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Latest podcast episodes about Cost

Screaming in the Cloud
Stepping Onto the AWS Commerce Platform with James Greenfield

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 45:23


About JamesJames has been part of AWS for over 15 years. During that time he's led software engineering for Amazon EC2 and more recently leads the AWS Commerce Platform group that runs some of the largest systems in the world, handling volumes of data and request rates that would make your eyes water. And AWS customers trust us to be right all the time so there's no room for error.Links Referenced:Email: jamesg@amazon.comTranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Vultr. Optimized cloud compute plans have landed at Vultr to deliver lightning-fast processing power, courtesy of third-gen AMD EPYC processors without the IO or hardware limitations of a traditional multi-tenant cloud server. Starting at just 28 bucks a month, users can deploy general-purpose, CPU, memory, or storage optimized cloud instances in more than 20 locations across five continents. Without looking, I know that once again, Antarctica has gotten the short end of the stick. Launch your Vultr optimized compute instance in 60 seconds or less on your choice of included operating systems, or bring your own. It's time to ditch convoluted and unpredictable giant tech company billing practices and say goodbye to noisy neighbors and egregious egress forever. Vultr delivers the power of the cloud with none of the bloat. “Screaming in the Cloud” listeners can try Vultr for free today with a $150 in credit when they visit getvultr.com/screaming. That's G-E-T-V-U-L-T-R dot com slash screaming. My thanks to them for sponsoring this ridiculous podcast.Corey: Finding skilled DevOps engineers is a pain in the neck! And if you need to deploy a secure and compliant application to AWS, forgettaboutit! But that's where DuploCloud can help. Their comprehensive no-code/low-code software platform guarantees a secure and compliant infrastructure in as little as two weeks, while automating the full DevSecOps lifestyle. Get started with DevOps-as-a-Service from DuploCloud so that your cloud configurations are done right the first time. Tell them I sent you and your first two months are free. To learn more visit: snark.cloud/duplo. Thats's snark.cloud/D-U-P-L-O-C-L-O-U-D. Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. And I've been angling to get someone from a particular department at AWS on this show for nearly its entire run. If you were to find yourself in an Amazon building and wander through the various dungeons and boiler rooms and subterranean basements—I presume; I haven't seen nearly as many of you inside of those buildings as people might think—you pass interesting departments labeled things like ‘Spline Reticulation,' or whatnot. And then you come to a very particular group called Commerce Platform.Now, I'm not generally one to tell other people's stories for them. My guest today is James Greenfield, the VP of Commerce Platform at AWS. James, thank you for joining me and suffering the slings and arrows I will no doubt be hurling at you.James: Thanks for having me. I'm looking forward to it.Corey: So, let's start at the very beginning—because I guarantee you, you're going to do a better job of giving the chapter and verse answer than I would from a background mired deeply in snark—what is Commerce Platform? It sounds almost like it's the retail website that sells socks, books, and underpants.James: So, Commerce Platform actually spans a bunch of different things. And so, I'm going to try not to bore you with a laundry list of all of the things that we do—it's a much longer list than most people assume even internal to AWS—at its core, Commerce Platform owns all of the infrastructure and processes and software that takes the fact that you've been running an EC2 instance, or you're storing an object in S3 for some period of time, and turns it into a number at the end of the month. That is what you asked for that service and then proceeds to try to give you as many ways to pay us as easily as possible. There are a few other bits in there that are maybe less obvious. One is we're also responsible for protecting the platform and our customers from fraudulent activity. And then we're also responsible for helping collect all of the data that we need for internal reporting to support some of the back-ends services that a business needs to do things like revenue recognition and general financial reporting.Corey: One of the interesting aspects about the billing system is just how deeply it permeates everything that happens within AWS. I frequently say that when it comes to cloud, cost and architecture are foundationally and fundamentally the same exact thing. If your entire service goes down, a few interesting things happen. One, I don't believe a single customer is going to complain other than maybe a few accountants here and there because the books aren't reconciling, but also you've removed a whole bunch of constraints around why things are the way that they are. Like, what is the most efficient way to run this workload?Well, if all the computers suddenly become free, I don't really care about efficiency, so much is, “Oh, hey. There's a fly, what do I have as a flyswatter? That's right, I'm going to drop a building on it.” And those constraints breed almost everything. I've said, for example, that S3 has infinite storage because it does.They can add drives faster than we're able to fill them—at least historically; they added some more replication services—but they're going to be able to buy hard drives faster than the rest of us are going to be able to stretch our budgets. If that constraint of the budget falls away, all bets are really off, and more or less, we're talking about the destruction of the cloud as a viable business entity. No pressure or anything.James: [laugh].Corey: You're also a recent transplant into AWS billing as a whole, Commerce Platform in general. You spent 15 years at the company, the vast majority of that over an EC2. So, either it was you've been exiled to a basically digital Siberia or it was one of those, “Okay, keeping all the EC2 servers up, this is easy. I don't see what people stress about.” And they say, “Oh, ho ho, try this instead.” How did you find yourself migrating over to the Commerce Platform?James: That's actually one I've had a lot from folks that I've worked with. You're right, I spent the first 15 or so years of my career at AWS in EC2, responsible for various things over there. And when the leadership role in Commerce Platform opened up, the timing was fortuitous, and part of it, I was in the process of relocating my family. We moved to Vancouver in the middle of last year. And we had an opening in the role and started talking about, potentially, me stepping into that role.The reason that I took it—there's a few reasons, but the primary reason is that if I look back over my career, I've kind of naturally gravitated towards owning things where people only really remember that they exist when they're not working. And for some reason, you know, I enjoy the opportunity to try to keep those kinds of services ticking over to the point where people don't notice them. And so, Commerce Platform lands squarely in that space. I've always been attracted to opportunities to have an impact, and it's hard to imagine having much more of an impact than in the Commerce Platform space. It underpins everything, as you said earlier.Every single one of our customers depends on the service, whether they think about it or realize it. Every single service that we offer to customers depends on us. And so, that really is the sort of nexus within AWS. And I'm a platform guy, I've always been a platform guy. I like the force multiplier nature of platforms, and so Commerce Platform, you know, as I kind of thought through all of those elements, really was a great opportunity to step in.And I think there's something to be said for, I've been a customer of Commerce Platform internally for a long time. And so, a chance to cross over and be on the other side of that was something that I didn't want to pass up. And so, you know, I'm digging in, and learning quickly, ramping up. By no means an expert, very dependent on a very smart, talented, committed group of people within the team. That's kind of the long and short of how and why.Corey: Let's say that I am taking on the role of an AWS product team, for the sake of argument. I know, keep the cringe down for a second, as far as oh, God, the wince is just inevitable when the idea of me working there ever comes up to anyone. But I have an idea for a service—obviously, it runs containers, and maybe it does some other things as well—going from idea to six-pager to MVP to barely better than MVP day-one launch, and at some point, various things happen to that service. It gets staff with a team, objectives and a roadmap get built, a P&L and budget, and a pricing model and the rest. One the last thing that happens, apparently, is someone picks the worst name off of a list of candidates, slaps it on the product, and ships it off there.At what point does the billing system and figuring out the pricing dimensions for a given service tend to factor in? Is that a last-minute story? Is that almost from the beginning? Where along that journey does, “Oh, by the way, we're building this thing. Maybe we should figure out, I don't know, how to make money from it.” Factor into the conversation?James: There are two parts to that answer. Pretty early on as we're trying to define what that service is going to look like, we're already typically thinking about what are the dimensions that we might charge along. The actual pricing discussions typically happen fairly late, but identifying those dimensions and, sort of, the right way to present it to customers happens pretty early on. The thing that doesn't happen early enough is actually pulling the Commerce Platform team in. but it is something that we're going to work this year to try to get a little bit more in front of.Corey: Have you found historically that you have a pretty good idea of how a service is going to be priced, everything is mostly thought through, a service goes to either private preview or you're discussing about a launch, and then more or less, I don't know, someone like me crops up with a, “Hey, yeah, let's disregard 90% of what the service does because I see a way to misuse the remaining 10% of it as a database.” And you run some mental math and realize, “Huh. We're suddenly giving, like, eight petabytes of storage per customer away for free. Maybe we should guard against that because otherwise, it's rife with misuse.” It used to be that I could find interesting ways to sneak through the cracks of various services—usually in pursuit of a laugh—those are getting relatively hard to come by and invariably a lot more trouble than they're worth. Is that just better comprehensive diligence internally, is that learning from customers, or am I just bad at this?James: No, I mean, what you're describing is almost a variant of the Defender's Dilemma. They are way more ways to abuse something than you can imagine, and so defending against that is pretty challenging. And it's important because, you know, if you turn the economics of something upside down, then it just becomes harder for us to offer it to customers who want to use it legitimately. I would say 90% of that improvement is us learning. We make plenty of mistakes, but I think, you know, one of the things that I've always been impressed by over my time here is how intentional we are trying to learn from those mistakes.And so, I think that's what you're seeing there. And then we try very hard to listen to customers, talk to folks like you, because one of the best ways to tackle anything it smells of the Defender's Dilemma is to harness that collective creativity of a large number of smart people because you really are trying to cover as much ground as possible.Corey: There was a fun joke going around a while back of what is the most expensive environment you can get running on a free tier account before someone from AWS steps in, and I think I got it to something like half a billion dollars in the first month. Now, I haven't actually tested this for reasons that mostly have to do with being relatively poor compared to, you know, being able to buy Guam. And understanding as well the fraud protections built into something like AWS are largely built around defending against getting service usage for free that in some way, shape or form, benefits the attacker. The easy example of that would be mining cryptocurrency, which is just super-economic as long as you use someone else's AWS account to do it. Whereas a lot of my vectors are, “Yeah, ignore all of that. How do I just make the bill artificially high? What can I do to misuse data transfer? And passing a single gigabyte through, how much can I make that per gigabyte cost be?” And, “Oh, circular replication and the Lambda invokes itself pattern,” and basically every bad architectural decision you can possibly make only this time, it's intentional.And that shines some really interesting light on it. And I have to give credit where due, a lot of that didn't come from just me sitting here being sick and twisted nearly so much as it did having seen examples of that type of misconfiguration—by mistake—in a variety of customer accounts, most confidently my own because it turns out that the way I learn things is by screwing them up first.James: Yeah, you've touched on a couple of different things in there. So, you know, maybe the first one is, I typically try to draw a line between fraud and abuse. And fraud is essentially trying to spend somebody else's money to get something for free. And we spent a lot of time trying to shut that down, and we're getting really good at catching it. And then abuse is either intentional or unintentional. There's intentional abuse: You find a chink in our armor and you try to take advantage of it.But much more commonly is unintentional abuse. It's not really abuse, you know. Abuse has very negative connotations, but it's unintentionally setting something up so that you run up a much larger bill than you intended. And we have a number of different internal efforts, and we're working on a bunch more this year, to try to catch those early on because one of my personal goals is to minimize the frequency with which we surprise customers. And the least favorite kind of surprise for customers is a [laugh] large bill. And so, what you're talking about there is, in a sufficiently complex system, there's always going to be weaknesses and ways to get yourself tied up in knots.We're trying both at the service team level, but also within my teams to try to find ways to make it as hard as possible to accidentally do that to yourself and then catch when you do so that we can stop it. And even more on the intentional abuse side of things, if somebody's found a way to do something that's problematic for our services, then you know, that's pretty much on us. But we will often reach out and engage with whoever's doing and try to understand what they're trying to do and why. Because often, somebody's trying to do something legitimate, they've got a problem to solve, they found a creative way to solve it, and it may put strain on the service because it's just not something we designed for, and so we'll try to work with them to use that to feed into either new services, or find a better place for that workload, or just bolster what they're using. And maybe that's something that eventually becomes a fully-fledged feature that we offer the customers. We're always open to learning from our customers. They have found far more creative ways to get really cool things done with our services than we've ever imagined. And that's true today.Corey: I mean, most of my service criticisms come down to the fact that you have more-or-less built a very late model, high performing iPad, and I'm out there complaining about, “What a shitty hammer this thing is, it barely works at all, and then it breaks in my hand. What gives?” I would also challenge something you said a minute ago that the worst day for some customers is to get a giant surprise bill, but [unintelligible 00:13:53] to that is, yeah, but, on some level, that kind of only money; you do have levers on your side to fix those issues. A worse scenario is you have a customer that exhibits fraud-like behavior, they're suddenly using far more resources than they ever did before, so let's go ahead and turn them off or throttle them significantly, and you call them up to tell them you saved them some money, and, “Our Superbowl ad ran. What exactly do you think you're doing?” Because they don't get a second bite at that kind of Apple.So, there's a parallel on both sides of this. And those are just two examples. The world is full of nuances, and at the scale that you folks operate at. The one-in-a-million events happen multiple times a second, the corner cases become common cases, and I'm surprised—to be direct—how little I see you folks dropping the ball.James: Credit to all of the teams. I think our secret sauce, if anything, really does come down to our people. Like, a huge amount of what you see as hopefully relatively consistent, good execution comes down to people behind the scenes making sure. You know, like, some of it is software that we built and made sure it's robust and tested to scale, but there's always an element of people behind the scenes, when you hit those edge cases or something doesn't quite go the way that you planned, making sure that things run smoothly. And that, if anything, is something that I'm immensely proud of and is kind of amazing to watch from the inside.Corey: And, on some level, it's the small errors that are the bigger concern than the big ones. Back a couple years ago, when they announced GP3 volumes at re:Invent, well, great, well spin up a test volume and kick the tires on it for an hour. And I think it was 80 or 100 gigs or whatnot, and the next day in the bill, it showed up as about $5,000. And it was, “Okay, that's not great. Not great at all.” And it turned out that it was a mispricing error by I think a factor of a million.And okay, at least it stood out. But there are scenarios where we were prepared to pay it because, oops, you got one over on us. Good job. That's never been the mindset I've gotten about AWS's philosophy for pricing. The better example that I love because no one took it seriously, was a few years before that when there was a LightSail bug in the billing system, and it made the papers because people suddenly found that for their LightSail instance, they were getting predicted bills of $4 billion.And the way I see it, you really only had to make that work once and then you've made your numbers for the year, so why not? Someone's going to pay for it, probably. But that was such out-of-the-world numbers that no one saw that and ever thought it was anything other than a bug. It's the small pernicious things that creep in. Because the billing system is vast; I had no idea when I started working with AWS bills just how complicated it really was.James: Yeah, I remember both of those, and there's something in there that you touched on that I think is really important. That's something that I realized pretty early on at Amazon, and it's why customer obsession is our flagship leadership principle. It's not because it's love and butterflies and unicorns; customer obsession is key to us because that's how you build a long-term sustainable business is your customers depend on you. And it drives how we think about everything that we do. And in the billing space, small errors, even if there are small errors in the customer's favor, slowly erode that trust.So, we take any kind of error really seriously and we try to figure out how we can make sure that it doesn't happen again. We don't always get that right. As you said, we've built an enormous, super-complex business to growing really quickly, and really quick growth like that always acts as kind of a multiplier on top of complexity. And on the pricing points, we're managing millions of pricing points at the moment.And our tools that we use internally, there's always room for improvement. It's a huge area of focus for us. We're in the beginning of looking at applying things like formal methods to make sure that we can make very hard guarantees about the correctness of some of those. But at the end of the day, people are plugging numbers in and you need as many belts and braces as possible to make sure that you don't make mistakes there.Corey: One of the things that struck me by surprise when I first started getting deep into this space was the fact that the finalized bill was—what does it mean to have this be ‘finalized?' It can hit the Cost and Usage Report in an S3 bucket and it can change retroactively after the month closed periodically. And that's when I started to have an inkling of a few things: Not just the sheer scale and complexity inherent to something like the billing system that touches everything, but the sheer data retention stories where you clearly have to be able to go back and reconstruct a bill from the raw data years ago. And I know what the output of all of those things are in the form of Cost and Usage Reports and the billing data from our client accounts—which is the single largest expense in all of our AWS accounts; we spent thousands and thousands and thousands of dollars a year just on storing all of that data, let alone the processing piece of it—the sheer scale is staggering. I used to wonder why does it take you a day to record me using something to it's showing up in the bill? And the more I learned the more it became a how can you do that in only a day?James: Yes, the scale is actually mind-boggling. I'm pretty sure that the core of our billing system is—I'm reasonably confident it's the largest or one of the largest data processing systems on the planet. I remember pretty early on when I joined Commerce Platform and was still starting to wrap my head around some of these things, Googling the definition of quadrillion because we measured the number of metering events, which is how we record usage in services, on a daily basis in the quadrillions, which is a billion billions. So, it's just an absolutely staggering number. And so, the scale here is just out of this world.That's saying something because it's not like other services across AWS are small in their own right. But I'm still reasonably sure that being one of a handful of services that is kind of at the nexus of AWS and kind of deals with the aggregate of AWS's scale, this is probably one of the biggest systems on the planet. And that shows up in all sorts of places. You start with that input, just the sheer volume of metering events, but that has to produce as an output pretty fine-grained line item detailed information, which ultimately rolls up into the total that a customer will see in their bill. But we have a number of different systems further down the pipeline that try to do things like analyze your usage, make sensible recommendations, look for opportunities to improve your efficiency, give you the ability to slice and dice your data and allocate it out to different parts of your business in whatever way it makes sense for your business. And so, those systems have to deal with anywhere from millions to billions to recently, we were talking about trillions of data points themselves. And so, I was tangentially aware of some of the scale of this, but being in the thick of it having joined the team really just does underscore just how vast the systems are.Corey: I think it's, on some level, more than a little unfortunate that that story isn't being more widely told, more frequently. Because when Commerce Platform has job postings that are available on the website, you read it and it's very vague. It doesn't tend to give hard numbers about a lot of these things, and people who don't play in these waters can easily be forgiven for thinking the way that you folks do your job is you fire up one of those 24 terabyte of RAM instances that—you know, those monstrous things that you folks offer—and what do you do next? Well, Microsoft Excel. We have a special high memory version that we've done some horse-trading with our friends over at Microsoft for.It's, yeah, you're several steps beyond that, at this point. It's a challenging problem that every one of your customers has to deal with, on some level, as well. But we're only dealing with the output of a lot of the processing that you folks are doing first.James: You're exactly right. And a big focus for some of my teams is figuring out how to help customers deal with that output. Because even if you're talking about couple of orders of magnitude reduction, you're still talking about very large numbers there. So, to help customers make sense of that, we have a range of tools that exist, we're investing in.There's another dimension of complexity in the space that I think is one that's also very easy to miss. And I think of it as arbitrary complexity. And it's arbitrary because some of the rules that we have to box within here are driven by legislative changes. As you operate more and more countries around the world, you want to make sure that we're tax compliant, that we help our customers be tax compliant. Those rules evolve pretty rapidly, and Country A may sit next to Country B, but that doesn't mean that they're talking to one another. They've all got their own ideas. They're trying to accomplish r—00:22:47Corey: A company is picking up and relocating from India to Germany. How do we—James: Exactly.Corey: —change that on the AWS side and the rest? And it's, “Hoo boy, have you considered burning it all down and filing an insurance claim to start over?” And, like, there's a lot of complexity buried underneath that that just doesn't rise to the notice of 99% of your customers.James: And the fact that it doesn't rise to the notice is something that we strive for. Like, these shouldn't be things that customers have to worry about. Because it really is about clearing away the things that, as far as possible, you don't want to have to spend time thinking about so that you can focus on the thing that your business does that differentiates you. It's getting rid of that undifferentiated heavy lifting. And there's a ton of that in this space, and if you're blissfully unaware of it, then hopefully that means that we're doing our job.Corey: What I'm, I think, the most surprised about, and I have been for a long time. And please don't take this as an insult to various other folks—engineers, the rest, not just in other parts of AWS but throughout the other industry—but talking to the people who work within Commerce Platform has always been just a fantastic experience. The caliber of people that you have managed to attract and largely retain—we don't own people, they do matriculate out eventually—but the caliber of people that you've retained on your teams has just been out of this world. And at first, I wondered, why are these awesome people working on something as boring and prosaic as billing? And then I started learning a little bit more as I went, and, “Oh, wow. How did they learn all the stuff that they have to hold in their head in tension at once to be able to build things like this?” It's incredibly inspiring just watching the caliber of the people that you've been able to bring in.James: I've been really, really excited joining this team, as I've gotten other folks on the team because there's some super-smart people here. But what's really jumped out to me is how committed the team is. This is, for the most part, a team that has been in the space for many years. Many of them have—we talk about boomerangs, folks who live AWS, go spend some time somewhere else and come back and there's a surprisingly high proportion of folks in Commerce Platform who have spent time somewhere else and then come back because they enjoy the space, they find that challenging, folks are attracted to the ability to have an impact because it is so foundational. But yeah, there's a super-committed core to this team. And I really enjoy working with teams where you've got that because then you really can take the long view and build something great. And I think we have tons of opportunities to do that here.Corey: It sounds ridiculous, but I've reached out to team members before to explain two-cent variances in my bill, and never once have I been confronted with a, “It's two cents. What do you care?” They understand the requirement that these things be accurate, not just, “Eh, take our word for it.” And also, frankly, they understand that two cents on a $20 bill looks a little different on a $20 million bill. So yeah, let us figure out if this is systemic or something I have managed to break.It turns out the Cost and Usage Report processing systems don't love it when there's a cost allocation tag whose name contains an emoji. Who knew? It's the little things in life that just have this fun way of breaking when you least expect it.James: They're also a surprisingly interesting problem. So like, it turns out something as simple as rounding numbers consistently across a distributed system at this scale, is a non-trivial problem. And if you don't, then you do get small seventh or eighth decimal place differences that add up to something that then shows up as a two-cent difference somewhere. And so, there's some really, really interesting problems in the space. And I think the team often takes these kinds of things as a personal challenge. It should be correct, and it's not, so we should go make sure it is correct. The interesting problems abound here, but at the end of the day, it's the kind of thing that any engineering team wants to go and make sure it's correct because they know that it can be.Corey: This episode is sponsored in parts by our friend EnterpriseDB. EnterpriseDB has been powering enterprise applications with PostgreSQL for 15 years. And now EnterpriseDB has you covered wherever you deploy PostgreSQL on premises, private cloud, and they just announced a fully managed service on AWS and Azure called BigAnimal, all one word. Don't leave managing your database to your cloud vendor because they're too busy launching another half dozen manage databases to focus on any one of them that they didn't build themselves. Instead, work with the experts over at EnterpriseDB. They can save you time and money, they can even help you migrate legacy applications, including Oracle, to the cloud.To learn more, try BigAnimal for free. Go to biganimal.com/snark, and tell them Corey sent you.Corey: On the one hand, I love people who just round and estimate—we all do that, let's be clear; I sit there and I back-of-the-envelope everything first. But then I look at some of your pricing pages and I count the digits after the zeros. Like, you're talking about trillionths of a dollar on some of your pricing points. And you add it up in the course of a given hour and it's like, oh, it's $250 a month, most months. And it's you work backwards to way more decimal places of precision than is required, sometimes.I'm also a personal fan of the bill that counts, for example, number of Route 53 zones. Great. And it counts them to four decimal places of precision. Like, I don't even know what half of it Route 53 zone is at this point, let alone something to, like, ah the 1,000th of the zone is going to cause this. It's all an artifact of what the underlying systems are.Can you by any chance shed a little light on what the evolution of those systems has been over a period of time? I have to imagine that anything you built in the early days, 16 years ago or so from the time of this recording when S3 launched to general availability, you probably didn't have to worry about this scope and scale of what you do, now. In fact, I suspect if you tried to funnel this volume through S3 back then, the whole thing would have collapsed under its own weight. What's evolved over the time that you had the billing system there? Because changes come slowly to your environment. And frankly, I appreciate that as a customer. I don't like surprising people in finance.James: Yeah, you're totally right. So, I joined the EC2 team as an engineer myself, some 16 years ago, and the very first thing that I did was our billing integration. And so, my relationship with the Commerce Platform organization—what was the billing team way back when—it goes back over my entire career at AWS. And at the time, the billing team was similar, you know, [unintelligible 00:28:34] eight people. And that was everything. There was none of the scale and complexity; it was all one system.And much like many of our biggest, oldest services—EC2 is very similar, S3 is as well—there's been significant growth over the last decade-and-a-half. A lot of that growth has been rapid, and rapid growth presents its own challenges. And you live with decisions that you make early on that you didn't realize were significant decisions that have pretty deep implications 15 years later. We're still working through some of those; they present their own challenges. Evolving an existing system to keep up with the growth of business and a customer base that's as varied and complex as ours is always challenging.And also harder but I also think more fun than a clean sheet redo at this point. Like, that's a great thought exercise for, well, if we got to do this again today, what would we do now that we've learned so much over the last 15 years? But there's this—I find it personally fascinating challenge with evolving a live system where it's like, “No, no, like, things exist, so how do we go from there to where we want to be next?”Corey: Turn the billing system off for 18 months, rebuild—James: Yeah. [laugh].Corey: The whole thing from first principles. Light it up. I'm sure you'd have a much better billing system, and also not a company left anymore.James: [laugh]. Exactly, exactly. I've always enjoyed that challenge. You know, even prior to AWS, my previous careers have involved similar kinds of constraints where you've got a live system, or you've got an existing—in the one case, it was an existing SDK that was deployed to tens of thousands of customers around the world, and so backwards compatibility was something that I spent the first five years of my career thinking about it way more detail than I think most people do. And it's a very similar mindset. And I enjoy that challenge. I enjoy that: How do I evolve from here to there without breaking customers along the way?And that's something that we take pretty seriously across AWS. I think SimpleDB is the poster child for we never turn things off. But that applies equally to the services that are maybe less visible to customers, and billing is definitely one of them. Like, we don't get to switch stuff off. We don't get to throw things away and start again. It's this constant state of evolution.Corey: So, let's say that I were to find a way to route data through a series of two Managed NAT Gateways and then egress to internet, and the sheer density of the expense of that traffic tears a hole in the fabric of space-time, it goes back 15 years ago, and you can make a single change to how the billing system was built. What would it be? What pisses you off the most about the current constraints that you have to work within or around?James: I think one of the biggest challenges we've got, actually, is the concept of an account. Because an account means half-a-dozen different things. And way back, when it seemed like a great idea, you just needed an account; an account was your customer, and it was the same thing as the boundary that you put all your resources inside. And of course, it's the same thing that you're going to roll all of your usage up and issue a bill against. And that has been one of the areas that's seen the most evolution and probably still has a pretty long way to go.And what's interesting about that is, that's probably something we could have seen coming because we watched the retail business go through, kind of, the same evolution because they started with, well, a customer is a customer is a customer and had to evolve to support the concept of sellers and partners. And then users are different than customers, and you want to log in and that's a different thing. So, we saw that kind of bifurcation of a single entity into a wide range of different related but separate entities, and I think if we'd looked at that, you know, thought out 15 years, then yeah, we could probably have learned something from that. But at the same time, when AWS first kicked off, we had wild ambitions for it, but there was no guarantee that it was going to be the monster that it is today. So, I'm always a little bit reluctant to—like, it's a great thought exercise, but it's easy to end up second-guessing a pretty successful 15 years, so I'm always a little bit careful to walk that line. But I think account is one of the things that we would probably go back and think about a little bit more.Corey: I want to be very clear with this next question that it is intentionally setting up a question I suspect you get a lot. It does not mirror my own thinking on the matter even slightly, but I get a version of it myself all the time. “AWS bills, that sounds boring as hell. Why would you choose to work on such a thing?” Now, I have a laundry list of answers to that aren't nearly as interesting as I suspect yours are going to be. What makes working on this problem space interesting to you?James: There's a bunch of different things. So, first and foremost, the scale that we're talking about here is absolutely mind-blowing. And for any engineer who wants to get stuck into problems that deal with mind-blowingly large volumes of data, incredibly rich dimensions, problems where, honestly, applying techniques like statistical reasoning or machine learning is really the only way to chip away at it, that exists in spades in the space. It's not always immediately obvious, and I think from the outside, it's easy to assume this is actually pretty simple. So, the scale is a huge part of that.Corey: “Oh, petabytes. How quaint.”James: [laugh]. Exactly. Exactly I mean, it's mind-blowing every time I see some of the numbers in various parts of the Commerce Platform space. I talked about quadrillions earlier. Trillions is a pretty common unit of measure.The complexity that I talked about earlier, that's a result of external environments is another one. So, imposed by external entities, whether it's a government or a tax authority somewhere, or a business requirement from customers, or ourselves. I enjoy those as well. Those are different kinds of challenge. They really keep you on your toes.I enjoy thinking of them as an engineering problem, like, how do I get in front of them? And that's something we spend a lot of time doing in Commerce Platform. And when we get it right, customers are just unaware of it. And then the third one is, I personally am always attracted to the opportunity to have an impact. And this is a space where we get to hopefully positively impact every single customer every day. And that, to me is pretty fulfilling.Those are kind of the three standout reasons why I think this is actually a super-exciting space. And I think it's often an underestimated space. I think once folks join the team and sort of start to dig in, I've never heard anybody after they've joined, telling me that what they're doing is boring. Challenging, yes. Is frustrating, sometimes. Hard, absolutely, but boring never comes up.Corey: There's almost no service, other than IAM, that I can think of that impacts every customer simultaneously. And it's easy for me to sit in the cheap seats and say, “Oh, you should change this,” or, “You should change that.” But every change you have is so massive in scale that it's going to break a whole bunch of companies' automations around the bill processing in different ways. You have an entire category of user persona who is used to clicking a certain button in this certain place in the console to generate the report every month, and if that button moves or changes color, or has a different font, suddenly that renders their documentation invalid, and they're scrambling because it's not their core competency—nor should it be—and every change you make is so constricted, just based upon all the different concerns that you've got to be juggling with. How do you get anything done at all? I find that to be one of the most impressive aspects about your organization, bar none.James: Yeah, I'm not going to lie and say that it isn't a challenge, but a lot of it comes down to the talent that we have on the team. We have a super-motivated, super-smart, super-engaged team, and we spend a lot of time figuring out how to make sure that we can keep moving, keep up with the business, keep up with a world that's getting more complicated [laugh] with every passing day. So, you've kind of hit on one of the core challenges there, which is, how do we keep up with all of those different dimensions that are demanding an increasing amount of engineering and new support and new investment from us, while we keep those customers happy?And I think you touched on something else a little bit indirectly there, which is, a lot of our customers are actually pretty technical across AWS. The customers that Commerce Platform supports, are often the least technical of our customers, and so often need the most help understanding why things are the way they are, where the constraints are.Corey: “A big bill from Amazon. How many books did you people buy last month?”—James: [laugh]. Exactly.Corey: —is still very much level of understanding in some cases. And it's not because they're dumb; far from it. It's just, imagine that some people view there as being more to life than understanding the nuances and intricacies of cloud computing. How dare they?James: Exactly. Who would have thought?Corey: So, as you look now over all of your domain, such as it is, what sucks the most? What are you looking to fix as far as impactful changes that the rest of the world might experience? Because I'm not going to accept one of those questions like, “Oh, yeah, on the back-end, we have this storage subsystem for a tertiary thing that just annoys me because it wakes us up once in a whi”—no, no, I want something customer-facing. What's the painful thing you're looking at fixing next?James: I don't like surprising customers. And free tier is, sort of, one of those buckets of surprises, but there are others. Another one that's pretty squarely in my sights is, whether we like it or not, customer accounts get compromised. Usually, it's a password got reused somewhere or was accidentally committed into a GitHub repository somewhere.And we have pretty established, pretty effective mechanisms for finding all of those, we'll scan for passwords and credentials, and alert customers to those, and help them correct that pretty quickly. We're also actually pretty good at detecting when an account does start to do something that suggests that it's been compromised. Usually, the first thing that a compromised account starts to do is cryptocurrency mining. We're pretty quick to catch those; we catch those within a matter of hours, much faster most days.What we haven't really cracked and where I'm focused at the moment is getting back to the customer in a way that's effective. And by that I mean specifically, we detect an account compromised super-quickly, we reach out automatically. And so, you know, a customer has got some kind of contact from us usually within a couple of hours. It's not having the effect that we need it to. Customers are still being surprised a month later by a large bill. And so, we're digging into how much of that is because they never saw the contact, they didn't know what to do with the contact.Corey: It got buried with all the other, “Hey, we saw you spun up an S3 bucket. Have you heard of what S3 is?” Again, that's all valuable, but you have 300-some-odd services. If you start doing that for every service, you're going to hit mail sending limits for Gmail.James: Exactly. It's not just enough that we detect those and notify customers; we have to reduce the size of the surprise. It's one thing to spend 100 bucks a month on average, and then suddenly find that your spend has jumped $250 because you reused the password somewhere and somebody got ahold of it and it's cryptocurrency-mining your account. It's a whole different ballgame to spend 100 bucks a month and then at the end of the month discover that your bill is suddenly $2,000 or $20,000. And so, that's something that I really wanted to make some progress on this year. Corey: I've really enjoyed our conversation. If people want to learn more about how you view these things, how you're approaching some of these problems, or potentially are just the right kind of warped to consider joining up, where's the best place for them to go?James: They should drop me an email at jamesg@amazon.com. That is the most direct way to get hold of me, and I promise I will get back to you. I try to stay on top of my email as much as possible. But that will come straight to me, and I'm always happy to talk to folks about the space, talk to folks about opportunities in this team, opportunities across AWS, or just hear what's not working, make sure that it's something that we're aware of and looking at.Corey: Throughout Amazon, but particularly within Commerce Platform, I've always appreciated the response of, whenever I report something, no matter how ridiculous it is—and I assure you there's an awful lot of ridiculousness in my bug reports—the response has always been the same: “Tell me more. Help me understand what it is you're trying to achieve—even if it is ridiculous—so we can look at this and see what is actually going on.” Every Amazonian team has been great about that or you're not at Amazon very long, but you folks have taken that to an otherworldly level. I just want to thank you for doing that.James: I appreciate you for calling that out. We try, you know, we really do. We take listening to our customers very seriously because, at the end of the day, that's what makes us better, and that's how we make sure we're in it for the long haul.Corey: Thanks once again for being so generous with your time. I really appreciate it.James: Yeah, thanks for having me on. I've enjoyed it.Corey: James Greenfield, VP of Commerce Platform at AWS. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry comment—possibly on YouTube as well—about how you aren't actually giving this five-stars at all; you have taken three trillions of a star off of the rating.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

The Vanished Podcast
William Jamison Part 2: The Cost of Doing Business

The Vanished Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 62:30


In the early morning hours of March 27, 1981, Bill Jamison disappeared after a night out at a bar and stopping for a quick bite to eat at a diner. When Bill left the restaurant, it was a clear night in the mid to low the 40s. But something happened to Bill after he left the diner. The waitress who served Bill didn't notice anything was wrong. Bill ordered the same thing he always got during his late-night stops. Bill finished his meal, walked out into the night, and disappeared forever. Yesterday, you learned about Bill's disappearance and the efforts to find him early on. His family didn't feel like they were getting enough help from law enforcement, so they started their own search, sometimes using unconventional methods like psychics. They met with law enforcement, begging them to do more. Over the years, family members sent letters to just about anyone they thought might listen or have resources that could aid their search efforts. Forty-one years later, Bill's disappearance remains just as much of a mystery as in 1981. Today, we will look at some things happening at Bill's work during the lead-up to his disappearance because a lot was going on. His family has always wondered if that could have something to do with what happened to Bill. If you have any information about the disappearance of William Jamison, please contact the Roselle Park Police Department at (908) 245-2300 or the New Jersey State Police Missing Persons Unit at (609) 882-2000.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

MoneywebNOW
Astral interim earnings leap despite maize input cost pressure

MoneywebNOW

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 7:10


‘However the profits look great versus the prior period, they are still below our average performance': CEO Chris Schutte. 7043

RealTalk MS
Episode 246: The High Cost of MS Medications with Steffany Stern

RealTalk MS

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 33:42


When my wife was diagnosed with MS in 1997, the annual cost of her MS medication was $9,000. Today, the annual cost of that same medication is $110,000. We cannot allow the insanity associated with the cost of MS medications to continue. Joining me to discuss the impact of the outrageously high cost of MS medications -- and what each of us can do about it -- is the National MS Society's Vice-President of Advocacy, Steffany Stern. We're also talking about a Phase 1 clinical trial for an investigational Epstein-Barr Virus vaccine (and why that matters to everyone living with MS). We'll tell you about a study that may have identified a biomarker for MS-related fatigue. We're also sharing the results of a study that identified which stress-reducing activities can help reduce MS-related depression and fatigue. And we'll tell you about a study that identified the economic benefits of starting MS medications early. We have a lot to talk about! Are you ready for RealTalk MS??! The (HIGH!) Cost of MS Medications   :22 NIH Announces Phase I Clinical Trial of Investigational EBV Vaccine 4:21 Study identifies a potential biomarker for MS fatigue  6:04 Study identifies stress-reducing activities that lower MS-related depression and fatigue    8:37 Study shows the economic benefits of starting MS medications early  11:25 Steffany Stern discusses the impact of the cost of MS medications   14:16 Share this episode  32:10 Download the RealTalk MS app for your iOS or Android device   32:30 SHARE THIS EPISODE OF REALTALK MS Just copy this link & paste it into your text or email: https://realtalkms.com/246 ADD YOUR VOICE TO THE CONVERSATION I've always thought about the RealTalk MS podcast as a conversation. And this is your opportunity to join the conversation by sharing your feedback, questions, and suggestions for topics that we can discuss in future podcast episodes. Please shoot me an email or call the RealTalk MS Listener Hotline and share your thoughts! Email: jon@realtalkms.com Phone: (310) 526-2283 And don't forget to join us in the RealTalk MS Facebook group! LINKS If your podcast app doesn't allow you to click on these links, you'll find them in the show notes in the RealTalk MS app or at www.RealTalkMS.com National MS Society COVID-19 Vaccine Guidance for People Living with MS https://www.nationalmssociety.org/coronavirus-covid-19-information/multiple-sclerosis-and-coronavirus/covid-19-vaccine-guidance National MS Society: You Can Help Bring MS Medications Into Reach https://nationalmssociety.org/Treating-MS/Medications/Make-MS-Medications-Accessible/Take-Action RealTalk MS Ep.229: Evidence Shows MS Is Triggered by the Epstein-Barr Virus with Dr. Kassandra Munger and Dr. AJ Joshi https://realtalkms.com/229 RealTalk MS Episode 231: Evidence Shows EBV Triggers MS: Understanding this Breakthrough Research with Dr. Bruce Bebo https://realtalkms.com/231 Cerebrospinal Fluid Amyloid Precursor Protein as a Potential Biomarker for Fatigue in Multiple Sclerosis: A Pilot Study https://sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2211034822003583 SURVEY: Undertaking Specific Stress-Reducing Activities are Associated with Reduced Fatigue and Depression, And Increased Mastery, in People with Multiple Sclerosis https://sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2211034822003169 Early vs Late Treatment Initiation in Multiple Sclerosis and Its Impact on Cost of Illness: A Register-Based Prospective Cohort Study in Sweden https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35496759 iConquer MS Survey for MS Caregivers https://survey.alchemer.com/s3/6823942/Caregiver-Survey-MS-Caregivers iConquer MS Survey for Researchers and Healthcare Providers https://survey.alchemer.com/s3/6823815/Caregiver-research-survey-HCPs-and-researchers Join the RealTalk MS Facebook Group https://facebook.com/groups/realtalkms Download the RealTalk MS App for iOS Devices https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/realtalk-ms/id1436917200 Download the RealTalk MS App for Android Deviceshttps://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=tv.wizzard.android.realtalk Give RealTalk MS a rating and review http://www.realtalkms.com/review Follow RealTalk MS on Twitter, @RealTalkMS_jon, and subscribe to our newsletter at our website, RealTalkMS.com. RealTalk MS Episode 246 Guests: Steffany Stern Tags: MS, MultipleSclerosis, MSResearch, MSSociety, RealTalkMS Privacy Policy

YogiTriathlete Podcast
Rolling Out With Jennifer Vollmann and Dan Casey On The Pura Vida Cycling Challenge

YogiTriathlete Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 74:22


If you don't know already, we are all about following signals from the universe to go after big things in this life. Things that no doubt invite fear along for the ride since giant leaps take us into the unknown, you know, that place where all our possibilities live. BJ and I were in that place right at the time of this interview as we were preparing to join our guests in Costa Rica for a multi-day cycling camp. Dan Casey and Jennifer Vollman are co-founders of the Pura Vida Cycling Challenge, the place where grit meets paradise. Jennifer is an endurance coach, avid triathlete, and an Ironman world championship qualifier in recent years at the 70.3 and 140.6 distances. Dan is a former pro-triathlete and NCAA swimmer with many podiums and victories under his belt. When BJ and I decided to join these guys for what we feel a bit more comfortable calling a cycling tour, we knew we wanted to get them on the show and share their beautiful souls with the community. We hope you feel the gratitude, love, and joy shared in this conversation. In this episode, we discuss. * Dan's backstory as a triathlete/cyclist/swimmer * Through loss you gain perspective * Things that just don't matter * Sharing fulfilling experiences * Importance of giving back to the community * Culture & community of Costa Rica * Jennifer's journey to who she is today * Bringing mindfulness into sport * Keep going to find your thing * Living it to build out the cycling challenge * Artisans hand-painted gems as you ride through small towns * Sugar cane juice and the jungle lodge * Charity component of Pure Vida Cycling * Importance of cycling in the Costa Rica way of life * Day by day breakdown of challenge * Cycling in Costa Rica compared to Europe * Living in the possibilities of life * Cost to waiting * Facing fear to draw the power from within * Celebration of the experience on the last day Namaste- Jess

The Journal.
The Political Cost of China's Faltering Economy

The Journal.

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 18:29


China's sputtering economy is altering the balance of power among its top leaders. For years, President Xi Jinping sidelined his second in command, Premier Li Keqiang, a proponent of economic liberalization. WSJ's Lingling Wei explains that Li is now gaining clout and pushing back on Xi's socialist policies. Further Reading:  - China's Economic Distress Deepens as Lockdowns Drag On  - China's Forgotten Premier Steps Out of Xi's Shadow as Economic Fixer  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Real Estate News: Real Estate Investing Podcast
What's California Doing About Coastline Erosion?

Real Estate News: Real Estate Investing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 5:52


Dealing with sea level rise along the California coast is not going to be easy. One of the options that cities are encouraged to consider is something called “managed retreat.” In a nutshell, that's when homes are moved away from the coast as it crumbles toward the sea. With so many expensive California homes perched on oceanside cliffs, the idea has become very controversial. There's even debate over the use of the term “managed retreat.” (1)Hi, I'm Kathy Fettke and this is Real Estate News for Investors. If you like our podcast, please subscribe and leave us a review. Managed retreat is a concept that's been around for a while. It's been used after natural disasters that have flooded whole communities. As reported by the SF Chronicle, The town of Soldiers Grove, Wisconsin, began relocating about 600 homes in 1979, after the Kickapoo River had flooded 25 times. It cost more than $27 million in federal, state, and local funds to buy new land and move 70 buildings, including 24 homes.“Managed Retreat” to Fight Rising Sea LevelsNow, with increased concern about rising sea levels because of climate change, there's been more discussion about how to deal with it, and “managed retreat” is one of the options. But it's not being embraced by everyone. Managed retreat is something that goes against the desirability and value of oceanside real estate.As the Chronicle reports, it “represents a radical departure from decades of coastal development philosophy and runs counter to our proclivity to build houses and cities up against the ocean.” And now cities along the shore have a tremendous challenge to deal with. As UC Santa Cruz professor, Gary Griggs, puts it: “Dealing with sea level rise and (cliff) retreat… is the biggest challenge that human civilization may ever have to face.”The Cost of California Sea Level RiseIn a 2019 study that was published in the journal Scientific Reports, researchers estimated that sea level rise along California's 1,271 mile-long coast could negatively impact $150 billion in property and 600,000 people. Two thirds of the impact is expected to hit the San Francisco Bay Area. But the same study predicts substantial erosion in Southern California over the next 80 years, and the disappearance of 67% of its beaches.California has already tried to fight erosion with other less aggressive measures such as seawalls, the reinforcing of cliffs, and the building of levees and jetties. Professor Griggs says the state has used these methods to protect about 10% of the coastline, but they are expensive and they don't last forever. They need maintenance and updating in the race to keep ahead of climate change.In some places, sand has been added to help keep the ocean at bay. The city of Santa Cruz has been doing this for decades. The Chronicle reports that Santa Cruz has dumped additional sand onto beaches 58 times since 1965. The price tag? Almost $18 million.Pacifica's Crumbling Cliff and Lost HomesOne well-known example of the need for the relocation of homes has made headlines in San Mateo County. Winter storms in 2010 and 2015 caused so much damage to the cliff along Esplanade Drive in Pacific, the city was forced to condemn, purchase, and demolish several homes and apartment complexes. But even in a situation like this, it is not easy to tell people they must relocate because homes are at risk of falling into the sea. In 2015, the Coastal Commission asked cities to study how they would deal with sea level rise. Pacifica considered the use of managed retreat but after feedback from the community, rejected it. The city council said that it did not align with the city's goals or the desires of the residents.SF State economist Philip King told the Chronicle: “When you ask people to leave their homes, even if you could fully compensate them 100% economically, you still would be pulling them away from their community.” He says: “It's an issue we're going to have to face in California.”The Term “Managed Retreat” Conveys “Defeat”The term “managed retreat” also sounds too much like “defeat” for some people. An article in Slate suggests changing the term to something more obscure like “managed realignment” or “planned relocation.” Or maybe something like “aggressive resilience” or “strategic advance” which sound more proactive. (2)One city that's embracing the idea of managed retreat is the city of Marina in Monterey County. Officials there have created a plan that allows for some amount of property relocation. That includes support from the owner of a beach resort who will have to move some buildings.One of the co-authors of a UC Santa Cruz paper on Marina said in the report: “So there are cases in which private property owners have seen the writing on the wall and they know that they're not going to be able to constantly rebuild their infrastructure after flooding and erosion. They are on board with the plan, and they want to help preserve the community.” (3)You can read more about this topic by following links in the show notes at newsforinvestors.com.Also, please remember to hit the subscribe button, and leave a review!You can also join our real estate investor network for free at newsforinvestors.com. That gives you access to the Investor Portal where you'll find information on rental markets and sample property pro-formas. You can also connect with our experienced investment counselors, property teams, lenders, 1031 exchange facilitators, attorneys, CPAs and more.Thanks for listening. I'm Kathy Fettke.Links:1 -https://www.sfchronicle.com/travel/article/California-coast-sea-level-rise-17091737.php2 -https://slate.com/technology/2022/04/managed-retreat-climate-change-language.html3 -https://www.eenews.net/articles/managed-retreat-unpopular-expensive-and-not-going-away/

Beholder to No One
How Much Does it REALLY cost to run a Podcast or Stream? w/ Mitch

Beholder to No One

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 56:34


Mitch and I have a lovely conversation about going into the details about what it really costs to stream or do podcasting. You can get started for relatively cheap, but costs come as you grow. Take a listen, you may learn something!   Mitch Twitter   Table Party Podcast   Help support the show with Patreon or Ko-Fi! All money provided helps ensure the show continues and is able to get art work for future shows!   I am in two more shows!  2000 Tales: Weird Web (Horror Monster of the Week stream held every Friday night at 9pm Eastern on Twitch.) Podcast Twitter Twitch   Awfully Queer Heroes (D&D 5e Games with mostly queer cast. Uncaged Anthology is DMed by me and Tower of the Soul that I DM. Uncaged Anthology Podcast   Twitter   We have two new shows on the Beholder to No One Podcast Network starting soon! Keep an eye on the Twitter's below for more details on when they will release! Sound Control: Radio Signal  (Science Fiction Stories, Radio Signal will be a Savage Worlds Game ran by Dan) Twitter: https://twitter.com/SoundControlRPG    Dice Before Dawn: Phoenix by Night (Darker stories, Phoenix by Night will be a Vampire the Masquerade 5th Edition game ran by Alex) Twitter: https://twitter.com/DiceBeforeDawn    Please check us out on: Facebook Twitter Youtube   Find more episodes on Podbean Keith (Nikki's Husband) Made our Website! Website Keith's Twitter   Intro & Outro Music created by Kyellan

The Two-Minute Briefing
The Evening Briefing: Monday, May 16

The Two-Minute Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 2:02


Cost of living: We are helpless in face of inflation, claims Bank of England GovernorGerard Lyons: The Bank of England is plagued by groupthinkEnergy price cap: Changes raise prospect of 'immense' winter energy bill shockAnalysis: What the energy price cap changes mean for you‘Far-reaching consequences': Putin threatens ‘response' if Nato military infrastructure deployed in Sweden and FinlandWatch: Ukrainian forces reach Russian border as Moscow plots new offensiveGay footballer: First openly-gay active male player in English football'Overnight mountaineers': The shocking reality of climbing Everest in 2022Shane Watson: 12 simple ways you can have more sexRead all these articles and stay expertly informed anywhere, anytime with a digital subscription. Start your free one-month trial today to gain unlimited website and app access. Cancel anytime. Sign up here: https://bit.ly/3v8HLez.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Reorg Ruminations
Americas Core Credit: Talen Energy; Diebold Nixon; Inflation and Cost Pressures; Financing Trends

Reorg Ruminations

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 11:04


This week on Reorg's Americas Core Credit podcast, we take a look at Talen Energy, Diebold Nixon, inflation and cost pressures, and financing trends. If you are not a Reorg subscriber, request access here: go.reorg-research.com/Podcast-Trial.

The Business of Agriculture Podcast
241 - Direct to Consumer Citrus to Boost Margins and Cope with California's Regulatory Cost

The Business of Agriculture Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 47:04


California's regulatory environment is prohibitive, especially for production Agriculture which uses a lot of water and works on historically slim margins. So, what's an enterprising California farm operator to do when faced with the challenge of preserving the family ranch in light of exploding regulatory costs? That's the question Eric Bream aims to answer with new ventures. His first venture: direct to consumer citrus sales with a hook. The hook: donating a matching portion of his direct sales crop to local homeless shelters and food pantries. Eric joins me to discuss California citrus and his new endeavor. Sponsored by Nori nori.com and Pattern Ag pattern.ag

Dropping Bombs
Nate Kennedy. The Marketing Doctor. Episode 475 with The Real Brad Lea (TRBL)

Dropping Bombs

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 62:29


Nate Kennedy is, above all, a husband & father.  His wife Susan, and two children are, as Nate would be quick to say, his greatest accomplishments. Bar None. Among his other passions, he counts business building, playing “Full Contact Entrepreneur”, Helping business owners reach their goals, and staying fit. His methods in business and consulting are decidedly “Tough Love”, Keeping his team and partners on track with a healthy mix of consulting, support, proper connections and honest feedback.  In this episode, Nate and Brad discuss the ins and outs of marketing and what it takes to be your own doctor of marketing. 00:00 Intro 3:50 Cost per lead 06:10 Paid ads that don't work 07:00 “People don't fully understand what they are selling and who they are selling to so it's the wrong offer.” - Nate Kennedy 10:00 Copyright 10:44 Go check out Nate's book All Gas No Brakes also go to https://www.natekennedy.com and check out what he does. 15:25 Follow Nate @natekennedymd  17:53 Bomb: A lot of people love to sell but if you do not know how to fulfill and you will fail - Nate 23:35 Keeping your work clean 28:33 CPM: Cost per impression/cost per million 30:30 Convertkit or Drip especially if you are a one man band 34:00 Staying in touch with your lists 38:00 Start building your list immediately 41:00 Top Secret stuff 48:00 The best outline for the email 53:25 Look out for the Brad Lea brand coming in hot 55:20 Bomb: The beauty of owning your own audience 01:01:28 Bomb: “I would rather have engagement over anything.” - Nate Kennedy  

The Truth About Money with Ric Edelman

College is expensive, and in this segment, Jean and Soledad talk about the average costs and what considerations to make before choosing a college. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Why or Why Not with the Watsons
Ep 14 - Why not know the cost first?

Why or Why Not with the Watsons

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 36:14


Are you a person that counts the cost ahead of time? In this episode of ‘Why or Why Not with the Watson's', Benjamin and Kirsten talk about counting the cost financially, in our daily lives and spiritually as believers in Christ. Reading the passage in Luke 14:25-35, they break down what Jesus tells his disciples about counting the cost to follow him. New episodes drop every Monday so be sure to subscribe so you never miss one!

You Just Have To Laugh
228. Mistakes in Communication can cost you an important friendship with Baseball Great, Greg Pryor

You Just Have To Laugh

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 28:47


Baseball great Greg Pryor is a good friend. He texted me to tell me I spelled a word wrong in my book. It was actually the name of the man who hired him to play on the Chicago White Sox. The man's name is Bill Veeck. I spelled it “Veck.”  Greg simply let me know for my next printing. I didn't interpret it that way. What happened next, is the beauty of the podcast. When we only hear and read words through our own “filter” it can cause damage to a friendship. But when we take the time to understand and admit we reacted through our own ‘filter' and it wasn't the best way to respond – your friendship can get closer. That's what happened, and it was me who reacted like, well, rather childish. Hey, You Just Have To Laugh at yourself, and things can really clear up. This is great podcast in communication. Thanks Greg Pryor for your friendship and proof-reading skills. thedaytheyankeesmademeshave.com – Greg's book naster.com/laughstore    - David's Book – You Just Have to Laugh Manual

El Bethel Church of Christ
5/15/2022 AM -- What Does Your Religion Cost You? (Donnie V. Rader)

El Bethel Church of Christ

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 46:59


Find the accompanying PowerPoint Here. What Does Your Religion Cost You?, by Donnie V. Rader. 5/15/2022 Sunday AM Sermon.

The Sky Sports Football Podcast
Everton stung by Brentford and Hammers hold City | Richards: Early red card cost Toffees, Souness: City and Liverpool best of any era

The Sky Sports Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 44:30


Micah Richards, Graeme Souness and Phil Jagielka discuss Everton's 3-2 defeat to Brentford in the Premier League as the Toffees miss the chance to ensure survival despite taking the lead against the Bees. Plus, Manchester City fight back to draw 2-2 with West Ham after being 2-0 down at half-time at the London Stadium

Calvary Chapel Downeast
220515AM - Count the Cost - Evan Valarik

Calvary Chapel Downeast

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 40:09


220515AM - Count the Cost - Evan Valarik by Pastor Will Cass

Domestic Violence & How I Survived
Death - The Cost of a Break-Up

Domestic Violence & How I Survived

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 28:47


Trigger warning for this episode - the story of how a 17 year old lost her life because of her abuser. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/domesticviolence/support

Home Sweet Home Chicago with David Hochberg
Home Sweet Home Chicago (05/14/2022) – David Hochberg with MegaPros Joe, Realtor Amy Kite, Mike Huston of Lindholm Roofing, Tom Jahnke with Builder Supply Outlet, BluSky Restoration's Pete Marrero, and special guests Greg and Kristina Gaardbo of Chicag

Home Sweet Home Chicago with David Hochberg

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022


We started off this week's show by chatting with The Kite Team's Amy Kite about the process of downsizing and if now's a good time. Next, Mike Huston of Lindholm Roofing  joined the show to talk about water management and the different options that are available to a homeowner. Then, Tom Jahnke of Builder Supply […]

POV You're My Therapist
ep 28. You Get $20 to Build Your Dream Man, “Alive” Cost $100. Good Luck.

POV You're My Therapist

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 51:22


On this week episode! Divine builds her dream man, and I mean Bob the Builder's his a$$ from the ground up. She explains the process her and her therapist use to narrow down what she looks for in a partner, and no not just the shallow stuff (6'4),  but the deep (6'4)  , touchy (6'4)  , feely (6'), nitty gritty stuff.  From familial relationships to personal attributes (kindness, integrity, generosity, emotional availability),  to income and literally everything else under the sun. Divine iterates the importance of knowing what you want in a partner so you are not easily swayed by what you don't want! And don't worry she's not being shallow or picky! This is literally the bare minimum for men, remember that!

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast
Podcast #85: Indy Pass President and Founder Doug Fish

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 66:51


To support independent ski journalism, please consider becoming a free or paid subscriber. Starting in June, paid subscribers will receive podcasts three days before free subscribers.WhoDoug Fish, President and Founder of the Indy PassRecorded onMay 9, 2022About the Indy PassHere’s an overview of the 2022-23 Indy Pass suite:And here’s what that gets you access to:Why I interviewed himIt’s unfortunate that Steamboat, a personal favorite and one of Colorado’s most amiable mountains, has become the avatar for sticker-shock skiing, but there it is: $269 peak-day walk-up lift tickets last season. Any collateral pain is self-inflicted, and they seem committed to the process, so I don’t feel too bad hammering on them about it. Still, for readers of this newsletter, most of whom have next year’s Ikon Passes tucked into their jacket pockets by Easter, my ceaseless yammering about walk-up ticket prices can probably seem tedious and abstract, like detailing the logistical challenges of sustainable asteroid mining or the tolerable viral load of a brontosaurus: who cares?Which is a fair question. But as the three dozen or so mega-resorts that have mainlined this triple-digit ticket tactic race toward $300 for a day of skiing, a cartoonishly absurd double universe has materialized. One that makes comparisons like this possible: for $10 more than an Ikon-oblivious skier would pay for one day at Steamboat, they could have skied 162 days at 81 ski areas with a $279 Indy Pass. Which is probably more days than most skiers rack up in a decade, and more ski areas than they visit in a lifetime.It’s a hell of a bargain, is what I’m trying to say here, and an amazing product that the greater skiing public has, so far, failed to appreciate in large numbers. Indy predicted 400,000 redemptions this past season. The number came in at 125,000. That’s a 68.75 percent miss, which Fish attributes, in this interview, to overzealous predictions coming off the bomber Covid-induced boom season of 2020-21. What that means, for us skiers, is that this thing probably has plenty of room left to grow.“Growth” means a couple things here. First, more resorts are incoming. Fish promised as much in this interview, even in already crowded New England. The smaller-than-expected number of redemptions means the 85 percent cut of Indy revenue that goes to the resorts was not as diluted as Fish feared it could have been (he explains how the pass operates in the interview). Plus, the new Allied Resorts discount program is broad enough that this thing could easily reach a total of 200 downhill partners (it’s not unthinkable that the addition of cross-country ski areas could push that number toward 300).Second, more skiers are likely coming too. That’s a good thing. Numbers bring stability. Wouldn’t more skiers mean more redemptions? Yes, but it means more revenue, too, and since it’s likely that the most hardcore skiers – i.e. those most likely to redeem 30 days – are already in. Fish was comfortable enough with the average number of redemptions that he held prices steady for next season – and sales are strong as a result.For all the attention The Storm lavishes on the Indy Pass, the product is an industry minnow, not even three years old. Yet somehow this little pass with as many annual visits as an Eagle County weekend has stapled itself to the marquee alongside the Epic and Ikon passes, a toddler in size 14 boots. It’s been astonishing to watch it grow, but it will be more amazing still to see what happens when it grows into those knee-high kicks. Fish is the first three-time guest on The Storm Skiing Podcast. Yes, because he’s generous with his time and humble in his approach, but also because he keeps coming up with new things to say, keeps making the story more compelling, keeps making us believe that this is something worth talking about.What we talked aboutContinued discussion on whether any of the Mt. Hood ski areas would ever land on Indy; redemption and sales totals versus expectations for this past ski season; how the Indy Pass works from a business point of view; how Indy is able to sign headliners like Powder Mountain and Jay Peak, which could easily align with the Epic or Ikon passes; how Cannon kept visits high even as the mountain added an enormous number of blackout dates; White Pass finds the Epkon refugees; the power of Brundage and Tamarack as a combined destination; other popular Indy combos; the New England state that will definitely get a new full Indy Pass partner before next season; expansion potential in New York; the chances of Jay staying with Indy post-sale (whenever that happens); why Indy Pass prices will stay steady for 2022-23; why the Indy Pass processing fee exists and why it’s here to stay; the Indy Switch Pass; untangling the spaghetti bowl of last year’s blackout dates; fixing the Saturday problem; thoughts on the recent additions of Kelly Canyon, Bluewood, and Ski Sawmill; the surprising appeal of Swain; finally breaking into Colorado, with Sunlight; the number of Indy Pass visits that originate out of state; thoughts on Japan; dispensing with the resort target number; losing Marmot Basin; the genesis and purpose of the Allied Resorts program; begging Doug to shift Burke to full partner status; and why Indy began including cross-country ski areas and how the response has been so far.          Why I thought that now was a good time for this interviewSince it debuted in 2008, the Epic Pass has both held steady and constantly evolved. Its premise, from the beginning, was fairly basic: unlimited access to all Vail Resorts, all the time. It launched with six mountains, and now includes access to 9,000. But almost annually, Vail has added some innovation or another: the Epic Local Pass, various versions of the Epic Day Pass, local and midweek passes, a massive lodging and on-mountain discount program, the Epic Mix tracking app, a payment plan, etc. Some of these innovations were more useful than others, but every year, we can expect something new. And that’s in addition to all the extra ski areas.Vail, skiing’s imperial fleet, rippling with aircraft carriers and battleships and submarines, is well equipped to dream up such annual salvos of newness. It’s impressive that Indy, with a staff that would be insufficient to captain a 30-foot fishing boat, has orchestrated a commando version of this evolution. The 2019 Indy Pass cost $199 and delivered two days each at 34 ski areas. There were no blackouts and no product variation (a few partners offered an add-on pass). The next year: 52 ski areas, plus a $99 kids pass and a $129 add-on pass, available uniformly across all partner ski areas. The Indy+ Pass and a payment plan also debuted. 2021 brought a (probably too large, Fish now admits) price increase, but access to 66 ski areas at launch and an additional 17 by December, including four in Japan.  By the time Indy confirmed its 2022-23 lineup last month, the roster stood at 83 downhill partners. An ambitious cross-country initiative seeks to add more than 30 Nordic partners by winter, and the standalone XC pass is just $69 (all Indy Pass holders get the XC days). And the Allied Resorts program, announced earlier this week, ensures that nearly any ski area that’s interested can fold itself into this nationally marketed network. Fish also held prices steady, upped the renewal discount, and introduced the Indy Switch Pass to encourage Epkon snobs to reconsider.There was plenty to talk about, is my point. And Fish, as always, accommodated, on one condition: for the love of God can we keep it to an hour?Questions I wish I’d askedI had meant to ask Doug about the possibility of pre-loading Indy tickets onto resort’s RFID cards, but I didn’t get to it. While he said that such integrations were “not practical,” he did provide the following statement, teasing a pretty cool tech upgrade coming for the season after next:In partnership with our tech partner Entabeni Systems, we will be rolling out an app for the 2023-24 season [I incorrectly indicated on Twitter earlier this week that this feature would be available for next ski season] that will allow our passholders to carry their pass on their phones. Among other features, it will contain a scannable QR code that can be read at the ticket window, eliminating the need for looking them up in our system.This app can be deployed without passing any additional costs on to our customers which we’d have to do if we issued a physical pass.What we got wrongI intimated that Powder Mountain was outside of the Wasatch Mountains, but the ski area in fact lies within this mountain range. I also suggested that Winter Park was a blacked-out mountain on the Ikon Pass, which it is not (on any version of the product other than the Ikon Session Pass). Doug also referred to “Wintergreen,” West Virginia. He meant Winterplace. Wintergreen is in Virginia, and is not an Indy Pass partner. Doug also referred to the marketing director of Sunlight, Colorado as “Tony Hawks” – his name is Troy Hawks, and you can (and should) follow him on Twitter here, since he’s the man who brough Indy Pass to Colorado.Why you should buy the Indy PassIn my head, gas is always a dollar a gallon. Even decades after that fleeting era when I pushed shopping carts for $4.35 an hour and drove a rusty pick-up, any sum over $15 to fill my gas tank baffles me. Candy bars are forever lodged at 35 cents, Hostess cupcakes at 55 cents – such were the prices when I would peddle my Huffy to the neighborhood Total in the 1980s.I’m sure there’s a name for this pricing nostalgia. Whatever it’s called, the first best thing about the Indy Pass has become a liability, as It-Used-to-Cost-$199 Bro forever peppers social media with his waxings of this bygone era. “When the Indy Pass came out, it was under $200 and there were no blackouts,” he will complain. “And it came with a pair of Volkls and a free Subaru. Now it costs $279, there’s all kinds of blackouts, and the courtesy ‘vehicle’ is just a Shetland pony without a saddle. It’s all going to hell!”Bros across America need to let it go. Yes, last year’s price jump was a little extreme. Fish admits as much in the interview. But it is still a very good deal – had it debuted at $279 with its current roster, it would seem like the greatest thing ever. That’s because it is. The glory in the Indy Pass is not in what it was – a coalition of 34 broadly distributed resorts – but in what it has become and is transforming into. We’re closing in on 100 partners, and we’ll likely blow right past that by the Fourth of July. God bless America. This is one damn fine product.There is one more dumbass Bro out there that befuddles Indy’s ascension: It’s-Not-Worth-It Bro. It’s-Not-Worth-It Bro’s narrative goes something like this: yes, it’s cool that Indy put all these mountains on one pass, but they’re not the sort of ski resorts that are “worth” traveling to Montana/Idaho/Utah for or anything.I beg your pardon? Scroll back to the chart at the top of this article. Red Lodge: 2,400 vertical feet, 1,635 acres, 250 inches of annual snowfall. Powder Mountain: 2,205 vert/8,464 acres (3,000 lift-served)/400 inches. Brundage: 1,921/1,920/320. Castle: 2,833/3,592/354. Exactly which district of Narnia do you call home if these numbers leave you yawning?There are a lot of good reasons to buy an Indy Pass: you live within a few hours of a half dozen or more partners and are looking for a reasonably priced family winter. You have an Epkon pass but are leary of voyaging through the gates of Mount Snow/Keystone/Mammoth/Crystal on a midwinter Saturday. You’ve already visited every high-speed demo center on the continent and are looking for something different. You’re Van Life Bro and want to ski an entire winter for less than five dollars. You want to support skiing’s equivalent of craft beer (only, in this case, the indie label is a lot less expensive). Or you just love skiing and everything about it, and you want to understand this dynamic world to the fullest extent possible.There are good reasons not to buy the Indy Pass, too: you don’t travel much, the mountains are too far, you are happy with your local, you dad’s private plane is too big to land at any mountain town airport other than Eagle. But if your goal is lots of skiing, and if you don’t exactly need a home mountain and have a little flexibility to travel, if you value novelty and don’t mind the occasional mile-long Hall double chair ride to the summit, then lock this thing in before prices increase on May 18.More Indy Pass on The Storm Skiing Podcast:Snow Ridge, New York GM Nick MirBeaver Mountain, Utah owner Travis SeeholzerLittle Switzerland, Nordic Mountain, The Rock Co-Owner Rick SchmitzTamarack, Idaho President Scott TurlingtonShawnee Mountain, Pennsylvania CEO Nick FredericksChina Peak, California CEO Tim CoheeLutsen and Granite Peak Owner Charles SkinnerCaberfae Peaks, Michigan Co-Owner and GM Tim MeyerWhaleback Executive Director Jon Hunt (recorded pre-Indy)Titus Mountain Co-Owner Bruce Monette Jr. (recorded pre-Indy)Indy Pass Founder Doug Fish (April 27, 2021 – 2nd appearance)West Mountain, New York owners Sara and Spencer Montgomery (recorded pre-Indy)Montage Mountain Managing Owner Charles Jefferson (recorded pre-Indy)Granite Peak, Wisconsin GM Greg FisherWaterville Valley, New Hampshire GM Tim SmithBolton Valley, Vermont President Lindsay DesLauriersBousquet GM and ownership (recorded pre-Indy)Saddleback, Maine GM Andy Shepard (recorded pre-Indy)Jay Peak, Vermont GM Steve WrightCannon Mountain, New Hampshire GM John DeVivoIndy Pass Founder Doug Fish (May 31, 2020 – 1st appearance)Berkshire East and Catamount, Massachusetts Owner Jon SchaeferBurk Mountain GM Kevin Mack (recorded pre-Indy)Magic Mountain, Vermont President Geoff HathewayThe Storm publishes year-round, and guarantees 100 articles per year. This is article 51/100 in 2022. Want to send feedback? Reply to this email and I will answer (unless you sound insane). You can also email skiing@substack.com. Get full access to The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast at www.stormskiing.com/subscribe

Prayers for Your Day
Count the cost of now

Prayers for Your Day

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 12:17


Repent and forgive now

The Todd Herman Show
Does The US Economy Stand A Chance? Zach Abraham joins - Episode 119 - Hour 2 US Economy Zach Abraham

The Todd Herman Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 52:25


It will take a miracle for our economy to survive the attacks it has undergone. But, will God step-in to save an economy of a Nation that has turned its back on Him? THE SCRIPTURE & SCRIPTURAL RESOURCES:  Jeremiah 6:16 [NIV] - "This is what the LORD says: "Stand at the crossroads and look; ask for the ancient paths, ask where the good way is, and walk in it, and you will find rest for your souls. But you said, 'We will not walk in it.' Jeremiah 6:14-15  14 They dress the wound of my people     as though it were not serious. ‘Peace, peace,' they say,     when there is no peace. 15 Are they ashamed of their detestable conduct?     No, they have no shame at all;     they do not even know how to blush. So they will fall among the fallen;     they will be brought down when I punish them,” says the Lord. THE NEWS & COMMENT: [AUDIO] - Biden starts SCREAMING about food shortages... which are currently happening under his administration [AUDIO] - Bernie Sanders says Food Lines are a Good Thing [AUDIO] - Yellen - more abortions will save the economy [AUDIO] - To his credit, I guess, Joe Biden straight up told us he was going to do this to gas/energy prices and thus tank the entire economy in the final presidential debate of 2020. Remember? THE LISTENERS: Jason - Question for Zach. Will the feds do all they can to keep the economy somewhat stable for midterm elections? Well lot of people do not realize, is a cost of diesel right now. Diesel moves Freight. Cost of freight going through the roof. More inflation this summer on Goods. ---   ---   ---   --- Hi Todd, I've heard you initially on Rush and was thrilled when my coworker Jesse told me about your podcasts. I am a mail carrier so I'm blessed to have the seat time to listen.I've been on board since around episode 50 (ish). I've had a thought that's been eating at me for quite some time. When Donald Trump was in office and the flu with given name Covid broke out, I feel DT had the best interest of the country and was eager to fix things so he got the "shot" pushed thru quickly. Not something done in his best interest, but I also don't hold him accountable as he never forced a mandate. It was each individuals choice. I have chosen NOT to receive ANY shots and I also have never gotten the flu with given name covid. Fast forward to "vaccine " mandates and a now Radical Democrat Administration..... I've done some Bible reading over the years (not a lot) and the book of Revelation - Chapter 13 vs 11-18 speaks of the mark of the beast (666). I feel like the covid shot is a method being used to see how many "sheep" will follow for the future plan of implementing humans with the mark of the beast. I hear Zach A. and yourself talk about a paperless money future and I see so many ways implemented already to buy and sell products/goods without "money in hand" that quite honestly is making me a little frightened. I'd love to hear your thoughts on this. Am I crazy to think this way? Faithful, (hooked on Bonefrog coffee listener) Colleen aka Connie Staeck Gleason Wisconsin   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Marketplace Morning Report
How many jobs has the war in Ukraine cost?

Marketplace Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 7:37


From the BBC World Service: Ukraine’s former economy minister gives us a sense of the job losses the war has caused, and on the rebuilding plans already in progress. Also, the dollar shortage causing a crunch for Kenyan businesses. Your donation powers the journalism you rely on. Give today to support Marketplace Morning Report.

Marketplace All-in-One
How many jobs has the war in Ukraine cost?

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 7:37


From the BBC World Service: Ukraine’s former economy minister gives us a sense of the job losses the war has caused, and on the rebuilding plans already in progress. Also, the dollar shortage causing a crunch for Kenyan businesses.

Today with Claire Byrne
How much will the Wagatha Christie trial cost?

Today with Claire Byrne

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 7:46


Paul Tweed- International Media Lawyer

Main Street Magic - A Walt Disney World Podcast
460: The Cost of a Vacation (2022 Edition)

Main Street Magic - A Walt Disney World Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 71:51


Jeremy and Rhonda revisit one of their most popular episodes ever, the Cost of a Vacation and break down 2022 costs.Follow Us on Social MediaFacebook GroupFacebook: @MainStMagicTwitter: @MainStMagicInstagram: @MainStMagicVisit Us Onlinewww.MainStMagic.comwww.WonderlandCrew.comwww.MainStreetShirts.comVisit our Partnerswww.MSMFriends.comGet a FREE vacation quote to your favorite destinationChuck Marchetti, Main Street Magic TravelMainStMagicTravel.com for a free quoteThanks to TFresh Productions for our theme songFollow Travis on Instagram @tfresh_productions

Coffee Runs Deep
How Much Does It Cost To Start a Custom Coffee Trailer - Abide Coffee Co. - Nate Ghoens (Ep. 22)

Coffee Runs Deep

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 73:27


I had a blast speaking with my old buddy about the coffee trailer he and his wife just started. Although he does not roast coffee yet I wanted to have Nate on because I feel starting a coffee trailer or cart is great for coffee roasters who want to start selling their own coffee. Nate was very generous in providing his figures and numbers on how much it cost to start a coffee trailer and also how much you can make with a coffee trailer.  For me, it was highly motivating to hear about his journey. I am in the process of following this path and it is nice to hear others' experiences. It was also nice reconnecting with an old friend and over all things, because of coffee!  Best of luck to you brother!Please go and follow Abide Coffee Co. and if you are ever in the Destin, Florida area look them up. Follow them here where they give all the updates on where the trailer is going to be. IG: https://www.instagram.com/AbideCoffeeFL/?fbclid=IwAR3Mo12Y48I8lsBsR8jADjNG3WViYRIxt6ftSsUJdmw-F0OPgN3bVKniK0oFB:https://www.facebook.com/abidecoffeecoFavorites Coffee Books: Coffee Roasting Best Practices: https://amzn.to/38uRJih   (Deep in the weeds)The World Atlas of Coffee: https://amzn.to/3s4tiQg   (Overall view of the coffee stages)My Mic I use: Shure MV7 Mic: https://amzn.to/3fakq72Support the show

Christ Fellowship Baptist Church
Not For Snowflakes: The Cost of Christianity

Christ Fellowship Baptist Church

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 69:00


The Sonya Looney Show
How to Be Honest with Yourself to Get Unstuck with Britt Frank

The Sonya Looney Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 60:23


Britt Frank - therapist, teacher, speaker, and trauma specialist - focuses her work on helping others who feel stuck. Her life's work developed out of a history of drug addiction, love addiction, borderline personality disorder, depression, an eating disorder and anxiety. It sounds like a lot, and it is, but her approach to her work comes from a deep understanding of what it feels like to be stuck.  Britt tried numerous things to get better, and got worse, but once she was on the path to recovery, she found purpose - to dismantle the mental health and motivation myths that keep us stuck, sick, and stressed.  Her recently released book - The Science of Stuck - is a research-based tool kit for moving past what's holding you back in life, love, and in work.  Britt's goal is to educate, empower, and equip people to transform their most persistent and long-standing patterns of thinking and doing. In this conversation, Britt and Sonya talk about how to get unstuck, celebrate successes, use past experiences to help us now and more. Key Takeaways   How to get out of being stuck How to celebrate successes Using “and thinking” instead of “but thinking” Nine benefits to staying stuck What role does shame play in keeping us stuck Cost-benefit analysis of behaviors How can we digest past traumas to help us now Myths about adult friendships Shadow Intelligence SQ Favorite five-minute challenges  

Columbia Presbyterian Church
2 Corinthians 12:15a "The Cost of a Soul"

Columbia Presbyterian Church

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 24:17


Morning Shift Podcast
Can We Get A Break On The Cost Of Everything?

Morning Shift Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 21:32


April saw a price spike of 0.3%, which is a breath of fresh air from March's striking 1.2% jump. Experts say that we're past the peak of inflation, so does this mean there's light at the end of the tunnel? Reset checks in with prices in housing, food, gas, and more. For more Reset interviews, subscribe to this podcast. And please give us a rating, it helps other listeners find us. For more about Reset, go to wbez.org and follow us on Twitter @WBEZReset

Hire Power Radio
How Hiring the Wrong Person Eats Profits with Rocky Lalvani

Hire Power Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 25:30


We often hear data on how much bad hire costs you and your company. About 3x the person's annual salary. But how much did the interview process itself cost? For a startup to make a hire, the company spends about 73 total hours interviewing. With the most significant cost being 30 hours of the production team's combined time. And this is assuming that 6 people make it through a full interview to get to the hire. We have to ask ourselves, can we really afford to lose almost 4 days of productive activity to interview? Roughly $9,855 per role, not including candidate marketing or recruiting fees.  As a small business, the answer is NO! Guest Bio: Rocky Lalvani of Profit Comes First, serves as Chief Profitability Adviser for business owners. He teaches them how to ensure they get paid and make profit a priority! As a certified Profit First Professional he implements Mike Michalowicz's Profit First System.   Rocky started with nothing when his parents immigrated to the United States when he was two years old, and his parents were in their 40's. It was his parents' second time starting over in life as they moved here to experience the American dream.  In spite of a lot of struggles and his mom passing away when Rocky was 7, he has been able to achieve financial and life success. Rocky loves to share his journey and inspire others to achieve their dreams even faster. Today we discuss: Why it is critical to understand what interviewing costs  How to maximize your team's time with structure Challenges today? Employees are the major cost for the business  Employee should provide a return for the business Return of Cost of person (taxes, unemployment)  Inefficiency does not show up anywhere on the p&l Wealth is built on the balance sheet! Why is this important to the company? Costs to the company hiring  Reduces morale Loose customer  Nobody is tracking interview or training costs  Hard costs that are very difficult to figure out As a client- doesn't want to do business with a company that hires wrong (leadership issue) Rick's Nuggets Team time waste! People who meet the team must be positioned properly Demonstrate strong leadership in protecting time How do we solve the problem?  Mission values purpose This is the step most business owners skip! Or in their head, but no one else knows Hire to it Have to live it Hire in alignment with mission, values, purpose Not who you like Having a interview process Understanding the real cost Bad Hire- Employee does not provide any value Mistakes  Morale for everyone else Lose clients/ client trust Example Costco vs. Sam's Gross profit / Total payroll including taxes For every $1 in payroll returns x$ in gross profit Measure & Know Need to be making at least 2X payroll It all comes back to leadership! We change the accounting formula of Sales - Expenses = Profit to Sales - Profit = Expenses.  This ensures Profit comes first! (PS. It's not about money at all costs, people come before money!) Rick's Nuggets Values - most important Protect time costs Structure interview Each step is a decision Only progress value aligned, well positioned & accomplished people Decisions must have evidence to back Eliminate uncertaintyAssign interview questions Prepare all for success  Key Takeaways that the Audience can plug into their business today! (Value): Is mission vision purpose written down & do your employees know it? Cost of a bad hire for you? How much profit do your employees bring you? Guest Links LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/rocky-lalvani/ Company: https://profitcomesfirst.com/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/profit-comes-first/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/rockylalvani Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/richersoul/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/richer.soul/?hl=en Blog: http://richersoul.com/ Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/profit-answer-man-implementing-the-profit-first-system/id1508245322 Host Links: LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/rick-girard-07722/ Company: https://www.stridesearch.com/ Authored:  "Healing Career Wounds"  https://amzn.to/3tGbtre HireOS inquiry: rick@stridesearch.com Podcast: https://www.hirepowerradio.com YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCeEJm9RoCfu8y7AJpaxkxqQ/featured Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rick.girard.5 Twitter: https://twitter.com/rick_girard?lang=en Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/rickgirard1/?hl=en Show Sponsor: www.stridesearch.com

The Annie Frey Show Podcast
AFS Gameshow! Does it cost less than we are spending in Ukraine?

The Annie Frey Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 10:33


Ryan Wiggins presents the guessing game....Does it cost less or more than the $40B Ukraine Spending Bill? Wiggins presents various "items"  to Annie and Brad that they then guess if it costs more or less than 40 Billion Dollars. 

Here & Now
The environmental cost of deep sea mining; Delays in routine cancer screenings

Here & Now

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 41:46


Electric vehicles and other new technologies that may help alleviate climate change sometimes rely on rare metals and minerals found at the bottom of the ocean. Professor Douglas McCauley is against deep-sea mining. He joins us. And, Dr. Brian Englum talks about how the pandemic-caused delays in routine cancer screenings are leading to more advanced cancers that are harder to treat.

Onto Waveland: A show about the Chicago Cubs
Will Cubs' injuries force prospects up & at what cost? + deadened ball discourse

Onto Waveland: A show about the Chicago Cubs

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 35:17


The trio leaps into the show by discussing the discourse surrounding the deadened balls. Are random Twitter stats more anecdotal and don't paint a full picture? Chicago has experienced its fair share of bumps and bruises this season, both figurative and literally. Could the Cubs tap prospects for their Majors' debut to fill the shoes of those injured, and is there harm in doing so? Follow Brett on Twitter: @BleacherNation Follow Sahadev on Twitter: @sahadevsharma Follow Patrick on Twitter: @PJ_Mooney Email us: wavelandathletic@gmail.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Football Outside the Box Podcast
Ep.22 - Noah: "The ref cost the game" & PL Preview

Football Outside the Box Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 35:31


Join us as the hosts react to the 3-0 loss inflicted on Arsenal by Tottenham to reignite the top 4 race. The hosts also preview the Premier League actions in both ends of the table. Let us know your thoughts on our Facebook page! Don't forget to like our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/fotbpod

Designer Discussions
How designers can make brand partnerships work for them

Designer Discussions

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 31:25


This episode focuses on an aspect of brand partnerships that is widely underreported. Mirjam talks to our guest Shanin Polce, a marketing strategist who runs the marketing for PPG/Speakman, about the different ways designers can partner with brands and the benefits of collaborating with smaller companies.● Different kinds of brand partnerships○ Paid influencer partnerships (often with bloggers)○ Licensing partnerships (with high-profile designers)○ “Grassroots partnerships” where brands and interests alig● Why “smaller” brands are interested in partnering with designers○ Brand positioning○ Exposure○ True long-term partnerships, brand advocates○ Content, especially images!● Benefits for designers to seek out partnerships with brands○ Product discounts○ Access to new products○ Social/PR exposure and other marketing○ Cost sharing of photography, or other financial incentives● How to initiate a relationship○ Find PR/marketing contact and reach out to introduce yourself○ Tag brand on social media when you use their products● Caveat○ Arrangement must be fair for both sides!If you would like to get the links and show notes for this episode, click on the link below: https://www.designerdiscussions.com/episodes/episode-42-How-designers-can-make-brand-partnerships-work-for-them

The Byron York Show
Biden's Inflation Fantasy

The Byron York Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 12:12


The reason President Joe Biden delivered a speech on inflation on Tuesday was that he knew the government would release the latest statistics on inflation Wednesday morning and he knew the news would be bad. Might as well try to get ahead of things. And now that the numbers are out, the news is indeed bad.

The Appraiser Coach Podcast
746 Opportunity Cost

The Appraiser Coach Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 13:19


Conscious or subconscious, we deal with the decisions of opportunity cost every day. How does it affect your appraisal business and, ultimately, the money you make? Dustin explores it today.

Two Smart Assets
Free Up Liquidity and Improve Cash Flow with Cost Segregation with Erik Oliver

Two Smart Assets

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 27:03


Join Daniel Nickles with his guest Erik Oliver as we discuss how cost segregation frees up your liquidity and improve cash flow as a real estate investor. As the cost segregation expert that he is, Erik gives us a detailed overview of what cost segregation could mean for anyone investing in real estate. In his own simple terms, cost segregation is basically just your property's appreciation on high speed. Erik explains what cost segregation means, what bonus depreciation is in relation to cost segregation, and the basics of cost segregation for newly closed deals.  In this episode you will learn:  Cost segregation increases the benefits you get by owning real estate  Bonus depreciation is cost segregation on steroids  You don't have to do cost segregation right after buying a property  The documents necessary for cost segregation  What questions to ask a cost segregation expert  About Erik Oliver:  Erik Oliver is the marketing director of Cost Segregation Authority.  Cost Segregation is used by commercial building owners to increase cash flow by accelerating depreciation. Depending on the type of building, there can be anywhere from 20 to 35% and sometimes more of the depreciable basis that can accelerated, translating into tens of thousands if not hundreds of thousands of dollars in current year tax savings. Consider the value of having and being able to use those tax dollars today vs. spreading them out over 27.5 or 39 years.   Cost Segregation can be used at pretty much anytime during the cycle of building ownership, including new construction, current acquisitions, previous acquisitions going back as much as ten or fifteen years, large improvement projects, following a step in basis from a change of ownership or estate transfer, and sometimes even at disposition to offset some of a capital gain.   Cost Segregation is an engineering-based analysis of a building's interior, exterior and land improvements in order to identify, measure and quantify assets that are considered personal property or land improvements under the federal tax code. Those assets are then re-classifying in order to accelerate their depreciation.   Connect with Erik Oliver on:  Website: https://costsegauthority.com  Email: erik@costsegauthority.com  Connect with Two Smart Assets on:  Website: https://twosmartassets.com/  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TwoSmartAssets/  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/twosmartassets/  YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5b8x2o3ByaPBcz5Lkev7uw   

Zora's Daughters
S2, E15 What In The World?!

Zora's Daughters

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 83:22


In today's episode, we are too TIED to repeat ourselves! There is simultaneously so much to talk about and little we haven't said in previous episodes, so we're treating this as a moment to hold space, be in community with each other and you all, and really, just rant about what in the world is going on?! You'll hear an update from Brendane and Alyssa (and why she's joining one of the industrial complexes they mentioned in the last episode!). Discussed today: Roe vs. Wade and the Supreme Court leak Kevin Samuels The Met Gala Previous episodes to help you make sense of our current moment: S1, E6 Deathcraft Country S2, E5 The Emancipation of ZD: Black Feminist Futurity S2, E12 Villain Origin Story S2, E1 Liberation Don't Cost a Thang S2, E4 Fleeing the Plantation ZD merch available here and the syllabus for ZD 202 is here! Let us know what you thought of the episode @zorasdaughters on Instagram and @zoras_daughters on Twitter! Transcript will be available on our website here.

Bankless
Betting the Fund on the Merge | Hal Press, North Rock Digital

Bankless

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 99:24


What happens when a guy becomes so convicted on ETH that he bets HIS ENTIRE FUND on the Ethereum Proof-of-Stake merge? How much alpha is there in the All Core Devs calls? How should YOU play the merge?  Hal Press of North Rock Digital joins us as we discuss how to value tokens, and how to trade the biggest moment in crypto history. ------  OPOLIS | Sign Up to Get 1000 $WORK and 1000 $BANK https://bankless.cc/Opolis ------  SUBSCRIBE TO NEWSLETTER:          https://newsletter.banklesshq.com/   ️ SUBSCRIBE TO PODCAST:                 http://podcast.banklesshq.com/   ------ BANKLESS SPONSOR TOOLS:  ️ ARBITRUM | SCALED ETHEREUM https://bankless.cc/Arbitrum  ACROSS | BRIDGE TO LAYER 2 https://bankless.cc/Across  ALTO IRA | TAX-FREE CRYPTO https://bankless.cc/AltoIRA  AAVE V3 | LEND & BORROW CRYPTO https://bankless.cc/aave ️ MAKER DAO | THE DAI STABLECOIN  https://bankless.cc/MakerDAO   BRAVE | THE BROWSER NATIVE WALLET https://bankless.cc/Brave ------ Topics Covered: 0:00 Intro 7:00 What Sets ETH Apart 18:09 Revenue and Cost 24:50 DeFi Utility 31:00 Blockchain Expenses 35:45 Inflating and Revenue 39:48 Supply and Demand 45:56 ETH vs Alt Layer 1s 56:06 Will the Price Lag? 1:03:36 Who Leads the Market? 1:05:35 Modeling Ethereum 1:11:45 ETH Staking Numbers 1:20:00 Wen Merge? 1:30:18 Trading the Merge 1:35:50 Closing ------ Resources: Hal Press: https://twitter.com/NorthRockLP?s=20&t=ZONa4ZJl5kcxbE43zFZKBg Crypto Fees: https://cryptofees.info/ Nillion: https://www.nillion.com/ The Ethereum Thesis: https://twitter.com/NorthRockLP/status/1484926691990556675?s=20&t=ZONa4ZJl5kcxbE43zFZKBg ----- Not financial or tax advice. This channel is strictly educational and is not investment advice or a solicitation to buy or sell any assets or to make any financial decisions. This video is not tax advice. Talk to your accountant. Do your own research. Disclosure. From time-to-time I may add links in this newsletter to products I use. I may receive commission if you make a purchase through one of these links. Additionally, the Bankless writers hold crypto assets. See our investment disclosures here: https://newsletter.banklesshq.com/p/bankless-disclosures 

Yoga | Birth | Babies
How Much Does It Cost To Have A Baby In The US? with Dr. Ashley Burkman

Yoga | Birth | Babies

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 48:03


Having a baby is expensive, but how much does it really cost? Even with insurance supporting you, there can be a number of surprising costs. So how can parents to be plan for the bill?  In today's episode of Yoga|Birth|Babies I speak to naturopathic doctor Dr. Ashley Burkman whose personal experiences navigating health care costs have led her to speak on the topic of health care costs. Dr. Burkman discusses understanding what is covered by insurance (and how to figure this out), the No Surprises Act, deductibles, lowering the cost of birth, what to do if you don't have insurance, and how to deal with medical bills.  New parents shouldn't be surprised by a big bill from birth. This conversation will help you figure out how to estimate costs so that your early days as a parent aren't overshadowed by bills. Support Our Sponsors:  Ritual: Turn healthy habits into a ritual. For 10% off your first 3 months go to ritual.com/ybb Boober: Looking for a  lactation support, birth doulas, mental health therapists, and postpartum doulas. Use the code PYC to get 10% off your first service at www.getboober.com Prenatal Yoga Center: YBB podcast listeners- join Deb for class! Take $10 off an 8 class or One Month Unlimited yoga class package with the code ybb10 Get your package here! Get the most out of each episode by checking out the show notes with links, resources and other related podcasts at: prenatalyogacenter.com Don't forget to grab your FREE guide, 5 Simple Solutions to the Most Common Pregnancy Pains HERE  If you love what you've been listening to, please leave a rating and review! Yoga| Birth|Babies  To connect with Deb and the PYC Community:  Instagram & Facebook: @prenatalyogacenter Youtube: Prenatal Yoga Center Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

So Money with Farnoosh Torabi
1355: The Cost Benefits of Outsourcing with Jenny Blake

So Money with Farnoosh Torabi

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 34:24


Jenny Blake is the author of the new book Free Time: Lose the Busywork, Love Your Business. On the show, Farnoosh and Jenny talk about the power of outsourcing, how to easily free up time in your day while still moving closer to your goals and some of the best tech resources for supporting our busy lives. Whether you're an entrepreneur, parent or a determined human living through the stress of 2022 (or all of the above), this episode is for you! More about Jenny: She launched her business in 2011 after five years at Google and two years at polling start-up, YouGov America. She is the author of many books, including: Life After College and Pivot. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The MFCEO Project
290. Andy & DJ CTI: Companies Cover Abortion Travel Cost, Clarence Thomas Hits Back & Biden's Disinformation Board

The MFCEO Project

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 57:44


In today's episode, Andy & DJ discuss the list of companies offering to cover travel costs for out-of-state abortions, Clarence Thomas' statement that the Supreme Court will not be bullied because a mob disagrees with its rulings, and the conflict of interest with President Biden's new disinformation board.

Rich Zeoli
The Economy Not Roe is Driving Voters (Full Zeoli Show 05-09-22)

Rich Zeoli

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 184:50


6:02-NEWS 6:10-Cost and supply of baby formula is at a crisis level  6:40-Republican voter turnout is expected to be higher now amid the Supreme Court leak regarding Roe v. Wade 6:45-A big announcement on the Zeoli Show!  7:01-NEWS 7:10-The third candidate for Senator of Pennsylvania that is catching attention for Republicans 7:32-The #MeToo movement amid the Johnny Depp-Amber Heard defamation trial  7:43-Depp could lose the trial but win back Hollywood 7:45-CUT SHEET | criminal defense attorney Sara Azari doesn't believe Amber Heard's testimony is truthful | Joe Biden reminisces about eating lunch with segregationists |  8:02-Could a loss of a Trump-endorsed candidate be a repudiation of former President Trump  8:10-Elizabeth Warren confronted about forgiving student loans for people who already paid it off  8:15-Bill Mahr and Paul Begala mock Warren's plan to forgive or cancel student loans as a way to piss off the working class  8:23-NEWS 8:35-Candidate for Lt. Governor of Pennsylvania Clarice Schillinger joined Rich to discuss to role of the Lieutenant Governor in Pennsylvania   9:01-NEWS 9:10-The ultimate nap is only 10-20 minutes  9:14-How many friends does the average person really need?. 9:18-Dave Chappelle is not happy the LA Sheriff is not pressing federal charges against attacker  9:25-Elon Musk's plan to quintuple Twitter's revenue  9:43- CUT SHEET | Bernie Sanders slam Amazon for attempts to prevent workers unionizing | Speaker Pelosi pushes back on Governor Newsom's comments on Democrats going "missing" over abortion rights | Jen Psaki defends the ethical questions surrounding her move to MSNBC |  9:55-Final Thoughts Photo: Getty Images

Rich Zeoli
Americans Are Facing a Baby Formula Shortage Crisis

Rich Zeoli

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 39:31


Zeoli Show Hour 1:  In the first hour of the Zeoli Show, Rich discussed the crisis level shortage of baby formula impacting American families. Families are struggling badly with cost of living from gas to formula now and President Biden has yet to address the issue.  6:02-NEWS 6:10-Cost and supply of baby formula is at a crisis level  6:40-Republican voter turnout is expected to be higher now amid the Supreme Court leak regarding Roe v. Wade 6:45-A big announcement on the Zeoli Show!  Photo by: Getty Images