pursuit/id1535722142 Podcast (Spotify): https://open.spotify.com/show/1Ec6kTMSzNXQ1dlvCKULVO?si=c24016064da34bc9 Project Endure: https://www.instagram.com/project.endure/ Hard Things Club: https://www.facebook.com/groups/2995141484034884/?ref=share My contact information: chrisdtgordon.com Instagram: @chrisdtgordon Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/chrisdt.gordon.5/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/chris-dt-gordon/ YouTube: Chris DT Gordon Podcast: Scar Bearers on Apple Podcasts, Spotify Theme music and post-production: @nateberan

Eye Know - Do You?
Receiving Genetic Test Results

Eye Know - Do You?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 14:44


With optimism and a positive attitude, Ashlyn Lincoln tells the story of how her newborn son, Gunner, who showed signs of vision loss, eventually received a genetic test—and how the results affected the family. A retina specialist diagnosed Gunner with Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), a rare, inherited eye disorder. An ambassador for Hope in Focus, Lincoln reveals how overwhelming the process was at times, and how she found support through the online IRD Community. Learn more about the power of genetic testing at EyeWant2Know.com.

The Bodybuilding Dietitians
#138 Can You Eat More & Lose Weight? Reaching "Genetic Limits" & Why The Scale NEEDS To Change

The Bodybuilding Dietitians

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 34:16


Welcome back for episode 138 of The Bodybuilding Dietitians Podcast! On this week's episode Tyarra and Jack answer and discuss various topics including: - Can you eat more food and lose weight? - How much weight should you gain per month during the improvement season? - Changing your perspective on scale weight - Is black coffee calorie-free? - Will we ever reach our "genetic limit"? Thank you again for tuning into the podcast and we hope you enjoy! We would greatly appreciate if you would please subscribe to the channel, give us a rating, leave us a review and tell your friends about the podcast! The more people we can reach out to and help the better! Stay tuned for more podcasts released on a weekly basis! Business Website: www.thebodybuildingdietitians.com Tyarra's Instagram: www.instagram.com/tyarranelson/?hl=en Jack's Instagram: www.instagram.com/jack.radfordsmith/?hl=en The Bodybuilding Dietitians Instagram: www.instagram.com/thebodybuildingdietitians/?hl=en YouTube: www.youtube.com/channel/UC9Why7CvHSXNMG8Aws6dnww 10% Off Marmadukes Peanut Butter Powder (discount code TBD10): www.marmadukes.com.au/discount/TBD10 VPA 10% off codes used at checkout: www.vpa.com.au/ TYARRA JACK

In Session with Dr. Farid Holakouee
November 08, 2021 Discussion on the book "The Genetic Lottery," Privilege

In Session with Dr. Farid Holakouee

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 46:55


November 08, 2021 Discussion on the book "The Genetic Lottery," Privilege by Dr. Farid Holakouee

The Stem Cell Report with Martin Pera
Linking Genetic Variants to Cell Phenotypes in Human iPSCs

The Stem Cell Report with Martin Pera

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 37:49


In this episode, Drs. Fiona Watt and Alice Vickers join the podcast to talk about uncovering the relationship between genetic variants and cellular behavior. They recently developed a platform to quantify iPSC differentiation propensity to investigate the genetic contribution to phenotypic variability. Drs. Vickers and Watt are authors of the recent paper,  "Plating human iPSC lines on micropatterned substrates relevels role for ITGBI nsSNV in endoderm formation” in Stem Cell Reports.  GuestsFiona Watt, DPhil, Centre for Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine, King's College London Website: http://www.wattlab.org/ Alice Vickers, PhD, INKEF Capital, Amsterdam (current affiliation). Centre for Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine, King's College London (previous affiliation). Website: https://www.inkefcapital.com Supporting Document ”Plating human iPSC lines on micropatterned substrates relevels role for ITGBI nsSNV in endoderm formation” HostMartin Pera, PhD – Editor-in-Chief, Stem Cell Reports and The Jackson LaboratoryTwitter: @martinperaJAXAbout Stem Cell ReportsStem Cell Reports is the Open Access journal of the International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) for communicating basic discoveries in stem cell research, in addition to translational and clinical studies. Stem Cell Reports focuses on original research with conceptual or practical advances that are of broad interest to stem cell biologists and clinicians.Twitter: @StemCellReportsAbout ISSCRWith nearly 4,000 members from more than 65 countries, the International Society for Stem Cell Research is the preeminent global, cross-disciplinary, science-based organization dedicated to stem cell research and its translation to the clinic. The ISSCR mission is to promote excellence in stem cell science and applications to human health. Twitter: @ISSCRAcknowledgementsISSCR StaffKeith Alm, Chief Executive OfficerBethany Almon, Senior Manager of Integrated MarketingYvonne Fisher, Managing Editor, Stem Cell ReportsKym Kilbourne, Director of Media and Strategic CommunicationsJack Mosher, Senior Manager of Scientific AffairsVoice WorkBen SnitkoffMusic@Konovalov

Higher Density Living Podcast
How Long Can Humans Live? Genetic Splicing, Longevity, and DNA Regeneration

Higher Density Living Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 30:04


Genetic Engineering has seen astronomical advancement since James Watson first identified the Molecular Structural of the DNA back in 1962. The long and similarly controversial scientific process to decode the Mysteries of the Pandora's Box of Human Biology. What Secret lies ahead? What are the possible potentials to achieve to master the Creational power of the human DNA? Higher Density Living incorporates a hot take on the human competition to the interwoven conflict between Government-funded Scientific Researches and Civilian Academe to unravel the secrets of the Human Genome. The massive human project to simultaneously control scientific progress and civilizational growth has set us back to achieve evolutionary breakthroughs as a collective species in order to unlock a higher path towards creative power in the universe. This podcast segment is part of Dr. Daniel Fry's phenomenal extraterrestrial account that can help us navigate the limits of known human biology and the infinite length of undiscovered human genetics. We aim to target as close as possible to decode and discuss human genomes in a casual fashion inlined with Creational Teachings. No secrets can be harbored forever using Knowledge and Wisdom. Alex and Jason made intricate syntheses of discussions relating to human genomics across the board. Where the political life of man conjoins the revolution of genetic engineering has profound control over the habitus of evolution happening at the biological level. The spiral of depression in the mind, body, and spirit complex is all connected to the molecular structure of human evolution. Nature adapts in every shape and form.  As with the previous discussion, the dangling web of corporate control imposes complete power to exploit purely scientific endeavors for the pursuit of material wealth. The vicious cycle never ends. Let's join Alex and Jason as they discuss the transcendence of Human Anatomy, expanded discussions on Human Philosophy, and Political Biology. www.higherdensityliving.com

People Behind the Science Podcast - Stories from Scientists about Science, Life, Research, and Science Careers
630: Mapping Our Genetic Make-Up in the Human Genome Project and Beyond - Dr. Eric Green

People Behind the Science Podcast - Stories from Scientists about Science, Life, Research, and Science Careers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 51:21


Dr. Eric Green is the Director of the National Human Genome Research Institute at the National Institutes of Health. Eric works in the field of genomics. Everything from cars to houses has a blueprint of information that defines its creation and operation. The field of genomics studies DNA, the information molecule of living cells, to understand how living organisms are created and operate. While his research can be time consuming, Eric loves digital photography because of the technological science involved. His two teenagers also keep him busy, and he is a diehard Cardinals baseball fan. He received his B.S. in Bacteriology from the University of Wisconsin, Madison and his M.D. and Ph.D. in Cell Biology from Washington University in St. Louis. Afterward, Eric completed his residency at Washington University in Laboratory Medicine and as part of his residency he did a postdoctoral research in genetics. Eric served on the faculty and as co-investigator in the Human Genome Center at Washington University School of Medicine before accepting a position at the National Institutes of Health where he has been now for over 20 years. Eric has been the recipient of many awards and honors during his career, including the NIH Director's Award (multiple times), the Alumni Achievement and the Distinguished Alumni Awards from Washington University School of Medicine, as well as a Ladue Horton Watkins High School Distinguished Alumni Award. He is also a member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation and the Association of American Physicians. Eric is here with us today to tell us all about his journey through life and science.

The Rogue Agronomist
Genetic Gain vs. Hybrid Familiarity

The Rogue Agronomist

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021


A discussion about genetic gain and how we may be missing out on bushels by sacrificing those bushels for hybrid familiarity when we are planting hybrids we have past positive experiences with. Recognizing what happens when we change practices that should be increasing yield but yields seem to plateau.

Geopolitics & Empire
Dr. Igor Shepherd: Covid is a Global Military Operation, We're Facing Genetic Genocide

Geopolitics & Empire

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 74:11


Former Soviet military physician Dr. Igor Shepherd provides his analysis of the current so-called pandemic, which he says is an enormous global military psychological operation implemented by communist-crazies who have infiltrated the governments of all nations. Their goal is to silently usher in a post-Covid-19 world government via The Great Reset and decimate all freedoms […]

GES Center Lectures, NC State University
#10 – Expert Panel: Considerations for adopting GE crops around the world

GES Center Lectures, NC State University

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 58:15


Genetic Engineering and Society Center GES Colloquium - Tuesdays 12-1PM (via Zoom) NC State University | http://go.ncsu.edu/ges-colloquium GES Mediasite - See videos, full abstracts, speaker bios, and slides https://go.ncsu.edu/ges-mediasite Twitter - https://twitter.com/GESCenterNCSU Considerations for adopting genetically engineered crops around the world AgBioFEWS Cohort 3 Fellows bring together a panel of speakers to discuss how the emerging field of GE might influence international markets and impact society. Abstract Given the tight interconnectedness of global food systems, genetically engineering (GE) staple crops might immediately influence our lives. AgBioFEWS cohort 3 fellows from the Genetic and Engineering Society Center at NC State have brought together a panel of speakers to discuss how the emerging field of GE might influence international markets and impact society. Speakers will discuss incentives and considerations regarding the adoption of GE technology from private, public, and consumer perspectives. Further, the panel hopes to reflect on how potential market arrangements might impact the welfare of different groups across regions and income levels, since many of the GE industry leaders come from a minority of wealthy nations. The three panel members are experts in the philosophy of agriculture and ethics, international relations, and biotechnology. They are well positioned to help us understand the effects of this paradigm changing technology. Guest Panelists Md. Arif Hossain is the CEO and Executive Director of Farming Future Bangladesh (FFB), a comprehensive communication and community engagement organization aimed to improve awareness about modern agricultural innovations including crop biotechnology to ensure sustainable food security in Bangladesh. Twitter: @arifromel Dr. Marc Ghislain is a global leader of the biotechnology research program at the International Potato Center where he is currently leading efforts to release a transgenic potato completely resistant to late blight in sub-Saharan African countries. Twitter: @Cipotato Dr. Paul B.  Thompson is the W.K. Kellogg Chair in Agricultural, Food and Community Ethics at Michigan State University and has spent his career in research and teaching focused on ethical and philosophical topics in food and agriculture. Twitter: @MSUAFRE GES Center - Integrating scientific knowledge & diverse public values in shaping the futures of biotechnology. Find out more at https://ges-center-lectures-ncsu.pinecast.co

Real Life Pharmacology - Pharmacology Education for Health Care Professionals

On this episode, I discuss azathioprine pharmacology, adverse effects, monitoring parameters, and drug interactions. Azathioprine is classified as an immunosuppressive agent so it is naturally going to be used for autoimmune type disorders and transplantation. Azathioprine has a boxed warning for myelosuppression. I talk more about this in the episode. Genetic testing is recommended by the AGA prior to the use of azathioprine. I discuss which tests might be helpful to reduce the risk of toxicity.

Digital Barbell Podcast
082 - Reaching Your Highest Genetic Potential & Building Lean Muscle At Any Age - Dr. Darin Deaton

Digital Barbell Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 63:09


Regardless of our current age, we all have a maximum potential we can reach. With the right training, nutrition, and mindset you can improve whether you're in your 30's, 40's, 50's and beyond. We covered a lot of important ground in this episode: Learning to endure through injuries and setbacks. The mental benefits of doing hard things in the gym. How our beliefs about ourselves affect our outcomes. Getting the most bang for your buck in your training. Increasing your muscle mass and metabolism as you age. Changing your body composition. Where to find Dr. Deaton http://www.40fit.com/40fitradio/ https://www.instagram.com/40fitradio/ https://riatatherapy.com/ Apply to work with Digital Barbell one-on-one with your own custom training program and nutrition coaching: www.digitalbarbell.com/contact-us Let us help you through the holidays. Get free weekly emails: www.digitalbarbell.com/join-our-email-list A lot of people want to get in shape. They work out hard and try to eat well, but are frustrated because they never get the results they were hoping for. We give you customized workouts, compassionate coaching and accountability, and a nutrition program built just for you that you'll love. You get the results you've always wanted, so you can enjoy your fitness without the stress of figuring it out on your own. Get our Free Macronutrient and Calorie guide. Includes our ANTI-FAD nutrition basics cheat sheet: https://www.digitalbarbell.com/calorieandmacronutrientcalculator

Eye Know - Do You?
Pursuing A Genetic Test

Eye Know - Do You?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 14:34


Diagnosed with an IRD as a Marine in the early 2000s, Steve Walker received a medical discharge and went on to become an Ironman Triathlete. He and his wife, Kacey, walk listeners though the steps of his own experience with genetic testing, from learning about it, to getting the test, to the difference the results made for their families. A powerful reminder of how getting the right information can change many lives. Learn more about Steve and Kacey's journey at EyeWant2Know.com.

The Carnivore Yogi Podcast
Why most people should not take calcium supplements and the real reason that taking vitamin D3 could be causing you more harm than good - Barton Scott - Upgraded Formulas

The Carnivore Yogi Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 49:53


This episode is sponsored by Upgraded Formulas - Get your HTMA with Upgraded Formulas - use my code YOGI12 for a discount! - https://www.upgradedformulas.com/?rfsn=4637317.2071db5&utm_source=refersion&utm_medium=affiliate&utm_campaign=4637317.2071db5 Join my private membership group here - https://carnivoreyogi.com/welcome-to-the-membership-group-page/ My previous episode with Barton Scott all about minerals - https://anchor.fm/carnivoreyogi/episodes/ELECTROLYTE--MINERAL-IMBALANCE---Symptoms-you-might-be-missing-that-are-impeding-your-health-with-Barton-Scott-es3h77 Check your vitamin D with my sponsor LetsGetChecked - http://trylgc.com/carnivorevitaminD Sperti Vitamin D lamp - https://amzn.to/3DJd2di EMR TEK - Red light therapy device - code carnivoreyogi30 to save 30% - https://emr-tek.com/collections/red-light-therapy 0:00 Intro 3:27 Episode begins - Meet Barton 4:00 Vitamin D - a simple topic that everyone is getting wrong 6:19 The role of magnesium in Vitamin D absorption 9:17 Vitamin D3 is actually like a hormone - influence on calcium 10:01 Why we do not want high calcium levels or to take calcium supplements 12:18 Calcium to potassium ratio and thyroid function & adrenal function 13:00 The role of minerals & all fat soluble vitamins and how taking vitamin D will throw off the rest of your vitamins 14:18 Potassium deficiency is very common & the issues associated with potassium deficiency 17:07 Barton's advice on ideal vitamin D levels 14:00 Sarah's Vitamin D supplementation routine 15:29 Red light and vitamin D absorption 16:50 Take light breaks during your work day & eat with the sun 17:50 How the body is an electrical system & how minerals play into our energy & vitamin absorption & the role of heavy metals 25:32 Why eating the “perfect diet” isn't enough anymore due to soil depletion & the role of iodine & fertility for men and women - 4.32 29:27 Why low carb & keto is not the reason for mineral depletion 28:04 Why we need to know mineral levels in relationship to other minerals 32:36 Why most people shouldn't take iron supplements for anemia and the role of copper in histamine 36:24 How minerals & fat soluble vitamins balance one another out 37:22 Calcium levels and vitamin D levels 37:50 Genetic predisposition and vitamin D absorption 39:32 The role of light and fat soluble vitamins 40:24 The main reason that people are not absorbing Vitamin D3 & the role of minerals 42:32 - Stop looking at the body as a closed system 44:32 Upgraded Magnesium & why we need it for dreaming, cramps & tightness/fatigue in the body 46:24 Why Upgraded Formulas minerals are different than other minerals you can buy commercially 48:05 - Outro

Full Scope
Part 3, Genetic Diversity and the Extinction of the Human Microbiome

Full Scope

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 36:26


SummaryDiversity in ecology and genetics appears to be a very good thing. The human species has a genetic pool (all the gene variants from all the humans alive) that is diverse and protective for our species. Human bodies and all other multi-cellular organisms also host diverse arrays of micro-organisms that our essential to health.  Morbidity and MortalityAntibiotics, pesticide, cesarean sections, baby formula, monocrops, processed foods, disconnection with nature, other pharmaceuticals like proton-pump inhibitors, and other factors have all contributed to a mass extinction of the human gut microbiome. It is estimated that humans have lost 50% of our microbial diversity in the last few hundred years. StoryMicrobial fossils isolated from 1000 year old poop shows 38% novel species (now extinct) Key Points1. Human bodies are an ecosystem2. A diverse ecosystem is associated with health. Dysbiosis is associated with numerous chronic diseases.3. The food we eat and the way we live our lives has profound effects on our microbiotia and health.4. In the absence of a genetic disease, our microbiome contributes more to our health than our own genes. References- Tu P, Chi L, Bodnar W, et al. Gut Microbiome Toxicity: Connecting the Environment and Gut Microbiome-Associated Diseases. Toxics. 2020;8(1):19. Published 2020 Mar 12. doi:10.3390/toxics8010019- Blaser MJ. The Past and Future Biology of the Human Microbiome in an Age of Extinctions. Cell. 2018 - Manor O, Dai CL, Kornilov SA, Smith B, Price ND, Lovejoy JC, Gibbons SM, Magis AT. Health and disease markers correlate with gut microbiome composition across thousands of people. Nat Commun. 2020- Chichlowski M, Shah N, Wampler JL, Wu SS, Vanderhoof JA. Bifidobacterium longum Subspecies infantis (B. infantis) in Pediatric Nutrition: Current State of Knowledge. Nutrients. 2020;12(6):1581. Published 2020 - https://www.the-scientist.com/features/neanderthal-dna-in-modern-human-genomes-is-not-silent-66299- https://www.genome.gov/about-genomics/fact-sheets/Genetics-vs-Genomics- https://www.genome.gov/about-genomics/fact-sheets/Comparative-Genomics-Fact-Sheet- https://academic.oup.com/jhered/article/108/6/671/3836924- Satoh, M; Kuroiwa, T (September 1991). "Organization of multiple nucleoids and DNA molecules in mitochondria of a human cell". Experimental Cell Research. 196 (1): 137–140. - https://www.cancer.gov/news-events/cancer-currents-blog/2020/colorectal-cancer-rising-younger-adults- Seneff, S. Toxic Legacy: Howe the Weedkiller Glyphosate is Destroying our Health and the Environment. 2021https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/autism/data.html 

Becoming Unique
Human Design with Stephen Robelledo from Genetic Yoga

Becoming Unique

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 88:45


Today is all about Human Design with Stephen Robelledo from Genetic yoga. Visit website for more details https://geneticyoga.com/store To check out. Genetic yoga Instagram https://instagram.com/geneticyoga?utm_medium=copy_link To check out Stephen Robelledo Instagram https://instagram.com/humandesignnow?utm_medium=copy_link To check out Becoming Unique Instagram https://instagram.com/becoming__unique?utm_medium=copy_link

Texas Tribune Brief
For Texans who want a child but have difficult pregnancies, the new abortion law just made that journey even harder

Texas Tribune Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 4:21


Genetic testing allows Texans to find out early if their baby has a fatal condition. But often by the time they do find out, they will no longer have the right to terminate that pregnancy under the new state law.

Mind Pump: Raw Fitness Truth
1673: How to Know If You Have Reached Your Genetic Muscle Building Potential, the Downside of Over-Consuming Protein, the Toxins in Vegetables & More

Mind Pump: Raw Fitness Truth

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 77:35


In this episode of Quah (Q & A), Sal, Adam & Justin answer Pump Head questions about how to know when you have reached your genetic potential, whether you can over-consume protein, if it is normal to progress on some lifts but regress on others at the same time, and if it is true certain vegetables are toxic. Another great forgotten exercise. (4:05) New technology is emerging in the housing market. (12:24) The importance of having tough conversations. (18:00) Organifi Pure, take it so your brain doesn't fart like Justin's. (22:14) To catch a predator. (25:28) When science proves that ‘class clowns' may be the brightest people in the room. (30:13) Mind Pump Recommends, Dune in theaters, and HBO Max. (36:37) Felix Gray has now entered the gaming market! (39:05) You can die from having too much gas?! (44:56) The sue-happy people need to stop. (46:30) #Quah questions #1 - How do you know when you have reached your genetic potential and what is the age that most people reach it? (51:27) #Quah question #2 - Can you over-consume protein? (59:17) #Quah question #3 – Is it normal to progress on some lifts but regress on others, at the same time? If not, what can be the problem? (1:03:22) #Quah question #4 – What is your take on certain vegetables being toxic? (1:08:43) Related Links/Products Mentioned October Promotion: MAPS Anabolic and NO BS 6-Pack Formula – Get Both for $59.99!    Tip: How to Fix All Your Biceps Problems - T NATION 3-D Printed Houses Are Sprouting Near Austin as Demand for Homes Grows - WSJ Visit Organifi for the exclusive offer for Mind Pump listeners! **Promo code “MINDPUMP” at checkout** Los Gatos woman charged with running secret teen parties filled with booze and sex Are more humorous children more intelligent? A case from Turkish culture Dune | In Theaters and on HBO Max October 21 | HBO Max Visit Felix Gray for an exclusive offer for Mind Pump listeners! Chinese man dies after guzzling 1.5 liters of Coca-Cola Kellogg's customer files $5 million lawsuit alleging Pop-Tarts don't have enough strawberries Visit My Serenity Kids for an exclusive offer for Mind Pump listeners! **Promo code “MP20” at checkout** How Your Genetics Influence Your Muscle Building Potential – Mind Pump Blog Here Are The Ages You Peak at Everything Throughout Life The Myth of Optimal Protein Intake – Mind Pump Blog Mind Pump Podcast – YouTube Mind Pump Free Resources People Mentioned Luke Storey (@lukestorey)  Instagram Dave Chappelle (@davechappelle)  Instagram Paul Saladino (@carnivoremd2.0)  Instagram Mikhaila Peterson (@mikhailapeterson)  Instagram    

NSGC Podcast Series
Access and Service Delivery: Changing the Conversation

NSGC Podcast Series

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 38:58


Join Podcast Subcommittee member Ryan Kuehl in conversation with Emily Boothe and Brian Reys from NSGC's Access and Service Delivery Committee. Emily and Brian share personal experiences with service delivery challenges and innovations and advice for tackling these issues in your own workplace. This conversation draws on the Journal of Genetic Counseling (JoGC) article "Genetic counseling service delivery models: A study of genetic counselors' interests, needs, and barriers to implementation", to which Emily was a contributing author. This episode is approved as part of the JoGC CEU program.

HOT FLASHES & COOL TOPICS
Breast Cancer: Know Your Genetic Risk Assessment with Dr. Holly Pederson

HOT FLASHES & COOL TOPICS

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 49:12


In today's episode, we share an extremely important conversation with Dr. Pederson to discuss the risk assessment for breast cancer, genetic testing, 3D mammograms, and the correlation between breast density and breast cancer. Dr Holly Pederson is Director of Medical Breast Services at Cleveland Clinic and an expert on breast cancer and its risk factors. Dr. Pederson explains that risk assessment involves a careful, thorough intake of family history with cancer and reporting the results to a health care provider to see your testing eligibility.  She also discusses the risks with breast density and her excitement for future studies that will better reveal our risks for breast cancer. Subscribe to Hot Flashes & Cool Topics podcast on any podcast platform. www.hotflashescooltopics.com  

The Better Behavior Show with Dr. Nicole Beurkens
Episode 167: Answers to Anorexia—Personalized Care for a Brain-Based Illness

The Better Behavior Show with Dr. Nicole Beurkens

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 42:45


My guest this week is Dr. James Greenblatt, he is a pioneer in the field of functional integrative medicine, a board-certified child and adult psychiatrist, and has treated patients since 1988. He received his medical degree and did his psychiatry residency at George Washington University and completed a Fellowship in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at Johns Hopkins Medical School. He currently serves as the Chief Medical Officer at Walden Behavioral Care and an Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at Tufts University School of Medicine and Dartmouth College. Dr. Greenblatt has lectured internationally on the scientific evidence for nutritional interventions in psychiatry and mental illness. He is the author of seven books, and his latest book Answers To Anorexia is released right now, and we are excited about that. He is also the founder of Psychiatry Redefined, which is a really innovative educational platform dedicated to the transformation of psychiatry, and they offer online courses, webinars, and even fellowships for professionals. In this episode, Dr. Greenblatt and I discuss his new book, Answers to Anorexia. Anorexia nervosa is on the rise, especially in young children, and the relapse and suicide rates are among the highest for psychiatric illnesses. We discuss warning signs, underlying causes, and effective treatment approaches. Anorexia Affects All Age Groups  Anorexia nervosa is the most life-threatening of the psychiatric illnesses (highest rate of suicide) Early intervention and treatment is critical Increasing rates, especially in preteens and younger, but seen in all genders and races Often starts in adolescence   What is Anorexia Nervosa? Listed as one of the eating disorders; as a psychiatric diagnosis Symptoms include distorted body image along with restrictive eating/weight loss The brain plays tricks on the body, where there is a complete distortion of reality Scientists now can articulate that this is a brain-based illness, that the neurophysiological changes are different in those with anorexia however, this has not been translated into clinical care Caregivers and professionals need to focus on a more empathic collaborative treatment model   Early Warning Signs & Risk Factors Very high genetic component, whether it is a parent or an aunt/uncle One of the most dramatic, well-proven risk factors is going on a vegan/vegetarian diet in puberty, certainly pre-puberty Any change in diet is usually the onset Literature showing that a vegan diet in adolescence with a genetic vulnerability is a very high risk for an eating disorder, poorer outcomes, and a higher relapse rate The restricting of those (animal-based) foods, which are particularly high in nutrients such as zinc and vitamin B12, are critical for puberty and one of the core deficiencies in anorexia nervosa   Treatments Historically Have Been Ineffective Massive lack of proper training about eating disorders and nutrition for practitioners For anorexia nervosa, there are no approved medications So every practitioner is making an educated guess as to what would be helpful for medication and/or therapy Dr. Greenblatt's thesis is it's a brain-based illness due to malnutrition, and without that nutritional repletion, therapy is often ineffective High relapse rate especially since typically patients are released with no ongoing care Lack of treatment centers puts a large time, financial, and stress burden on families to have to travel further Insurance companies limit treatment The highest risk of suicide of any psychiatric illnesses Not a lot of research as to why, but Dr Greenblatt's theory is the relationship between depleted levels of essential fatty acids (EPA and DHA) and brain function Low levels of those nutrients are associated with a higher risk of suicide    Proper Treatment and Prevention First, need to address the (chronic) malnutrition and genetic vulnerability as a first red flag as well as changes in diet in early adolescence All nutritional deficiencies of major nutrients affect brain function and brain distortion Forcing a patient to eat during in inpatient care to stabilize weight while not addressing a nutrient-dense diet is not an effective solution   Key Nutrients Needed for Recovery Zinc, especially during puberty Low zinc is related to loss of appetite and taste, poor digestion, depression, and sleep problems Other essential nutrients: B vitamins, amino acids, and fatty acids Treatment centers are not necessarily providing nutrient-dense foods or additional supplementation Magnesium is one of the most common nutrient deficiencies in the U.S., and particularly in those with anxiety, mental health, sleep, or constipation Nutrient testing is not always helpful/accurately providing the full picture as most nutrients are found in multiple parts of the body, not just blood   Where to Start for Support Schedule a nutritional augmentation consultation Try in the fields of functional or integrative medicine as they are typically trained across multiple disciplines and are either well-versed in nutrition or work closely with nutritional professionals Early interventions with personalized care/therapy and dietitian are critical Psychotherapy, so that children and adolescents are feeling valued and heard Using food as a therapeutic approach along with targeted supplementation and nutrients; nutrition as being profoundly important in even some of these most severe clinical presentations. Consider any underlying medical contributors such as undiagnosed celiac, PANDAS, etc. Stay curious and keep asking good questions Genetic testing can be helpful   Answers to Anorexia Book: Answers to Anorexia An overview of the lack of a current effective model and a proposal around a nutritional repletion model Available on Amazon.com and jamesgreenblattmd.com For clinicians, therapists, nurse practitioners, and psychiatrists there is an educational platform (psychiatryredefined.org) with hundreds of hours of content for functional medicine for mental health and functional psychiatry where they can learn a model to dig deeper Connect with Dr. Nicole Beurkens on... Instagram Facebook Drbeurkens.com

Swine.It
Heat stress: how does it affect our pigs and how can we avoid it? - Dr. Jay Johnson

Swine.It

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 29:38


In hotter climates and seasons, heat stress can have a large effect on pig performance, regardless of their stage of production. Dr. Jay Johnson has been a wonderful asset to the swine community with his work on the effect of heat stress on pigs and shares some insight on his research findings. In today's episode, he discusses the importance of understanding heat stress and different strategies we can utilize to help mitigate its effects on pig health and performance. "

Functional Medicine Research with Dr. Nikolas Hedberg
How to Follow a Low Histamine Diet

Functional Medicine Research with Dr. Nikolas Hedberg

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 17:58


Histamine is often overlooked as a cause of chronic health problems yet the fix for this issue can be quite straightforward. In this article, I cover the details of histamine and how to follow a low histamine diet. Histamine intolerance (HIT) affects approximately 1% of the population. Approximately 80% of those affected are middle-aged.1 Histamine intolerance occurs when an individual has more histamine in their system than they can breakdown. Excess systemic concentrations of histamine can result from overproduction, overconsumption, and/or having a reduced ability to clear out histamine from the body. For those with HIT, eating a diet that results in increased histamine can contribute to chronic inflammation due to the ongoing exposure to histamine. This excess histamine often accumulates as a result of decreased diamine oxidase (DAO) activity.2, 3 The resulting excess histamine contributes to the physical symptoms associated with HIT. Following a low-histamine diet along with supplemental DAO is often recommended to decrease the symptoms associated with HIT. Eating a low-histamine diet involves more than simply eliminating foods that are high in histamine. This article will help to explain the challenges with following a low histamine diet and will highlight the many ways excess histamine can occur in food and in the body. Histamine Synthesis and Degradation Excess histamine concentrations may be exogenously released from food or endogenously produced. Histamine is synthesized by a variety of cells in the body including mast cells, basophils, platelets, histaminergic neurons, and enterochromaffin cells. Endogenous histamine is released in response to a variety of immune and inflammatory related stimuli as well as certain foods, alcohol, or drugs which can activate release.1 Endogenous histamine supplies are also controlled by genes that code for the enzymes that synthesize and degrade histamine. Genetic polymorphisms in histamine receptors and DAO can decrease the rate of DAO activity, reducing the rate of clearance and increasing systemic histamine concentrations.3 Exogenous sources of histamine mainly comes from ingested foods. Several factors in food processing and storage can increase the histamine content of certain foods as well. Histamine is normally metabolized by amine oxidases in healthy individuals. These amine oxidases include monoamine oxidase (MAO), DAO, and histamine N-methyltransferase (HNMT), with DAO being the primary enzymes for metabolism of histamine.5 It is thought that low gastrointestinal levels of DAO contributes to an individual being unable to break down histamine in the intestines, resulting in the increased sensitivity to histamine found in common foods. As excess levels accumulate, intolerance symptoms develop.1, 2, 6, 7 Symptoms Associated with Histamine Intolerance There is great heterogeneity in the presentation of symptoms in those with HIT, making it difficult to define a clear clinical picture. Histamine intolerance is generally suspected when symptoms appear after the ingestion of histamine containing food.3 Symptoms may develop immediately or can be delayed as much as three hours following ingestion.5 Histamine receptors are found ubiquitously throughout the body, making different organ systems susceptible to adverse reactions due to excess histamine concentrations. This results in a wide variety of symptoms that may be exhibited by an individual, contributing to the difficulty in diagnosis. These symptoms include gastrointestinal issues such as abdominal pain, bloating, diarrhea, and constipation. Extraintestinal complaints may affect neurological, respiratory, dermatological, and/or hemodynamic systems.2 Histamine has vasoactive properties that may result in flushing, headaches, and/or hypertension.5 Other common symptoms related to HIT include brain fog, fatigue, dizziness, itching, and difficulty swallowing, low blood pressure, nasal congestion, sneezing,

The Tailored Life Podcast
Ep. 665 - How Much Do Genetics Matter?

The Tailored Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 46:27


The goal of this podcast is to tackle the long debated and internal burning question we all have... Do genetics matter? And if so, how large of a role do they play in the results we see? Well the truth is, yes they do. But how much they matter is where most people are actually pretty incorrect, because they matter FAR less than we often make it seem or allow ourselves to believe. In fact, it's mostly just an excuse to not work hard based on what the research actually shows. However we're going to dive into genotypes, epigenetics, polygenetics, and what the research says about all of these things, in regards to strength and performance, hypertrophy, as well as fat loss and obesity. ---- Join The Tailored Trainer (TCM's Membership Site) to gain full access to daily programming and a private coaching forum for guidance. Get a 7 Day FREE Trial HERE ASK CODY YOUR QUESTION HERE Check Out Free Guides and E-Books HERE Head over to http://buylegion.com/boomboom enter code boom boom at checkout to save 20%, start earning loyalty points, and supplementing with the top supplement company on the market. For training equipment, visit www.giantlifting.com and use promo code: TCM5 to save 5% on purchases. ---- Shownotes: SHOWNOTES: Genetics vs. Epigenetics GENETICS: Genetics is the study of how different qualities, called traits, are passed down from parents to child. Genetics helps explain what makes you unique, why family members look alike, and why some diseases run in families. When we trace the paths of these qualities, we are following packages of information called genes. EPIGENETICS: Epigenetics is the study of how your behaviors and environment can cause changes that affect the way your genes work. Unlike genetic changes, epigenetic changes are reversible and do not change your DNA sequence, but they can change how your body reads a DNA sequence. Maybe it's all in your head…? Learning One's Genetic Risk Changes Physiology Independent of Actual Genetic Risk 2 groups, told either they have good or bad genes for aerobic fitness… regardless of the accuracy of information told to the individuals, performance followed what they believed/were told. It DOES matter, for performance and strength, mostly. ACTN3 Genotype is Associated with Human Elite Athletic Performance Specific gene seen in majority of elite sprinters vs. endurance athletes. However… that's ONE out of 22 genes. Which still leaves 95% up to chance: Genetics of muscle strength and power: polygenic profile similarity limits skeletal muscle performance “Using typical genotype frequencies, the probability of any given individual possessing an "optimal" polygenic profile was calculated as 0.0003% for the world population.” Ok ok… what about with fat loss? FTO genetic variants, dietary intake and body mass index: insights from 177,330 individuals This is the gene most associated with obesity risk that the scientific literature is currently aware of. But it's independent effect is only about 0.3 BMI points, which corresponds to about 2.2lbs of scale weight. It's tied to higher BMI and dietary protein intake. FTO genotype and weight loss: systematic review and meta-analysis of 9563 individual participant data from eight randomised controlled trials “These findings show that individuals carrying the minor allele respond equally well to dietary, physical activity, or drug based weight loss interventions” This means that although it may set you up for a worse starting point, it won't affect your weight loss journey or progress. Remember, this AGAIN, is a polygenetic situation - there are MANY genes that affect weight loss and obesity, this is merely one out of many (which means counteracting is possible). How about for muscle growth? Fitness and strength responses to distinct exercise modes in twins: Studies of Twin Responses to Understand Exercise as a THerapy (STRUETH) study “Our findings indicate that (i) individual responsiveness differs between exercise modalities; (ii) low-responders to one mode may be ‘rescued' by switching to an alternate mode of exercise; and (iii) genes may not play as large a role, as previously estimated from cross-sectional data, for exercise training adaptation.” Genetic determinism of fiber type proportion in human skeletal muscle About 45% of muscle fiber dominance is determined by genetic makeup. Much of the rest is determined by childhood, which can be considered epigenetics in a way. However this leaves less IN our control to change… but this is just your starting point, NOT your progress to be made. In other words, genetics may play a role in the speed at which you succeed but not necessarily the definitive process of improving. Your mindset plays a role here, too… you can placebo yourself! (“Expectancy”) Mind over milkshakes: mindsets, not just nutrients, determine ghrelin response Two groups were drinking milkshakes, both which were 380 calories but the shakes had different labels on them. One read 620 calories and one read 140 calories. After drinking the shakes, the researchers monitored their ghrelin levels (hunger hormone, which often triggers more hunger) and satiety signals. The participants who drank the 620 calorie labeled shake had lower ghrelin levels and reported feeling full and satisfied. The group with the 140 calorie labeled shake had the opposite! Even though both shakes were in fact the exact same, nutritionally speaking. Anabolic steroids: the physiological effects of placebos Researchers took 15 lifters and had them train for seven weeks, telling them that the people who get the best results would be given free steroids. In 7 weeks, the lifters put a combined total of ~22 pounds on their bench, military press, seated press, and squat, on average. They then took 6 of the participants to join the “steroid” trial. They told them they were taking 10mg/day of Dianabol, but they were really just taking placebo pills. They trained for another 4 weeks and put a combined total of ~100 pounds on those same 4 lifts, meaning their rate of progress increased almost 8x just because they thought they were on steroids. Conclusion In both cases, it takes consistency and patience. Which is why most studies on this suck… it just takes too long. Genetics play a big role in responsiveness and starting points. So some may have a slight head start compared to others, but much of it is luck - if you just happen to find the style of training that matches your makeup early on and spend a lot of time doing it, you're winning the lottery for your physique. There's no accurate way of testing this, so we're wasting our time stressing about what we cannot control. You can, somewhat, trick your mind into believing you have great genetics… so focus on your mindset most! Find a training style you enjoy, stick with it diligently and be patient - if it works really well after 3-6 months, stick to it. If not, switch it up. Genetics play a role in fat loss but it's so minor that it's really just an excuse at this point. ---- Apply for our World Renowned Coaching Program, RIGHT HERE. Remember to join our private FB community, RIGHT HERE. As Featured on: Huffington Post, Bodybuilding.com, The PTDC, Dr. John Rusin, Muscle For Life, HLHL, iN3, OPEX Fitness and More… ---- Apply For Coaching: bit.ly/Coaching-App Get Your Free Copy of The Nutrition Hierarchy, HERE Learn How We Coach: Read This Case Study Article Top 4 Episodes: - Nutritional Periodization - Nutrition FAQ - Training FAQ - My Story ---- You can get access to ALL of our content in one place, now: www.tailoredcoachingmethod.com/links/ Check out all of our e-books by visiting www.tailoredcoachingmethod.com/products/ Tailored Coaching Method Coaching Info: www.tailoredcoachingmethod.com/online-coaching/ ---- Social Links: Blog – http://www.tailoredcoachingmethod.com/blog
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This EndoLife
Endometriosis and Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome - Is There a Connection?

This EndoLife

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 13:48


Okay today I want to now talk about something a little more unusual, and that's Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and its possible connection to endometriosis.  Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome is a group of 13 conditions which all affect connective tissue (collagen) in the body. Most are rare, but one type called hypermobility EDS is common.  Because the intestines are made from soft tissue, EDS affects digestion and often causes IBS symptoms. It is a major risk factor for developing SIBO, because it slows down motility. If you have EDS and SIBO, you will be chronic - but you can still live well! And we'll get to that in the bonus lesson with Dr Allison Siebecker.  And just to hammer this point home about the connection between EDS and IBS, one study of 228 IBS patients found 48% also had EDS. Now the reason why I want to bring EDS to your attention is because I am seeing it more and more in my clients with both endometriosis and SIBO. Despite these statistics, to my knowledge, most experts do not consider EDS and endometriosis to be significantly connected. At present, it is thought that most of the period pain and menstrual problems of those with EDS is not caused by endometriosis, but EDS itself.  However, I have spoken to multiple health care practitioners who do see a connection and see the two conditions together in patients, and because EDS can cause gut problems and SIBO, I think it's worth raising here.   So, here's an overview of what we know so far…  Current estimation is 6-23% of patients with EDS also have endometriosis. More research is being done into the connection at present. 32-77% of those with EDS have vulvodynia and or pain with sex. 33-75% have heavy menstrual bleeding.  73-93% have painful periods. And here are some of the main symptoms of EDS, though there are many and they are often far reaching. You do` not have to have them all to have EDS: ·Joint pain/full body pain Hypermobility (can be very subtle) Stretchy skin Soft, velvety skin Bruise easily Dislocations of joints Chronic fatigue Dental crowding  And I wanted to include some signs or clues of EDS as well… Unusual symptoms that seem random, so people with EDS often feel like they have lots of symptoms and never really feel well. Family has hypermobility - again, this can be very subtle. They might have no idea. Tight muscles and stiffness - because your joints are unstable, the muscles overcompensate and are often stiff and tight to try and create some stability in the body. Allergies - and this is because MCAS is now being identified as a co-condition of EDS. MCAS is when the mast cells which release histamine are overly sensitive and easily triggered, resulting in a higher amount of histamine being released on a daily basis. Mast Cell Activation Syndrome still isn't widely acknowledged by conventional medicine, but many functional and naturopathic doctors are leading the way with this. MCAS is now showing up in the research as being a likely co-condition of EDS, as part of a trio with another condition call PoTS, which stands for Postural Tachycardia syndrome. Low blood pressure and/or dizziness - because EDS often comes with something called dysautonomia Racing heart or palpitations - due to a type of dysautonomia which I mentioned earlier, called PoTs IBS - because of how EDS affects the gut So, following on from that, I just wanted to provide a bit more education around dysautonomia in case you have the signs.  Dysautonomia is a group of conditions that affect the autonomic nervous system, which control involuntary functions of the body.  Postural Tachycardia syndrome or PoTs is one of these conditions and is part of a trio of EDS-MCAS-PoTs I mentioned earlier, and it affects blood flow and blood pressure in the body, so that too little blood is getting to the heart and the heart rate increases when going from sitting/lying down to standing. Some of the symptoms of dysautonomia are…  Blood sugar dysregulation Low blood pressure/fainting Chest pain/breathing issues/palpitations/racing heart Gut problems and bladder problems Dizziness/balance difficulties/vertigo Struggle to regulate temperature  I'll take you through some ways to get tested in the next lesson. Now I know this might sound scary, but if you do get a diagnosis, you can manage these symptoms long-term, and your quality of life will dramatically improve! And just because I found this personally quite helpful, because there's a lot of symptoms floating around with this, EDS specialist Dr Alena Guggenehim sees loose joints, joint pain and dysautonomia as the main signs/symptoms of hEDS. Diagnosis for EDS is best done through a rheumatologist, but reportedly this is more frequently being performed by GPs these days. If you can't get a referral on the NHS (if you're based in the UK), then I think the best route would be to buy health insurance and get referred to an EDS specialist. I think that would be safest, because not all GPs are fully versed in diagnosing EDS. For hypermobility EDS, diagnosis is based on a physical test called Beighton score, which looks at the range of mobility in your joints, as well as issues like teeth overcrowding. Family and patient history should also be taken into account, and signs of co-conditions, like allergies and dizziness. It's worth noting here that you can still have hEDS if you don't score highly on the Beighton score. There is a link to it in the slides, but it does have some confusing terminology and is not to be used as a tool for diagnosis without a doctor. Genetic testing will also be carried out to rule out the rarer forms of EDS. PoTs is tested for by testing heart rate and blood pressure when going from sitting to standing and lying down (on a tilted table) to upright. You'll need to speak to your GP to get a referral. If you test positive for EDS and you have signs of dysautonmia, even if it's just fatigue, it's worth looking into this.  Other tests may be run to look for other types of dysautonomia   Listen and subscribe on your favourite player or listen directly/download MP3 here or just listen below! Let's get social! Come say hello on Instagram or sign up to my newsletter. Sign up to the wait list for my course, Live and Thrive with Endo here. My cookbook This EndoLife, It Starts with Breakfast is out now! Get 28 anti-inflammatory, hormone friendly recipes for living and thriving with endometriosis. Order your copy here. If you feel like you need more support with managing endometriosis, you can join Your EndoLife Coaching Programme. A 1-to-1 three month health and life coaching programme to help you thrive with endometriosis. To find out more about the programme and to discuss whether it could be right for you, email me at hello@thisendolife.com or visit my website. This episode is sponsored by The Pod Farm. Learn all about how to start your own podcast with the complete course from The Pod Farm. Aimed at beginners, this course takes a simple and straightforward approach to planning, equipment buying, setting up, recording, editing and hosting your own podcast. With hours of audio and video materials, and downloadable guides and useful links, this multimedia approach aims to have something for every kind of learner. From now until April 15, newsletter subscribers get 20% off the course price. Visit www.thepodfarm.com to enroll or find out more This episode is sponsored by BeYou. Soothe period cramps the natural way with these 100% natural and discreet menthol and eucalyptus oil stick on patches and CBD range. Click here to find out more and to shop: https://beyouonline.co.uk Show Notes Stats references https://www.rcgp.org.uk/clinical-and-research/resources/toolkits/ehlers-danlos-syndromes-toolkit.aspx https://www.siboinfo.com/associated-diseases.html https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29687534/ https://www.ehlers-danlos.com/pdf/2018-annual-conference/N-Blagowidow-2018Baltimore-OB-GYN-and-EDS-HSD-S.pdf Symptoms https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/ehlers-danlos-syndromes/ https://www.rcgp.org.uk/clinical-and-research/resources/toolkits/ehlers-danlos-syndromes-toolkit.aspx https://ehlers-danlos.com/wp-content/uploads/hEDS-Dx-Criteria-checklist-1.pdf https://www.rcgp.org.uk/clinical-and-research/resources/toolkits/ehlers-danlos-syndromes-toolkit.aspx Dysautonomia https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31267471/ https://drbeckycampbell.com/mast-cell-activation-syndrome-postural-orthostatic-tachycardia-syndrome-and-ehlers-danlos-syndrome-what-is-the-connection/ https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/postural-tachycardia-syndrome/ https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/diseases/6004-dysautonomia https://join.sibosos.com/page/94124 Testing references https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/ehlers-danlos-syndromes/ https://ehlers-danlos.com/wp-content/uploads/hEDS-Dx-Criteria-checklist-1.pdf https://www.rcgp.org.uk/clinical-and-research/resources/toolkits/ehlers-danlos-syndromes-toolkit.aspx https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/postural-tachycardia-syndrome/

Adventures Through The Mind
Hallucinogen Perception Persisting Disorder (HPPD) | Ed Prideaux ~ ATTMind 152

Adventures Through The Mind

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 110:56


Ed Prideaux joins us to discuss what Hallucinogen Perception Persisting Disorder (HPPD) is, its symptoms, its history, its association with other mental health conditions, how widespread it seems to be, and how it isn't necessarily a negative experience. We also speak of psychedelic flashbacks--what they are and what they are not; the role of memory, trauma, and neuroplasticity in HPPD; the pathologizing of neurodiversity; and each of our personal experiences of the condition.   For links to Prideaux's work, full show notes, and to watch this episode in video, head to https://bit.ly/ATTMind152   ***Full Topics Breakdown Below***     SUPPORT THIS PODCAST   ► Patreon: https://patreon.com/jameswjesso ► Donations: https://www.paypal.com/biz/fund?id=383635S3BKJVS ► Merchandise: https://www.jameswjesso.com/shop/ ► More options: https://www.jameswjesso.com/support/   ► Newsletter: https://www.jameswjesso.com/newsletter   *** Extra BIG thanks to my patrons on Patreon for helping keep this podcast alive! Especially, Andreas D, Clea S, Joe A, Ian C, David WB, Yvette FC, Ann-Madeleine, Dima B, Eliz C, Chuck W, Nathan B, & Nick M     Episode Breakdown What is Hallucinogen Perception Persisting Disorder? James' personal experiences of HPPD HPPD is much more common than we realize, and not always negative The potentially serious negative consequences of HPPD The harm of drug stigma, cultural ignorance, and pathologizing of neurodiversity The urgency of HPPD The pharmacological treatments for HPPD Psychedelic flashbacks: what they are, and what they are not HPPD is not necessary the consequence of psychedelics Genetic predispositions to HPPD Memory triggers, Neruoplastiocity and being traumatized by psychedelics (bad trips) HPPD can be positive, too The current treatments for HPPD The relationship between Cannabis and HPPD Something everyone should know about HPPD Why do people who don't have HPPD think it's not real? How to create better awareness around Hallucinogen Perception Persisting Disorder Links to Ed Prideaux's Twitter, The Perception Restoration Foundation, and some Australia studies happening now/soon   ************** SUPPORT THIS PODCAST   ► Patreon: https://patreon.com/jameswjesso ► Donations: https://www.paypal.com/biz/fund?id=383635S3BKJVS ► Merchandise: https://www.jameswjesso.com/shop/ ► More options: https://www.jameswjesso.com/support/   ► Newsletter: https://www.jameswjesso.com/newsletter   ► Or, you can buy a copy of one of my books! Decomposing The Shadow: https://www.jameswjesso.com/decomposing-the-shadow/ The True Light Of Darkness: https://www.jameswjesso.com/true-light-darkness/

The Female Health Solution Podcast
368. Is PCOS Related to Genetics?

The Female Health Solution Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 15:23


I am dedicating today's episode to discussing the connection between PCOS and genetics. Knowing your unique genetic makeup is the key to knowing these predispositions to certain health issues.  Genes and genetic mutations are often overlooked because it can take time and testing to uncover what is individual to your body. But it's so worth it! The goal of this episode is to open the conversation around this issue and share ways you can improve your health.  Genetic testing: https://dr-beth-westie.mykajabi.com/offers/ 12 Week Program Waitlist: www.drbethwestie.com/waitlist

Naval
Genetic Evolution Was a Prelude to Mimetic Evolution

Naval

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 2:25


Transcript http://nav.al/evolution

Sidenote
Self Control: How Do You Create It?

Sidenote

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 48:35


This week we are talking about self control! Is it Genetic? How does it affect your day to day life? and is it related to gaming and technology. We will also talk our relationship with self control and how you can improve on it.What Did We Learn This Week? 2:00What is a poo transplant? 3:16What years of your life are considered the best? 8:10Studytime: 12:31 See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.