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A daily news show from the publisher of The Monthly and The Saturday Paper. Hear from the country’s best reporters, covering the news as it affects Australia. This is news with narrative, every weekday.

Schwartz Media

  • Australian Podcast Awards
    2020 Best New Podcast


  • Sep 25, 2021 LATEST EPISODE
  • daily NEW EPISODES
  • 16m AVG DURATION
  • 613 EPISODES


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Latest episodes from 7am

The Culture: ‘Alone' is the real life Hunger Games we can't stop watching

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 37:38

Have you ever wondered how long you would last if you were dropped into the wilderness with just a hunting knife, a shovel, and a sleeping bag? A day? A week? That's the premise of a show called ‘Alone'. Think ‘Survivor', but on steroids.Contestants are isolated with nothing but a camera for company. They take on grizzly bears and hunt wildlife. And the last person standing wins a cash prize. It's like a real life ‘Hunger Games', complete with the discomfort of watching people struggle against the elements for our entertainment.This week on The Culture, Osman Faruqi is joined by The Saturday Paper's TV critic Sarah Krasnostein to talk about why we're so obsessed with ‘Alone', and what that says about what we're all grappling with as a society right now.Plus, Sarah shares what she's been watching, reading and listening too.Guest: Sarah Krasnostein, TV critic for The Saturday Paper.Follow The Culture on Instagram See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Everybody Knows, episode five: What will it take?

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 27:46

In the final episode of Everybody Knows, Ruby Jones unpacks what she's learnt about the rise and fall of MeToo in Australia, and why holding perpetrators accountable still feels so hard.To help answer that question, Ruby speaks to two people who have thought deeply about the problems in the music industry.The first is Dorothy Carvello. She worked for major labels in the US, and is now blowing the whistle on decades of abuse in the industry.The second is Deena Lynch, also known as Jaguar Jonze. She's an Australian musician who went public about being sexually assaulted a few months ago.Together, the three of them explore what the cost is of speaking out, and whether it's worth it. And what real, genuine, accountability might look like in the music industry and beyond. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Morrison's French kiss off

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 15:30

Scott Morrison has hailed Australia's military alliance and new submarine deal with the United Kingdom and United States as a landmark achievement.But it's already led to a global diplomatic standoff, pitting Australia against a number of European countries as well as further deepening tensions with China.Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno on the fallout from Australia's nuclear submarine deal and why the President of France won't return Scott Morrison's phone calls.Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno.Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Can Australia actually reach its vaccination goal?

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 13:35

Australia is now steadily marching towards the magic number of 80 percent of the population aged 16 and above being fully vaccinated: the number that should see lockdowns and most restrictions end. But given how few countries have reached that target so far, even with a significant head start, how likely are we to actually get vaccination coverage that high?Today, journalist with the Australian Associated Press Hannah Ryan on whether Australia can reach 80 percent, and what might happen even if we get there.Guest: Journalist with the Australian Associated Press, Hannah Ryan.Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Why Labor is sending Keneally to Cabramatta

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 16:07

Over the past few weeks an internal brawl over who will represent the Labor party in the western Sydney seat of Fowler at the next federal election has been playing out in public.The move to parachute in a high profile Labor frontbencher, who doesn't live in the seat, has exposed the rifts and rivalries within the party.But it's also raised a bigger question.. Is Labor doing enough to make sure its candidates actually represent their voters?Today, chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper Karen Middleton on what is really driving the battle for Fowler, and what it says about the Labor party.Guest: Chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Karen MiddletonBackground reading: Inside Kristina Keneally's preselection battle in The Saturday PaperStay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Everything wrong with Australia's nuclear submarine deal

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 15:25

Australia has entered into a new trilateral military alliance with the United Kingdom and the United States, called AUKUS.The partnership was sealed with the announcement that Australia would, for the first time, construct and operate a fleet of nuclear-powered submarines. The new deal has been criticised by former Prime Minister Paul Keating and national security experts. It's also led to increasing tension between Australia and a number of other countries.Today, Emeritus Professor of Strategic Studies at the Australian National University and contributor to The Saturday Paper Hugh White on why this new submarine deal puts Australia at risk, and what we should be doing instead.Guest: Emeritus Professor of Strategic Studies at the Australian National University and contributor for The Saturday Paper Hugh White.Background reading: From the submarine to the ridiculous in The Saturday PaperStay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The healing power of MDMA

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 15:55


A major new study has found that the therapeutic use of the illicit drug MDMA, more commonly known as ecstasy, could cure people suffering from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.The landmark findings could radically change the way PTSD is treated.Now an Australian psychologist is finally embarking on Australia's first ever clinical trial using the drug. Today, James Bradley on the healing power of MDMA - and why Australia has been so slow to explore its possibilities. Guest: Writer for The Monthly, James BradleyBackground reading: The agony and ecstasy in The MonthlyStay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.


The Culture: Why do millennials love Sally Rooney?

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 38:37


Sally Rooney's third novel, ‘Beautiful World, Where Are You', was one of the most hotly anticipated releases of the year. Now that it's out, it's smashing sales records.Her new book covers similar ground to her earlier work, but this time, more than ever, Rooney turns inward and grapples with what it means to be a successful writer in the current moment.So why has Rooney's work struck such a chord with millions of readers? And does ‘Beautiful World, Where Are You' live up to the hype?Guest: Writer and book critic, Madeleine GrayFollow The Culture on Instagram See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.


Everybody Knows, episode four: The complaints

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 32:38

In episode four of Everybody Knows Ruby Jones speaks to three women who have worked at Sony Music Australia, who all have something in common: they all experienced bullying and intimidation from the same man at the company.Two of those women have lodged complaints to Sony about this man as part of Sony's internal investigation into workplace culture. But the longer the investigation has gone on, the more they've wondered: is anyone listening?This is episode four of Everybody Knows: The complaints. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Does anyone trust Scott Morrison?

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 14:44

After a slow and delayed start, vaccination rates across Australia are finally gaining momentum, with NSW and Victoria hitting 80 percent and 70 percent single dose targets this week.The targets were reached despite a confusing rollout, riddled with mixed messages from the federal government.Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno on whether the Morrison government has the trust and credibility to maintain the goodwill of the Australian public throughout the rest of the pandemic.Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno.Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

What happens after we're vaccinated?

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 15:35

From this week residents in NSW, who have been locked down for nearly three months, will finally be able to leave their homes.But the new freedoms are contingent on one important factor: their vaccination status.It's the first time the easing of restrictions has been linked to vaccine status, but it's likely to become the new normal across Australia.Today, journalist with the AAP Hannah Ryan on the plan to provide freedoms only to fully vaccinated, and what that means for the next phase of the pandemic.Guest: Journalist with the Australian Associated Press and contributor to The Saturday Paper Hannah Ryan. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

What have we learned from the War on Terror?

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 15:25

The anniversary of 9/11 this week, along with the withdrawal of U.S. troops from Afghanistan, has seen politicians, military leaders and the public reflect on the past two decades.But what has really been learned from these events that shaped world history?Today, The Saturday Paper's chief political correspondent Karen Middleton on the aftermath of 9/11 and its impact on foreign policy 20 years later.Guest: Chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper Karen Middleton.Background reading: After the war on terror in The Saturday PaperStay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

How bad is Australia's mental health crisis?

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 14:40

State and federal governments have promised billions in new spending to fix Australia's mental health crisis, a crisis exacerbated by the pandemic.But despite the pledges, experts are identifying that young people in particular are still struggling to access urgent care and support.Today, contributor to The Saturday Paper Santilla Chingaipe on why this could be our one chance to fix the ailing mental health care system. Guest: Journalist and filmmaker, Santilla Chingaipe.Background reading: The mental health crisis facing young Australians in The Saturday PaperStay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

How to cure homesickness

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 15:20

The pandemic has kept many people separated from their homes and their loved ones for over 18 months. Lockdowns and border closures have led to a specific kind of grief and yearning - homesickness.Homesickness isn't an official medical condition but it was once, with soldiers fighting on foreign soil regularly diagnosed after suffering debilitating symptoms.Today, GP and health columnist for The Saturday Paper Dr Melanie Cheng on the origins of homesickness and whether there's a cure.Guest: Health columnist for The Saturday Paper, Dr Melanie Cheng See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Culture: Why Kanye West can't be cancelled

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2021 68:03

It was one of the most chaotic and controversial album rollouts in recent history but Kanye West's 10th studio album, Donda, is finally here. It's safe to say Kanye is now far from the peak of his nearly two-decade career – artistically and culturally – yet his latest album still went to No. 1.But when we're talking about Kanye, it's never really about the sales figures, or even just the music. There's not that many artists who are as loved, and hated, as Kanye. This week on The Culture, we've got a special jumbo episode (not quite as long as Donda, but still) with two of the podcast's favourites. Filmmaker and contributor to The Saturday Paper, Santilla Chingaipe, talks to us about who Kanye is: where he comes from, why so many people fell in love with his music, and why it's so hard to be a fan right now. And music critic for The Saturday Paper, Shaad D'Souza, takes us through a more in-depth discussion about Donda, and where Kanye sits musically today.Guests: Journalist and writer, Santilla Chingaipe and music critic for The Saturday Paper, Shaad D'Souza. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Generation 9/11: A soldier, a refugee and a Muslim Australian

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 21:17

Twenty years ago the terrorist group Al-Qaeda hijacked four planes, flying them into New York City's World Trade Center and the Pentagon, killing nearly 3000 people.The September 11 attacks, and the war on terror that followed, changed the world.They ushered in a new era of global conflict, domestic terror threats, counter-terrorism laws and Islamophobia. Two decades on the legacy of the attacks still reverberates all over the world.Today, Osman Faruqi speaks to three people whose lives were changed forever by 9/11.Guests:Rana Hussain, diversity and inclusion manager at Cricket AustraliaBill Capstick, former soldier who served in AfghanistanZaki Haidari, Hazara refugee from AfghanistanStay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Everybody Knows, episode three: A broken system

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 26:22

In this episode, Ruby Jones speaks to some of the best known lawyers on either side of the Me Too movement in order to help her investigation.Ruby looks at how the law is used to silence women, and the media, when it comes to sexual harassment and misconduct. And she asks how legal threats became one of the foremost barriers to women sharing their stories.This is episode three of Everybody Knows: A Broken System. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Why your next car will be electric

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 14:30

Governments and car manufacturers all over the world are preparing for a future where most vehicles will be powered by electricity - a future that is just around the corner.But in Australia there's no national policy on electric vehicles and, as a result, the country is falling behind the rest of the world.Today, Mike Seccombe on how electric cars are poised to take over and what Australia needs to do to keep up.Guest: National correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Mike Seccombe.Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Just how stretched are our hospitals?

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 14:55


As Australia grapples with its biggest outbreak yet of Covid-19, an outbreak that shows few signs of slowing, the focus is shifting to hospitalisation figures and deaths.But even though Covid-19 wards are becoming busier, it isn't easy to get a clear picture of just how bad things are in our hospital system.Today, senior reporter for The Saturday Paper, Rick Morton on how our two largest states are handling the current outbreak and what might happen if things get worse.Guest: Senior reporter The Saturday Paper, Rick Morton.Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.


What we can learn from the world's reopening

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 17:20

As our political leaders fight over the proposed national plan to re-open the country, health experts are imploring state and federal governments to learn from the experiences of places like the UK and Israel.But, there is another country closer to home whose prudent and cautious reopening could prove to be a much better blueprint for Australia. Today, journalist with the Australian Associated Press and contributor to The Saturday Paper Hannah Ryan on what we can learn from the ongoing global experiment.Guest: Journalist with the Australian Associated Press and contributor to The Saturday Paper Hannah Ryan. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The charity feeding Sydney during lockdown

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2021 14:45

Ongoing lockdowns have put many Australians under extreme financial pressure.Without adequate government support the responsibility is falling on community organisations to help thousands of people receive the basics, like food.Today, chief executive of the Addison Road Community Organisation Rosanna Barbero on the massive food relief operation underway right now in Sydney and how it exposes a broken system.Guest: CEO of Addison Road Community Organisation, Rosanna BarberoStay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Culture: The dark side of the games industry

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2021 29:24

The video games industry is worth over $180 billion a year, more than the US film and sports industries combined. For decades though, it's been plagued by a culture of misogyny, homophobia and racism.Right now, a reckoning is taking place at one of the biggest games developers in the world, Activision Blizzard, the publisher of some of the most popular games ever, including Candy Crush, Call of Duty and World of Warcraft.This isn't the first time sexism and harassment in gaming has made headlines, but could this be the long-awaited reckoning that the industry needs?To help break down the lawsuit and why it matters, games reporter for Screenhub and regular games critic for The Saturday Paper, Jini Maxwell, joins The Culture this week.Guest: Jini MaxwellFollow The Culture on Instagram See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Everybody Knows, episode two: Five days in November

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 29:12

In episode two of Everybody Knows, Ruby Jones goes back to the beginning of MeToo in Australia in 2017. Why did the movement seem to run out of momentum here so quickly?Ruby investigates what happened, hoping to learn lessons from the first wave of MeToo reporting as she investigates allegations of misconduct in the Australian music industry. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Are we heading towards a pandemic election?

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 15:24

The country might still be in the grip of a pandemic and ongoing lockdowns, but our major parties are already planning for a looming federal election.The Prime Minister has strongly hinted the nation could be heading to the polls in just a few months, and the political battle lines are now being drawn.Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno on when the election looks likely to be held, and what it will be fought over.Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

What went wrong with Australia's withdrawal from Afghanistan

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 15:05

Over the past few weeks the world has witnessed scenes of chaos and desperation in Afghanistan as people scrambled to evacuate the country as it fell to the Taliban.Some were able to get out, but many others, including Afghans with Australian visas remain trapped.Coalition forces had been planning their withdrawal from Afghanistan for months, but it's now emerged that intelligence reports failed to forecast how quickly the country would fall, and the impact that would have on the evacuation.Today, chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper Karen Middleton on what went wrong with Australia's withdrawal plan and what it means for those trapped in Afghanistan.Guest: Chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Karen Middleton See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Everybody Knows, episode one: The company

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 35:04

Follow journalist Ruby Jones as she investigates an open secret in the Australian music industry -- stories of harassment, abuse and assault spanning decades.In this episode, Ruby asks why Me Too stories are still so hard to tell in Australia - and why there is so much fear about speaking out, and naming names.So will Ruby be able to tell this story? Or will the allegations remain hidden in plain sight?This is episode one of Everybody Knows. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Can our hospitals cope with Covid-19?

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 14:10

As hospitals in NSW and Victoria prepare to deal with an influx of Covid-19 patients, there are fresh concerns that our healthcare system might not be up to the challenge. Hundreds of healthcare workers have been forced into isolation during this outbreak, putting further pressure on a system already grappling with the Delta strain.Today, senior reporter for The Saturday Paper Rick Morton, on the situation in hospitals right now, and what might happen when we come out of lockdown.Guest: Senior reporter for The Saturday Paper, Rick MortonStay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

How Australia is holding back vaccine supply

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2021 14:00

As wealthy countries like Australia race to vaccinate their population, many other nations in our region are falling behind due to the high cost of vaccines: a cost set by big pharmaceutical companies like Pfizer.As a result, South East Asia is now the epicenter of the Covid-19 pandemic. Today, contributor to The Saturday Paper Lyndal Rowlands on the proposal that could speed up vaccinations around the world, and why Australia is holding it back. Guest: Contributor for The Saturday Paper, Lyndal RowlandsStay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Culture: Why is Lorde's new album so divisive?

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 36:52

Lorde released her first full-length album, Pure Heroine, back in 2013 and it struck a chord around the world, selling 5 million copies, picking up two Grammys and inspiring a new generation of pop artists.Four years later Lorde returned with her follow-up, the critically acclaimed but much less commercially successful, Melodrama.Another four years down the track, she's back with her third album, Solar Power. It's a pretty big gear shift, and the sunny, warm sound reflects the new, luxe lifestyle Lorde has been living. The same kind of lifestyle she mocked backed on Pure Heroine. The reception has been pretty mixed, and the fan and critical reaction divisive.This week, culture writer and critic Elle Hunt joins The Culture to help break down the album, and why it isn't quite landing the same way as Lorde's earlier work.Guest: Culture writer and critic Elle HuntBackground reading: Review: Lorde's Solar Power in The Saturday Paper See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Scott Morrison's coming out of his cave, and he's doing just fine

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 13:20

It was just a couple of weeks ago that the Prime Minister, along with state and territory leaders, signed off a plan to end lockdowns and border closures when vaccine rates reached 80 percent of the adult population.But it didn't take long for the so-called national plan to fall apart, with states and the federal government spending the last week bickering over Australia's roadmap out of this crisis.Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno on the battle over when to open the country up… and the Prime Minister's strange decision to invoke an animated movie to help argue his case.Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Angus Taylor's fossil fuel handouts

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 14:20

As scientists, and the United Nations, continue to warn about the likely impacts of climate change, the federal government is spending big to help prop up the gas industry.One company in particular has been the sole beneficiary of a government fund established to help drill for gas in the Northern Territory. That company, which has links to the Liberal Party, has been quietly lobbying for federal support for months.Today, national correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe on the question marks around another government grant process, and why Australia continues to subsidise fossil fuels.Guest: National correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Mike Seccombe.Background reading: Morrison ministers lobbied over Beetaloo Basin in The Saturday Paper See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Introducing 'Everybody Knows': A new investigative series from 7am

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 2:49

In November 2020, an Instagram account began to publish anonymous stories of harassment, abuse and assault in the Australian music industry. These were stories that journalist Ruby Jones had heard whispers about before. But when she started looking into them, she found that the allegations were much worse than she had thought, and that they were an open secret in the music industry. Everybody Knows is a new five-part podcast series from the makers of Australia's number one daily news podcast, 7am. Follow Ruby as she investigates what has held back the MeToo Movement in Australia and whether this new wave of women speaking out could be the start of a true reckoning. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

“This is a wake-up call”: The pandemic hits regional Australia

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 13:45

One of the most concerning outbreaks of Covid-19 in the country right now is taking place in western NSW.Towns like Wilcannia and Walgett have high Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations and some of the lowest vaccination rates in the state.When the pandemic hit the region only eight percent of Indigenous people were fully vaccinated.Now, with the virus spreading fast, there are serious concerns for the community.Today, Bhiamie Williamson on the situation on the ground in western NSW. Guest: ANU research associate and Euahlayi man, Bhiamie WilliamsonStay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The document predicting Covid-19 hospitalisations

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 14:50

As Covid-19 case numbers continue to reach record highs in NSW, so too do hospitalisations and intensive care admissions.Now, a leaked document from the National Cabinet has revealed that the state's hospitals could soon reach a tipping point.Today, senior reporter for The Saturday Paper Rick Morton, on exactly who is being hospitalised with Covid-19 and how close our hospitals really are to capacity.Guest: Senior reporter for The Saturday Paper, Rick MortonStay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

What's next for Afghanistan

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2021 18:15

After twenty years of war, invasion and occupation, US-led forces in Afghanistan, including Australian defence personnel have finally withdrawn, ending one of the longest military engagements in modern history.Within weeks of the withdrawal the Taliban, who were officially deposed at the beginning of the conflict, swept the country, seizing the capital, Kabul, and retaking control.Now there are fears for millions of Afghans facing life under a repressive regime.Today, chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper Karen Middleton and political analyst in Kabul Ramish Salimi, on the latest developments in Afghanistan, how we got to this point, and what the future looks like for Afghans.Guest: Chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Karen Middleton.Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Culture: Tony Armstrong on the wholesome reprieve of Ted Lasso

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 32:32

Tony Armstrong, former AFL player and sports presenter on ABC News Breakfast, joins The Culture to talk about a show one of the most heartwarming TV shows out right now - ‘Ted Lasso'.The first season dropped on Apple TV last year, starring Jason Sudeikis as the small-time US football coach, who ends up coaching a UK Premier League soccer team. The show went on to make history, scoring 20 Emmy nominations, the most ever for the first season of a comedy.We're about halfway through the second season now, so Osman and Tony came together to chat about how ‘Ted Lasso' is much, much more than just a comedy about sports.Guest: Former AFL player and sports presenter on ABC News Breakfast Tony ArmstrongFollow The Culture on Instagram See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Scott Morrison is late to the rescue

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 13:50

This week the federal government was caught out without a clear plan on two of the biggest crises facing the world right now: the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic, and the resurgence of the Taliban in Afghanistan.In both instances, Prime Minister Scott Morrison has been accused of not sufficiently preparing for outcomes that many had predicted, and responding too defensively.Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno on whether being underprepared is now a feature of Scott Morrison's leadership - and what the consequences are. Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno.Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Curfews, police, more fines: Is there another way to fight lockdown fatigue?

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 15:30

Outbreaks of Covid-19 are continuing to spread across the country, hitting largely unvaccinated and unprepared populations.Eighteen months into the pandemic many Australians are feeling exhausted, and compliance with public health measures is dropping off - leading governments to ramp up policing efforts.Today, infectious disease and pandemic response expert Dr Alexandra Phelan on the situation in Australia, how governments can maintain public trust, and what the end game looks like.Guest: Member of the Center for Global Health Science and Security, Dr Alexandra PhelanStay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Kevin Rudd on Murdoch's plan for Sky News

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 16:40

From its origins as a little watched cable news broadcaster, Sky News has grown into a media powerhouse reaching millions of people, primarily on YouTube.Now it's broadening its reach even further, into the homes of thousands of Australians living in the regions, further solidifying Rupert Murdoch's control of news media in Australia.Today, former Prime Minister Kevin Rudd on what Murdoch is planning to do with Sky News, and how it could impact Australian politics.Guest: Former Prime Minister, Kevin Rudd.Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

NSW abandons Covid Zero

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 16:00

NSW is currently experiencing its worst outbreak of Covid-19 since the start of the pandemic. With case numbers continuing to rise, the government has slowly acknowledged it's losing control.Unlike the rest of the country, it now appears that NSW is abandoning its intention of eliminating the virus and reaching zero cases of community transmission, instead relying more heavily on vaccinations.Today, national correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe on the NSW strategy to deal with the virus and what it might mean for the rest of the nation. Guest: National correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Mike SeccombeStay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

A climate scientist offers us hope

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2021 15:18

Australian scientist Joëlle Gergis was one of the lead authors on a landmark climate report by the IPCC, a United Nations body responsible for assessing the science on climate change.The report has been described as “code red” for humanity, a desperate attempt by the world's best climate scientists to force political leaders to take action and stop runaway climate change.Today, Joëlle Gergis explains the science behind it, what it tells us about the future of our planet, and how we can all maintain some hope. Guest: Climate scientist and contributor to The Saturday Paper, Dr Joëlle Gergis.Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Culture: The story behind The Kid LAROI's phenomenal rise

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2021 31:32

This week on The Culture, we're talking about the young Kamilaroi kid from Waterloo, New South Wales, who this week topped the US Billboard charts. His name is The Kid LAROI, and his album 'F*ck Love' is taking the world by storm.He dropped his debut EP at 14, was mentored by the likes of Juice WRLD at 15, and signed an international deal at 16. He's collaborated with Miley Cyrus and his most recent single 'Stay', features one of the biggest pop stars in the world, Justin Beiber.The success of his album makes him the first Australian-born solo artist to top the chart since Sia in 2014, and the first Indigenous Australian artist to top the chart - ever.So this begs the question, where are the headlines? Why aren't Australian media outlets falling over themselves to cover one of the most exciting musical acts to come out of the country in years?To talk about why Australia seems to be playing catch up, I'm joined by Hau Latukefu, a pioneer of the Australian hip hop scene. As part of the duo Koolism, he won the first ever ARIA for Best Urban Release and has gone on to mentor many hip hop artists in the industry today. Guest: Hau LatukefuFollow The Culture on Instagram See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The anti-lockdown movement reaches Parliament

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 14:30

Australia's anti-lockdown movement reached federal parliament this week, when a rogue Coalition MP took to the floor to blast public health measures used to limit the spread of Covid-19.The comments highlight growing divisions in the government over Australia's national approach to the pandemic.Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno on the challenges Scott Morrison is facing from his own side, and why he's unwilling to openly confront them. Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno.Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The rise of Afterpay

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 16:00

In 2014 two friends from Sydney created a company that transformed the way we buy and sell things online. That company, Afterpay, has become a bedrock of the online shopping experience, growing exponentially every year. Its success was cemented when it was sold for $39 billion, making it the largest corporate deal in Australian history.Afterpay promises the allure of credit-free online shopping. But just how different is it's business model compared to traditional credit cards and loans? Today, James Hennessy on the rise of Afterpay, and the regulatory loopholes it's exploited to build a multi-billion dollar business.Guest: Contributor to The Saturday Paper, James Hennessy.Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The tax cuts that could bankrupt Australia

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 13:40

No matter which major party wins the next federal election, the top 5 percent of income earners in Australia will receive tax cuts worth 180 dollars a week. These tax cuts, which will overwhelmingly benefit high income earners, will cost the budget 300 billion dollars over 10 years.So how will those cuts be funded? According to those in the social services sector it's likely to be made from cuts to education, health and welfare. Today, chief executive of the Australian Council of Social Service Cassandra Goldie, on the origin of these tax cuts and what their real cost will be.Guest: Contributor to The Saturday Paper and chief executive of the Australian Council of Social Service Cassandra GoldieStay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Does Australia have a pandemic ‘Freedom Day'?

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 16:22


Eighteen months into the pandemic Scott Morrison has announced a plan for the way out, underpinned by modelling from one of our most respected scientific institutes, The Doherty Institute.The plan itself, which has four phases, is based on vaccination rates. It predicts we could be living almost as normal when we reach 80 percent of the population fully vaccinated. But how likely are we to reach that target, and when? Today, senior reporter for The Saturday Paper Rick Morton on the uncertainty surrounding the Prime Minister's plan. Guest: Senior Reporter for The Saturday Paper, Rick Morton.Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.


'Magic mushrooms treated my depression'

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2021 14:00


For thousands of years naturally occurring psychedelics have been used medicinally. But for the past few decades, research into their potential has been on hold, because their supply and use is illegal.Now, things are changing. In Australia there are a number of trials currently underway investigating the use of psychedelics as a way to treat depression and addiction. But while the research is happening, for some it's not happening fast enough, and there are those who are taking matters into their own hands.Today, contributor to The Monthly, James Bradley on his personal experience of how psychedelics are transforming mental health therapies.Stay in touch with us on Twitter and InstagramGuest: Contributor to The Monthly, James Bradley See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.


The Culture: Is Billie Eilish the radical saviour pop needs?

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2021 36:47

In 2018 singer Billie Eilish released her debut album ‘When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go?'With it the teenager pretty much immediately changed the face and sound of modern pop music.Her album won all four of the major categories at the Grammy awards that year. The first time that's happened since 1981.Her hit Bad Guy took out the top spot on the Hottest 100, making her both the youngest person to win the countdown and the first solo female artist.Now, she's back, with her follow up second record: ‘Happier Than Ever'.It's a very different sounding album, and it feels like a response to the immense pressure and scrutiny she's faced since becoming a pop superstar. To talk about it, and the way Billie Eilish is reshaping the music industry around herself, we're joined on the show by music critic for The Saturday Paper, Shaad D'Souza. Guest: Music critic for The Saturday Paper, Shaad D'SouzaFollow The Culture on Instagram See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Weekend Read: Scott Ludlam on Julian Assange

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 32:34


Today, Scott Ludlam, ICAN ambassador and former Australian Greens Senator, reads his cover essay from the latest issue of The Monthly.It's called ‘The Endgame'. It explores the trial of Julian Assange, and the powers fighting to extradite him, while his condition deteriorates in a UK prison.Stay in touch with us on Twitter and InstagramGuest: Scott Ludlam, ICAN ambassador and former Australian Greens Senator. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.


Scott Morrison's in the race of his political life

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 14:35

After riding high in the opinion polls for the past 12 months, Prime Minister Scott Morrison is now facing the consequences of a slow and messy vaccine rollout.To try and claw back public support the PM has tried to tap into the country's Olympic spirit, describing our vaccine challenge as a “gold medal” race.Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno on the intertwined fates of the vaccine rollout and the Prime Minister's political fortunes. Stay in touch with us on Twitter and InstagramGuest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The frontline of Australia's strictest lockdown

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2021 14:50

Sydney has been in lockdown for six weeks now, but the number of Covid-19 infections is still continuing to rise.While most residents are able to stay at home, thousands of essential workers are traveling to their place of employment everyday, to keep the city turning. They're doctors, nurses, teachers, carers, but they're also cooks, cleaners and factory workers.And according to the state government, they're the people most at risk of catching and spreading Covid-19. Today, we speak to Paloma, an essential worker living in Sydney's south-west, about her job and what the government could be doing to help the most vulnerable. Stay in touch with us on Twitter and InstagramGuest: Paloma Jackson-Vaughan, an essential worker living in Sydney's south-west. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

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