Podcasts about Melbourne

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  • 11,775PODCASTS
  • 58,795EPISODES
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  • Jul 8, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about Melbourne

Show all podcasts related to melbourne

Latest podcast episodes about Melbourne

Selador Recordings Podcasts
*SELADOR PREMIERE* Sam Hopgood - Flow

Selador Recordings Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 4:35


What do we want? Top tunes! When do we want them? Now!! Well, pleasure to be of assistance, step right this way… We, the custodians of all things Seladorian, purveyors of only the good stuff, are delighted to welcome Mr Sam Hopgood back aboard the good ship Selador. Hot on the heels of his stellar contributions to our last two Showcase Compilation releases (‘Waiting' on 2021's ‘The 14th Adventure' / ‘Trust' on our 2022 opener ‘The Phenomenal 15th'), the man from Melbourne now steps up with own solo double header. “Two tracks with simple melodic motifs that twist, bend and build into epic dance floor moments,” is how Sam himself describes the choice cuts you have before you and boy, does he deliver. Contemporary club music of the highest order, ‘Flow' gets down to business from the get-go. As Sam says, it twists, bends and builds like a theme park ride on acid – well, Sam said the first bit, we embellished ;) ‘Undulation' then brings a crisp metallic sheen with a pulsing synth line leading the charge before sci-fi squelches and muted vocal clips enter the fray and the whole deal gets bent in and out of shape. All beautifully executed. Yowsah. Team Selador – in full flow x

Selador Recordings Podcasts
*SELADOR PREMIERE* Sam Hopgood - Undulation

Selador Recordings Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 4:00


What do we want? Top tunes! When do we want them? Now!! Well, pleasure to be of assistance, step right this way… We, the custodians of all things Seladorian, purveyors of only the good stuff, are delighted to welcome Mr Sam Hopgood back aboard the good ship Selador. Hot on the heels of his stellar contributions to our last two Showcase Compilation releases (‘Waiting' on 2021's ‘The 14th Adventure' / ‘Trust' on our 2022 opener ‘The Phenomenal 15th'), the man from Melbourne now steps up with own solo double header. “Two tracks with simple melodic motifs that twist, bend and build into epic dance floor moments,” is how Sam himself describes the choice cuts you have before you and boy, does he deliver. Contemporary club music of the highest order, ‘Flow' gets down to business from the get-go. As Sam says, it twists, bends and builds like a theme park ride on acid – well, Sam said the first bit, we embellished ;) ‘Undulation' then brings a crisp metallic sheen with a pulsing synth line leading the charge before sci-fi squelches and muted vocal clips enter the fray and the whole deal gets bent in and out of shape. All beautifully executed. Yowsah. Team Selador – in full flow x

Principle of Hospitality - The Podcast
Ep 196 - Replay - Sharing Italian heritage through a true love for pasta making with Piera and Federica from Piera Pasta Fresca

Principle of Hospitality - The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 67:35


Ep 196 - Sharing Italian heritage through a true love for pasta making with Piera and Federica from Piera Pasta Fresca Piera Pasta Fresca is a pasta business supplying Fresh Pasta to restaurants and individuals all around Melbourne.  Their founder Piera aims to share her Bolognese roots with the Australian community, through her love for Pasta Having arrived in Australia with her husband in 2010 on Valentines Day she realised that her love for making pasta was undeniable. She is now one of the most well-known pasta makers in Melbourne and her dream of starting her own pasta business finally came true last year. Welcome to the program, Piera Pagnoni and Federica Tassini the sales and operations manager on this week's podcast.   In this podcast we talk about how the business started in February 2020 and has only gone to another level, how to produce the best pasta using the simplest methods, Piera's thoughts on apprenticeships in hospitality, and how they have built a secret pasta club supplying some of Victoria's best venues. Please find our guest information here: Website:  https://pierapastafresca.com.au/ (https://pierapastafresca.com.au/) Instagram:  https://www.instagram.com/pierapastafresca/?hl=en (https://www.instagram.com/pierapastafresca/) Please find us here at POH: Website: https://principleofhospitality.com/ (https://principleofhospitality.com/) Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/principle_of_hospitality/ (https://www.instagram.com/principle_of_hospitality/) Thanks to our supporter for this season - https://www.mryum.com/ (Mr Yum) https://www.mryum.com/split-and-pay (https://www.mryum.com/split-and-pay) Mentioned in this episode: Mr Yum - Split & Pay Split the bill, pay the bill - their way Allow guests to quickly split the bill by a percentage, item or custom amount and make payments their way including credit card, Apple Pay, Google Pay, Afterpay and use partial cash payments and vouchers. Simple! https://principle-of-hospitality.captivate.fm/https-www-mryumcom-split-and-pay (Mr Yum - Split & Pay ) Mr Yum - Split & Pay Split the bill, pay the bill - their way Allow guests to quickly split the bill by a percentage, item or custom amount and make payments their way including credit card, Apple Pay, Google Pay, Afterpay and use partial cash payments and vouchers. Simple! https://principle-of-hospitality.captivate.fm/https-www-mryumcom-split-and-pay (Mr Yum - Split & Pay )

Toddler Tunes
Our Ears | Fun Songs for Toddlers | Baby Music | English for Children | Activites for Kids

Toddler Tunes

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 8:44


Follow The Tambourine Social on Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/artist/5nHEzEXgMjDsR58ZMG4aHq?si=gAfWYVtzRJ-aJfmyfXTcXA&nd=1 And on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thetambourinesocial/ Hello friends, today we're going to sing songs about all about our ears! Are you ready to sing with me? 

Answer Me This!
An Important Bulletin from the Zaltzwick Corporation

Answer Me This!

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 3:10


Hello! Helen and Martin are on tour with the new Allusionist live show in Australia and Aotearoa New Zealand. Imagine the fun facty bits of AMT minus the tricky personal dilemmas or drunk people phoning up asking about poo. Come and see them! They're playing Canberra, Melbourne, Adelaide and Sydney in July, and Wanaka, Dunedin, Christchurch, Wellington and Auckland in August. Dates and tickets are at .

Asia Rising
Public event: Sleepwalk to War: The Australia-US alliance in Asia

Asia Rising

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 61:00


Australia has a strong alliance with America, one that has remained unwavering through changes of leadership and turbulent international developments. While agreements such as AUKUS and the Quad have strengthened our position in the region, it has come at the cost of relations with other states in the region and could in the future draw us into conflict. Where does this leave our future security and prosperity in Asia? Is there a better way to navigate the disruption caused by China's rise? A Melbourne event to discuss Sleepwalk to War, a new Quarterly Essay by Hugh White. Panel: - Professor Hugh White (Emeritus Professor of Strategic Studies, Strategic and Defence Studies Centre, Australian National University) - Dr Emma Shortis (School of Global, Urban and Social Studies, RMIT) - Professor Andrew O'Neil (Acting Dean, Griffith Graduate Research School, Griffith University) - Associate Professor Bec Strating (Director, La Trobe Asia) (Chair) Recorded at the La Trobe University City Campus on 30th June 2022.

The Long and The Short Of It
197. Self-Promotion

The Long and The Short Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 20:01


This week, Jen brings up an ides that initially elicits a groan from Pete, but they both end up with some aha moments about the (dreaded) topic of self-promotion.Specifically, in this episode Jen and Pete talk about:How might self-promotion be reframed?How are self-promotion and idea sharing linked?What are some ways to start a practice of positive self-promotion?To hear all Episodes and read full transcripts visit The Long and The Short Of It website: https://thelongandtheshortpodcast.com/.You can subscribe to our Box o' Goodies here (https://thelongandtheshortpodcast.com/) and receive a weekly email full of book and podcast recommendations, quotes, videos and other interesting things Jen and Pete are noodling on. To get in touch, send an email to: hello@thelongandtheshortpodcast.comLearn more about Pete's work here (https://humanperiscope.com/) and Jen's work here (https://jenwaldman.com/).

RNZ: Morning Report
Aotearoa food, wine part of glitzy display in trade mission dinner

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 2:26


Aotearoa's best food and wine was on display at a glamorous dinner on Melbourne's waterfront last night. The Prime Minister ended the second day of her trade mission in Australia wining and dinning at a special event showcasing New Zealand food and beverage. Political reporter Anneke Smith filed this report from a dining table in Melbourne.

Get Busy Livin’
14. What 101 Countries Teach Us About Creating Values with Dr. Mandeep Rai

Get Busy Livin’

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 36:02


Dr. Mandeep Rai is an international best-selling author, speaker, and broadcast journalist. She is the author of The Values Compass: What 101 Countries Teach Us About Purpose, Life and Leadership, which details how to incorporate values from other nations into your own life. She began her career working for JPMorgan, the United Nations, the European Commission, and grassroots NGOs before setting up the UAE's first media venture capital fund. Dr. Rai studied philosophy, politics, and economics (PPE) at the University of Melbourne, has an MSc in development from the London School of Economics, an MBA at London Business School, with a year at Harvard Business School and MIT, and she holds a PhD in global values.Through her extensive travels (185 countries, and counting!), Dr. Rai came to the conclusion that each country has a core value. For example, the United States is characterized by entrepreneurship, Canada by openness, South Africa by forgiveness, and Mexico by celebration. The book is equal parts travel guide, foreign language class, and history lesson all told through the lens of vivid, vibrant stories. In our conversation, Dr. Rai explains how she came up with the five primary values and shares a preview of a tool she's developing to help readers narrow down their own values. We also touch on daily practices for heart-centering and tapping into your own energy. Dr. Rai is a deeply spiritual person and connected with her community, and she shares a charity that is near and dear to her. The Jaskomal Foundation is about bringing awareness and education in regards to stem cell transplants and increasing the donor registration list. Listen to today's episode to hear our conversation about The Values Compass and more.Listen to the episode on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, TuneIn, Simplecast, or on your favorite podcast platform. Topics Covered:Notable leaders who have endorsed Dr. Rai's work, including His Holiness the Dalai LamaHow Dr. Rai makes every morning a ‘miracle morning' Looking at countries through their relationship to change, continuity, connection, community, and core values Dr. Rai's go-to practices for finding and discovering values so that you're always operating as your authentic self How Dr. Rai is working to build more awareness about the importance of understanding national valuesAbout our guest: Dr. Rai's WebsiteDr. Rai's LinkedInDr. Rai's InstagramThe Values Compass: What 101 Countries Teach Us About Purpose, Life and LeadershipThe Jaskomal FoundationSpecial Offers: If there's a topic or charity you want me to highlight on the podcast, DM it to me on Instagram @getbusylivin_podFollow Us:Get Busy Livin' Podcast WebsiteGet Busy Livin' Podcast Instagram Get Busy Livin' Podcast TwitterAnne's Website Anne's LinkedInAnne's InstagramAnne's Twitter

The Immunology Podcast
Ep. 32: “Memory T Cell Responses” Featuring Dr. Laura Mackay

The Immunology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 55:47


Dr. Laura Mackay is a Professor and Laboratory Head at the Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity at the University of Melbourne. She talks about her tissue-resident memory T cell research and her ongoing collaboration with Pfizer to identify and validate new targets for cancer therapy.

Pacific Beat
Will the US-led Blue Pacific initiative undermine Pacific institutions?

Pacific Beat

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 51:07


Academics raise concerns a United States-led initiative bringing together various nations to support "prosperity, resilience, and security" in the Pacific undermines regional decision making and institutions. Also, Pacific climate change activists call for Australia to support Vanuatu's bid to have the International Court of Justice issue an opinion on climate change.

RNZ: Checkpoint
ANZ boss says govt's immigration policy hitting businesses

RNZ: Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 3:13


A top banking executive says New Zealand's immigration settings are hampering businesses trying to bounce back post-pandemic. The comments were made to journalists during a business breakfast at ANZ's headquarters in Melbourne this morning. The bank's Aotearoa chief executive Antonia Watson wants the government to be more flexible in how it brings skilled labour into New Zealand - something the Prime Minister won't budge on. Our political reporter Anneke Smith is in Melbourne.  

All Things Narrative
Working with Communities through Collective Narrative Practices

All Things Narrative

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 60:55


Today I am honored to share my conversation with world-renowned Narrative Practitioner, teacher, and writer David Denborough. We discuss David's experience working in prisons, contributing to social actions, deconstructing masculinity, and his use of songs and folk culture to honor people's stories. Introduction (0:00) Developing a Passion for Narrative Practices (5:55) Rewriting Storylines of Identity in Prisons (11:56) Collective Narrative Practices & Folk Culture (26:50) "A Song of Survival" + Working at the Dulwich Centre (45:50) What Keeps David Going (53:30) David Denborough works as a community worker, teacher and writer/editor for Dulwich Centre. He is particularly interested in cross-cultural partnerships which limit the chances of psychological colonization and create possibilities for cross-cultural inventions, such as the Team of Life Narrative Approach and Tree of Life (with Ncazelo Ncube-Mlilo). These collective narrative methodologies seek to assist people to address the effects of traumatic experiences without having to speak directly about them. David is also vitally interested in how collective narrative practices can spark and/or sustain social movementand in projects that respond to racism and seek to strengthen social cohesion/inclusion.  Recent teaching/community assignments have included Brazil, Palestine, Singapore, Austria, Brazil, Hong Kong, Kurdistan (Iraq), India, Canada, Sri Lanka, Argentina, Chile, South Africa and a number of Aboriginal Australian communities. David is also a coordinator of the Master of Narrative Therapy and Community Work with the University of Melbourne where he is also involved in supporting/supervising graduate researchers. His songs in response to current social issues have received airplay throughout Australia and Canada. His books/publications include: Retelling the Stories of Our Lives Everyday Narrative Therapy to Draw Inspiration and Transform Experience and Collective Narrative Practice: Responding to Individuals, Groups and Communities Who Have Experienced Trauma. To learn more about David and his work, please visit The Dulwich Centre website.  All Things Narrative offers group workshops and 1-on-1 coaching that can empower you to live a meaningful story. Learn more and get your FREE consultation at: allthingsnarrative.com Like us on Facebook Follow us on Instagram Read my Film Diary (including reviews and rankings) on Letterboxd

RNZ: Nine To Noon
Media commentator Andrew Holden

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 10:49


Andrew looks at the newly-released draft legislation for Aotearoa New Zealand Public Media and why the commercial sector has greeted it with some unease. Stuff and The Spinoff have a new partnership as The Spinoff asks for more contributions, while NZME cracks 100-thousand paid digital subs and a new contract with Google. Andrew Holden is a journalist for more than 30 years including five as Editor of The Press (in Christchurch) and four as Editor-in-Chief of The Age in Melbourne.

AFL Exchange
Thursday night thriller, Coleman Medal fancies & Rockin' Robbie Williams

AFL Exchange

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 38:35


Sarah Olle and Riley Beveridge are back with a fresh edition of AFL Exchange. We are already building up to the top-of-the-table clash between Melbourne and Geelong on Thursday night. Who will win the Coleman from here? And, what's on Robbie Williams AFL Grand Final playlist? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Christian Science | Daily Lift
Every day can be Independence Day

Christian Science | Daily Lift

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022


Bill Warrick, CS, from Melbourne, Australia

Red Door Caroline Springs
The Biblical Mandate For Small Groups | Acts 2:42-47

Red Door Caroline Springs

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 36:41


Preacher: SJ Beasy Reader: Doug Carr Today SJ shows us the biblical mandate for having small groups in the modern day church. We always want our churches to be like 'The Early Church". He explores what that means and then demonstrates to us that the modern church cannot be like the early church WITHOUT small groups. Red Door is an Anglican Church in Melbourne, Australia. We exist to be a community of people helping people make all of life all about Jesus.

RNZ: Nine To Noon
Crisis moment for video game industry

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 12:17


New Zealand's video game industry is at risk of losing out to Australia as game studios look to take advantage of new tax incentives across the Tasman. Companies here are expected to be eligible for a 40% tax break if they move or expand into Australia. The NZ Game Developers Association says this will halt the growth of what has been a fast growing and promising sector, which has previously reported growing 34% each year. Already Lower Hutt studio A44 Games has expanded to Melbourne, while Wellington's PikPok has expanded offshore with a new studio in Medellin, Columbia. New Zealand's other leading studios including RocketWerkz, Runaway Play and StaplesVR are also making plans to move their thriving businesses across the Tasman.

REBŪKERAVE RADIO
ERA 013: Rory Marshall Live From Timberyard, Melbourne

REBŪKERAVE RADIO

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 60:33


Be part of the show by leaving me a Whatsapp voice message on the Era Radio hotline! The number is +44 7727429290. Can't wait to hear from you.

Research Round-up
July 2022 – Prof Jon Emery and Prof Michael Jefford (Part 1 of 2)

Research Round-up

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 13:49


Today we are speaking with Professor Jon Emery, Herman Chair of Primary Care Research at the University of Melbourne, and Director of PC4. And Professor Michael Jefford, Medical Oncologist and Director of the Australian Cancer Survivorship Centre at the Peter MacCallum Centre. Jon and Michael are part of a team of experts who have published a series of three papers around Cancer Survivorship in the Lancet. And for those of you who aren't in research, The Lancet would be the silver medallist at the Olympics in medical journals. Today, we're discussing the first two papers in the series: management of clinical issues experienced by survivors, and improved models of care for cancer survivors.

Sportsday WA
SD6PR - Trent Cooper

Sportsday WA

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 9:22


Fremantle Dockers AFLW coach joined Sportsday following the release of this season's fixtures earlier this morning in Melbourne.

superchuckamania
Superchuckamania Ep 071 "the dodgy tradesman who ripped off this poor old man"

superchuckamania

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 56:18


No chopping this episode! Just one long extravaganza!. We have more listeners than ever! Captain is still in Melbourne and Playa tells his tale of the Rona! Playa has been on an organizing trip for the last week, SXSW is coming to Sydney, Captain has a KFC update, we talk fast food prices , grocery prices, we talk about the poor old people scared to death by rubbish tv 'news'.. There is Sydney OPAL card news, there might even be a bit of Prince here and there, we have THREE yes THREE emails, recommendations and probably more I forgot about!! Listen now!

Warrior School
Episode 124: How we can be more confident with Sina King

Warrior School

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 73:06


Episode Notes Episode 124: How we can be more Confident with Sina King Show notes Today my guest is the delicious Sina King. Last ranked #22 most influential burlesque star in the world and voted Australia's ‘Most Glamorous' Showgirl; Melbourne-born Sina King is an international icon. After a decade touring the world as Australia's elite burlesque performer, model, creative director and social media entrepreneur; Sina King has become an expert on the way of the confident woman and embodying feminine energy. I wanted to put her in the hot seat and ask her “how do we build more confidence”, so we can live into our vision and feel great in our bodies. Here's what we chat about in our conversation today: What is confidence The two types of confidence: situational and embodied The importance of having self-awareness and feeling safe How our experiences create patterns and how they can affect our confidence How we can learn how to embody confidence so we can bring it to every situation Her story as an elite burlesque performer Sina's work: “The Way of the Confident Woman” Featured on the show Sina King Website https://www.misssinaking.com Sing King Instagram https://www.instagram.com/misssinaking/ Learn more about Warrior School https://warriorschool.carrd.co/ Apply for Warrior School https://amy639434.typeform.com/to/vt59Yd

On the Edge with April Mahoney
Susan Dimasi, Award winning fashion designer and artisan joins me on the edge

On the Edge with April Mahoney

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 42:00


http://www.susandimasi.com Award-winning designer and artisan Susan Dimasi is the Creative Director of fashion house MATERIALBYPRODUCT. She established the brand in Melbourne in 2003 and has consistently delivered collections, described by fashion commentators as “a seamless blend of fashion and art”, ever since. Dimasi's work is informed by her long apprenticeship in men's tailoring; consequently, signature stitching and constructed tailoring details are continuing themes in her work. In line with couture traditions, MATERIALBYPRODUCT does not compromise on materials, time or custom fitting. Attention to detail is paramount, even in ready-to-wear items. Dimasi has an unapologetic commitment to exquisite materials – silk crepe, wool felt, and featherweight leather: “The garments are more than clothes, they are compositions.”

RNZ: Morning Report
PM begins Aus trip with 'realistic' expectations for 501 progress

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 3:21


The Prime Minister says she's heading into a trade mission in Australia with "realistic" expectations about progress on 501 deportees. Jacinda Ardern is touring Melbourne and Sydney this week to promote trans-tasman trade and business, ahead of her annual bilateral meeting with her counterpart Anthony Albanese. Last month, she said there had been a "significant shift" in the the new Australian Government's attitude on the long-standing 501 rift but is now downplaying expectations there will be any progress on this trip. Political reporter Anneke Smith is in Melbourne.

RNZ: Checkpoint
Ardern in Melbourne for first trade mission to Aus since Covid

RNZ: Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 3:35


The Prime Minister has touched down in Melbourne, beginning a five day trip - a bid to reinvigorate the trans-Tasman bond as both countries re-open to the world. It's the first trade mission to Australia since the Covid-19 pandemic - though Jacinda Ardern did hop across the ditch last month for a quick catch-up with Australia's newly elected PM Anthony Albanese. The two leaders will meet again later this week - after a series of trade, tourism and business events first in both Melbourne and Sydney. Our political reporter Anneke Smith is in Melbourne and joins Lisa Owen with the latest. [embed] https://players.brightcove.net/6093072280001/default_default/index.html?videoId=6309090926112

RN Drive - Separate stories podcast
St Basil's charged with failing to provide safe pandemic working environment

RN Drive - Separate stories podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 6:16


Melbourne aged care facility St Basil's has been charged with failing to implement a safe working environment during a covid outbreak in July 2020.

AFL Daily
Looking ahead to a Thursday night epic

AFL Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 22:13


Damian Barrett and Nat Edwards bring you all the latest footy news on AFL Daily The Dees are set to be bolstered by Max Gawn's return (0:32); Geelong are hitting their straps (4:21); The Tigers are “still a force to be reckoned with” (6:55); James Hird endorses Mark McVeigh at GWS (11:53); The “flaky” Swans (16:50); The AFLW fixture will be released today (19:52); Subscribe to AFL Daily and never miss an episode. Rate and review wherever you listen to podcasts. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Robert McLean's Podcast
A postcapitalist vision: Anitra Nelson talks about a life beyond money

Robert McLean's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 3:33


Anitra Nelson wants to see a different sort of society - one that cares about people, that cares about the state of the Earth and puts both those values ahead of the profit so prized by the prevailing capitalist society. The honorary principal fellow at the Melbourne Sustainable Society Institute from the University of Melbourne wrote about that in her 2022 book "Beyond Money: A Postcapitalist Strategy" (pictured) and talks about the idea in the video clip "Beyond Money". Enjoy "Music for a Warming World". --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/robert-mclean/message

The Signal
Why are Australians worried about Roe v Wade?

The Signal

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 12:23


Thirty-six years years ago, Melbourne woman Ilsa Evans had an abortion, a decision she says changed her life immeasurably for the better. On the weekend she was one of thousands of women who took to the streets to protest against the ruling in the United States to wind back abortion rights. Today, why Ilsa is worried about Australia's abortion laws and an expert on just how secure our reproductive rights are. Featured: Ilsa Evans, demonstrator and author Dr Prudence Flowers, senior lecturer in US history at Flinders University

Joint Action
The volume of joint replacement surgeries for osteoarthritis is not sustainable with Prof Ilana Ackerman

Joint Action

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 49:14


Studies have shown that the rates of joint replacement surgeries has increased steadily over the past decade. In Australia alone, there are about 110,000 joint replacements performed every year. This number is expected to rise with the aging population and increasing rates of obesity. Furthermore, COVID-related cancellations and hospital restrictions will likely impact the provision of joint replacements for years to come. Although joint replacement surgery is an effective treatment for end-stage osteoarthritis, the volume of joint replacement surgeries being places a huge burden on the surgical workforce and the healthcare system. Ilana Ackerman is a Professor (Research) in the School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine at Monash University and a Deputy Director of the Monash-Cabrini Department of Musculoskeletal Health and Clinical Epidemiology. Ilana is a musculoskeletal epidemiologist and an experienced orthopaedic physiotherapist. She completed her PhD at The University of Melbourne in 2006. Over the past 15 years, Ilana has led a program of clinical and population-based research designed to quantify osteoarthritis impacts and joint replacement trends to inform optimal patient care. RESOURCESJournal articlesThe projected burden of primary total knee and hip replacement for osteoarthritis in Australia to the year 2030Actual versus Forecast Burden of Primary Hip and Knee Replacement Surgery in Australia: Analysis of Data from the Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry Lifetime Risk of Primary Shoulder Arthroplasty From 2008 to 2017: A Population-Level Analysis Using National Registry Data WebsitesOrthoanswerAAOS CONNECT WITH ILANATwitter @IlanaAckermanCONNECT WITH USTwitter: @ProfDavidHunter @jointactionorgEmail: hello@jointaction.infoWebsite: www.jointaction.info/podcastIf you enjoyed this episode, don't forget to subscribe to learn more about osteoarthritis from the world's leading experts! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

RNZ: Morning Report
Top Stories for Monday 4 July 2022

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 30:49


Straight off the back of her trip to Europe the Prime Minister heads to Melbourne on her way home for a series of trade, tourism and business events, Several people have been shot in a shopping mall in Copenhagen. One person has killed and tens-of-thousands of people are under evacuation orders as flood waters rise in Sydney

From The Embers
The Stage Goes Dark

From The Embers

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 27:50


Melbourne became a ghost town during the COVID-19 pandemic. Pubs and venues closed their doors, leaving many of the city's artists and creatives without a stage to perform on or an audience to perform for. Yet over successive lockdowns, it was the creative industries that kept communities strong, as we all adapted to unprecedented circumstances.  In The Stage Goes Dark, four creatives share their struggles and victories during the pandemic and cry out for an overlooked community, calling for a lifeline.   Guests: Eilish Gilligan Brenton Harris Neil Morris (DRMNGNOW) Virginia Gay   Credits: Producer: Erin Dick Executive Producer and sound design: Sarah Mashman Engineer: Tegan Nichols Theme composer: Oliver Beard Additional music by Blue Dot Sessions Management team: Abe Killian and Sime Knezevic Made in co-operation with: SYN, Melbourne   This episode was made on the lands of the Wurundjeri people of the Kulin Nation and the muwinina people from Country around nipaluna. These lands were never ceded.  From the Embers Season 2: Phoenix is supported by The Judith Neilson Institute for Journalism and Ideas, The Paul Ramsay Foundation, Monash University's Fire to Flourish program and The Minderoo Foundation Fire and Flood Resilience Initiative and broadcast across Australia via the Community Radio Network See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

What a Great Punk
Episode 201: Rythm of the Beat feat. Teether

What a Great Punk

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 65:59


Melbourne hip hop artist Teether returns to the pod this week. We chat about the creative process on his new album MACHONA, his days playing in a metal band, why Melbourne doesn't need any more AstroTurf, the pros and cons of clearing samples, and Jamie presents Todd with a surprise gift!Shout outs @_teetherSign up to our Patreon for a bonus pod each week (that's double the pod!) and other VIP stuff for just $5 a month:https://patreon.com/whatagreatpunkJoin us all in the TNSW Discord community chathttps://tnsw.co/discordWatch our Comedy Central mockumentary series and TNSW Tonight! on YouTube:https://youtube.com/thesenewsouthwhalesFollow us on Twitch:https://twitch.tv/thesenewsouthwhalesTNSW on Spotify:https://open.spotify.com/artist/0srVTNI2U8J7vytCTprEk4?si=e9ibyNpiT2SDegTnJV_6Qg&dl_branch=1TNSW: @thesenewsouthwhalessJamie: @mossylovesyouTodd: @mrtoddandrewshttps://patreon.com/whatagreatpunkhttps://thesenewsouthwhales.comShout-outs to the Honorary Punks of the Pod:Oli MossMagnusZac NickClaireElliott FlassmanJimi KendallEdmund SmithAngus LillieBen JaminDan Dingus

Life and Crimes with Andrew Rule
Rape in a safe haven

Life and Crimes with Andrew Rule

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 52:11


WARNING: DISTURBING CONTENT When Sue was only 19 years old, she sought sanctuary at an inner-Melbourne police station. What followed has been a 40-year ordeal as she has searched for the policeman who assaulted her. Sexual assault helpline Call 1800 010 120 Counsellors are available from 7:30am until 11:30pm, 7 days. Crimestoppers: https://crimestoppers.com.au/ If you or anyone you know needs help Lifeline: 13 11 14 Beyond Blue: 1300 22 4636 Kids Helpline: 1800 55 1800 Like the show? Get more at https://heraldsun.com.au/andrewrule See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Pleibéricos
Pleibéricos 21.8 - Sesión de preguntas (Especial Estudios LGBTQ+).

Pleibéricos

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 17:11


Preguntas de los asistentes del evento público en el chat para las y los autoras/es que presentaron sus nuevos libros en el especial de estudios LGBTQ+, Alfredo Martínez Expósito (University of Melbourne), Emilio Peral (Universidad Complutense de Madrid), Ana Isabel Simón Alegre (Adelphi University), Alberto Mira (Oxford Brookes University), Estefanía Sanz Romero, Francisco Zurián (Universidad Complutense de Madrid).

SBS Kurdish - SBS Kurdî
Seasonal influenza vaccinations are recommended - Tê pêşniyarkirin ku vaksîna girîpê bête wergitin

SBS Kurdish - SBS Kurdî

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 8:39


Many people get sick with influenza in winter time, especially the elderly and children. It is recommended that people get their influenza vaccines, but many people are hesitant about the vaccination. We speak to Dr Ali Ziabari from Melbourne about the subject. - Di demsala zivistanê de gelek kes bi nixweşiya girîpê dikevin bi taybetî yên temen mezin û zarok ku di heman demê de derziya vaksînlêdanê heye. Lê gelek kes derbarê vakisînkirinê dudilin. Em derbarê vê mijarê bi Dr Elî Zêbarî re ji Melbourne diaxifîn.

Hot Pipes One Hour Podcast m4a
Hot Pipes Podcast 291 – The Dendy Theatre, Melbourne, Australia 1967-2021

Hot Pipes One Hour Podcast m4a

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 65:00


The Dendy Theatre, Melbourne, Australia 1967-2021 To donate to the re-installment fund at RMIT Ian McIver's Southerncross website - Dendy Theatre Start Name Artist Album Year Comments The Dendy March George Blackmore Concert: Dendy Theatre, Melbourne 1967-04-30 1967 3-15 Wurlitzer, Dendy Theatre, Middle Brighton, Melbourne, Australia; Opening concert 4:13 Southern Star George Blackmore Sea Side Walk [Concert Recording CR-0031] 1967 3-15 Wurlitzer, Dendy Theatre, Middle Brighton, Melbourne, Australia 7:17 Westward Ho; Charmaine; The Big Chase Gaylord Carter Concert: Dendy Theatre, Brighton, Melbourne 1980-10-08 1980 3-15 Wurlitzer, Dendy Theatre, Middle Brighton, Melbourne, Australia 11:30 Chloe (Song of the Swamp) Vic Hammett Concert: Dendy Theatre, Brighton 1968-07-28 1968 3-15 Wurlitzer, Dendy Theatre, Brighton, Victoria, Australia; from and returning to Capitol Theatre, Melbourne, Victoria 16:19 Mack The Knife Vic Hammett Wurlitzer '69 [Philips PDS 305 Stereo] 1968 3-15 Wurlitzer, Dendy Theatre, Middle Brighton, Melbourne, Australia; recorded on Vic's second Australian visit 18:46 Spanish Eyes Tony Fenelon Tony [Festival L32.500] 1969 3-15 Wurlitzer, Dendy Cinema, Brighton, Victoria, Australia; Formerly in Capitol Theatre, Melbourne 22:14 How High The Moon Gordon Hamilton Fine And Dendy [Fidelis CMS-316] Ozone 50-15 3-15 Wurlitzer, Dendy Theatre, Brighton, Melbourne, Australia 24:17 Elizabethan Serenade John Howlett Concert: Dendy Theatre, Brighton, Melbourne 1980-05-18 1980 3-15 Wurlitzer, Dendy Theatre, Brighton, Melbourne, Australia; From Capitol Theatre, Melbourne and returning there 27:48 Jay Walk Lyn Larsen Concert: Dendy Theatre, Brighton, Melbourne 1970s 1970s 3-15 Wurlitzer, Dendy Theatre, Brighton, Melbourne, Australia. Originally from Capitol Theatre, Melbourne; 1970s 31:04 What I Did For Love Neil Jensen Australia Wide [Keymedia LP] 3-15 Wurlitzer, Dendy Theatre, Brighton, Melbourne, Australia 35:51 The Stripper Tom Hazleton Concert: Dendy Theatre, Brighton, Melbourne - Late 1970s 1977 3-15 Wurlitzer, Dendy Theatre, Brighton, Melbourne, Australia; 1977? 39:04 Stanley Cliff Bingham The Cliff Bingham Concert Collection 2018 3-15 Wurlitzer, Dendy Theatre, Brighton, Victoria, Australia 42:14 Can't Stop The Music Jonas Nordwall Concert: Dendy Theatre, Brighton, Melbourne 1981 - rebalance 1981 3-15 Wurlitzer, Dendy Theatre, Brighton, Melbourne, Australia; Originally from Capitol Theatre Melbourne; currently being reinstalled in its original home; Kevin Simmons on drums 45:20 Misty John Atwell Concert: Dendy Theatre, Brighton 1981 1981 3-15 Wurlitzer, Dendy Theatre, Brighton, Melbourne, Australia; from Capitol Theatre Melbourne, returning there 48:36 Ivory Rag Tony Fenelon, John Atwell Concert: Dendy Theatre, Brighton 1981 1981 3-15 Wurlitzer, Dendy Theatre, Brighton, Melbourne, Australia; from Capitol Theatre Melbourne, returning there 51:11 When Love Is Gone Tony Fenelon Concert: Dendy Theatre, Brighton 1981 1981 3-15 Wurlitzer, Dendy Theatre, Brighton, Melbourne, Australia; from Capitol Theatre Melbourne, returning there 55:01 A Swingin' Safari Scott Harrison Distinctly Dendy 2003 3-15 Wurlitzer, Dendy Theatre, New Brighton, Melbourne, Australia 58:26 Auf Wiedersehen Lyn Larsen Concert: Dendy Theatre, Brighton, Melbourne 1970s 1970s 3-15 Wurlitzer, Dendy Theatre, Brighton, Melbourne, Australia; Originally from Capitol Theatre, Melbourne and returning there. 61:47 The Dendy March Tony Fenelon, John Atwell Concert: Dendy Theatre, Brighton 1981 1981 3-15 Wurlitzer, Dendy Theatre, Brighton, Melbourne, Australia; from Capitol Theatre Melbourne, returning there

MeatRx
When Low-Carb Finally Clicks | Dr. Shawn Baker & Dr. Avi Charlton

MeatRx

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 56:28 Very Popular


Avi is a General Practitioner, or family doctor, working in Melbourne, Australia. She has been a GP for 20 years and worked in the same clinic for over 15 years. She loves her job and looks after families, coughs, colds, diabetes, metabolic diseases, cancers, basically anything that comes into the door.  Her journey started when her kids started to get older and she joined the gym to try to lose weight and get fit about 7 years ago. She started going to the gym, also took up running. She has since ran 2 full marathons. She joined the local gym for an 8 week body transformation challenge. The gym coach prescribed a set diet in which she had to measure a certain protein, carb and fat ratio. This made her lose fat and was basically a low carb diet.  Since then, she has looked into science. She did a Low Carb for physician course by Low Carb Down Under and also courses by Nutrition Network and read many books. She also connected with others with similar interests such as Tracey McBeath, health coach. They set up a support group called Low Carb Melbourne. She has been a speaker for Tracey's Low Carb Lifestyle Long Weekend, telling her story.   With work, I have been prescribing a low carb or keto lifestyle to my patients. I have reversed diabetes, obesity, metabolic syndrome and other chronic conditions. Patients feel better, gain more energy and lose weight.  At the moment, she is studying with ACNEM (Australasian College of Nutrition and Environmental Medicine) and hoping to become a fellow in that college. She has learnt to prescribe lifestyle medicine, especially nutrition, to improve her patients' health. You can find Avi at: www.Dravicharlton.com and on IG: @dr_charlton_low_carb_gp Timestamps: 00:00 Introduction 05:34 Lifestyle and metabolic diseases 11:25 Experience as a low-carb physician 16:58 Imaging studies 21:37 Removing processed foods from diet 24:41 How long to start seeing results 28:45 Conflicts of interest 34:17 Protein 38:30 Veganism and mental health 43:34 Doctor visit time limitations 48:35 Ideal practice 51:51 Chronic disease expenditures See open positions at Revero: https://jobs.lever.co/Revero/ Join Carnivore Diet for a free 30 day trial: https://carnivore.diet/join/ Book a Carnivore Coach: https://carnivore.diet/book-a-coach/ Carnivore Shirts: https://merch.carnivore.diet Subscribe to our Newsletter: https://carnivore.diet/subscribe/ . ‪#revero #shawnbaker #Carnivorediet #MeatHeals #HealthCreation   #humanfood #AnimalBased #ZeroCarb #DietCoach  #FatAdapted #Carnivore #sugarfree  ‪

Liquid Sunshine Sound System
My House is Your House - Sunset to Sunrise House Trip - Part 2 of 4 - Liquid Sunshine @ The Face Radio - 21-06-2022

Liquid Sunshine Sound System

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 124:34


Hello Groovers, Tonight I am taking you on a long trippy house set. Warm sensual grooves at sunset slowly move to hard dancing when the eckies drop. You are coming with me on a journey to the sunrise. Sweaty, glowing, sexy and hot. Part 2 of 4 . Oh yeah, good times! Deejay Maarten Vlot QC Tracklist Pontchartrain - Rock Your Baby Kraak & Smaak - Sebs Party Kapote - Jaas Func Haus (Art of Tones Remix) Igor B - Ponteio Infradisco - Aungasana! Peter Croce - Do What You Wanna Do (Mr PC Mystic Rhythm Dub Edit) Sam Ruffillo - Es Buena (Original Mix) Soundsmith - Aye Oh (original Mix) Jo Paciello & Raffaelle Ciavolino - A Night At Wembley (Original Mix) Joel Holmes & Cody Currie - Them One (original Mix) Adam Ten & OMRI - Shekem Electric (Extended Mix) Magic In Threes - Finnish Funk (COEO Remix) Roberto Surface - Joys (Purple Disco Machine Extended Remix) Foot-Loose - Nah That's Ross Kemp Pete Maxey - Right On Giuseppe Scarano - BEK Again (Original Mix) COEO - Mydonna Underdog Edits - So Damn Good C Da Afro - Get On Your Feet Love Generator - Peace Love Happiness Put on your boogie pants and dancing shoes and come on down for some Liquid Sunshine. It's sexy music, for sexy people. Liquid Sunshine is a weekly radio show on 2XX FM in Australia, and The Face Radio in Brooklyn, USA, playing the best Deep Funk, Rare Groove, Disco & Beats - All The Good Stuff. And we also DJ out in the wild! We regularly do shows in Canberra, Sydney, Melbourne and along the Australian East Coast. 2022 will see us on the stages of the European summer festivals and in the booths of the European night clubs. We are also a full service law firm to the music industry, providing advice to DJs, Producers, Musicians and Event Organisers. Link up, tune in and shake ya booty with Maarten Vlot - podcast, browse the socials, or get in contact via this link: https://linktr.ee/liquidsunshineradio or Stream live at https://thefaceradio.com or www.mixcloud.com/live/sasmancometh Liquid Sunshine Sound System on Mixcloud Live | Mixcloud every Tuesday from 10 PM – Midnight Brooklyn / 3 – 5 AM London / 2 - 4 PM Oz or Stream live at https://2xxfm.org.au, or tune in to 98.3 FM in Australia every Thursday from 7:30 - 8:30AM New York / 12:30 - 1:30PM London / 9:30 - 10:30PM Oz

SBS Nepali - एसबीएस नेपाली पोडकाष्ट
Another Code Red for Melbourne ambulances - मेलबर्नका एम्बुलेन्स सेवामा अर्को कोड रेड लागु गरियो

SBS Nepali - एसबीएस नेपाली पोडकाष्ट

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 5:00


Melbourne's health care system is again at a crisis point, with Ambulance Victoria forced to call a code red, temporarily unable to meet demand.The state government has come under fire for not issuing a public alert that paramedics were operating under emergency protocols - मेलबर्नको स्वास्थ्य प्रणाली फेरी एक पटक सङ्कटको अवस्थामा रहेको देखिएको छ। माग अनुसारको सेवा दिन नसक्ने भए पछि एम्बुलेन्स भिक्टोरियाले कोड रेड जारी गरेको थियो।

In Black and White
How cynical electioneering backfired and gave women a voice

In Black and White

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 22:56


How cynical electioneering backfired and gave women a voice. When the suffrage movement was close to victory at the ballot box, a male politician tried to wedge the vote with a contentious clause.But when the vote went through, the clause backfired, and gave women their first voice in the halls of parliament. Melbourne author Mark Wilson tells the story Like the show? Go to https://heraldsun.com.au/ibaw for more See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Roar Deal
The Roar Deal 183: Tom Berry & Cam Bruce

The Roar Deal

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 57:04


Join Mike & Dom as they chat through our tough loss against Melbourne and speak with Tom Berry ahead of brother, Jarrod's 100th game. The boys also chat to midfield coach, Cam Bruce and how he's finding life at the Club. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Sportsday
Jake Lever - Wednesday June 29

Sportsday

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 10:06


Melbourne defender, Jake Lever joined Gerard, Sam and Leigh Mathews on Sportsday

IN HER LENS
In Conversation: Hundefreund - Costume + Set Designer Joan Ling-Li

IN HER LENS

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 25:59


IN HER LENS In Conversation: Hundefreund. Hundefreund (a.k.a. Dogfriend) is a German short film currently making waves in the film festival circuit. In this episode, host Nadine chats with the project's costume and set designer Joan Ling-Li Nesbit-Chang. Hailing from Melbourne, Australia- Joan Ling-Li (she/they) moved to Berlin in 2020 and works as a freelance Set Designer and Stylist. In this episode, Joan and Nadine talk about her Bachelors in Psychology, growing up in Australia, and moving to Berlin. Joan breaks down their love for aesthetics and exploration of different creative endeavors. She opens up about how she got involved with Hundefreund and the recruiting process. Joan talks about their process with a new script and collecting/assembling the set of Hundefreund, and Nadine asks her about what she took away from the process. Joan Ling-Li Nesbit-Chang is a freelance stylist, set designer, and creator. They are based in Berlin, Germany. Joan has worked with Danny Elfmann, Vogue, Adidas, and Kalt Blut Magazine. Joan will commense a Set Design Praktikum with the Berlin opera Academy in July of 2022. You can follow Joan on Instagram or visit her website: www.joanling-li.comHundefreund received its funding from the Bundesregierung für Kultur und Medien (Federal Ministry of Art and Media of Germany) and is presented by BIPOC Film Society.Nadine Reumer is a Dutch actress and podcaster based between Amsterdam and New York City. For further information on her work & to get in contact, visit her website: www.nadinereumer.comYou can follow the podcast @inherlenspodcast and the film @hundefreund.film on Instagram. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Liquid Sunshine Sound System
Funky Love Songs with Late Night Sunshine @ 2XX FM - Show #183 - 23-06-2022

Liquid Sunshine Sound System

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 60:55


Hello Groovers, Some super funky sweetness grooving the Liquid Sunshine studio tonight. Late Nite Sunshine brings you love songs and ballads that are smoochily danceable. Kiss and grind, lovers, kiss and grind. Oh yeah, good times! Deejay Maarten Vlot QC Put on your boogie pants and dancing shoes and come on down for some Liquid Sunshine. It's sexy music, for sexy people. Liquid Sunshine is a weekly radio show on 2XX FM in Australia, and The Face Radio in Brooklyn, USA, playing the best Deep Funk, Rare Groove, Disco & Beats - All The Good Stuff. And we also DJ out in the wild! We regularly do shows in Canberra, Sydney, Melbourne and along the Australian East Coast. 2022 will see us on the stages of the European summer festivals and in the booths of the European night clubs. We are also a full service law firm to the music industry, providing advice to DJs, Producers, Musicians and Event Organisers. Link up, tune in and shake ya booty with Maarten Vlot - podcast, browse the socials, or get in contact via this link: https://linktr.ee/liquidsunshineradio or Stream live at https://thefaceradio.com or www.mixcloud.com/live/sasmancometh Liquid Sunshine Sound System on Mixcloud Live | Mixcloud every Tuesday from 10 PM – Midnight Brooklyn / 3 – 5 AM London / 2 - 4 PM Oz or Stream live at https://2xxfm.org.au, or tune in to 98.3 FM in Australia every Thursday from 7:30 - 8:30AM New York / 12:30 - 1:30PM London / 9:30 - 10:30PM Oz Tracklist Judy Pollack - Your Mine The Reality Band and Show - Gangsterboy Lew Kirkton - Love, I Don't Want Your Love Rasputin's Stash - Love and Happiness Cool Creations - Wish Upon Love Nubia - Feeling Funky Star Quake - Don't You Know I Love You Formula 1 - Walking With My Eyes Closed T'Spoon - Sweetness Bobby Boyd - How Do You Hang On To A Dream Raphael Munnings - Loneliness Aaron Bloomfield - Does Anybody Really Know Friction Band - Watching' You Raphael Munnings - Opportunity Knockin' Bobby Boyd - Love Goddess Ice - Hey Hey

SBS Nepali - एसबीएस नेपाली पोडकाष्ट
World championship contender chef says Nepali and Indian foods are not the same - विश्व स्तरीय प्रतियोगिताका प्रतिस्पर्धी शेफ भन्छन् नेपाली र भार

SBS Nepali - एसबीएस नेपाली पोडकाष्ट

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 14:48


Binod Dhungana is among the finalists to compete in the World Food Championships in Melbourne from July 8 to 10. Sydney-based chef wants to promote a broader understanding of Nepali gastronomy in the world food market. - पहिलो पटक अस्ट्रेलियामा हुन गइरहेको वर्ल्ड फुड च्याम्पियनसिप्स् अन्तर्गतको प्रतिस्पर्धामा विनोद ढुङ्गानाले नेपाली खाना र यससँग जोडिएको सांस्कृतिक पाटोलाई अन्तर्राष्ट्रिय बजारमा विस्तार गर्ने प्रयास गर्दै छन्। 

His Grace Bishop Youssef
Four Sins Against The Holy Spirit

His Grace Bishop Youssef

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 19:39


Sunday Sermon @ Archangel Michael Coptic Orthodox Church, Melbourne, FL ~ June 26, 2022 | Paone 19, 1738

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 150: “All You Need is Love” by the Beatles

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022


This week's episode looks at “All You Need is Love”, the Our World TV special, and the career of the Beatles from April 1966 through August 1967. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a thirteen-minute bonus episode available, on "Rain" by the Beatles. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ NB for the first few hours this was up, there was a slight editing glitch. If you downloaded the old version and don't want to redownload the whole thing, just look in the transcript for "Other than fixing John's two flubbed" for the text of the two missing paragraphs. Errata I say "Come Together" was a B-side, but the single was actually a double A-side. Also, I say the Lennon interview by Maureen Cleave appeared in Detroit magazine. That's what my source (Steve Turner's book) says, but someone on Twitter says that rather than Detroit magazine it was the Detroit Free Press. Also at one point I say "the videos for 'Paperback Writer' and 'Penny Lane'". I meant to say "Rain" rather than "Penny Lane" there. Resources No Mixcloud this week due to the number of songs by the Beatles. I have read literally dozens of books on the Beatles, and used bits of information from many of them. All my Beatles episodes refer to: The Complete Beatles Chronicle by Mark Lewisohn, All The Songs: The Stories Behind Every Beatles Release by Jean-Michel Guesdon, And The Band Begins To Play: The Definitive Guide To The Songs of The Beatles by Steve Lambley, The Beatles By Ear by Kevin Moore, Revolution in the Head by Ian MacDonald, and The Beatles Anthology. For this episode, I also referred to Last Interview by David Sheff, a longform interview with John Lennon and Yoko Ono from shortly before Lennon's death; Many Years From Now by Barry Miles, an authorised biography of Paul McCartney; and Here, There, and Everywhere: My Life Recording the Music of the Beatles by Geoff Emerick and Howard Massey. Particularly useful this time was Steve Turner's book Beatles '66. I also used Turner's The Beatles: The Stories Behind the Songs 1967-1970. Johnny Rogan's Starmakers and Svengalis had some information on Epstein I hadn't seen anywhere else. Some information about the "Bigger than Jesus" scandal comes from Ward, B. (2012). “The ‘C' is for Christ”: Arthur Unger, Datebook Magazine and the Beatles. Popular Music and Society, 35(4), 541-560. https://doi.org/10.1080/03007766.2011.608978 Information on Robert Stigwood comes from Mr Showbiz by Stephen Dando-Collins. And the quote at the end from Simon Napier-Bell is from You Don't Have to Say You Love Me, which is more entertaining than it is accurate, but is very entertaining. Sadly the only way to get the single mix of "All You Need is Love" is on this ludicrously-expensive out-of-print box set, but the stereo mix is easily available on Magical Mystery Tour. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript A quick note before I start the episode -- this episode deals, in part, with the deaths of three gay men -- one by murder, one by suicide, and one by an accidental overdose, all linked at least in part to societal homophobia. I will try to deal with this as tactfully as I can, but anyone who's upset by those things might want to read the transcript instead of listening to the episode. This is also a very, very, *very* long episode -- this is likely to be the longest episode I *ever* do of this podcast, so settle in. We're going to be here a while. I obviously don't know how long it's going to be while I'm still recording, but based on the word count of my script, probably in the region of three hours. You have been warned. In 1967 the actor Patrick McGoohan was tired. He had been working on the hit series Danger Man for many years -- Danger Man had originally run from 1960 through 1962, then had taken a break, and had come back, retooled, with longer episodes in 1964. That longer series was a big hit, both in the UK and in the US, where it was retitled Secret Agent and had a new theme tune written by PF Sloan and Steve Barri and recorded by Johnny Rivers: [Excerpt: Johnny Rivers, "Secret Agent Man"] But McGoohan was tired of playing John Drake, the agent, and announced he was going to quit the series. Instead, with the help of George Markstein, Danger Man's script editor, he created a totally new series, in which McGoohan would star, and which McGoohan would also write and direct key episodes of. This new series, The Prisoner, featured a spy who is only ever given the name Number Six, and who many fans -- though not McGoohan himself -- took to be the same character as John Drake. Number Six resigns from his job as a secret agent, and is kidnapped and taken to a place known only as The Village -- the series was filmed in Portmeirion, an unusual-looking town in Gwynnedd, in North Wales -- which is full of other ex-agents. There he is interrogated to try to find out why he has quit his job. It's never made clear whether the interrogators are his old employers or their enemies, and there's a certain suggestion that maybe there is no real distinction between the two sides, that they're both running the Village together. He spends the entire series trying to escape, but refuses to explain himself -- and there's some debate among viewers as to whether it's implied or not that part of the reason he doesn't explain himself is that he knows his interrogators wouldn't understand why he quit: [Excerpt: The Prisoner intro, from episode Once Upon a Time, ] Certainly that explanation would fit in with McGoohan's own personality. According to McGoohan, the final episode of The Prisoner was, at the time, the most watched TV show ever broadcast in the UK, as people tuned in to find out the identity of Number One, the person behind the Village, and to see if Number Six would break free. I don't think that's actually the case, but it's what McGoohan always claimed, and it was certainly a very popular series. I won't spoil the ending for those of you who haven't watched it -- it's a remarkable series -- but ultimately the series seems to decide that such questions don't matter and that even asking them is missing the point. It's a work that's open to multiple interpretations, and is left deliberately ambiguous, but one of the messages many people have taken away from it is that not only are we trapped by a society that oppresses us, we're also trapped by our own identities. You can run from the trap that society has placed you in, from other people's interpretations of your life, your work, and your motives, but you ultimately can't run from yourself, and any time you try to break out of a prison, you'll find yourself trapped in another prison of your own making. The most horrifying implication of the episode is that possibly even death itself won't be a release, and you will spend all eternity trying to escape from an identity you're trapped in. Viewers became so outraged, according to McGoohan, that he had to go into hiding for an extended period, and while his later claims that he never worked in Britain again are an exaggeration, it is true that for the remainder of his life he concentrated on doing work in the US instead, where he hadn't created such anger. That final episode of The Prisoner was also the only one to use a piece of contemporary pop music, in two crucial scenes: [Excerpt: The Prisoner, "Fall Out", "All You Need is Love"] Back in October 2020, we started what I thought would be a year-long look at the period from late 1962 through early 1967, but which has turned out for reasons beyond my control to take more like twenty months, with a song which was one of the last of the big pre-Beatles pop hits, though we looked at it after their first single, "Telstar" by the Tornadoes: [Excerpt: The Tornadoes, "Telstar"] There were many reasons for choosing that as one of the bookends for this fifty-episode chunk of the podcast -- you'll see many connections between that episode and this one if you listen to them back-to-back -- but among them was that it's a song inspired by the launch of the first ever communications satellite, and a sign of how the world was going to become smaller as the sixties went on. Of course, to start with communications satellites didn't do much in that regard -- they were expensive to use, and had limited bandwidth, and were only available during limited time windows, but symbolically they meant that for the first time ever, people could see and hear events thousands of miles away as they were happening. It's not a coincidence that Britain and France signed the agreement to develop Concorde, the first supersonic airliner, a month after the first Beatles single and four months after the Telstar satellite was launched. The world was becoming ever more interconnected -- people were travelling faster and further, getting news from other countries quicker, and there was more cultural conversation – and misunderstanding – between countries thousands of miles apart. The Canadian media theorist Marshall McLuhan, the man who also coined the phrase “the medium is the message”, thought that this ever-faster connection would fundamentally change basic modes of thought in the Western world. McLuhan thought that technology made possible whole new modes of thought, and that just as the printing press had, in his view, caused Western liberalism and individualism, so these new electronic media would cause the rise of a new collective mode of thought. In 1962, the year of Concorde, Telstar, and “Love Me Do”, McLuhan wrote a book called The Gutenberg Galaxy, in which he said: “Instead of tending towards a vast Alexandrian library the world has become a computer, an electronic brain, exactly as an infantile piece of science fiction. And as our senses have gone outside us, Big Brother goes inside. So, unless aware of this dynamic, we shall at once move into a phase of panic terrors, exactly befitting a small world of tribal drums, total interdependence, and superimposed co-existence.… Terror is the normal state of any oral society, for in it everything affects everything all the time.…” He coined the term “the Global Village” to describe this new collectivism. The story we've seen over the last fifty episodes is one of a sort of cultural ping-pong between the USA and the UK, with innovations in American music inspiring British musicians, who in turn inspired American ones, whether that being the Beatles covering the Isley Brothers or the Rolling Stones doing a Bobby Womack song, or Paul Simon and Bob Dylan coming over to the UK and learning folk songs and guitar techniques from Martin Carthy. And increasingly we're going to see those influences spread to other countries, and influences coming *from* other countries. We've already seen one Jamaican artist, and the influence of Indian music has become very apparent. While the focus of this series is going to remain principally in the British Isles and North America, rock music was and is a worldwide phenomenon, and that's going to become increasingly a part of the story. And so in this episode we're going to look at a live performance -- well, mostly live -- that was seen by hundreds of millions of people all over the world as it happened, thanks to the magic of satellites: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "All You Need is Love"] When we left the Beatles, they had just finished recording "Tomorrow Never Knows", the most experimental track they had recorded up to that date, and if not the most experimental thing they *ever* recorded certainly in the top handful. But "Tomorrow Never Knows" was only the first track they recorded in the sessions for what would become arguably their greatest album, and certainly the one that currently has the most respect from critics. It's interesting to note that that album could have been very, very, different. When we think of Revolver now, we think of the innovative production of George Martin, and of Geoff Emerick and Ken Townshend's inventive ideas for pushing the sound of the equipment in Abbey Road studios, but until very late in the day the album was going to be recorded in the Stax studios in Memphis, with Steve Cropper producing -- whether George Martin would have been involved or not is something we don't even know. In 1965, the Rolling Stones had, as we've seen, started making records in the US, recording in LA and at the Chess studios in Chicago, and the Yardbirds had also been doing the same thing. Mick Jagger had become a convert to the idea of using American studios and working with American musicians, and he had constantly been telling Paul McCartney that the Beatles should do the same. Indeed, they'd put some feelers out in 1965 about the possibility of the group making an album with Holland, Dozier, and Holland in Detroit. Quite how this would have worked is hard to figure out -- Holland, Dozier, and Holland's skills were as songwriters, and in their work with a particular set of musicians -- so it's unsurprising that came to nothing. But recording at Stax was a different matter.  While Steve Cropper was a great songwriter in his own right, he was also adept at getting great sounds on covers of other people's material -- like on Otis Blue, the album he produced for Otis Redding in late 1965, which doesn't include a single Cropper original: [Excerpt: Otis Redding, "Satisfaction"] And the Beatles were very influenced by the records Stax were putting out, often namechecking Wilson Pickett in particular, and during the Rubber Soul sessions they had recorded a "Green Onions" soundalike track, imaginatively titled "12-Bar Original": [Excerpt: The Beatles, "12-Bar Original"] The idea of the group recording at Stax got far enough that they were actually booked in for two weeks starting the ninth of April, and there was even an offer from Elvis to let them stay at Graceland while they recorded, but then a couple of weeks earlier, the news leaked to the press, and Brian Epstein cancelled the booking. According to Cropper, Epstein talked about recording at the Atlantic studios in New York with him instead, but nothing went any further. It's hard to imagine what a Stax-based Beatles album would have been like, but even though it might have been a great album, it certainly wouldn't have been the Revolver we've come to know. Revolver is an unusual album in many ways, and one of the ways it's most distinct from the earlier Beatles albums is the dominance of keyboards. Both Lennon and McCartney had often written at the piano as well as the guitar -- McCartney more so than Lennon, but both had done so regularly -- but up to this point it had been normal for them to arrange the songs for guitars rather than keyboards, no matter how they'd started out. There had been the odd track where one of them, usually Lennon, would play a simple keyboard part, songs like "I'm Down" or "We Can Work it Out", but even those had been guitar records first and foremost. But on Revolver, that changed dramatically. There seems to have been a complex web of cause and effect here. Paul was becoming increasingly interested in moving his basslines away from simple walking basslines and root notes and the other staples of rock and roll basslines up to this point. As the sixties progressed, rock basslines were becoming ever more complex, and Tyler Mahan Coe has made a good case that this is largely down to innovations in production pioneered by Owen Bradley, and McCartney was certainly aware of Bradley's work -- he was a fan of Brenda Lee, who Bradley produced, for example. But the two influences that McCartney has mentioned most often in this regard are the busy, jazz-influenced, basslines that James Jamerson was playing at Motown: [Excerpt: The Four Tops, "It's the Same Old Song"] And the basslines that Brian Wilson was writing for various Wrecking Crew bassists to play for the Beach Boys: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Don't Talk (Put Your Head on My Shoulder)"] Just to be clear, McCartney didn't hear that particular track until partway through the recording of Revolver, when Bruce Johnston visited the UK and brought with him an advance copy of Pet Sounds, but Pet Sounds influenced the later part of Revolver's recording, and Wilson had already started his experiments in that direction with the group's 1965 work. It's much easier to write a song with this kind of bassline, one that's integral to the composition, on the piano than it is to write it on a guitar, as you can work out the bassline with your left hand while working out the chords and melody with your right, so the habit that McCartney had already developed of writing on the piano made this easier. But also, starting with the recording of "Paperback Writer", McCartney switched his style of working in the studio. Where up to this point it had been normal for him to play bass as part of the recording of the basic track, playing with the other Beatles, he now started to take advantage of multitracking to overdub his bass later, so he could spend extra time getting the bassline exactly right. McCartney lived closer to Abbey Road than the other three Beatles, and so could more easily get there early or stay late and tweak his parts. But if McCartney wasn't playing bass while the guitars and drums were being recorded, that meant he could play something else, and so increasingly he would play piano during the recording of the basic track. And that in turn would mean that there wouldn't always *be* a need for guitars on the track, because the harmonic support they would provide would be provided by the piano instead. This, as much as anything else, is the reason that Revolver sounds so radically different to any other Beatles album. Up to this point, with *very* rare exceptions like "Yesterday", every Beatles record, more or less, featured all four of the Beatles playing instruments. Now John and George weren't playing on "Good Day Sunshine" or "For No One", John wasn't playing on "Here, There, and Everywhere", "Eleanor Rigby" features no guitars or drums at all, and George's "Love You To" only features himself, plus a little tambourine from Ringo (Paul recorded a part for that one, but it doesn't seem to appear on the finished track). Of the three songwriting Beatles, the only one who at this point was consistently requiring the instrumental contributions of all the other band members was John, and even he did without Paul on "She Said, She Said", which by all accounts features either John or George on bass, after Paul had a rare bout of unprofessionalism and left the studio. Revolver is still an album made by a group -- and most of those tracks that don't feature John or George instrumentally still feature them vocally -- it's still a collaborative work in all the best ways. But it's no longer an album made by four people playing together in the same room at the same time. After starting work on "Tomorrow Never Knows", the next track they started work on was Paul's "Got to Get You Into My Life", but as it would turn out they would work on that song throughout most of the sessions for the album -- in a sign of how the group would increasingly work from this point on, Paul's song was subject to multiple re-recordings and tweakings in the studio, as he tinkered to try to make it perfect. The first recording to be completed for the album, though, was almost as much of a departure in its own way as "Tomorrow Never Knows" had been. George's song "Love You To" shows just how inspired he was by the music of Ravi Shankar, and how devoted he was to Indian music. While a few months earlier he had just about managed to pick out a simple melody on the sitar for "Norwegian Wood", by this point he was comfortable enough with Indian classical music that I've seen many, many sources claim that an outside session player is playing sitar on the track, though Anil Bhagwat, the tabla player on the track, always insisted that it was entirely Harrison's playing: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Love You To"] There is a *lot* of debate as to whether it's George playing on the track, and I feel a little uncomfortable making a definitive statement in either direction. On the one hand I find it hard to believe that Harrison got that good that quickly on an unfamiliar instrument, when we know he wasn't a naturally facile musician. All the stories we have about his work in the studio suggest that he had to work very hard on his guitar solos, and that he would frequently fluff them. As a technical guitarist, Harrison was only mediocre -- his value lay in his inventiveness, not in technical ability -- and he had been playing guitar for over a decade, but sitar only a few months. There's also some session documentation suggesting that an unknown sitar player was hired. On the other hand there's the testimony of Anil Bhagwat that Harrison played the part himself, and he has been very firm on the subject, saying "If you go on the Internet there are a lot of questions asked about "Love You To". They say 'It's not George playing the sitar'. I can tell you here and now -- 100 percent it was George on sitar throughout. There were no other musicians involved. It was just me and him." And several people who are more knowledgeable than myself about the instrument have suggested that the sitar part on the track is played the way that a rock guitarist would play rather than the way someone with more knowledge of Indian classical music would play -- there's a blues feeling to some of the bends that apparently no genuine Indian classical musician would naturally do. I would suggest that the best explanation is that there's a professional sitar player trying to replicate a part that Harrison had previously demonstrated, while Harrison was in turn trying his best to replicate the sound of Ravi Shankar's work. Certainly the instrumental section sounds far more fluent, and far more stylistically correct, than one would expect: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Love You To"] Where previous attempts at what got called "raga-rock" had taken a couple of surface features of Indian music -- some form of a drone, perhaps a modal scale -- and had generally used a guitar made to sound a little bit like a sitar, or had a sitar playing normal rock riffs, Harrison's song seems to be a genuine attempt to hybridise Indian ragas and rock music, combining the instrumentation, modes, and rhythmic complexity of someone like Ravi Shankar with lyrics that are seemingly inspired by Bob Dylan and a fairly conventional pop song structure (and a tiny bit of fuzz guitar). It's a record that could only be made by someone who properly understood both the Indian music he's emulating and the conventions of the Western pop song, and understood how those conventions could work together. Indeed, one thing I've rarely seen pointed out is how cleverly the album is sequenced, so that "Love You To" is followed by possibly the most conventional song on Revolver, "Here, There, and Everywhere", which was recorded towards the end of the sessions. Both songs share a distinctive feature not shared by the rest of the album, so the two songs can sound more of a pair than they otherwise would, retrospectively making "Love You To" seem more conventional than it is and "Here, There, and Everywhere" more unconventional -- both have as an introduction a separate piece of music that states some of the melodic themes of the rest of the song but isn't repeated later. In the case of "Love You To" it's the free-tempo bit at the beginning, characteristic of a lot of Indian music: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Love You To"] While in the case of "Here, There, and Everywhere" it's the part that mimics an older style of songwriting, a separate intro of the type that would have been called a verse when written by the Gershwins or Cole Porter, but of course in the intervening decades "verse" had come to mean something else, so we now no longer have a specific term for this kind of intro -- but as you can hear, it's doing very much the same thing as that "Love You To" intro: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Here, There, and Everywhere"] In the same day as the group completed "Love You To", overdubbing George's vocal and Ringo's tambourine, they also started work on a song that would show off a lot of the new techniques they had been working on in very different ways. Paul's "Paperback Writer" could indeed be seen as part of a loose trilogy with "Love You To" and "Tomorrow Never Knows", one song by each of the group's three songwriters exploring the idea of a song that's almost all on one chord. Both "Tomorrow Never Knows" and "Love You To" are based on a drone with occasional hints towards moving to one other chord. In the case of "Paperback Writer", the entire song stays on a single chord until the title -- it's on a G7 throughout until the first use of the word "writer", when it quickly goes to a C for two bars. I'm afraid I'm going to have to sing to show you how little the chords actually change, because the riff disguises this lack of movement somewhat, but the melody is also far more horizontal than most of McCartney's, so this shouldn't sound too painful, I hope: [demonstrates] This is essentially the exact same thing that both "Love You To" and "Tomorrow Never Knows" do, and all three have very similarly structured rising and falling modal melodies. There's also a bit of "Paperback Writer" that seems to tie directly into "Love You To", but also points to a possible very non-Indian inspiration for part of "Love You To". The Beach Boys' single "Sloop John B" was released in the UK a couple of days after the sessions for "Paperback Writer" and "Love You To", but it had been released in the US a month before, and the Beatles all got copies of every record in the American top thirty shipped to them. McCartney and Harrison have specifically pointed to it as an influence on "Paperback Writer". "Sloop John B" has a section where all the instruments drop out and we're left with just the group's vocal harmonies: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Sloop John B"] And that seems to have been the inspiration behind the similar moment at a similar point in "Paperback Writer", which is used in place of a middle eight and also used for the song's intro: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Paperback Writer"] Which is very close to what Harrison does at the end of each verse of "Love You To", where the instruments drop out for him to sing a long melismatic syllable before coming back in: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Love You To"] Essentially, other than "Got to Get You Into My Life", which is an outlier and should not be counted, the first three songs attempted during the Revolver sessions are variations on a common theme, and it's a sign that no matter how different the results might  sound, the Beatles really were very much a group at this point, and were sharing ideas among themselves and developing those ideas in similar ways. "Paperback Writer" disguises what it's doing somewhat by having such a strong riff. Lennon referred to "Paperback Writer" as "son of 'Day Tripper'", and in terms of the Beatles' singles it's actually their third iteration of this riff idea, which they originally got from Bobby Parker's "Watch Your Step": [Excerpt: Bobby Parker, "Watch Your Step"] Which became the inspiration for "I Feel Fine": [Excerpt: The Beatles, "I Feel Fine"] Which they varied for "Day Tripper": [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Day Tripper"] And which then in turn got varied for "Paperback Writer": [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Paperback Writer"] As well as compositional ideas, there are sonic ideas shared between "Paperback Writer", "Tomorrow Never Knows", and "Love You To", and which would be shared by the rest of the tracks the Beatles recorded in the first half of 1966. Since Geoff Emerick had become the group's principal engineer, they'd started paying more attention to how to get a fuller sound, and so Emerick had miced the tabla on "Love You To" much more closely than anyone would normally mic an instrument from classical music, creating a deep, thudding sound, and similarly he had changed the way they recorded the drums on "Tomorrow Never Knows", again giving a much fuller sound. But the group also wanted the kind of big bass sounds they'd loved on records coming out of America -- sounds that no British studio was getting, largely because it was believed that if you cut too loud a bass sound into a record it would make the needle jump out of the groove. The new engineering team of Geoff Emerick and Ken Scott, though, thought that it was likely you could keep the needle in the groove if you had a smoother frequency response. You could do that if you used a microphone with a larger diaphragm to record the bass, but how could you do that? Inspiration finally struck -- loudspeakers are actually the same thing as microphones wired the other way round, so if you wired up a loudspeaker as if it were a microphone you could get a *really big* speaker, place it in front of the bass amp, and get a much stronger bass sound. The experiment wasn't a total success -- the sound they got had to be processed quite extensively to get rid of room noise, and then compressed in order to further prevent the needle-jumping issue, and so it's a muddier, less defined, tone than they would have liked, but one thing that can't be denied is that "Paperback Writer"'s bass sound is much, much, louder than on any previous Beatles record: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Paperback Writer"] Almost every track the group recorded during the Revolver sessions involved all sorts of studio innovations, though rarely anything as truly revolutionary as the artificial double-tracking they'd used on "Tomorrow Never Knows", and which also appeared on "Paperback Writer" -- indeed, as "Paperback Writer" was released several months before Revolver, it became the first record released to use the technique. I could easily devote a good ten minutes to every track on Revolver, and to "Paperback Writer"s B-side, "Rain", but this is already shaping up to be an extraordinarily long episode and there's a lot of material to get through, so I'll break my usual pattern of devoting a Patreon bonus episode to something relatively obscure, and this week's bonus will be on "Rain" itself. "Paperback Writer", though, deserved the attention here even though it was not one of the group's more successful singles -- it did go to number one, but it didn't hit number one in the UK charts straight away, being kept off the top by "Strangers in the Night" by Frank Sinatra for the first week: [Excerpt: Frank Sinatra, "Strangers in the Night"] Coincidentally, "Strangers in the Night" was co-written by Bert Kaempfert, the German musician who had produced the group's very first recording sessions with Tony Sheridan back in 1961. On the group's German tour in 1966 they met up with Kaempfert again, and John greeted him by singing the first couple of lines of the Sinatra record. The single was the lowest-selling Beatles single in the UK since "Love Me Do". In the US it only made number one for two non-consecutive weeks, with "Strangers in the Night" knocking it off for a week in between. Now, by literally any other band's standards, that's still a massive hit, and it was the Beatles' tenth UK number one in a row (or ninth, depending on which chart you use for "Please Please Me"), but it's a sign that the group were moving out of the first phase of total unequivocal dominance of the charts. It was a turning point in a lot of other ways as well. Up to this point, while the group had been experimenting with different lyrical subjects on album tracks, every single had lyrics about romantic relationships -- with the possible exception of "Help!", which was about Lennon's emotional state but written in such a way that it could be heard as a plea to a lover. But in the case of "Paperback Writer", McCartney was inspired by his Aunt Mill asking him "Why do you write songs about love all the time? Can you ever write about a horse or the summit conference or something interesting?" His response was to think "All right, Aunt Mill, I'll show you", and to come up with a lyric that was very much in the style of the social satires that bands like the Kinks were releasing at the time. People often miss the humour in the lyric for "Paperback Writer", but there's a huge amount of comedy in lyrics about someone writing to a publisher saying they'd written a book based on someone else's book, and one can only imagine the feeling of weary recognition in slush-pile readers throughout the world as they heard the enthusiastic "It's a thousand pages, give or take a few, I'll be writing more in a week or two. I can make it longer..." From this point on, the group wouldn't release a single that was unambiguously about a romantic relationship until "The Ballad of John and Yoko",  the last single released while the band were still together. "Paperback Writer" also saw the Beatles for the first time making a promotional film -- what we would now call a rock video -- rather than make personal appearances on TV shows. The film was directed by Michael Lindsay-Hogg, who the group would work with again in 1969, and shows Paul with a chipped front tooth -- he'd been in an accident while riding mopeds with his friend Tara Browne a few months earlier, and hadn't yet got round to having the tooth capped. When he did, the change in his teeth was one of the many bits of evidence used by conspiracy theorists to prove that the real Paul McCartney was dead and replaced by a lookalike. It also marks a change in who the most prominent Beatle on the group's A-sides was. Up to this point, Paul had had one solo lead on an A-side -- "Can't Buy Me Love" -- and everything else had been either a song with multiple vocalists like "Day Tripper" or "Love Me Do", or a song with a clear John lead like "Ticket to Ride" or "I Feel Fine". In the rest of their career, counting "Paperback Writer", the group would release nine new singles that hadn't already been included on an album. Of those nine singles, one was a double A-side with one John song and one Paul song, two had John songs on the A-side, and the other six were Paul. Where up to this point John had been "lead Beatle", for the rest of the sixties, Paul would be the group's driving force. Oddly, Paul got rather defensive about the record when asked about it in interviews after it failed to go straight to the top, saying "It's not our best single by any means, but we're very satisfied with it". But especially in its original mono mix it actually packs a powerful punch: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Paperback Writer"] When the "Paperback Writer" single was released, an unusual image was used in the advertising -- a photo of the Beatles dressed in butchers' smocks, covered in blood, with chunks of meat and the dismembered body parts of baby dolls lying around on them. The image was meant as part of a triptych parodying religious art -- the photo on the left was to be an image showing the four Beatles connected to a woman by an umbilical cord made of sausages, the middle panel was meant to be this image, but with halos added over the Beatles' heads, and the panel on the right was George hammering a nail into John's head, symbolising both crucifixion and that the group were real, physical, people, not just images to be worshipped -- these weren't imaginary nails, and they weren't imaginary people. The photographer Robert Whittaker later said: “I did a photograph of the Beatles covered in raw meat, dolls and false teeth. Putting meat, dolls and false teeth with The Beatles is essentially part of the same thing, the breakdown of what is regarded as normal. The actual conception for what I still call “Somnambulant Adventure” was Moses coming down from Mount Sinai with the Ten Commandments. He comes across people worshipping a golden calf. All over the world I'd watched people worshiping like idols, like gods, four Beatles. To me they were just stock standard normal people. But this emotion that fans poured on them made me wonder where Christianity was heading.” The image wasn't that controversial in the UK, when it was used to advertise "Paperback Writer", but in the US it was initially used for the cover of an album, Yesterday... And Today, which was made up of a few tracks that had been left off the US versions of the Rubber Soul and Help! albums, plus both sides of the "We Can Work It Out"/"Day Tripper" single, and three rough mixes of songs that had been recorded for Revolver -- "Doctor Robert", "And Your Bird Can Sing", and "I'm Only Sleeping", which was the song that sounded most different from the mixes that were finally released: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "I'm Only Sleeping (Yesterday... and Today mix)"] Those three songs were all Lennon songs, which had the unfortunate effect that when the US version of Revolver was brought out later in the year, only two of the songs on the album were by Lennon, with six by McCartney and three by Harrison. Some have suggested that this was the motivation for the use of the butcher image on the cover of Yesterday... And Today -- saying it was the Beatles' protest against Capitol "butchering" their albums -- but in truth it was just that Capitol's art director chose the cover because he liked the image. Alan Livingston, the president of Capitol was not so sure, and called Brian Epstein to ask if the group would be OK with them using a different image. Epstein checked with John Lennon, but Lennon liked the image and so Epstein told Livingston the group insisted on them using that cover. Even though for the album cover the bloodstains on the butchers' smocks were airbrushed out, after Capitol had pressed up a million copies of the mono version of the album and two hundred thousand copies of the stereo version, and they'd sent out sixty thousand promo copies, they discovered that no record shops would stock the album with that cover. It cost Capitol more than two hundred thousand dollars to recall the album and replace the cover with a new one -- though while many of the covers were destroyed, others had the new cover, with a more acceptable photo of the group, pasted over them, and people have later carefully steamed off the sticker to reveal the original. This would not be the last time in 1966 that something that was intended as a statement on religion and the way people viewed the Beatles would cause the group trouble in America. In the middle of the recording sessions for Revolver, the group also made what turned out to be their last ever UK live performance in front of a paying audience. The group had played the NME Poll-Winners' Party every year since 1963, and they were always shows that featured all the biggest acts in the country at the time -- the 1966 show featured, as well as the Beatles and a bunch of smaller acts, the Rolling Stones, the Who, the Yardbirds, Roy Orbison, Cliff Richard and the Shadows, the Seekers, the Small Faces, the Walker Brothers, and Dusty Springfield. Unfortunately, while these events were always filmed for TV broadcast, the Beatles' performance on the first of May wasn't filmed. There are various stories about what happened, but the crux appears to be a disagreement between Andrew Oldham and Brian Epstein, sparked by John Lennon. When the Beatles got to the show, they were upset to discover that they had to wait around before going on stage -- normally, the awards would all be presented at the end, after all the performances, but the Rolling Stones had asked that the Beatles not follow them directly, so after the Stones finished their set, there would be a break for the awards to be given out, and then the Beatles would play their set, in front of an audience that had been bored by twenty-five minutes of awards ceremony, rather than one that had been excited by all the bands that came before them. John Lennon was annoyed, and insisted that the Beatles were going to go on straight after the Rolling Stones -- he seems to have taken this as some sort of power play by the Stones and to have got his hackles up about it. He told Epstein to deal with the people from the NME. But the NME people said that they had a contract with Andrew Oldham, and they weren't going to break it. Oldham refused to change the terms of the contract. Lennon said that he wasn't going to go on stage if they didn't directly follow the Stones. Maurice Kinn, the publisher of the NME, told Epstein that he wasn't going to break the contract with Oldham, and that if the Beatles didn't appear on stage, he would get Jimmy Savile, who was compering the show, to go out on stage and tell the ten thousand fans in the audience that the Beatles were backstage refusing to appear. He would then sue NEMS for breach of contract *and* NEMS would be liable for any damage caused by the rioting that was sure to happen. Lennon screamed a lot of abuse at Kinn, and told him the group would never play one of their events again, but the group did go on stage -- but because they hadn't yet signed the agreement to allow their performance to be filmed, they refused to allow it to be recorded. Apparently Andrew Oldham took all this as a sign that Epstein was starting to lose control of the group. Also during May 1966 there were visits from musicians from other countries, continuing the cultural exchange that was increasingly influencing the Beatles' art. Bruce Johnston of the Beach Boys came over to promote the group's new LP, Pet Sounds, which had been largely the work of Brian Wilson, who had retired from touring to concentrate on working in the studio. Johnston played the record for John and Paul, who listened to it twice, all the way through, in silence, in Johnston's hotel room: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "God Only Knows"] According to Johnston, after they'd listened through the album twice, they went over to a piano and started whispering to each other, picking out chords. Certainly the influence of Pet Sounds is very noticeable on songs like "Here, There, and Everywhere", written and recorded a few weeks after this meeting: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Here, There, and Everywhere"] That track, and the last track recorded for the album, "She Said She Said" were unusual in one very important respect -- they were recorded while the Beatles were no longer under contract to EMI Records. Their contract expired on the fifth of June, 1966, and they finished Revolver without it having been renewed -- it would be several months before their new contract was signed, and it's rather lucky for music lovers that Brian Epstein was the kind of manager who considered personal relationships and basic honour and decency more important than the legal niceties, unlike any other managers of the era, otherwise we would not have Revolver in the form we know it today. After the meeting with Johnston, but before the recording of those last couple of Revolver tracks, the Beatles also met up again with Bob Dylan, who was on a UK tour with a new, loud, band he was working with called The Hawks. While the Beatles and Dylan all admired each other, there was by this point a lot of wariness on both sides, especially between Lennon and Dylan, both of them very similar personality types and neither wanting to let their guard down around the other or appear unhip. There's a famous half-hour-long film sequence of Lennon and Dylan sharing a taxi, which is a fascinating, excruciating, example of two insecure but arrogant men both trying desperately to impress the other but also equally desperate not to let the other know that they want to impress them: [Excerpt: Dylan and Lennon taxi ride] The day that was filmed, Lennon and Harrison also went to see Dylan play at the Royal Albert Hall. This tour had been controversial, because Dylan's band were loud and raucous, and Dylan's fans in the UK still thought of him as a folk musician. At one gig, earlier on the tour, an audience member had famously yelled out "Judas!" -- (just on the tiny chance that any of my listeners don't know that, Judas was the disciple who betrayed Jesus to the authorities, leading to his crucifixion) -- and that show was for many years bootlegged as the "Royal Albert Hall" show, though in fact it was recorded at the Free Trade Hall in Manchester. One of the *actual* Royal Albert Hall shows was released a few years ago -- the one the night before Lennon and Harrison saw Dylan: [Excerpt: Bob Dylan, "Like a Rolling Stone", Royal Albert Hall 1966] The show Lennon and Harrison saw would be Dylan's last for many years. Shortly after returning to the US, Dylan was in a motorbike accident, the details of which are still mysterious, and which some fans claim was faked altogether. The accident caused him to cancel all the concert dates he had booked, and devote himself to working in the studio for several years just like Brian Wilson. And from even further afield than America, Ravi Shankar came over to Britain, to work with his friend the violinist Yehudi Menuhin, on a duet album, West Meets East, that was an example in the classical world of the same kind of international cross-fertilisation that was happening in the pop world: [Excerpt: Yehudi Menuhin and Ravi Shankar, "Prabhati (based on Raga Gunkali)"] While he was in the UK, Shankar also performed at the Royal Festival Hall, and George Harrison went to the show. He'd seen Shankar live the year before, but this time he met up with him afterwards, and later said "He was the first person that impressed me in a way that was beyond just being a famous celebrity. Ravi was my link to the Vedic world. Ravi plugged me into the whole of reality. Elvis impressed me when I was a kid, and impressed me when I met him, but you couldn't later on go round to him and say 'Elvis, what's happening with the universe?'" After completing recording and mixing the as-yet-unnamed album, which had been by far the longest recording process of their career, and which still nearly sixty years later regularly tops polls of the best album of all time, the Beatles took a well-earned break. For a whole two days, at which point they flew off to Germany to do a three-day tour, on their way to Japan, where they were booked to play five shows at the Budokan. Unfortunately for the group, while they had no idea of this when they were booked to do the shows, many in Japan saw the Budokan as sacred ground, and they were the first ever Western group to play there. This led to numerous death threats and loud protests from far-right activists offended at the Beatles defiling their religious and nationalistic sensibilities. As a result, the police were on high alert -- so high that there were three thousand police in the audience for the shows, in a venue which only held ten thousand audience members. That's according to Mark Lewisohn's Complete Beatles Chronicle, though I have to say that the rather blurry footage of the audience in the video of those shows doesn't seem to show anything like those numbers. But frankly I'll take Lewisohn's word over that footage, as he's not someone to put out incorrect information. The threats to the group also meant that they had to be kept in their hotel rooms at all times except when actually performing, though they did make attempts to get out. At the press conference for the Tokyo shows, the group were also asked publicly for the first time their views on the war in Vietnam, and John replied "Well, we think about it every day, and we don't agree with it and we think that it's wrong. That's how much interest we take. That's all we can do about it... and say that we don't like it". I say they were asked publicly for the first time, because George had been asked about it for a series of interviews Maureen Cleave had done with the group a couple of months earlier, as we'll see in a bit, but nobody was paying attention to those interviews. Brian Epstein was upset that the question had gone to John. He had hoped that the inevitable Vietnam question would go to Paul, who he thought might be a bit more tactful. The last thing he needed was John Lennon saying something that would upset the Americans before their tour there a few weeks later. Luckily, people in America seemed to have better things to do than pay attention to John Lennon's opinions. The support acts for the Japanese shows included  several of the biggest names in Japanese rock music -- or "group sounds" as the genre was called there, Japanese people having realised that trying to say the phrase "rock and roll" would open them up to ridicule given that it had both "r" and "l" sounds in the phrase. The man who had coined the term "group sounds", Jackey Yoshikawa, was there with his group the Blue Comets, as was Isao Bito, who did a rather good cover version of Cliff Richard's "Dynamite": [Excerpt: Isao Bito, "Dynamite"] Bito, the Blue Comets, and the other two support acts, Yuya Uchida and the Blue Jeans, all got together to perform a specially written song, "Welcome Beatles": [Excerpt: "Welcome Beatles" ] But while the Japanese audience were enthusiastic, they were much less vocal about their enthusiasm than the audiences the Beatles were used to playing for. The group were used, of course, to playing in front of hordes of screaming teenagers who could not hear a single note, but because of the fear that a far-right terrorist would assassinate one of the group members, the police had imposed very, very, strict rules on the audience. Nobody in the audience was allowed to get out of their seat for any reason, and the police would clamp down very firmly on anyone who was too demonstrative. Because of that, the group could actually hear themselves, and they sounded sloppy as hell, especially on the newer material. Not that there was much of that. The only song they did from the Revolver sessions was "Paperback Writer", the new single, and while they did do a couple of tracks from Rubber Soul, those were under-rehearsed. As John said at the start of this tour, "I can't play any of Rubber Soul, it's so unrehearsed. The only time I played any of the numbers on it was when I recorded it. I forget about songs. They're only valid for a certain time." That's certainly borne out by the sound of their performances of Rubber Soul material at the Budokan: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "If I Needed Someone (live at the Budokan)"] It was while they were in Japan as well that they finally came up with the title for their new album. They'd been thinking of all sorts of ideas, like Abracadabra and Magic Circle, and tossing names around with increasing desperation for several days -- at one point they seem to have just started riffing on other groups' albums, and seem to have apparently seriously thought about naming the record in parodic tribute to their favourite artists -- suggestions included The Beatles On Safari, after the Beach Boys' Surfin' Safari (and possibly with a nod to their recent Pet Sounds album cover with animals, too), The Freewheelin' Beatles, after Dylan's second album, and my favourite, Ringo's suggestion After Geography, for the Rolling Stones' Aftermath. But eventually Paul came up with Revolver -- like Rubber Soul, a pun, in this case because the record itself revolves when on a turntable. Then it was off to the Philippines, and if the group thought Japan had been stressful, they had no idea what was coming. The trouble started in the Philippines from the moment they stepped off the plane, when they were bundled into a car without Neil Aspinall or Brian Epstein, and without their luggage, which was sent to customs. This was a problem in itself -- the group had got used to essentially being treated like diplomats, and to having their baggage let through customs without being searched, and so they'd started freely carrying various illicit substances with them. This would obviously be a problem -- but as it turned out, this was just to get a "customs charge" paid by Brian Epstein. But during their initial press conference the group were worried, given the hostility they'd faced from officialdom, that they were going to be arrested during the conference itself. They were asked what they would tell the Rolling Stones, who were going to be visiting the Philippines shortly after, and Lennon just said "We'll warn them". They also asked "is there a war on in the Philippines? Why is everybody armed?" At this time, the Philippines had a new leader, Ferdinand Marcos -- who is not to be confused with his son, Ferdinand Marcos Jr, also known as Bongbong Marcos, who just became President-Elect there last month. Marcos Sr was a dictatorial kleptocrat, one of the worst leaders of the latter half of the twentieth century, but that wasn't evident yet. He'd been elected only a few months earlier, and had presented himself as a Kennedy-like figure -- a young man who was also a war hero. He'd recently switched parties from the Liberal party to the right-wing Nacionalista Party, but wasn't yet being thought of as the monstrous dictator he later became. The person organising the Philippines shows had been ordered to get the Beatles to visit Ferdinand and Imelda Marcos at 11AM on the day of the show, but for some reason had instead put on their itinerary just the *suggestion* that the group should meet the Marcoses, and had put the time down as 3PM, and the Beatles chose to ignore that suggestion -- they'd refused to do that kind of government-official meet-and-greet ever since an incident in 1964 at the British Embassy in Washington where someone had cut off a bit of Ringo's hair. A military escort turned up at the group's hotel in the morning, to take them for their meeting. The group were all still in their rooms, and Brian Epstein was still eating breakfast and refused to disturb them, saying "Go back and tell the generals we're not coming." The group gave their performances as scheduled, but meanwhile there was outrage at the way the Beatles had refused to meet the Marcos family, who had brought hundreds of children -- friends of their own children, and relatives of top officials -- to a party to meet the group. Brian Epstein went on TV and tried to smooth things over, but the broadcast was interrupted by static and his message didn't get through to anyone. The next day, the group's security was taken away, as were the cars to take them to the airport. When they got to the airport, the escalators were turned off and the group were beaten up at the arrangement of the airport manager, who said in 1984 "I beat up the Beatles. I really thumped them. First I socked Epstein and he went down... then I socked Lennon and Ringo in the face. I was kicking them. They were pleading like frightened chickens. That's what happens when you insult the First Lady." Even on the plane there were further problems -- Brian Epstein and the group's road manager Mal Evans were both made to get off the plane to sort out supposed financial discrepancies, which led to them worrying that they were going to be arrested or worse -- Evans told the group to tell his wife he loved her as he left the plane. But eventually, they were able to leave, and after a brief layover in India -- which Ringo later said was the first time he felt he'd been somewhere truly foreign, as opposed to places like Germany or the USA which felt basically like home -- they got back to England: [Excerpt: "Ordinary passenger!"] When asked what they were going to do next, George replied “We're going to have a couple of weeks to recuperate before we go and get beaten up by the Americans,” The story of the "we're bigger than Jesus" controversy is one of the most widely misreported events in the lives of the Beatles, which is saying a great deal. One book that I've encountered, and one book only, Steve Turner's Beatles '66, tells the story of what actually happened, and even that book seems to miss some emphases. I've pieced what follows together from Turner's book and from an academic journal article I found which has some more detail. As far as I can tell, every single other book on the Beatles released up to this point bases their account of the story on an inaccurate press statement put out by Brian Epstein, not on the truth. Here's the story as it's generally told. John Lennon gave an interview to his friend, Maureen Cleave of the Evening Standard, during which he made some comments about how it was depressing that Christianity was losing relevance in the eyes of the public, and that the Beatles are more popular than Jesus, speaking casually because he was talking to a friend. That story was run in the Evening Standard more-or-less unnoticed, but then an American teen magazine picked up on the line about the Beatles being bigger than Jesus, reprinted chunks of the interview out of context and without the Beatles' knowledge or permission, as a way to stir up controversy, and there was an outcry, with people burning Beatles records and death threats from the Ku Klux Klan. That's... not exactly what happened. The first thing that you need to understand to know what happened is that Datebook wasn't a typical teen magazine. It *looked* just like a typical teen magazine, certainly, and much of its content was the kind of thing that you would get in Tiger Beat or any of the other magazines aimed at teenage girls -- the September 1966 issue was full of articles like "Life with the Walker Brothers... by their Road Manager", and interviews with the Dave Clark Five -- but it also had a long history of publishing material that was intended to make its readers think about social issues of the time, particularly Civil Rights. Arthur Unger, the magazine's editor and publisher, was a gay man in an interracial relationship, and while the subject of homosexuality was too taboo in the late fifties and sixties for him to have his magazine cover that, he did regularly include articles decrying segregation and calling for the girls reading the magazine to do their part on a personal level to stamp out racism. Datebook had regularly contained articles like one from 1963 talking about how segregation wasn't just a problem in the South, saying "If we are so ‘integrated' why must men in my own city of Philadelphia, the city of Brotherly Love, picket city hall because they are discriminated against when it comes to getting a job? And how come I am still unable to take my dark- complexioned friends to the same roller skating rink or swimming pool that I attend?” One of the writers for the magazine later said “We were much more than an entertainment magazine . . . . We tried to get kids involved in social issues . . . . It was a well-received magazine, recommended by libraries and schools, but during the Civil Rights period we did get pulled off a lot of stands in the South because of our views on integration” Art Unger, the editor and publisher, wasn't the only one pushing this liberal, integrationist, agenda. The managing editor at the time, Danny Fields, was another gay man who wanted to push the magazine even further than Unger, and who would later go on to manage the Stooges and the Ramones, being credited by some as being the single most important figure in punk rock's development, and being immortalised by the Ramones in their song "Danny Says": [Excerpt: The Ramones, "Danny Says"] So this was not a normal teen magazine, and that's certainly shown by the cover of the September 1966 issue, which as well as talking about the interviews with John Lennon and Paul McCartney inside, also advertised articles on Timothy Leary advising people to turn on, tune in, and drop out; an editorial about how interracial dating must be the next step after desegregation of schools, and a piece on "the ten adults you dig/hate the most" -- apparently the adult most teens dug in 1966 was Jackie Kennedy, the most hated was Barry Goldwater, and President Johnson, Billy Graham, and Martin Luther King appeared in the top ten on both lists. Now, in the early part of the year Maureen Cleave had done a whole series of articles on the Beatles -- double-page spreads on each band member, plus Brian Epstein, visiting them in their own homes (apart from Paul, who she met at a restaurant) and discussing their daily lives, their thoughts, and portraying them as rounded individuals. These articles are actually fascinating, because of something that everyone who met the Beatles in this period pointed out. When interviewed separately, all of them came across as thoughtful individuals, with their own opinions about all sorts of subjects, and their own tastes and senses of humour. But when two or more of them were together -- especially when John and Paul were interviewed together, but even in social situations, they would immediately revert to flip in-jokes and riffing on each other's statements, never revealing anything about themselves as individuals, but just going into Beatle mode -- simultaneously preserving the band's image, closing off outsiders, *and* making sure they didn't do or say anything that would get them mocked by the others. Cleave, as someone who actually took them all seriously, managed to get some very revealing information about all of them. In the article on Ringo, which is the most superficial -- one gets the impression that Cleave found him rather difficult to talk to when compared to the other, more verbally facile, band members -- she talked about how he had a lot of Wild West and military memorabilia, how he was a devoted family man and also devoted to his friends -- he had moved to the suburbs to be close to John and George, who already lived there. The most revealing quote about Ringo's personality was him saying "Of course that's the great thing about being married -- you have a house to sit in and company all the time. And you can still go to clubs, a bonus for being married. I love being a family man." While she looked at the other Beatles' tastes in literature in detail, she'd noted that the only books Ringo owned that weren't just for show were a few science fiction paperbacks, but that as he said "I'm not thick, it's just that I'm not educated. People can use words and I won't know what they mean. I say 'me' instead of 'my'." Ringo also didn't have a drum kit at home, saying he only played when he was on stage or in the studio, and that you couldn't practice on your own, you needed to play with other people. In the article on George, she talked about how he was learning the sitar,  and how he was thinking that it might be a good idea to go to India to study the sitar with Ravi Shankar for six months. She also talks about how during the interview, he played the guitar pretty much constantly, playing everything from songs from "Hello Dolly" to pieces by Bach to "the Trumpet Voluntary", by which she presumably means Clarke's "Prince of Denmark's March": [Excerpt: Jeremiah Clarke, "Prince of Denmark's March"] George was also the most outspoken on the subjects of politics, religion, and society, linking the ongoing war in Vietnam with the UK's reverence for the Second World War, saying "I think about it every day and it's wrong. Anything to do with war is wrong. They're all wrapped up in their Nelsons and their Churchills and their Montys -- always talking about war heroes. Look at All Our Yesterdays [a show on ITV that showed twenty-five-year-old newsreels] -- how we killed a few more Huns here and there. Makes me sick. They're the sort who are leaning on their walking sticks and telling us a few years in the army would do us good." He also had very strong words to say about religion, saying "I think religion falls flat on its face. All this 'love thy neighbour' but none of them are doing it. How can anybody get into the position of being Pope and accept all the glory and the money and the Mercedes-Benz and that? I could never be Pope until I'd sold my rich gates and my posh hat. I couldn't sit there with all that money on me and believe I was religious. Why can't we bring all this out in the open? Why is there all this stuff about blasphemy? If Christianity's as good as they say it is, it should stand up to a bit of discussion." Harrison also comes across as a very private person, saying "People keep saying, ‘We made you what you are,' well, I made Mr. Hovis what he is and I don't go round crawling over his gates and smashing up the wall round his house." (Hovis is a British company that makes bread and wholegrain flour). But more than anything else he comes across as an instinctive anti-authoritarian, being angry at bullying teachers, Popes, and Prime Ministers. McCartney's profile has him as the most self-consciously arty -- he talks about the plays of Alfred Jarry and the music of Karlheinz Stockhausen and Luciano Berio: [Excerpt: Luciano Berio, "Momenti (for magnetic tape)"] Though he was very worried that he might be sounding a little too pretentious, saying “I don't want to sound like Jonathan Miller going on" --