Podcasts about Western Australia

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State in Australia

  • 1,926PODCASTS
  • 5,731EPISODES
  • 43mAVG DURATION
  • 4DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Nov 24, 2021LATEST
Western Australia

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Best podcasts about Western Australia

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Latest podcast episodes about Western Australia

Forgotten Australia
Blue Murder On The Golden Mile — Part Two

Forgotten Australia

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 36:11


On 12 May 1926, south of Kalgoorlie, at an abandoned mine known as Miller's Find, Detective-Sergeant Grenville Purdue makes a horrifying discovery. The biggest manhunt in Western Australia is now on for the murderers of Detective-Inspector John Walsh and Detective-Sergeant Alexander Pitman. This episode produced from research material made accessible thanks to Forgotten Australia supporters. For more info on helping out (and for show shout-outs, early ad-free access, exclusive bonus episodes and the Australia's Sweetheart audiobook) go to: www.patreon.com/forgottenaustralia See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

WW1 Digger History Podcast
Episode 6.7 Jim Martin The youngest Anzac to die

WW1 Digger History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 25:13


Guest presenters, 12 year old Abbey, 11 year old Xavier and their teacher, Mr Rob Coughlan, from St Michael's School in Western Australia bring you the story of Jim Martin, believed to have been the youngest Aussie Digger to die at Gallipoli. He was just under 14 years and 10 months old when he died of disease on a hospital ship. It is very fitting that a couple young Australians, just a few years off Jim's age present this true story. Lest we forget!

Lowy Institute: Live Events
2021 Owen Harries Lecture: The Hon. Mathias Cormann

Lowy Institute: Live Events

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 55:26


Since 2013, the annual Owen Harries Lecture has honoured the significant contribution made to the international debate in Australia and the United States by Mr Harries, who was a Nonresident Fellow at the Lowy Institute. The 2021 Owen Harries Lecture was given by former Australian Finance Minister and Secretary-General of the OECD Matthias Cormann. Mr Cormann will speak on “Levelling the playing field – an agenda for growth, climate and a rules-based international order”. His lecture was followed by a conversation with Lowy Institute Executive Director Dr Michael Fullilove. The Hon. Mathias Cormann is the 6th Secretary-General of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Prior to his appointment, he served as the Australian Minister for Finance, Leader of the Government in the Senate, and as a Senator representing Western Australia. Dr Michael Fullilove AM is the Executive Director of the Lowy Institute. He writes widely on global affairs in publications such as The New York Times, Financial Times, The Atlantic and Foreign Affairs. Recorded on November 24, 2021

Life Concierge Podcast
Reuse + Radiate: Kasie Kelly, Owner and Designer of Jutie

Life Concierge Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 31:56


Kasie Kelly is the owner and designer of Jutie, a reusable product-line that's purpose is to inspire and enable you to live a more sustainable life! All products are reusable, timeless, and durable. Kasie was deeply inspired to create this brand and product-line after living in Western Australia and being exposed to people who greatly value sustainability and reusable products. She now calls Charleston, South Carolina home and is focused on sharing these sustainable habits she learned with others through Jutie.Check out @shopjutie on instagram or www.shopjutie.com and use code LCPODCAST20 for 20% the Reuse and Radiate market tote! Offer valid through Friday, November 26, 2021.

Big Ideas - ABC RN
Western Australia's relationship with the federation

Big Ideas - ABC RN

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 54:05


Australia is a federation. But how much have you ever identified with your state? That is before the pandemic hit. The COVID-sponsored resurgence of the states has revealed how little notice we typically take of our federal compact. On Big Ideas, we look at its history and in particular at Western Australia's relationship to the rest of the federation - a state that has often felt like ‘the Cinderella state of the Australian Federation'.

Amateur Traveler Travel Podcast
AT#778 - Travel to The Kimberley in Western Australia

Amateur Traveler Travel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 58:10


Hear about travel to The Kimberley region of Western Australia, Broome, and the Gibb River Road as the Amateur Traveler talks to James Schomburgk about this unique destination.

Halal Tube
Belal Assad – Breaking The Chains: Social Media Addiction

Halal Tube

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 54:37


Sheikh Belal Assad from Melbourne, Victoria speaks on the topic of Social Media Addiction. This lecture was delivered at the "Breaking The Chains 2019" Youth Conference organised by the Youth Office of The Islamic Centre of West Australia and Curtin Muslim Student Association at The Curtin University of Western Australia.

Deeper Dhamma
2021 November |Buddhawajana Retreat (7/7) | Ajahn Brahmavamso and Venerable Munissara

Deeper Dhamma

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 68:15


3 day Retreat with  Ajahn Brahm & Venerable Munissara at Jhana Grove Retreat Centre in Serpentine, Western Australia, from 2nd to 4th November of November 2021. Track 7 :  The Four Noble Truths (Part Five) – 4th November 21. See the full retreat on bswa.org here. Please support the BSWA in making teachings available for free online via Patreon. To find and download more precious Dhamma teachings, visit the BSWA teachings page: https://bswa.org/teachings/, choose the teaching you want and click on the audio to open it up on Podbean.  

Deeper Dhamma
2021 November |Buddhawajana Retreat (6/7) | Ajahn Brahmavamso and Venerable Munissara

Deeper Dhamma

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 83:39


3 day Retreat with  Ajahn Brahm & Venerable Munissara at Jhana Grove Retreat Centre in Serpentine, Western Australia, from 2nd to 4th November of November 2021. Track 6 :  Q & A – 3rd November 21. See the full retreat on bswa.org here. Please support the BSWA in making teachings available for free online via Patreon. To find and download more precious Dhamma teachings, visit the BSWA teachings page: https://bswa.org/teachings/, choose the teaching you want and click on the audio to open it up on Podbean.    

Deeper Dhamma
2021 November |Buddhawajana Retreat (5/7) | Ajahn Brahmavamso and Venerable Munissara

Deeper Dhamma

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 71:09


3 day Retreat with  Ajahn Brahm & Venerable Munissara at Jhana Grove Retreat Centre in Serpentine, Western Australia, from 2nd to 4th November of November 2021. Track 5 :  The Four Noble Truths (Part Four)) – 3rd November 21. See the full retreat on bswa.org here. Please support the BSWA in making teachings available for free online via Patreon. To find and download more precious Dhamma teachings, visit the BSWA teachings page: https://bswa.org/teachings/, choose the teaching you want and click on the audio to open it up on Podbean.

Deeper Dhamma
2021 November |Buddhawajana Retreat (4/7) | Ajahn Brahmavamso and Venerable Munissara

Deeper Dhamma

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 65:25


3 day Retreat with  Ajahn Brahm & Venerable Munissara at Jhana Grove Retreat Centre in Serpentine, Western Australia, from 2nd to 4th November of November 2021. Track 4 :  The Four Noble Truths (Part Three) – 3rd November 21. See the full retreat on bswa.org here. Please support the BSWA in making teachings available for free online via Patreon. To find and download more precious Dhamma teachings, visit the BSWA teachings page: https://bswa.org/teachings/, choose the teaching you want and click on the audio to open it up on Podbean.    

Deeper Dhamma
2021 November |Buddhawajana Retreat (3/7) | Ajahn Brahmavamso and Venerable Munissara

Deeper Dhamma

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 82:49


3 day Retreat with  Ajahn Brahm & Venerable Munissara at Jhana Grove Retreat Centre in Serpentine, Western Australia, from 2nd to 4th November of November 2021. Track 3 :  Q & A – 2nd November 21. See the full retreat on bswa.org here. Please support the BSWA in making teachings available for free online via Patreon. To find and download more precious Dhamma teachings, visit the BSWA teachings page: https://bswa.org/teachings/, choose the teaching you want and click on the audio to open it up on Podbean.

Deeper Dhamma
2021 November |Buddhawajana Retreat (2/7) | Ajahn Brahmavamso and Venerable Munissara

Deeper Dhamma

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 68:15


3 day Retreat with  Ajahn Brahm & Venerable Munissara at Jhana Grove Retreat Centre in Serpentine, Western Australia, from 2nd to 4th November of November 2021. Track 2 :  The Four Noble Truths (Part Two) – 2nd November 21. See the full retreat on bswa.org here. Please support the BSWA in making teachings available for free online via Patreon. To find and download more precious Dhamma teachings, visit the BSWA teachings page: https://bswa.org/teachings/, choose the teaching you want and click on the audio to open it up on Podbean.

Deeper Dhamma
2021 November |Buddhawajana Retreat (1/7) | Ajahn Brahmavamso and Venerable Munissara

Deeper Dhamma

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 71:39


3 day Retreat with  Ajahn Brahm & Venerable Munissara at Jhana Grove Retreat Centre in Serpentine, Western Australia, from 2nd to 4th November of November 2021. Track 1 :  The Four Noble Truths (Part One) – 2nd November 21. See the full retreat on bswa.org here. Please support the BSWA in making teachings available for free online via Patreon. To find and download more precious Dhamma teachings, visit the BSWA teachings page: https://bswa.org/teachings/, choose the teaching you want and click on the audio to open it up on Podbean.

Perth Entrepreneurs PEP Talk
Episode 80 - Sarah O'Leary

Perth Entrepreneurs PEP Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 51:48


Do you have any business ideas in your mind right now? I had a chat with @sazoleary, the owner of @get_naked_handmade. She found her start-up niche during the COVID-19 pandemic. Sarah's soap business started in early 2020 during lockdown when their little family indulged in some random 'art' sessions. At present, you can find their products in 11 retail stores across Western Australia. It's never too late to start your own business. Sarah's experience is proof that you can be an entrepreneur too! Perth Entrepreneurs Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/perthentrepreneurspodcast/ Entrepreneurs Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/neilgibbpeptalk/Perth Entrepeneurs LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/neil-gibb-14a618185/  HMO Property Co Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/thehmopropertyco 

Fringe Radio Network
RAVEN'S CREEK: Ahithophel's Rejection

Fringe Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 44:27


Raven Creek Social Club began, like most things in our lives, with a conversation. Or rather, multiple conversations wherein brother and sister, Nathan and Emily, discussed theology, the challenges and joys of being family, sci-fi movies, the woes of the world, and whatever else happened to capture their imagination or attention. Along the way, friends joined in and offered up their insights and questions. The end result was often the same - you should start a podcast, write a book, or anything so that the conversation did not have to end. Encouraged by some positive peer pressure, Nathan and Emily, embarked on the adventure that is Raven Creek Social Club, and we hope that you enjoy being a part of it.Nathan UnderwoodNATHAN UNDERWOODNathan is a husband and a father of two. A self-taught musician and song writer, he has led worship since the age of fifteen, and also served as a small group leader in churches over the years. A science fiction and comic book fanatic, lover of legos, and musical omnivore, his conversations on faith often take a stroll through these unexpected but relatable lands. Having worked both in the church and the private sector, Nathan brings a real world perspective our conversations while still upholding Biblical authority to direct the life of the believer. His education on matters of faith, though not formal, is one driven by curiosity and a desire to live his faith with integrity and fervor. His upcoming book, Are You Worshipping?, explores how study is an expression of worship that all believer should pursue.Nathan can be reached at the following addresses:ravencreeksc@gmail.com or by searching RavenCreekSC on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.Emily DixonEmily DixonEMILY DIXONEmily Dixon, author of Scandalous: Things Good Christian Girls Don't Talk About, But Probably Should, is a wife and mother of two. After having her faith shattered by her first marriage that ended in abuse and divorce, Emily returned to school to add a Masters in Biblical Literature to her degrees in art and psychology. During this time of study, her faith was restored and she discovered a renewed love for the Biblical text. Since then she has taught in the Christian Ministries Department of a local college. Her classes included: Life of Christ, Old and New Testament Literature, Sociology of Christianity, World Religion and more. And while she loves teaching, her true delight is often found in the real and often difficult conversations that happen among friends as we wrestle with matters of faith.Emily can be reached at the following addresses:ravencreeksc@gmail.com or by searching RavenCreekSC on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.Joe ZaragozaJoe ZaragozaJOE ZARAGOZAJoe joined Nathan and Emily when they decided to partner on Joe's podcast The Commentarians. Joe is a former punk rocker (though will always be punk rock at heart) who is today an Evangelical Christian, a feminist and a political and social liberal (for the most part). He bases what he believes on this question: What does the Bible say and what is the context it says it in? Not what does tradition say or what do most Christians believe, but what does the Bible say? He tries to live out the life God has laid out for him as best he can, with varying results. He likes his bourbons neat and his beers on tap. A few more things you should know about Joe is he is married to his best friend, hates iced tea, and when he is asked how he's doing he will always say, “I can't complain.” It's the most honest answer he can give. Be sure to follow Joe on your preferred social media.Facebook: @TheCommentatiransTwitter: @CommentariansInstagram: @CommentariansJOSHUA SHERMANJoshua Sherman is a husband and father of two. He loves studying deep things and making them digestible for people that have limited time, energy, or relevant background. A worship leader and song-writer, Joshua has been deeply involved in both music and the church since his youth. A continual student, Joshua is always seeking to learn more about the truth. He believes the Bible is best read with a view to the original context, with full awareness of the historical and traditional lenses we all wear. Joshua is used to being a bit of an outsider – growing up in conservative Evangelical circles among much more liberal culture on the West Coast, and going to a Christian college in Seattle. He now lives in Western Colorado, where he tends to be seen as a bit of a “crazy liberal” among a very conservative culture, though he continues to hold primarily conservative positions regarding Biblical interpretation and politics. Go figure!Joshua can be contacted online at any of the following places:tendingournets@gmail.comFacebook: @TendingOurNetsInstagram: @tendingournetsTimothy J. SteadmanTimothy J. SteadmanTIMOTHY J. STEADMANTimothy is an author, podcaster and musician who lives in Perth, Western Australia with his lovely and devoted wife Elizabeth, their three young children and a couple of cheeky dogs. He enjoys participating in peaceful outdoor pursuits, music and motorsport events with friends and family, enjoys quiet time at Perth's many pristine beaches and hopes to one day have the patience to teach his boys to fish. He is a songwriter and musician, having served as a founding member of Christian evangelistic heavy metal band "Grave Forsaken." Tim became a Christian in 1992 and has devoted himself to the study of the Word of God in almost every spare moment since.If you want to contact Tim without going all the way to Australia or waiting on the post to go all that way, he can be contacted online at the following places:giantanswers.comgiantanswers@outlook.comTwitter: @giantanswersguyInstagram: @tj_steadmanFacebook: @giantanswersEli The RavenWHY A RAVEN IN A TOP HAT?When we began looking to name our group, (A task none of us are ever fond of) we knew we wanted a name that would remind us of our dependence on God. If this project has any hope of succeeding, it will be the hand (and most likely reluctant amusement) of God keeping us going. After the prophet Elijah confronted the status quo of his day, he had to rely on God to feed him since his message wasn't the most popular one in town. The ravens in this story remind us of God's provision for His people. We call this project a “social club” as a tongue in cheek reminder that we are not alone. There are many people around the world following the LORD's lead even if feels lonely sometimes. We hope we are worthy of considering ourselves part of that group. The raven is to remember that God will provide, even in unlikely ways. The top hat serves to remind us we are children of the King. Putting both items together to reminds us not to take ourselves too seriously. And, of course there's the monocle, because Eli the raven is a very dapper bird.

StarDate Podcast
Impact!

StarDate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 2:14


About eight million years ago, a big space rock slammed into the Atacama region of Chile, near the Pacific coast. The impact melted the sand and dirt and blasted it high into the sky. As the debris fell back to Earth, it formed dark balls of glass about the size of your little fingernail. Today, thousands of them are scattered across hundreds of square miles of desert. Geologists discovered the glass balls a few years back, and confirmed their origin this year. The beads contain a lot of iron and other elements that likely came from the space rock. Researchers haven't found the impact crater that was gouged by the impact, even though it should be at least a mile across. It might have been filled in by blowing sand. Wind, rain, and the motions of Earth's crust probably have erased many other impact craters as well. Yet scientists have logged about 200 confirmed craters, and they're still finding new ones. The craters are tough to see. But drilling into them reveals that rocks below the surface have been crushed and churned by a powerful blow. One possible recent discovery is the Brushy Creek structure in Louisiana, which is more than a mile wide. Another is Ora Banda in Western Australia, which is three miles wide. Neither has been confirmed as an impact crater. But scientists are doing more research to prove that both were created by collisions with space rocks — like the one that sprinkled round beads across Chile eight million years ago.  Script by Damond Benningfield Support McDonald Observatory

True Crime Society
'My Name is Cleo' | The Abduction of 4-Year-Old Cleo Smith

True Crime Society

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 98:55


Join Stephanie and Olivia this week as they cover the highly-requested, insane story of the abduction and safe (!) recovery of 4 y/o Cleo Smith in Western Australia.Cleo went on a camping trip with her Mum Ellie, Dad Jake and baby sister Isla on October 15.  The area where the family was camping was very beautiful but remote.  Cleo woke up at 1.30am on October 16 and asked her mum for a drink of water.    When Ellie woke up again at 6am, Cleo and her sleeping bag were missing from the tent.  One of the largest and most comprehensive police investigations ever undertaken in Australian history began at 6.23am on October 16.Drones and spy planes were used.  Hundreds of full-time police officers were assigned to Cleo's case and they worked tirelessly for weeks on end.  They even searched through tons of rubbish, collected from an area spanning thousands of kilometres, looking for the smallest clue.On November 6, 18 days after Cleo disappeared, the unexpected happened.  CLEO WAS FOUND SAFE!  She was found playing with toys at around 1am in a locked house just MINUTES from her own home.  A man named Terence Kelly has been arrested for Cleo's abduction and will face court again in December.And just when you think this story could not get any more unbelievable, it does.  Terence had an extensive social media presence, made up of fake accounts for 'family members' that he made up.  He also had a huge obsession with Bratz dolls - his house was a shrine to them.  Are these the toys that Cleo was found playing with?   Most of the accounts have been removed, but we have the receipts.  Terence even followed Cleo's parents on social media.  Was this really a random stranger abduction as per the police?  Or did Terence have an obsession with Cleo and her family?Make sure you check out our blog for the entire rundown of Cleo's case - https://truecrimesocietyblog.com/2021/11/09/my-name-is-cleo/Thank you for listening!  Support the show (https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/TrueCrimeSociety)

Full Story
The Western Australian police and the shooting of JC

Full Story

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 33:02


In 2019, a 29-year-old Yamatji woman – known as JC – was homeless, suffering from poor mental health and walking through Geraldton holding a kitchen knife, when the police were called. Sixteen seconds after a police officer began to approach her, she was shot and later died. Last month a jury found the officer not guilty of both murder and manslaughter. Laura Murphy-Oates speaks to ABC reporter Rebecca Trigger and Noongar human rights lawyer Hannah McGlade about the life of JC, and what happened in those 16 seconds

Optimal Health Daily
1537: In Praise Of Lunch by Dr. Jenny Brockis on Mindful Eating for a Healthier Lifestyle

Optimal Health Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 11:52


Dr. Jenny Brockis praises eating a healthy lunch Episode 1537: In Praise Of Lunch by Dr. Jenny Brockis on Mindful Eating for a Healthier Lifestyle Dr. Jenny Brockis is a medical practitioner and board-certified lifestyle medicine physician, keynote speaker and best-selling author based out of Perth, Western Australia. She is an expert in the science of high-performance thinking, creating thriving teams and leaders through improving brain health and wellbeing. And in her new book, Thriving Mind: How to Cultivate a Good Life, she reveals how to cultivate the mental agility, flexibility and adaptability required to meet the needs of the modern workplace and thrive. The original post is located here: https://www.drjennybrockis.com/2017/4/17/in-praise-of-lunch/  InsideTracker's patented algorithm analyzes your biometric data and offers you a clearer picture than you've ever had before of what's going on inside your body. For a limited time, get 25 percent OFF the entire InsideTracker store! Go to InsideTracker.com/OHD to get your discount code and to start using InsideTracker today. Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com  Interested in advertising on the show? Visit https://www.advertisecast.com/OptimalHealthDailyDietNutritionFitness Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

SBS Macedonian - СБС Македонски
Australia reaches 80 per cent vaccine milestone but some states lag behind - Австралија вакцинира 80 проценти од населението, но некои држави заостануваат

SBS Macedonian - СБС Македонски

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 4:52


Australia has reached a significant benchmark in its vaccine rollout with the number of people aged 16 and over who have received two doses passing 80 per cent. But in some states, immunisation rates remain worryingly low, particularly among the young, raising more concerns about Western Australia's plan to keep its border closed until it reaches 90 per cent coverage. - Bројот на луѓе на возраст од 16 и повеќе години vo Avstralija кои се двојно вакцинирани e над 80 проценти, но, во некои држави, стапките на имунизација остануваат загрижувачки ниски, особено кај младите, што предизвикува поголема загриженост за планот на Западна Австралија да ја задржи својата граница затворена, додека не достигне покриеност од 90 проценти.

SBS World News Radio
Australia reaches 80 per cent vaccination milestone but some states lag behind

SBS World News Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 2:56


While 80 per cent of Australians aged 16 and over are now fully vaccinated against COVID-19, the rates are significantly lower in Western Australia and Queensland.

SBS Italian - SBS in Italiano
Con lo sforzo comune il teatro italo-australiano tornerà in scena

SBS Italian - SBS in Italiano

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 11:53


Grande successo al Camelot Theatre di Perth della commedia “Un giorno in ospedale” di Camillo Vittici messa in scena dalla compagnia teatrale “Italian Theatre of Western Australia”. Il regista, Rino Pellone, lamenta lo scarso aiuto ricevuto dagli enti governativi italiani e dalle università locali.

RTÉ - Morning Ireland
The Week In News

RTÉ - Morning Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 54:43


A selection of stories from the week: Four year old Cleo Smith rescued in Western Australia; Taoiseach at COP26; Farmers react to Climate Action Plan; EU fines Poland; Doolin Coastguard stood down; Will your next car be electric?; Is the UK about to trigger Article 16?; ABBA launches first album in 40 year

SBS Korean - SBS 한국어 프로그램
클레오 스미스 납치범은 36살 지역주민남성 테런스 켈리...아동 납치 및 불법감금 등 죄로 기소

SBS Korean - SBS 한국어 프로그램

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 2:15


전 국민의 공분을 촉발시켰던 4살배기 클레오 스미스를 납치한 범인은 사건 발생 지역의 주민 테런스 켈리(36)로 드러났다. 켈리는 아동 납치 및 불법 감금 등 다수의 죄목으로 기소됐다.

SBS Italian - SBS in Italiano
Il ritrovamento di Cleo Smith frutto di un'operazione di polizia senza precedenti

SBS Italian - SBS in Italiano

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 11:33


La notizia, inaspettata ed estremamente positiva, è stata diffusa poco più di 24 ore fa: il ritrovamento a Carnarvon, in Western Australia, della piccola Cleo Smith, la bambina di quattro anni che da 18 giorni era sparita. L'esito positivo è giunto al termine di una complessa operazione di polizia, che ha coinvolto centinaia di persone.

RNZ: Morning Report
Australian toddler's rescue a 'miracle' - anthropologist

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 4:54


A photo of smiling Cleo Smith, the four-year old found in a locked house eighteen days after her disappearance in remote Western Australia, reassured a nation on tenterhooks. Mother Ellie Smith posted a photo of Cleo on Instagram yesterday with the caption, "our family is whole again". But Cleo's successful rescue is almost unheard of after such an extended length of disappearance, experts say. Approximately 25,000 young people are reported missing in Australia every year. In Western Australia, Aboriginal people make up 17 percent of unsolved missing persons cases, but just 3 percent of the population. University of Newcastle forensic anthropologist and associate professor of criminology Dr Xanthe Mallett called Cleo's rescue a miracle. She spoke to Susie Ferguson.

SBS Spanish - SBS en español
Cleo Smith de 4 años fue encontrada viva y el hombre detenido está siendo interrogado por las autoridades

SBS Spanish - SBS en español

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 8:11


Cleo Smith, la niña de cuatro años desaparecida hace 18 días, ha sido encontrada con vida en una casa cerrada en la ciudad de Carnarvon, en Australia Occidental.

RN Drive - Separate stories podcast
WA Police Deputy Commissioner: finding Cleo Smith was a "truly amazing moment"

RN Drive - Separate stories podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 9:28


WA Police Deputy Commissioner, Col Blanch says after 18 days the extraordinary moment 4-year-old Cleo Smith was found was "truly amazing"

Hack
“My name is Cleo”

Hack

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 30:00


Missing four-year-old Cleo Smith has been found alive and well, after she went missing for 18 days in remote Western Australia. Hack explores why this case captured the country's attention, and a former police detective sheds light on how these investigations work. Plus, doctors around the world have noticed a strange trend during the pandemic - teen girls suffering from uncontrollable jerking movements and verbal outbursts. They were baffled by what was causing it, until they realised their patients had a few things in common, including their use of TikTok. Live guests: Terry Goldsworthy, criminologist and former detective John Safran, writer and documentary maker Perminder Sachdev, professor of neuropsychiatry at the University of New South Wales

RNZ: Checkpoint
Four-year-old Perth girl found alive after 18 days missing

RNZ: Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 3:47


An astonishing outcome - the four-year-old girl who disappeared almost three weeks ago from a remote Australian campsite has been found alive. Police broke into a locked house in the early hours of the morning and rescued the toddler. Worldwatch's Perlina Lau has the details. Western Australia police say the man in custody is a local from Carnarvon he is assisting police with their inquiries. They've released a photo of Cleo in hospital, eating an ice block and waving.

RNZ: Checkpoint
Abducted 4yo girl Cleo found after 18 days missing

RNZ: Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 7:14


It was remarkably good news for Perth today as the little Australian girl abducted while on a camping trip with her family 18 days ago was found alive. She was locked in a house just minutes away from her own family home. The four-year-old was silently taken from a tent at a rural campsite in Western Australia in the dead of the night while her parents slept. It sparked a massive police hunt and today they raided a house in Carnarvon - a town about 75 kilometres south of the campsite - and they found Cleo in one of the rooms. A man has been taken into custody and Cleo has been reunited with her family. Channel 9's Joshua Dawe talks through the details with Lisa Owen.

Shat the Movies: 80's & 90's Best Film Review

Shat listeners were appalled when we gave "The Goonies" more than two wipes. When they hear our "The Monster Squad" score, they might just try casting us into a demon dimension.  This '80s cult classic taught us what a pastiche was, illustrated how to explode a werewolf, and modeled perfect '80s parenting. We also enjoyed foul-mouthed kids, easy-to-remember character names, an outstanding montage, Dracula blowing up a treehouse with dynamite, and a corny thumbs-up that would make Van Damme blush.  Thanks to listener Christian in Perth, Western Australia, for giving us one more monster movie to celebrate spooky season. SUBSCRIBE & FOLLOW Android: http://shatthemovies.com/android Apple/iTunes: http://shatthemovies.com/itunes Social Media: http://shatthemovies.com/social-media CONTACT Email: hosts@shatthemovies.com Website: http://shatthemovies.com Leave a Voicemail: (914) 719-SHAT - (914) 719-7428 SUPPORT THE PODCAST Commission Movie: http://shatthemovies.com/support Donate with Paypal: http://shatthemovies.com/paypal Donate With Venmo: http://shatthemovies.com/venmo Shop Merchandise: http://shatthemovies.com/shop Our TV Podcasts: https://shatontv.com/shat-on-podcasts Theme Song - Die Hard by Guyz Nite: https://www.facebook.com/guyznite

SBS Macedonian - СБС Македонски
WA stays firmly closed despite other states reopening - Западна Австралија останува затворена и покрај тоа што другите држави повторно се отвораат

SBS Macedonian - СБС Македонски

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 3:45


While much of the country is celebrating the return of international travel, it's a different story in Western Australia, where Premier Mark McGowan has refused to set a date for reopening. The indefinite border closure is taking a mounting toll on especially migrant families, who have been separated for nearly two years. - Додека во повеќе делови од земјата се слави враќањето на меѓународните патувања, приказната е поинаква во Западна Австралија, каде што премиерот Марк Мекгован одби да одреди датум за повторно отворање. Личниот данок на затворањето на границите на неодредено време е се поголем, особено за мигрантските семејства, кои се разделени речиси две години.

Central Station - Stories from Outback Australian Cattle Stations
[SPINNING YARNS] 114. Haydn Sale – Opportunity knocks but once

Central Station - Stories from Outback Australian Cattle Stations

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 75:47


A young man heads north straight out of school and works in the stockcamp. Over the years he progresses to head stockman, and then manager. This story is fairly common and the norm in the cattle industry.  However, that is not the story of Haydn Sale. In this episode Haydn shares his journey from growing up in Melbourne to running one of the largest aggregates of cattle stations in Western Australia. Haydn speaks candidly about overcoming both personal and financial losses, the importance of mentors, having a different approach to business, and what is truly important to him. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are advised that this episode contains names and discussions of deceased persons. This episode is sponsored by Red Range Stock Supplements - a locally owned family run business based in Kununurra, Western Australia and servicing the whole North West. They offer a range of custom blended supplements for cattle and horses tailored specifically to your individual requirements. For more information or to discuss your supplement needs please visit redrangestocksupplements.com.au This podcast is brought to you by Ariat Australia: the perfect choice for the tough jobs. Ariat boots and clothing work hard, look good and are so comfortable there's never a need to slow down. Visit ariat.com.au today.

SBS World News Radio
WA stays firmly closed despite other states reopening

SBS World News Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 2:26


While much of the country is celebrating the return of international travel, it's a different story in Western Australia, where Premier Mark McGowan has refused to set a date for reopening.

The RegenNarration
100. Wanted Land Doctors: Rehydrating landscapes, reversing desertification & rebuilding wealth

The RegenNarration

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 76:55


Tens of millions of ‘pests' degrade lands and waters in Australia alone – pigs, goats, camels, buffalos, donkeys. Cruel, wasteful, expensive, mostly futile and often counter-productive culling programs are no solution. But what if it didn't have to be this way? What if some of those large wild herbivores could be harnessed towards regeneration? This is the story of a family that has regenerated an incredible patch of country, and for 20 years that has incorporated and relied on wild donkeys. The bond these animals share with this Station family is clear. But the state department recently ordered the family to gun them down. It's a painful flashpoint. One of the great stories of regeneration is on the line, and by extension, the potential for next generations to build on it, further restoring landscapes at scale for all our benefit. Chris Henggeler and his family manage Kachana Station in a remote pocket of the East Kimberley, only accessible by foot or air. They took responsibility for this desertified and abandoned country, and have achieved so much. Yet with still vast lands desertifying around them, and so much opportunity to build on models like Kachana, Chris gave a presentation earlier this year called ‘Wanted Land Doctors'. It was a powerful invitation for the next generations to join the fray, and how rest of us can help them do it. The model areas at Kachana feel like an oasis. But imagine this being the norm. Something very special is happening here. And a significant aspect of it is in jeopardy, when it could be a great catalyst for further regeneration. As Judith Schwartz, renowned author of The Reindeer Chronicles, says: we could be a world leader off the back of developments like this. And she's not alone. My family and I spent a couple of days here with the podcast last time, back in 2018, and felt transformed. We spent ten days this time, to delve more deeply into this great tale of regeneration, and see for myself whether the donkey shoot order is a necessary evil, or as Chris argues, an enormous error in regeneration, at a time when we can least afford it. I've gone the full distance on this one, with a couple of parts to release, as a) it's so rare I'm here, b) it's so vitally important to discuss, and c) there just might be opportunities stemming out of this with some of you. In the main episode here, we head out to the Station in the old Cessna light plane, before a short evening stroll on arrival. Then come morning, Chris and I head out into the gorge behind the homestead for an extended walk. This episode was recorded at Kachana Station in the East Kimberley, in the far north east of Western Australia, throughout the week of 13 September 2021. Title slide image: Chris Henggeler on our gorge walk at Kachana Station (pic: Anthony James). You'll find an extensive selection of photographs on the episode web page. Music: The System, by the Public Opinion Afro Orchestra. The tune accompanying the intro is by Jeremiah Johnson. Get more: Tune in to the special Extra to this episode out shortly, and the closing chapter to our time at Kachana, out next week. And to hear more from our first visit to Kachana Station back in 2018, tune into episode 25. The Kachana Station website - https://www.kachana-station.com/ And a blog and sequence of short videos with Chris on a webinar hosted by Biodiversity for Livable Climate (which also took place while we were at Kachana) - https://bio4climate.org/2021/10/23/kachana-station-a-home-for-donkey-led-restoration/ Thanks very much to the generous supporters of this podcast, for making it possible. If you too value what you hear, please consider joining them by becoming a patron of the podcast. Just head to the website at https://www.regennarration.com/support, and follow the prompts. Thanks for helping to keep the show going! And thanks for listening.

Passive House Podcast
Luke Kellett – Kellett Design Group

Passive House Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 53:11


Passive House Podcast cohost Matthew Cutler-Welsh interviews Luke Kellett, Director of Kellett Design Group based in Western Australia, about his Passive House practice, and the challenges and opportunities for Passive House adoption in the WA market.For links to the events that Matthew and cohost Zack Semke discuss after the interview, visit: https://passivehouseaccelerator.com/articles/passive-house-week-in-preview-november-1

Weird Crap in Australia
Episode 178 - The Era of Skylab

Weird Crap in Australia

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 48:30


As of 2021, Skylab is the only space station 100% operated exclusively by the USA - everything else has been at the bahest of or in conjunction with another nation, or as part of the ISS mission. Join Holly and Matthew as they look into this historic effort, its achievements, and the reason why it's sometimes called the "Chicken little Satellite" in Australia.

CEO Podcasts: CEO Chat Podcast + I AM CEO Podcast Powered by Blue 16 Media & CBNation.co
IAM1174- Entrepreneur Manufactures and Prints Waterproof Paper

CEO Podcasts: CEO Chat Podcast + I AM CEO Podcast Powered by Blue 16 Media & CBNation.co

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 16:59


Kyle Ewing became a full-time entrepreneur in 2014 when he left the corporate world to build his first company, Guerrilla Tags ID Systems. After a successful exit in 2015, Kyle is now focused on the growth and development of his company, TerraSlate Paper, which manufactures and prints waterproof paper for the US Military, restaurants, and biotech firms around the world. The success of his businesses can be best attributed to a creative marketing approach that nimbly tracks customer needs to fulfillment and leverages just-in-time inventory management. His most recent high-profile advertising campaign in partnership with BMW USA is the “Road to Sustainability” in which he seeks to make redundant laminated documents in all applications. Kyle enjoys collaborating with fellow entrepreneurs and venture capitalists to develop new systems, metrics and growth strategies for emerging companies in the tech and renewable resources industries. The experience Kyle gained in corporate positions provided the underpinnings for his entrepreneurship a position as Supply Chain Manager at Brightstar Corporation on supply chain optimization and demand signal forecasting in which, at an operator-wide level, he successfully carried out multiple initiatives in supply chain management, data-driven analytics, and inventory management using triple exponential smoothing models that he built for the wireless phone industry. Kyle also held roles as a Business Operations & Management Consultant, Procurement Manager and Marketing Analyst where he gained much of the valuable experience upon which he relies. Kyle received his BSBA in 2008 and his MBA in 2009 with a Chancellor's Scholarship from the Daniel's College of Business at the University of Denver. During his time at DU he developed a passion for philanthropic work and founded the Seven Ribbons Foundation supporting cancer research. In his personal life Kyle is an avid triathlete, runner, mountaineer, and is active in philanthropic work in the community. He won the Mt. Kilimanjaro Marathon in 2009, completed the Ironman Triathlon in Western Australia in 2010, and summited the mountains of the Swiss Holy Trinity: Mont Blanc, the Matterhorn, and the Eiger in 2011. Kyle is an accomplished skydiver and musician winning the state flute championships 3 years in a row. Recent accolades include “Entrepreneur of the Year” awarded by the Worldwide Who's Who organization and has become an avid Ukulele and Guitar player. Website: http://www.terraslate.com/   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/terraslatepaper  Twitter: https://twitter.com/terraslatepaper  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/terraslatepaper/  LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/9260188/  Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/terraslate/  YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC2NjPfmnOXiTQ84puuvKjfw 

SBS Italian - SBS in Italiano
Elezioni Comites 2021 in Western Australia

SBS Italian - SBS in Italiano

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 22:35


In occasione della campagna elettorale per l'elezione dei COMITES, i Comitati degli Italiani all'estero, ospitiamo una serie di dibattiti con alcuni candidati australiani.

Pushing The Limits
Ultramarathoning: How to Do the Impossible with Dean Karnazes

Pushing The Limits

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 64:16


When was the last time you got up and ran? Simply jogging around the neighbourhood during the weekends to keep fit may be daunting for some. Now, imagine the sheer amount of dedication, endurance, and resilience ultramarathoning requires. This type of long-distance running is an activity that tests the limits of human endurance. You might think running a thousand miles is impossible, but today's guest continues to prove others wrong. He's on a mission to exceed his limits and inspire others to do the same. Dean Karnazes joins us in this episode to get up close and personal about his experiences in ultramarathoning. He candidly shares the highs and lows, the triumphs and defeats. We also find out the importance of failure and finding magic in misery.  If you're interested in discovering how you can build your character, embrace pain and failure, and get inspired to push your limits, then this episode is for you.    Here are three reasons why you should listen to the full episode: Discover how to cope with the ups and downs of ultramarathoning. Learn about the importance of pain and failure. Get inspired by Dean's valuable takeaways from his career.   Get Customised Guidance for Your Genetic Make-Up For our epigenetics health program all about optimising your fitness, lifestyle, nutrition and mind performance to your particular genes, go to  https://www.lisatamati.com/page/epigenetics-and-health-coaching/. You can also join their free live webinar on epigenetics.   Online Coaching for Runners Go to www.runninghotcoaching.com for our online run training coaching. You can also join our free live webinar on runners' warm-up to learn how a structured and specific warm-up can make a massive difference in how you run.   Consult with Me If you would like to work with me one to one on anything from your mindset, to head injuries,  to biohacking your health, to optimal performance or executive coaching, please book a consultation here: https://shop.lisatamati.com/collections/consultations   Order My Books My latest book Relentless chronicles the inspiring journey about how my mother and I defied the odds after an aneurysm left my mum Isobel with massive brain damage at age 74. The medical professionals told me there was absolutely no hope of any quality of life again. Still, I used every mindset tool, years of research and incredible tenacity to prove them wrong and bring my mother back to full health within three years. Get your copy here: http://relentlessbook.lisatamati.com/ For my other two best-selling books, Running Hot and Running to Extremes, chronicling my ultrarunning adventures and expeditions all around the world, go to https://shop.lisatamati.com/collections/books.   My Jewellery Collection For my gorgeous and inspiring sports jewellery collection, 'Fierce', go to https://shop.lisatamati.com/collections/lisa-tamati-bespoke-jewellery-collection.   Resources Gain exclusive access and bonuses to Pushing the Limits Podcast by becoming a patron!  Harness the power of NAD and NMN for anti-aging and longevity with NMN Bio.  A new program, BOOSTCAMP, is coming this September at Peak Wellness!  Listen to my other Pushing the Limits episodes:  #8: Dean Karnazes - The Road to Sparta #183: Sirtuins and NAD Supplements for Longevity with Dr Elena Seranova #189: Understanding Autophagy and Increasing Your Longevity with Dr Elena Seranova Connect with Dean: Website Books by Dean Karnazes:  Ultramarathon Man: Confessions of an All-Night Runner A Runner's High: My Life in Motion Dean's other books   Episode Highlights [05:21] Dean's Lockdown Experience in Australia Dean was supposed to go on a 1000-mile run across New South Wales.  After boarding a jet to Australia, he found that the pandemic situation was getting worse.  And so, Dean and Pat Farmer will be doing their run in a military base instead. Although he's quarantined inside a hotel room, Dean always stays moving and does bodyweight exercises to remain active. It was challenging to go from California, where 80% have been vaccinated, to Australia, which is still in lockdown. [11:18] Chronological and Biological Age Chronologically, Dean is closer to 60 than 50 years old. There are various ways to test your biological age, like C-reactive proteins and inflammation. Tune in to the full episode to learn more about what else goes into calculating your biological age. [14:17] Dean's Greek Heritage Dean's mother is from Ikaria, a Blue Zones with the highest concentration of centenarians worldwide. People in Ikaria live long, healthy lives. They don't pay attention to time and live in a strong community. Therefore, they are not prone to stress. Dean doesn't have any back, muscle, or joint pain. [18:50] Know What Your Body is Built For People are built to run at different speeds and distances. Various factors affect what you're optimised to do.  What's important is knowing the things that are optimal for your health. Dean has run over 300 traditional marathons in his career. He has also seen people well past their 70s who are still physically able and active. [22:04] What is A Runner's High About? A Runner's High is about the changes that he, the world, and ultramarathoning has undergone. Ultramarathoning impacts the people closest to you. Dean wanted to write a true and honest story about his reflections over the past three decades.  [24:00] Running the Western States Endurance Run This 100-mile trail race starts in Sierra Nevada, California. Dean first did this race in 1994. To him, this was an unforgettable experience. Going back after 13 times, Dean found that watching his dad and son crew for him and seeing how things changed over time was transformative for him. Dean recounts his experiences in detail in A Runner's High. [25:54] The Surprises of Parenting Kids grow faster than parents can adjust to them growing up.  Dean describes his son Nick as dichotomous, recounting how he would complain about his roommates being slobs while his own room is a mess. Nick volunteered to crew for him. Dean thought Nick would be irresponsible. Nick surprised Dean; he was much more responsible than Dean's dad. It's a parent's burden to accept that their child is now a self-sufficient, capable adult. [29:58] Did Dean's Career and Fame Affect His Family? Ultramarathoning has always been a family affair for Dean.  He would take his family to where his marathons are. Dean's kids had the opportunity to travel to different places from a young age. Fans that come up to him asking for autographs and selfies are decent people. [34:44] Dealing with Pain and Failure When you're in pain, it's difficult to interact with others. Dean admits that it can be tough when his fans come up to chat with him during this time. He commits to setting aside his ego and always gives 100% in everything he does, including ultramarathoning and interacting with fans. [40:44] The Value of Failing Success builds character, but failure more profoundly so. The emotional range that comes with failure makes one a better human. Don't shy away from hitting rock bottom because you'll be missing out on a profound character-building opportunity. In the end, it's a matter of perspective. Most people will applaud the distance that you run, whether you come in first or not. [44:49] Ultramarathoning is Achieving the Impossible Dean initially thought there was trickery involved in ultramarathoning. The moments that stuck to Dean in his career weren't victories or crossing finish lines.  What stuck to him were the moments when he was on the verge of giving up but persisted through difficulty. [48:04] The Importance of Character Ultramarathoning teaches you to be resilient through the tough times. Running doesn't hurt when you're doing it right. Some people try to avoid difficult things and pain, while others embrace them. We've built our world around comfort, but somehow we're still miserable. However, the more struggle you experience, the more strength you build. [53:21] Dean's Biggest Takeaways From Ultramarathoning To Dean, it's the little moments that are the most priceless. Ultramarathoning is a journey, a passion, and a commitment. Staying true to yourself is valuable, simple, and magical. [56:11] Forming Connections Through Books Writing is laborious, but the motivation it brings to people makes it worthwhile. Dean dictates the things he wants to write on his phone while running.  Running clears Dean's thoughts. To him, motion stirs emotion. A singularity of purpose is achieved when focusing on a specific goal or mission.   7 Powerful Quotes from This Episode ‘Some people are built to run far and slow, and other people are built to run quick and short.' ‘In school, you get the lesson and you take the test. In parenting, you take the test, and then you get the lesson.' ‘What can you do other than just do your best? You're human. All of us can only just do our best.' ‘When I stand on the starting line, I'm going to give it my all. I'm not going to leave anything on this course. I'm just going to be the best that Dean can be. I'm going to try my hardest and the only way I'm going to fail is if I don't try my hardest and don't give it my all.' ‘I think bold failures build character. I have to be honest. Success builds character, but so does failure and in a more profound way.' ‘We've built our world around comfort: having every comfort available and removing as much discomfort and pain as we can. And I think, in a way, we're so comfortable, we're miserable.' ‘I'm just a runner, but that's who I am and I'm staying true to that. I'm going to do that to the grave. And I think in that, there's a simplicity and I think there's some magic in that.'   About Dean Dean Karnazes is a renowned ultramarathon runner. Among his many accomplishments, he has run 50 marathons in 50 days on 50 consecutive days, gone across the Sahara Desert in 120-degree temperatures, and ran 350 miles without sleep. He has also raced and competed in all seven continents twice. Dean has carried the Olympic Torch twice. He appeared on the covers of Runner's World, Outside, and Wired, and has been featured in TIME, People, GQ, and Forbes. He was named one of the "Top 100 Most Influential People in the World". Men's Fitness has also labelled him as one of the fittest men in the world. To top it off, Dean is also a New York Times bestselling author and a much sought-after speaker and panellist in running and athletic events worldwide.  If you want to learn more about Dean, his incredible adventures and his achievements, you may visit his website.   Enjoyed This Podcast? If you did, be sure to subscribe and share it with your friends! Post a review and share it! If you enjoyed tuning in, then leave us a review. You can also share this with your family and friends so they can find inspiration from Dean's stories on ultramarathoning and the lessons he learned along the way. Have any questions? You can contact me through email (support@lisatamati.com) or find me on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube. For more episode updates, visit my website. You can also tune in on Apple Podcasts. To pushing the limits, Lisa   Trasncript Of The Podcast Welcome to Pushing the Limits, the show that helps you reach your full potential, with your host Lisa Tamati, brought to you by lisatamati.com. Lisa Tamati: Good day, everyone. Welcome back to Pushing the Limits, your host Lisa Tamati here. Today, I have one of my longtime friends and a guy who has had a massive influence in my life both as a role model and as someone who has facilitated me with a lot of help with my books and so on. He's a worldwide legend. He is Dean Karnazes. He is the author of four books. And he has a new one out called the Runner's High, which I was excited to give me an excuse to chat to my buddy, and see what he's been up to, and to talk everything, ultramarathon running. We talk a whole lot about getting older in ultramarathon running, and the difficulties, and we talk about life in general and longevity, and the beauty of the sport. He's an incredible ambassador for our sport. He's done so much. He's brought so many people into the sport worldwide and he's an incredible human being. He's actually stuck in lockdown in Australia right at the moment as we were recording this and was about to do a race ride around Australia with my other friend, Pat Farmer. Another incredible human being. These guys are just next level crazy, and bloody COVID has ripped everything so they're now down to doing thousand-mile race around a military base in Australia in New South Wales. But in true ultramarathon form, where there's a will, there's a way. And when there's an obstacle, you find a way around it. Improvise, adapt, and overcome as my friend Craig Harper always says. So that's what these guys have been doing. So I hope you enjoy this episode with Dean Karnazes. Without him, I wouldn't have my books. He is a very generous and caring person as well as being an incredible athlete. Before we head over to the show, just want to remind you, we have our BOOSTCAMP live webinar series coming up starting on the first of September 2021. If you're listening to this later on, we will be doing these on an ongoing basis. And actually, we have planned to set up a mastermind that goes the year long. I don't know how long it's gonna take us to get organised but that is our goal. We're all about helping each other upgrade our lives and be the best versions of ourselves that we can be. This one's called BOOSTCAMP. This eight-week-long webinar series that Neil and I are doing. This is a live series where you hang out with us once a week for an hour and get a lot of great information: the latest science, the latest biohacking, the latest longevity, everything about mental toughness, resilience, everything that's going to basically upgrade your life and help you be a better human. The stuff that we've spent years and decades actually studying, learning, and doing. So I hope you get to enjoy this with us. You can head on over to peakwellness.co.nzboostcamp. That's B-O-O-S-T camp. BOOSTCAMP, not boot camp. We won't be making you run around doing anything. We're just going to be having wonderful chats and education. A lot of lectures and a lot of fun to be had along the way. And, I think, what's most important is you'll be networking with like-minded individuals. They say that you are the sum total of the five people that you hang out with most. And make those five people, in this case, it will be a few more, some top-quality people who are all on a mission the same as you are. So if you want to come and join us, that's BOOSTCAMP. We also have our epigenetics program. If you want to know all about your genetics, and how to upgrade your life through your genes, understanding what your genes do, if you're dealing with a difficult health journey, and you don't know where to go to next, this is a very good place to start. This is our flagship program that we've been running for years now. We've taken hundreds and hundreds of people through this program. And it's really an incredible all-encompassing program that looks at your food, your exercise types, what time of the day to do different things, your mood and behaviour, and lots, lots more. So come and check that out at lisatamati.com and hit the ‘Work with Us' button then you'll see our Peak Epigenetics program there if you're interested in doing that. Right. Now, over to the show with Dean Karnazes who's sitting in lockdown in Australia. Well. Hi, everyone and welcome to the show. Today, I have my very good friend and absolute legend of ultramarathoning, Dean Karnazes, with me. Dean, welcome to the show, again. Repeat offender. Dean Karnazes: Oh, it's so nice to be back on with you. Thank you for having me. We always have such lively conversations. I love it. Lisa: We do, right? I just absolutely enjoy your company. Whenever I've had the chance to spend a little bit of time with you, it's been absolute gold whether it's been on the podcast, or interviewing you, or hanging out with you on the Gold Coast like we did last year. That was absolutely awesome. Dean, you've just brought out another book. Another amazing book called Runner's High, and that's why we had to get you back on, because I want to share about all this book. But before we get into the book, you're sitting in lockdown in Australia. Tell me what is going on there. Dean: It's a long story but it started with a run across Australia with Pat Farmer. So from Western Australia to the East Coast, and that was the original idea; it was 5,000 kilometres. And this was six months ago when the world was going in a better direction, and over the past six months, boy, the world has done just the opposite. And we, like you, are a fighter and we kept saying we're going to persevere the same... Well, the run across Australia got mixed to a run across New South Wales, a thousand-mile run across New South Wales. And we kept thinking, 'This is going to happen. This is going to happen.' I boarded the plane, I flew to Australia with 10 people on the huge jet, yeah. And when I get to Australia, I realise how bad the situation is here. And every day, I turn on the news. It's getting worse, it's getting worse as I'm in quarantine, and then finally Pat called me a couple days ago and said, 'We can't do the thousand-mile run now. We could still the thousand-mile run. It's just going to be contained within a military base because we need to stay in our own bubble.' And I thought 'Oh.' Lisa: He has flown away from America to Australia to run around the military base. It sounds a bit like being tactic stuff. Dean: Oh, yeah. And not only the... To sit in quarantine. To your point, I've been in our hotel room for 12 days now, waiting to get out, yeah. Lisa: For someone like you... You're just like me. Obviously, you're even more extreme than me. It must be torture. I just can't comprehend being in a room. This must be awful for you. Dean: Don't remind me, but yeah. Basically, from the moment I get up, I'm staying active. We both know the importance of movement. So from the moment my head leaves the pillow, I'm not sitting down ever. Even right now, I'm pacing back and forth in this room, and I'm doing bodyweight exercises just constantly, at least throughout the day. Lisa: I used to... If I was travelling and I was stuck in a hotel room somewhere in a dangerous city or whatever, I'd put on something running on TV and run along with them. I was doing the Boston Marathon in Budapest in a hotel room one day. Just run along the spot. Doesn't matter. You got to do something to keep active, so I can imagine it being a bit of a mission for you. So my heart goes out to you and hang in there for two more days. And all my love, please, to Pat Farmer. I love the guy. He's just amazing. We got to hang out when we're in the Big Red Run together, which I failed spectacularly, by the way. I had a back injury that walked me out in the middle of that race. But one of the big advantages of that run was actually getting to meet Pat Farmer because he's an absolute legend of the sport. So you two together would be a really powerful combination. I'm really sad that he's not going to go right around Australia because imagine the people that would have come out and enjoyed meeting you two. Dean: Oh, he pulled all the strings. He's very well connected in political circles and the Australian Army is crazy for us. So we had 13 Army personnel and they're setting up a tent city every night, and they're cooking for us. It was amazing but COVID had other plans. Lisa: Oh, bloody COVID. It's wrecking every damn thing. Hey, but it's ultramarathon runner and Pat Farmer who has run from the North Pole to the South Pole, people. Absolute crazy guy. Obstacle? Find a way around it. Obstacle? Find a way around. And that's what you guys are doing, and you have to be flexible. That's a good lesson for this day and age because we're all having to be very, very flexible right now, and adapt to a hell of a lot of change, and being able to cope in different situations. So I bet you guys would just find a way through it and it will be another incredible story at the end of the day. Dean: I think the world needs it. As controversial as the Olympics were, I think it was an amazing thing, and it's so scaled back, right? But still, people are stuck in their house and now, what are they doing? They're watching the Olympics. They're getting energised, and they're thinking about the future so yeah, thank you. It's been a very emotional journey for me to leave a place... Where I live in California, we're over 80% vaccinated. So to leave a place where there was no masks then come here, it's been eye-opening and challenging. Lisa: You should have Pat go to you and run around California. You got it backwards. I have no doubt that you guys will just find a way through, and you'll make it epic, anyway. Say you get given lemons, you make lemonade. Dean: Yeah well, at least we're staying in military barracks, and we're basically running. Every day, we're staying in the same place so logistically, it'll be easier. Lisa: Yeah. Oh my god, you guys just don't stop. I admire you guys so much, and I was saying to you last year, when we're in the Gold Coast, 'I've hit the wall at about 48 but to be honest, I had a pretty hit on, full-on war with my body and....' But you guys just seem to keep going, and going, and going. I had Mum as well so I did have an excuse, guys. But pretty highly, it was a stressful last five years. But you just seem to... Because how old are you now, Dean, if you don't mind sharing? Dean: Yeah. Well, when anyone would ask my age, I would say, 'Are you talking about my chronological age or my biological age?' Lisa: Well, your chronological because biological, you're probably 20 years younger. Because I definitely am. That's my take on it. Dean: Chronologically I'm closer to 60 than 50. Lisa: Exactly. Have you actually ever had your biological age done? Because that's an interesting thing. Dean: Yeah, I had a couple. There's a lot of good ways you can test it, and I've had it done a couple different times. One, I was about I was in my late 30s. And then on another, I was older than my actual chronological age. Lisa: Which one was that? Dean: It was post ultramarathon. So after racing, we spoke about C-reactive protein earlier and inflammation. And that was one of the biomarkers that they used in calculating your biological age. So when I looked at the results, I said, 'Hold it. How did you arrive at that figure?' And they gave me all the markers they looked at, and I said, 'Well, look. This is wildly elevated because just four days ago, I just ran a hundred miles.' Lisa: Exactly. And C-reactive protein, if you've just had a cold, if you've just hit like we were talking about my dad before and sepsis and his C-reactive protein was just through the roof. So that makes sense that they would be out. There's a whole clock, which is the methylation markers, which is a very good one. I've done just one very basic one that came out at 34. I was pretty pleased with that one. At the end of the day, I think if you can keep all your inflammatory markers like your homocysteine and C-reactive protein generally under control, keep your albumin levels high, they are pretty good markers. Albumin is one that is looking at, it's a protein that your liver makes, and that's a very important one. And if you albumin starts to go too low, that's one sign that things aren't going to good. So keep an eye on all those. I love studying all this longevity stuff because I plan to live to 150 at least, and I don't think that that's unrealistic now as long as I don't get run over by a bus or something. With the stuff that's coming online and the technology that's coming, we're going to be able to turn back the clock on some pretty advanced stuff already. Now, my mum's on more than me because obviously, her needs are a bit greater than mine. I can't afford for us to be on all the top stuff. But yeah, I'm very excited. We don't need to age like our grandparents have aged. We're gonna have... And someone like you, Dean, who's lived a good healthy life, apart from pushing the hell out of your body, and I'll talk about that in a sec, but I think you've got the potential to live to 150, especially because you're Greek. You come from stock. Dean: And my mom is from one of the Blue Zones. An island called Ikaria and I've been there and I've met... Ikaria, the island she's from, has the highest concentration of centenarians anywhere on Earth. Lisa: Oh my gosh. So you're going to live to 200 then. Dean: Well, the beautiful thing about these people is that not only are they over 100, they still have a high quality of life. They're still mobile; they're self-sufficient. Mentally and cognitively, they're sharp as a tack. They're active. The one thing that they have that we don't have the luxury of is the complete absence of stress. They don't pay attention to time. Lisa: That's, I think, a crucial point. Stress is a killer in so, so many ways. Dean: Even the fact that we have mortgages, and we have payments, rent, all those sort of things, I think, contribute to obviously, to stress. And fitting in with new society. It's much more of a sense of community in these villages where everyone is part of it. They all take care of each other, so it's a different lifestyle. Lisa: I think, definitely when you're actually living the old way of being out in the sunshine, from the time you get up to the end of the day, you're working outside and on the ground, in the land, hands in the dirt, all of that sort of stuff really... Because I studied lots about circadian rhythms and how our eyes, for example, you see sunshine early in the morning. That resets your circadian rhythms, sets the clock going for the day. Your adenosine starts to build up over the day. You get tired at about 14 to 16 hours later. All of these things that we've... as modern-day humans, we've taken ourselves out of the old way of living and put ourselves into this artificial comfortable environment. But this is upsetting all our ancient DNA, and that's why that's leading to problems. And then, of course, we've got this crazy life with technology, and the stuff we have to do, and work. Just like stress, what it does to the gut, the actual microbiota in the gut, and how much it affects your gut health. And of course, gut health affects everything. Your brain and your gut talk all the time. All these stuff so I think if we can harness the cool stuff of the technology coming, plus go back and start respecting as much as possible our ancient DNA, and then eating our ancestors did as best we can with these depleted soils, and pesticides, and glyphosates, and God knows what's in the environment, but doing the best we can, then we've got a good chance of actually staying around on this planet and still be running ultramarathons or at least marathons when you're a hundred plus. I don't think that that's unrealistic anymore, and that excites me. So I'm always learning on that front. Dean: But I want to be that guy that's running a marathon when you say a hundred. That's my ambition now. Lisa: I'll keep you up on the latest stuff then. What you need to be aware of. Dean: I don't have any... People say, ‘You must have arthritis, or back pain, or knee pain, or joint pain.' I don't have any of those things. I don't know why but I just... I'm so happy. I get up every morning and feel fresh. Lisa: That's absolutely amazing. I think one of the amazing things with you is that... Because I studied genetics, and I looked at my genes. And actually doing really long bouts of exercise with my combination of genetics and my cardiovascular system, especially I've got a very weak glycocalyx, which is the lining of your endothelial cells. Bear with me people. This means that if I do a lot of oxidative damage, which you do, of course, when you're running, that's pretty damaging to my lining of my blood vessel. So I've got to be a little more careful and take a lot of antioxidant support. But having that inflammation means I can now take steps to mitigate that so that I can still do what I love to do. And that's really key. It's hitting stuff off at the pass and there's so much we can do now and that's really, really exciting. But I've gone completely off topic because we should be talking about your book. Dean: No, I think it's very relevant because I think that some people are built to run far and slow and other people are built to run quick and short. Lisa: Yeah. I do and I agree and it's not just about your fast-twitch fibres. It is also about your methylation and your detox pathways, your hormonal pathways, your cardiovascular genes. All of these things do play a role, and that's why there's no one size fits all. And that's why we don't all have to be Dean Karnazes or Pat Farmer. You know what I mean? Not everybody is built for that or should be doing that, and that's okay as well. And working out what is optimal for your health is the key thing. Having role models like you guys is just mind-blowing because it does lift your perception of what the human body is capable of. That leads the way for others, and to follow, and to test out their personal limits. I think that's important too. Dean: Well, I've run over 300 traditional marathons. And you go to the Boston Marathon, you go to these big marquee marathons, the New York City Marathon, and you see people in their 70s and 80s that, compared to their peers, are off the charts. You say, 'Well, that running is gonna be bad for you.' I don't subscribe to that. Lisa: I've done what, 70-odd thousand K's. Not as much as you have. And I don't have any knee pain. I don't have any back pain because I keep my core strong and that's despite having accidents with my back and having no discs. Because I keep myself fit and healthy. I have had some issues with hormones and kidney function because when we... You would have been rhabdomyolysis, no doubt a few times. Dean: Minor, minor, but I have. Yeah. Every ultra runner has, yeah. Lisa: Yeah, so things that. You've got to just keep an eye on and make sure you don't... You look after your kidneys otherwise and do things to mitigate the damage. Because yeah there are certain things that damage. But life damages you. Like living, breathing is damaging. It's causing oxidative stress. So you've got to weigh up the pros and cons, but having an active physical life outdoors, and having adventures, and being curious and excited, and being involved in the world, that's got to be beneficial for you. So when do you actually start with this big adventure with Pat? Dean: It's on the 14th of August, so in about a week. Yep. They finish on the 24th, yeah. Lisa: Oh, I'd like to get you both back on at the end of it to give me a rundown, have a go. That will be cool. Dean, let's just pivot now and let's talk a little bit about your book. Because you brought out some incredible books over the years. You're world-famous. You're a New York Times bestselling author. You've been named by the Times magazine as one of the most hundred influential people of the world. That's just insane. And now, you're brought out Runner's High. What's different about this story? Dean: Well, my first book was Ultramarathon Man, and that was kind of a coming-of-age book. It was about me learning about this crazy universe of ultramarathon and people doing things that I thought was impossible. And Runner's High is five books later and three decades later. How am I still doing it? And how have I changed? How has the sport of ultramarathoning changed? How has the world changed? And that was the book. And it was also a very personal book and that... You're an ultramarathoner, and you know ultramarathon is an island. If you start running these long distances it impacts everyone in your life including your family. Very much for your family. The book, it is not really about running. It's funny. People read it and they say, 'Wow. It's amazing but it's storytelling.' And you and I are both good storytellers, and that was what I just set out to write a book that was true and honest, and it was enjoyable for the reader. And yeah, it's doing really well in New Zealand, actually. Lisa: It must be doing well around the world. And this one is very... It's really real, and genuine, and raw. No holds barred. No barred... What do you call it? No... How do you say that? It's very much a real and it's a love letter to, basically, like you say, to running. And you're actually revisiting the Western States, a race that you've done how many times? 13 times or something? But coming back in your 50s, late 50s to do this again in 2018. It was a bit of a tough road, shall we say. Can you tell us a little bit about that part of the journey and why Western States are so special to you? Dean: Yeah. The Western States 100 mile endurance run is in the Sierra Nevada, California. And it was the first 100-mile trail race, and I first did it back in 1994. So your first is always your best. It's kind of this amazing experience that you have, and you just never forget it. I can recall literally conversations I had in that race in 1994. I can recall what people were wearing. I can recall where I saw my parent. I recall it. It gets impressed upon your mind. So my synapses just absorbed it. So going back here after 13 goes at it and thinking, 'Wow, is this going to be a stale experience? Or what is it going to be like?' And it ended up being quite magical and quite transformative in my career as well as... I learned a lot about my father and my son, and I wrote a lot about that in the book, and watching them crew for me, and how things have changed over time. It wasn't a good race. I don't want to be a spoiler but I think good races don't make good stories. Good races, you pop the champagne, yeah, it's boring. You high five at the finish, you have some champagne, and all this good. When things go to shit, that's an interesting story. Lisa: Yeah, absolutely. I've got three books full of things turning to shit. And I think it's beautiful that you talk about your dad or what a crazy guy he is, and your son coming and how your son was actually... Like you didn't know whether he was up to crewing for you really because he's a young man. He wasn't going to take this seriously because you need your crew to be on form. How do he actually do when he was out there? Dean: Yeah. There's a saying that in school, you get the lesson and you take the test. In parenting, you take the test and then you get the lesson. You're just like, 'Boy I screwed that one up.' You lose track of your kids, especially when they go off to uni. Lisa: Just interrupting the program briefly to let you know that we have a new patron program for the podcast. Now, if you enjoy Pushing the Limits, if you get great value out of it, we would love you to come and join our patron membership program. We've been doing this now for five and a half years and we need your help to keep it on air. It's been a public service free for everybody and we want to keep it that way. But to do that we need like-minded souls who are on this mission with us to help us out. So if you're interested in becoming a patron for Pushing the Limits podcast, then check out everything on patron.lisatamati.com. That's patron.lisatamati.com. We have two patron levels to choose from. You can do it for as little as 7 dollars a month, New Zealand, or 15 dollars a month if you really want to support us. We are grateful if you do. There are so many membership benefits you're going to get if you join us: everything from workbooks for all the podcasts, the strength guide for runners, the power to vote on future episodes, webinars that we're going to be holding, all of my documentaries, and much, much more. So check out all the details: patron.lisatamati.com. And thanks very much for joining us. Dean: As a parent, your kids grew up quicker than you adjust to them growing up, and I always treat them as a guy that needs his diaper change kind of thing even though he's 20 years old now. Nick was just such a dichotomous individual because he complained to me when he came home from uni that his roommates were such slobs. I said, 'How do you like living with three other guys?' He's like, 'It's great. They're my best friends, but they're such slobs.' Every every time I walked past his room, I'd look in his room, and it was a Tasmanian devil had gone through it. ‘Your room is such a mess.' When he volunteered the crew for me at Western States, claiming he knew how to do it, even though the last time he'd done it, he was nine years old, and he didn't do anything. At this time, he was actually driving a vehicle. He was the most important support I had during this kind of foot race. And I just thought that it was gonna be a horrible experience. That he'd be irresponsible, he wouldn't show up, and this, and that. At least it was just the opposite. He was the most responsible, so much more responsible than my dad. So much more capable. My dad's been doing this for 30 years, and my son who's never done it was so much better than my dad. He showed me a new side of him that I'd never seen. Lisa: That's him growing up, I suppose? Dean: Yeah. I think every parent that's got a kid is kind of nodding their head as they're hearing this because they can relate. Lisa: Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. And I think kids, sometimes when they can be a kid, they'll be a kid. They'll be the irresponsible... But when you actually put them on the spot and expect something from them, sometimes, they come to the party if you're lucky, and actually step up to the line, and actually do a good job, and obviously, Nicholas did that. Dean: Yeah. I think it's more the burden of the parent to accept and to realise that this little baby is self-sufficient and capable. Let go of the fact that they once were so dependent on you. They're not anymore. They have their own life, and they can navigate their way through the world. Lisa: It must be pretty hard to let go. What do you think it's been like for them having such a famous, crazy, extreme athlete dad? Was it hard for both of them? Because I can imagine you were away a lot. You're doing dangerous, crazy, amazing things. Everybody knows you. You're extremely well known when you go anywhere. How did that affect the family in general? Dean: It's funny. My kids have never known me as anything different. They've always known me as this ultramarathoner, and it's always been a family affair for me. My kids, they've been to Australia, they've been to Europe multiple times, South America, all over North America. I have taken them with me. I once ran 50 marathons in all of the 50 US states in 50 days, and they were along. Yeah. How many kids... My son was nine, my daughter was 11. How many kids ever, how many people ever get to see all of the states of America, let alone when you're that age? So I think that they just accept me for what I am. Sometimes I get the fan thing where people come up to me like at a restaurant. Like, 'Oh, can you sign this or that?' And it's always good people. The people that come up to me in an airport and say, 'Hey, I really admire you. Can we do a selfie?' They're decent people. Like I want to go have a glass of wine with this guy or this lady. It's not like I'm a rock star or movie star where I have all the crazy people chasing around. The people who chase me around are my peers. People I really admire myself. Lisa: Or other runners. You know what? Something I've always admired about you, too, was that you always gave every single person time of day despite... And when we did that speaking gig together last year on the Gold Coast, I was really nervous, to be honest, because I was like, 'I'm on the stage with someone who is a superstar, and I'm little me.' Right? I'm sort of like, 'How the hell am I on stage with you? Because no one's gonna be interested in what the hell I've got to say when you're standing next to...' It's like some superstar, and you're standing on the stage with them, and you've got to do... It was quite difficult in a way because everybody wanted to... The line for your books was just two hours long. The line from mine was two people long. Dean: You carried yourself beautifully. I thought together, we were a great pair. We complemented each other. Lisa: You are a gentleman. You would always straight to me and make sure that I was included, which was fantastic. I saw you. Like you take the time for every single person. You are present with everybody, and that's a really hard thing to do. It's not so hard in a book signing, but it's bloody hard in the middle of a hundred-miler or a hundred K-er or when you were half-dead, dragging yourself into a checkpoint, and somebody wants a signature from you or a selfie, and you're trying to just get your stuff together. I found that difficult on my level of stuff. Because when I enter in New Zealand, I found that really difficult. I'd have people coming out on the road with me all the way through. And in that preparation, I thought that would be cool. In the reality of the day-to-day grind, did you know when you're... Because I was running up to 70K's a day. I was in a world of pain and hurt most of the time, and just struggling to keep going, and very, very breakable, you feel like. And then, you'd have people coming out and now it's been maybe 2, 3, 4 or 5K's with you, and they're full of beans, and they want you to be full of beans and full of energy, and give them the greatest advice in their 5K's when you're half dead. I found that really, really hard because I'm actually, believe it or not, quite introverted and when I'm running, I go in. How do you deal with it? How do you deal with that without being... Because you don't want to be rude. You don't want to be disrespectful to anybody, God forbid. But there were times on that run when I just literally had to say to my crew, 'I can't cope right now. I'm in a world of pain. I need some space.' And they have to sort of politely say, 'Sorry, she's not in a good space.' How do you deal with that? Dean: Well, it's amazing that we're having this conversation because there are not a lot of people that can relate intimately to what you just said. Because most people will never be in that position but what.. I experienced exactly you've experienced. When running 50 marathons in 50 days or running, I ran across America as well. When you're in a world of hurt, you've got this protective shell on, and you don't want to be social, and then I'd have groups of college kids show up with my book. Like 'Oh my god. Karnazes, you're such a great influence, and we love your book.' And 'Let's order a pizza.' I just feel like I just want to crawl into a mummy bag and hide and you just got to turn it on. Lisa: You've got to step up fine. Dean: Yeah, they're so happy to see you, and they want to see you on. They don't want to see you like this groveler just dying. They want to see you strong and engaging, and it's really tough sometimes. Yeah. It's definitely really tough sometimes. Lisa: Yeah, and that's why I admire that you managed to do that most of the time. You turn it on no matter in what shape you were. If I were to pull it out whereas, to be honest, a couple of times, I just couldn't. I'm just like, 'I'm done guys.' Remember on the run through New Zealand that one time? This was not with fans. I was running for CanTeen, the kids with cancer. I was in an immeasurable world of hurt one night after running for, God knows how long I've been out there, 1200 K's or something at the stage. I had a 13-year-old boy was sent into my room to give me a pep talk. He was dying of cancer or had cancer, and he was here to give me a pep talk because I was crying. I wasn't able to get up and run the next day. And he came in and told me how much it meant to him, and to his peers, and what it meant to him that I was undertaking this journey. That was a real lesson. Like, 'Oh, get over yourself. You're not dying, okay? You're not a 13 year old with cancer. You just have to run another 70 K's tomorrow. So what?' That's a good perspective. I did get up the next morning and go again and that was like, 'Here, come on.' Some funny but really touching moments. You are human and it's very easy when you go to a speaking engagement or whatever to be what you meant to be, a professional. But it's bloody hard when the chips are down and you're in the middle of a race to do that. So I really always did admire that about you. What I also admired was that it didn't matter whether you came first or last in a race. With the Western States, it was a struggle. You never shied away from the fact that today might not have been your day, and you're having a bad day, and you weren't embarrassed about that. I've had races with Pat Farmers, a classic one in the middle of the Big Red Run where I was just falling to pieces. I was going through some personal trauma at the time, and my back went out. Yeah, I was just at a bad place. And I was embarrassed because I failed at a race at that stage. I was in that mindset. Now, I look back and go 'Give yourself a break.' How do you cope with that? How do you... Like when you don't do what the fans expect you to do on that day? Dean: To me, it's your ego. Yeah, it is such an ego thing. And let's be honest, when you're a public figure, your failures are public. You don't fail in silence. You just kind of DNF and walk away and live the race another day. You DNF and people are taking pictures of you, and it's on the internet. I always got crowded. But in the end, I just... What can you do other than just do your best? You're human. All of us can only just do our best. So my commitment now is like, ‘When I stand on the starting line, I'm going to give it my all. I'm not going to leave anything on this course. I'm just going to be the best that Dean can be. I'm going to try my hardest and the only way I'm going to fail is if I don't try my hardest and don't give it my all.' And when you go with that mindset, no matter what happens, you're doing yourself a service. Lisa: Yeah, and you're a winner. This is such a powerful message, I think, for young people listening because often, we don't even try because we don't want to risk embarrassing ourselves, and risk failure, and risk looking like an idiot. And what you're saying is just forget your ego, set that to the side, and go, 'I'm going to give it all today, and if it isn't enough, it isn't enough and that's fine. I'll learn something out of it. And it's a journey that I'm on. And I'm going to be the best I can be today.' That's such a powerful story of perspective, and resilience, and leaving the ego at the door. I did struggle with that when I was younger because I had some pretty spectacular failures, and they really hurt. They really hurt where you take a long time to sort of go, 'Do I want to do that again in the public eye?' So to speak. And you've just always just been 'If it was a good day, it was a good day, and on to the next one if it was a bad day.' Dean: Yeah, I think bold failures build character. I have to be honest. Success builds character, but so does failure and in a more profound way. I lean into every emotion that I have. Either success or failure, sorrow or regret. All those things that happen when you have a bad race or a bad day. I want that full emotional range. It just makes you a better human, I think. Not to shy away from those deep lows where you're just crushed. I think that people that try to avoid that are really missing out. Yeah, yeah, it's painful and it hurts but it builds your character in a profound way. Lisa: Wow. That is so deep, actually. Because we're often taught push down your emotions, and keep them in a box, and be a professional, and keep going, and keep calm and carry on type thing. And it has its place as far as when you're in the middle of a race, you've got to keep your shit together, and compartmentalise stuff, and be able to function. But I think it's also very important to experience the pain, the grief, the pain, or whatever you're going through, and the happiness. It's another thing. I would get to the end of a race and it didn't matter how well I'd done, and what I've just achieved, and how difficult it was. I remember doing one in the Himalayas and a friend coming up to me afterwards and it was 220K race, extreme altitude, hell of a journey to get there, all sorts of obstacles. I get to the finish line and he's just like, 'Wow, you're amazing. It's incredible. I can't believe what you just did. If I hadn't seen it, I wouldn't have believed it.' And I just went, 'Oh no. Someone else was faster, and there's a longer race.' You know what I mean? And I didn't integrate it. And he just went, 'Oh, for crying out loud. Can't you just take this one to the bank and actually bank it as being a success and a huge win?' And I really took that to heart. And now, I pat myself on the back when I do even a little thing good because it reinforces that neural pathway in my brain that tells me, 'This was great because I just got a little reward' rather than, 'You're never good enough.' Because that was what I was telling myself before. No matter what I did, it wasn't enough. And now, flip that script around to go, 'Hey, you managed to do your shoelaces and get to the end of the road today. Well, done.' And it's the thought of it. Dean: It is, completely. My son said something to me that was along that same vein during the Western States. I said, ‘Nicholas…' This is maybe a mile 60 or 70 of a hundred-mile run. I said, 'My race is crap. I'm not having a good race.' And he looked at me, said, 'Dad, you're running a hundred miles. To most people, that's enough.' And I put it in perspective. That although I'm with all these super elite athletes, you're not doing that... To most people that hear about anyone running a hundred miles, they don't care if you came in first or last. A hundred miles? They don't care if my time was 15 hours or 50 hours. They're just so inspired. Yeah, blown away by it. Yeah. Lisa: Exactly, And I think that puts it because when we hang out... Because you are the sum total of the people that you hang out with, the top five, as the saying goes. And that can have negative connotations as well as positive. It can be the fact that you think if you're hanging out with the five top guys in the world, then you are going to be not looking too good. But if you're hanging out with just the average person, and you're doing something this long and this incredible, for most people, that's just like, 'Huh? Humans can do that?' I did a speaking engagement yesterday in Auckland and the people were like, 'But that's humanly impossible.' I go, 'It actually isn't, and there's actually thousands of us that do the stuff.' And then, they're like, 'What? I don't get it.' Dean: That was it. That was the same reaction I had when I heard about someone running a hundred mile like that. They're, 'Oh, there's trickery.' I thought there's trickery. I thought there's hotels, or just campgrounds, or something. The guy said, 'The gun goes off and you just run, and you stop when you cross the finish line.' I couldn't wrap my head around it. Lisa: Until you did it. Dean: Until you did it. Exactly, yeah. Lisa: And you built yourself up to it, and this is the thing. It's a combination of so much and it's that journey isn't it? So I think what we're talking about is it being this incredible life journey that you go on within an ultramarathon and within the training of our ultramarathon. It's like living an entire life in short. You're going through the highs, and the lows, and everything in between. And it's long, and it's hard, and it's awesome, and it's amazing, and you meet incredible people. It's everything that you go through in life but just on an intensive timescale, I feel like. And it's just a beautiful experience to go through, especially with the value of hindsight. Sometimes, in the middle of it, mile 70 of a hundred-mile race, it's not looking too flash. Dean: Well, but I mean, to that point, when we reflect back on moments that we remember, at least me, it's not the victories. It's not the crossing the finish line first to me. It's always that time where I thought, 'I'm done. This is it. I can't get out of this chair. I'm trashed.' And somehow getting through that really, really tough moment and carrying on. That's what sticks with you. It's pretty weird, at least with me. Those are the moments that reflect back on my career. It's those horrible moments that I somehow persisted. Lisa: When you look back, you're proud of yourself and you know that when... One of the biggest values, and I've seen this with my story with Mum and, unfortunately, recently with my dad, is that when the shit hits the fan, like it did in those two situations, I knew that I could step up to do everything within my power and that I was a fighter. I knew that I was a fighter, and then I knew that I would fight to the bitter end, whatever the outcome was. And that's a really good thing to know about yourself. Because you need to know that when things are down, what character do you have? Who are you when all the niceties of our world have gone? What are you capable of? And you learn to be able to function when everyone else is gone. And that's a really powerful lesson that ultramarathoning teaches you, I think, in decades of the sort of hard work. And that's why athletes, I think... When you're employing athletes or you going into business with other athletes, you're more likely to have someone who's willing to fight through the tough times than if you just get someone who hasn't ever experienced any sort of discomfort in their life. Then they're not liable to be able to push through and be as resilient. I think that's what I'm trying to say. Dean: I agree with you completely. And I often wonder if people have those character, those values, and that's what draws them to ultra running or if ultrarunning instils those values. I remember coming home from a run one time, and my neighbour was fetching up the morning paper. He saw me running back to my house and I'd, I don't know, I'd run 30 or 40 kilometres, and he said to me, 'Doesn't running hurt?' And I said to him, 'It doesn't if you're doing it right.' And he looked at me, 'I do everything to avoid difficult things.' And I'm like, ‘And I embrace it.' It's just a different mindset. Lisa: And if you have the mindset of wanting to always avoid all sorts of pain in life, then you're not going to experience very much. And when you're in a tough situation, you won't be able to cope because you won't have experienced any sort of pain. So the more that you had to struggle, the more strength you develop from that. The old proverb: 'Strength comes from struggle' is valid in all walks of life. So unfortunately, this is the way the world is set up. If you seek comfort all the time, you're actually going to be in deeper shit somewhere along the way and not able to help yourself because you haven't learned to fight, and you haven't learned to push through and to deal with a certain level of discomfort and a certain level of pain. And I think that's a really, really valuable thing to do. Every day, I try to experience some sort of discomfort or pain: whether it's cold, whether it's pushing myself mentally, intellectually, whether it's pushing myself physically, doing some intense extreme exercise, or whatever the case may be. Every day, I try to do something that it scares the shit out of me or pushes me in some way because then, I know that I haven't gone backwards that day. I've probably learned something, and gone forward, and I've strengthened my body and my mind in some sort of way, shape, or form. Dean: Yeah, but I think you're an exception. I think most people just try to take the path of least resistance and avoid difficult things and avoid pain. I think we've built our world around comfort: having every comfort available and removing as much discomfort and pain as we can. And I think, in a way, we're so comfortable, we're miserable. Lisa: Exactly. That's exactly the problem. Because by actually experiencing a little bit of pain, by doing your push-ups, going for your run, doing your pull-ups, whatever the case is, being outside and digging the garden and doing stuff that is a bit unpleasant, it actually makes your body stronger, and it makes you mentally stronger. If we all sit on the couch and watch Netflix all day every day and eat chips, what's going to happen to us? We're going to destroy our health. We're going to just be so... And this is... I think I'm scared for the younger generation, that they haven't actually... We grew up. We're roughly the same age. You're a couple years older. I grew up in the 70's where we were outside, doing something all day, every day. We came in at night time for a feed and went to bed. That was our childhood, and that was just a beautiful way to grow up. We were cold. We were hungry. We were tired. We were happy. Dean: We were playing, right? We were exercising. I remember riding my bike just everywhere. I never thought of it as exercise. It was playing. Kids don't play that way anymore, unfortunately. Lisa: It's a scary thing for them because we need to teach them. Because again, it goes back to sort of respecting our ancient DNA and that's what I think... That's another thing that ultramarathoning does, or even trekking, or adventuring in any sort of way, shape, or form. It's that we've come from stock that used to have to build their own houses, cut down their own trees, chase animals, whatever the case was, just to survive. And then, we now have it all laid on for us. We're in lovely houses. We've got light all day or night. We've got food every street corner. And our ancient DNA isn't just set up for that. This is where all the problems come. We could go on a complete rant, which I often do on this podcast. But coming back to your story in your Runner's High, what do you think now looking back at this incredibly long and prolific career and this incredible journey that you've been on so far, and I do think that you still got miles and miles to go. What are some of the biggest lessons that you've learned along the way on the thirty-odd year journey that you've been? What are the biggest takeaways from ultramarathon running? Dean: I think that it's the little moments that are the most priceless. It's not the moments where... I write about meeting with First Lady Michelle Obama. Yeah, that was great. It was amazing, and incredible, and everything else, but it's the little moments of having a moment with a crew member or your family that you just you reflect on and laugh about. So it's those things to me that are most priceless. The other thing with ultramarathoning that I've certainly learned is that it's a journey. To me, it's a passion and it's something I've committed my life to. And staying true to the person you are, there's value in that. Even though it's just running, Lisa. It's nothing hugely intellectual. I'm not winning Nobel prizes. I'm just a runner, but that's who I am and I'm staying true to that. I'm going to do that to the grave. And I think in that, there's a simplicity and I think there's some magic in that. Lisa: Oh, absolutely. You know what you're born to do. You say it's only running but actually, you're a teacher; you're an author; you're a person who empowers others. You're doing all of that in the framework of running. So you do a heck of a lot more than just running for me. You've influenced an entire generation worldwide. I hope you know. Without you, ultramarathon running would not be where it is today. So I think you know a little bit more than just running yourself. This is the power of books, and this is the power of storytelling. And it's the power of having such a unique character that is so charismatic and draws people in. And those are all the things that you've managed to take. You could have just been a silent runner who just did his thing and went away again, but you've chosen to share your journey with the world. And that's just gold because that just gives people an insight into what they can do. It's all about... when I read your books, I'm getting something for me. And everybody who's reading those books, that's actually, 'Yes, we talk. We're hearing Dean's story.' But we're actually going, 'Huh. Maybe I could do that. Maybe I could try that. Oh, yeah I've experienced that.' This is the conversation that are going on in people's heads when they read those stories, and that's why they have such an intimate connection with you. And why, even though it's weird when people come up and ask you for an autograph or any of that, they feel like they know you, and they do know you. Dean: I've got a message from a guy. Yeah, I know. Every time I think, 'Wow, this is really laborious, writing these books. And maybe it's my last book.' I got a message from a guy a couple days ago and he said, 'I was planning on reading a couple chapters of your new book before I went to bed.' And he said five hours later, 'I finished the last page.' And then, he said, 'And then I got up. I just had to go running.' Wow. Then the book worked if it motivated him to read the whole thing in one sitting and get up and go running, then it's worthwhile. Lisa: Absolutely. And you know when you read, I read books ferociously, and the list is long. I'm usually reading about 10 books at a time. And when I'm reading, I am distilling the world's top people and their entire experience, I get to absorb within the space of 10, 15 hours of reading their book. That's a good return on investment. If I want to download someone's experience, or knowledge, or whatever the case is, then reading books is just such a powerful way to do it and listening to podcasts as well. Because that's another way that you can do it without having to... You can be out and about, driving, or running, or whatever and absorbing some new information. And I think we're just so lucky to have access to all of this. It's just incredible. Dean: It is and it's a pity if you don't take advantage of that because you're so wise and educated. That conversation we had before the podcast, it's amazing how... It's amazing. Your knowledge base and how you developed your knowledge base. Well, you've absorbed the best of the best and what they're thinking and the research they've done. Lisa: Exactly. All you're doing is you're absorbing it from the best scientists, the best doctors, the best athletes, the best executives, the best business people, and then, you get to share it, teach it. This is the other thing. If I learn something in the morning, I'm teaching it in the afternoon. Usually it's to my poor husband or my mother. I'm teaching it and then, I often build into my programs, or it comes out in my webinars, or whatever. And you're basically just regurgitating stuff that you've learned, but it's powerful when you put it into the perspective of your experience and you change it. You learn it, you teach it. You learn it, you teach it. And that's a such a cool way to share, and get that information out there into the world, and actually help the world on your little corner of the earth and what you're doing. And that's what I love to do and that's the power of what your books are all about. So yeah, I commiserate with you. Getting a book out is a bloody long, hard journey. People don't realise how hard it is to write a book. Give me a bloody hundred miler any day over writing a book. In fact, give me ten hundred milers over any day because it's such a long process, isn't it? Dean: Well, I do a lot of my writing while I'm running actually. So I dictate into my phone now. Because we have some of our clearest thoughts while we're running. Before, I used to think, 'God, why didn't I write that down? How did that go again?' Now, I just dictate as I'm running and then come home, put in an earbud, and just type up my notes. Lisa: I haven't done variations of that. I do end up stopping on my runs and just writing a quick note. I haven't actually dictated. I have to start adapting that because maybe that'll make it easy because you're damn right. When I'm actually at the computer, there's distractions. There's a hundred windows open; there's notifications coming all the time, and I really find it hard to sit down and write. It is sometimes best if you could just dictate into something, so I'll have to give that a crack next time. Dean: I think motion stirs emotion. Lisa: Yeah, it does and it clears the mind. That's one thing I miss now that I'm not doing the ultras, personally, at the moment. It's that singularity of purpose. That cleanness the mind had before of this one goal. And I'm watching my husband's preparing for a hundred miler in November. And just watching everything in his whole day, and he has the luxury of doing this because we haven't got kids and stuff, but everything in his whole day is centred around his training and getting to that hundr

SBS Russian - SBS на русском языке
Climate change: a conversation with the Australian scientist Slava Kitaeff - Изменение климата: беседа с австралийским ученым Славой Китаевым

SBS Russian - SBS на русском языке

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 20:56


A conversation on climate change with Dr Slava Kitaeff from the University of Western Australia. This podcast is available in Russian only. - Доступно и интересно: беседа об изменении климата с доктором наук Университета Западной Австралии Славой Китаевым.

Greenelines
Do You Pray for More Power in the Gifts of the Holy Spirit? with Dr. Reg Morais

Greenelines

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 37:36


Dr. Reg Morais, a pastor in Western Australia and founder of Living Faith Community Church (LFCC) and Anoint the World Ministries, returns to the show to discuss how you can grow in the Holy Spirit and faith-building message. He discusses his personal struggle and healing with autism and what God is showing him for the country of Australia. Be encouraged by this message and have hope in God. Get a copy of Dr. Morais' book, "Fast and Pray" at https://regmorais.com/product/fast-pray/. If you want to learn more about Dr. Morais' story with autism and its spiritual significance, listen to his podcast, "Autism Overturned with Dr. Reg Morais."

Lamplighters
Rabbi Justice Marcus Solomon: The First Rabbi Appointed To Western Australia's Highest Court

Lamplighters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 17:10


Rabbi Justice Marcus Solomon: The First Rabbi Appointed To Western Australia's Highest CourtFrom The Rebbe's Court To The Supreme Court

True Crime Paranormal
Where is Cleo Smith?

True Crime Paranormal

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 22:05


Cleo Smith has been missing since October 16th. Cleo was on holiday with her family in Western Australia at the blowholes campground. When her parents awoke around 6 a.m., Cleo was gone. So was her sleeping bag. She was wearing pink Pajamas. Her sleeping bag is gray and red. The Western Australian government has announced that they are offering a one million dollar reward for information that leads to Cleo's return. Get 20% Off and Free Shipping with the code truecrimeparanormal at Manscaped.com. That's 20% off with free shipping at manscaped.com and use code truecrimeparanormal. Experience premium grooming with MANSCAPED. #sponsored Source Material: https://www.skynews.com.au/australia-news/wa-police-reveal-car-was-seen-leaving-blowholes-campsite-around-the-time-fouryearold-cleo-smith-disappeared/news-story/272825699e33b48bbd63f3ed46fc3171?fbclid=IwAR2gOZz27tb3Qc8n0HE6rij4bNRbasQ2SRZPE4MBiJ8coTEfo4P4ZXMJ1Ow https://au.news.yahoo.com/cleo-smith-new-breakthrough-search-for-missing-4-year-old-203954786.html?guccounter=1&guce_referrer=aHR0cHM6Ly93d3cuZ29vZ2xlLmNvbS8&guce_referrer_sig=AQAAAMF4eQeF6-RtmbQ3D8P0CJ6p1gfs-Avg-tkK8OA-rvfLpcWWBXx3JQ5yn2wW4qkZ3Qth9BvTCRyfBjDn8ZiEeR0Me6EBHRVYTe8CpA88E7OsRBIol5zDy-GgB2vB3wI5QthDsqpmbDV81On9qtuxLz1jeMqtGKKpXX8eyvOXF_i0 https://www.the-sun.com/news/3902213/cleo-smith-missing-update-found-australia-latest-campsite/ SUBSCRIBE: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCd85RJRW6kn51aM2un6ButA/featured *Social Media Links* Facebook: www.facebook.com/truecrimeparanormalTPS Facebook Discussion Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/215774426330767 Website: https://www.truecrimeparanormalpodcast.com/ TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@truecrimeparanormal? Our Latest Video: https://youtu.be/pPX8L-nmQ5g Check Out Some of Our Previous Uploads! Is Leanne Green Out There Somewhere? https://youtu.be/TBUVNbHiZqk Paul Shane Garrett is Innocent https://youtu.be/svejODa_2ws Aubrey Dameron is Still Missing https://youtu.be/pGmH9rrZgKA True Crime Paranormal on Spotify https://open.spotify.com/show/5gIPqBHJLftbXdRgs1Bqm1 True Crime Paranormal on Apple https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/true-crime-paranormal/id1525438711?ls=1

PhotoBizX The Ultimate Portrait and Wedding Photography Business Podcast
436: Nik Buttigieg – Change your mindset for photography sales success

PhotoBizX The Ultimate Portrait and Wedding Photography Business Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 46:24


Premium Members, click here to access this interview in the premium area. Nik Buttigieg of www.nikbuttigieg.com is a wedding and family photographer based in Broome, Western Australia. I've known Nik for a few years through the PhotoBizX podcast. He's been a listener and member since 2018. He's completed various courses, and I've worked with him [...] The post 436: Nik Buttigieg – Change your mindset for photography sales success appeared first on Photography Business Xposed - Photography Podcast - how to build and market your portrait and wedding photography business.

True Crime Society
How to get away with Murdaugh | Part 2

True Crime Society

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 60:33


THE TRUE CRIME SOCIETY PODCAST IS BACK, FEATURING PART TWO OF THE MURDAUGH SAGA We start this episode off by yelling at you because we said Alex Murdaugh's name wrong last episode.We have had some feedback that people want to hear the main content only – if this is you, please fast forward as per below to your desired start point. As of next week's episode, we are going to make some changes to formatting our podcast, so stay tuned!CONTENT TIME STAMPS - FAST FORWARD TO YOUR DESIRED START POINT! Gabby/ Brian - 6:05Missing Cleo - 10:55Murdaugh - 15:30First up we have a BIG update on the Gabby Petito and Brian Laundrie case.  We also give a quick rundown on the case of missing girl Cleo Smith, who disappeared from her family's tent in Western Australia over the past weekend.   For anyone who is not familiar with this one, definitely start with Part One. Alex Murdaugh and his wife Maggie lived an affluent life with their two sons Buster and Paul in South Carolina. They were/are basically South Carolina Royalty - their family has been high profile in the area for decades. A few years ago, things started going really wrong for them - their housekeeper died mysteriously and Paul (allegedly) caused a boat crash while drunk that killed 19 y/o Mallory Beach. And then in June this year, Alex found Paul and Maggie murdered at one of the many homes they owned. Police have now reopened other cold cases in the area, looking for connections to the Murdaugh's. And to top it off, Alex allegedly paid someone to shoot him in the head in a suicide-for-hire insurance plot. In this episode we discuss (this synopsis is very general as I don't want to spoil the story for anyone.  : - The reopening of the Stephen Smith case- New information from Connor Cook about the boat crash that killed Mallory Beach – Connor was aboard the boat on the night of the accident- Alex's ‘suicide-for hire' plot –  I can't even begin to describe the whole debacle here- Alex's resignation from his law firm and his entry into rehab- The ‘alleged' misappropriation of funds by Alex from PMPED- Updates on the lawsuits surrounding the boat crash- More info on the Gloria Satterfield death settlement and Alex's shady involvement in that case- And we finish up with Alex in jail! Be sure to check out our blog for the whole rundown on the Murdaugh case - https://truecrimesocietyblog.com/2021/10/13/m-is-for-murdaugh-a-saga-in-the-south/?fbclid=IwAR06bHzNvDCBjPiA5ClSKfDKnuW-eZhvg2o4vQstiqQ9hYnLXVHKMNwa_48Spotify link for this episode - https://open.spotify.com/episode/7CAlKdixjAQrCQ2O5y7Hj2?si=KPr0-O4SQM6brenpWAOX9gSpotify link for Part One - https://open.spotify.com/episode/2N6mcxxQwb7pcvjSNJyEAI?si=8oUJwXLvQR2jSrAkPEXTywApple link for this episode - https://podcasts.apple.com/au/podcast/true-crime-society/id1504300714?i=1000539256388Apple link for Part One - https://podcasts.apple.com/au/podcast/true-Support the show (https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/TrueCrimeSociety)