Podcasts about Pakistan

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard

Country in South Asia

  • 5,592PODCASTS
  • 14,074EPISODES
  • 39mAVG DURATION
  • 9DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 16, 2021LATEST
Pakistan

POPULARITY

20112012201320142015201620172018201920202021


Best podcasts about Pakistan

Show all podcasts related to pakistan

Latest podcast episodes about Pakistan

The History Hour
The Pakistani law that jailed rape survivors

The History Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 56:54


Under legislation known as the Hudood Ordinances introduced in 1979, a nearly blind teenaged rape survivor was jailed herself for having sex outside marriage. In 1983 Safia Bibi was sentenced to three years imprisonment, 15 lashes and a fine. The verdict and the draconian punishment galvanised the women's rights movement in Pakistan. Also in the programme the terrible price paid by an abortion doctor in 1990s America, the rise of a fascist movement in 1960s Britain plus the Saudi author who shook up Arabic fiction in the early 2000s and from 1987 how a baby stuck down a well in Texas gripped the world's attention.

Thought Behind Things
156 | Candid With Usman Mukhtar

Thought Behind Things

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 63:37


Be part of our community by joining our Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/thoughtbehindthings Tonight, we have with us ‘Anaa' and ‘Hum Kahan Ke Sachay Thay' famed actor, Usman Mukhtar. This episode explores his journey from Kuch Khaas to the Pakistani drama and film industry. Does he come from a traditional family? How were his early years? Did he always want to pursue acting? What had he thought about the content industry in his early days? How Kuch Khaas made a huge difference in his life? What Kuch Khaas is? What does he feel about the Pakistani drama industry? Why are we not producing serials like Turkish dramas? What does he think about OTT and Netflix's original content in Pakistan? How ‘Anaa' made a huge difference in his career? Tune in to know more on Hum Kahan Ke Sachay Thay, the future of cinema, social media commentary, online hate speech, and Pakistan of 2050! Connect with us: • https://www.instagram.com/thoughtbehindthings • https://www.instagram.com/muzamilhasan Usman Mukhtar's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/mukhtarhoonmein/ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/syed-muzamil-hasan-zaidi3/support

Events from the Brookings Institution
The future of US-Pakistan relations

Events from the Brookings Institution

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 62:53


On October 13, the Center for Middle East Policy addressed how the Taliban takeover in Afghanistan, understanding the role Pakistan will play, both in the region, and with the United States, has become increasingly important. Subscribe to Brookings Events on iTunes, send feedback email to events@brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. To learn more about upcoming events, visit our website. Brookings Events is part of the Brookings Podcast Network.

Last Word
Abdul Qadeer Khan (pictured), R. Allen Gardner, Joyce Jackson, Beresford King-Smith

Last Word

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 28:06


Matthew Bannister on Dr. Abdul Qadeer Khan, once described as the world's most dangerous man - but hailed as a hero in his native Pakistan for leading the country's development of nuclear weapons. Dr. R. Allen Gardner, the American ethologist who trained a chimpanzee to use sign language. Beresford King-Smith, who played a key backstage role in the success of the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra. And memories of the long life of Joyce Jackson who has died aged 107. Interviewed guest: Stephen Maddock OBE Interviewed guest: Mary Lee Jensvold Interviewed guest: Umer Farooq Interviewed guest: Gordon Corera Interviewed guest: Mary Lee Jensvold Interviewed guest: Sarah Allatt Archive clips used: DocsOnline, Nuclear Tango 26/05/2009; AP, Clinton condemns Pakistans Nuclear Tests 28/05/1998; Al Jazeera English, Abdul Qadeer Khan 10/10/2021; Geo News, Funeral prayers for Dr Abdul Qadeer Khan 10/10/2021; WGBH, BBC Horizon - Washoe the Chimp 04/11/1974; YouTube, Unidentified clip of Beatrix and Allen Gardner with Washoe the Chimp 13/02/2009; Sarah Allatt, Private interviews of Joyce Jackson 2021; BBC, Scrapbook for 1924 23/02/1955; British Pathé, Sir Alan Cobham shows how he will refuel in the air 1934; Inter-Pathé History, British Declaration of War 03/09/1939; BBC Radio 4, On The Town - Birmingham 02/01/1980; Central Television, Simon Rattle on the Record 1988.

The Fifth Floor
Why I became a journalist

The Fifth Floor

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 41:45


For many the decision to become a journalist emerges slowly, but not for Nataliya Zotova. Writing was always a passion, and the killing of Novaya Gazeta's Anna Politkovskaya inspired her to work at the same newspaper. She shares her journey from shy teenager to BBC Russian reporter. The Chinese workers who live in fear in Pakistan Chinese workers who move to Pakistan to work on projects connected to China's Belt and Road initiative are increasingly being targetted by local militant groups. BBC Urdu's Sarah Atiq visited a factory in Balochistan where the Chinese employees have to live on site under armed guard. Give us back our gold! The theme of stolen gold is a popular internet meme used by Brazilians against the Portuguese. Brazil had a huge gold rush in the 18th century, and there's a feeling that nearly all that wealth ended up in Portugal. As BBC Brasil's Vitor Tavares explains, the real story is much more complex. 1, 2, 3: counting around the world Counting on your fingers is as easy as 1, 2, 3 right? But do you start with your thumb, or your pinkie, or even your index finger? Maybe you get clever and use each finger segment to triple up the number? Counting around the world, with Suping of BBC Chinese, Devina Gupta of BBC Hindi, Grigor Atanesian of BBC Russian and Iman Mohammed of BBC Somali. Vietnam's pets killed for Covid Vietnam's extended lockdowns have left many people out of work and forced them to return to their home towns. The story of one family's return sparked outrage when the authorities destroyed their pets – 15 dogs and 1 cat. BBC Vietnamese journalist Bui Thu spoke to the family. Image: Nataliya Zotova at work Credit: Georgy Malets

New Books in Literary Studies
Siobhan Lambert-Hurley, "Elusive Lives: Gender, Autobiography, and the Self in Muslim South Asia" (Stanford UP, 2018)

New Books in Literary Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 56:58


Muslim South Asia is widely characterized as a culture that idealizes female anonymity: women's bodies are veiled and their voices silenced. Challenging these perceptions, Siobhan Lambert-Hurley, University of Sheffield, highlights an elusive strand of autobiographical writing dating back several centuries that offers a new lens through which to study notions of selfhood. In Elusive Lives: Gender, Autobiography, and the Self in Muslim South Asia (Stanford University Press, 2018), she locates the voices of Muslim women who rejected taboos against women speaking out, by telling their life stories in written autobiography.  To chart patterns across time and space, materials dated from the sixteenth century to the present are drawn from across South Asia – including present-day India, Pakistan and Bangladesh. Lambert-Hurley uses many rare autobiographical texts in a wide array of languages to elaborate a theoretical model for gender, autobiography, and the self beyond the usual Euro-American frame. In doing so, she works toward a new, globalized history of the field. Ultimately, Elusive Lives points to the sheer diversity of Muslim women's lives and life stories, offering a unique window into a history of the everyday against a backdrop of imperialism, reformism, nationalism and feminism. In our conversation we discuss autobiographical writing, travelogues, letters, diaries, interviews, low literacy rates, the social and physical geographies of authors, reasons Muslim women narrated their life, the role of editors, translators, on publishers, intended and unintended audiences, the actress Begum Khurshid Mirza, and gender difference across autobiographies. Kristian Petersen is an Assistant Professor of Philosophy & Religious Studies at Old Dominion University. You can find out more about his work on his website, follow him on Twitter @BabaKristian, or email him at kpeterse@odu.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literary-studies

New Books in Islamic Studies
Siobhan Lambert-Hurley, "Elusive Lives: Gender, Autobiography, and the Self in Muslim South Asia" (Stanford UP, 2018)

New Books in Islamic Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 56:58


Muslim South Asia is widely characterized as a culture that idealizes female anonymity: women's bodies are veiled and their voices silenced. Challenging these perceptions, Siobhan Lambert-Hurley, University of Sheffield, highlights an elusive strand of autobiographical writing dating back several centuries that offers a new lens through which to study notions of selfhood. In Elusive Lives: Gender, Autobiography, and the Self in Muslim South Asia (Stanford University Press, 2018), she locates the voices of Muslim women who rejected taboos against women speaking out, by telling their life stories in written autobiography.  To chart patterns across time and space, materials dated from the sixteenth century to the present are drawn from across South Asia – including present-day India, Pakistan and Bangladesh. Lambert-Hurley uses many rare autobiographical texts in a wide array of languages to elaborate a theoretical model for gender, autobiography, and the self beyond the usual Euro-American frame. In doing so, she works toward a new, globalized history of the field. Ultimately, Elusive Lives points to the sheer diversity of Muslim women's lives and life stories, offering a unique window into a history of the everyday against a backdrop of imperialism, reformism, nationalism and feminism. In our conversation we discuss autobiographical writing, travelogues, letters, diaries, interviews, low literacy rates, the social and physical geographies of authors, reasons Muslim women narrated their life, the role of editors, translators, on publishers, intended and unintended audiences, the actress Begum Khurshid Mirza, and gender difference across autobiographies. Kristian Petersen is an Assistant Professor of Philosophy & Religious Studies at Old Dominion University. You can find out more about his work on his website, follow him on Twitter @BabaKristian, or email him at kpeterse@odu.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/islamic-studies

New Books Network
Siobhan Lambert-Hurley, "Elusive Lives: Gender, Autobiography, and the Self in Muslim South Asia" (Stanford UP, 2018)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 56:58


Muslim South Asia is widely characterized as a culture that idealizes female anonymity: women's bodies are veiled and their voices silenced. Challenging these perceptions, Siobhan Lambert-Hurley, University of Sheffield, highlights an elusive strand of autobiographical writing dating back several centuries that offers a new lens through which to study notions of selfhood. In Elusive Lives: Gender, Autobiography, and the Self in Muslim South Asia (Stanford University Press, 2018), she locates the voices of Muslim women who rejected taboos against women speaking out, by telling their life stories in written autobiography.  To chart patterns across time and space, materials dated from the sixteenth century to the present are drawn from across South Asia – including present-day India, Pakistan and Bangladesh. Lambert-Hurley uses many rare autobiographical texts in a wide array of languages to elaborate a theoretical model for gender, autobiography, and the self beyond the usual Euro-American frame. In doing so, she works toward a new, globalized history of the field. Ultimately, Elusive Lives points to the sheer diversity of Muslim women's lives and life stories, offering a unique window into a history of the everyday against a backdrop of imperialism, reformism, nationalism and feminism. In our conversation we discuss autobiographical writing, travelogues, letters, diaries, interviews, low literacy rates, the social and physical geographies of authors, reasons Muslim women narrated their life, the role of editors, translators, on publishers, intended and unintended audiences, the actress Begum Khurshid Mirza, and gender difference across autobiographies. Kristian Petersen is an Assistant Professor of Philosophy & Religious Studies at Old Dominion University. You can find out more about his work on his website, follow him on Twitter @BabaKristian, or email him at kpeterse@odu.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Sociology
Siobhan Lambert-Hurley, "Elusive Lives: Gender, Autobiography, and the Self in Muslim South Asia" (Stanford UP, 2018)

New Books in Sociology

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 56:58


Muslim South Asia is widely characterized as a culture that idealizes female anonymity: women's bodies are veiled and their voices silenced. Challenging these perceptions, Siobhan Lambert-Hurley, University of Sheffield, highlights an elusive strand of autobiographical writing dating back several centuries that offers a new lens through which to study notions of selfhood. In Elusive Lives: Gender, Autobiography, and the Self in Muslim South Asia (Stanford University Press, 2018), she locates the voices of Muslim women who rejected taboos against women speaking out, by telling their life stories in written autobiography.  To chart patterns across time and space, materials dated from the sixteenth century to the present are drawn from across South Asia – including present-day India, Pakistan and Bangladesh. Lambert-Hurley uses many rare autobiographical texts in a wide array of languages to elaborate a theoretical model for gender, autobiography, and the self beyond the usual Euro-American frame. In doing so, she works toward a new, globalized history of the field. Ultimately, Elusive Lives points to the sheer diversity of Muslim women's lives and life stories, offering a unique window into a history of the everyday against a backdrop of imperialism, reformism, nationalism and feminism. In our conversation we discuss autobiographical writing, travelogues, letters, diaries, interviews, low literacy rates, the social and physical geographies of authors, reasons Muslim women narrated their life, the role of editors, translators, on publishers, intended and unintended audiences, the actress Begum Khurshid Mirza, and gender difference across autobiographies. Kristian Petersen is an Assistant Professor of Philosophy & Religious Studies at Old Dominion University. You can find out more about his work on his website, follow him on Twitter @BabaKristian, or email him at kpeterse@odu.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/sociology

New Books in Gender Studies
Siobhan Lambert-Hurley, "Elusive Lives: Gender, Autobiography, and the Self in Muslim South Asia" (Stanford UP, 2018)

New Books in Gender Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 56:58


Muslim South Asia is widely characterized as a culture that idealizes female anonymity: women's bodies are veiled and their voices silenced. Challenging these perceptions, Siobhan Lambert-Hurley, University of Sheffield, highlights an elusive strand of autobiographical writing dating back several centuries that offers a new lens through which to study notions of selfhood. In Elusive Lives: Gender, Autobiography, and the Self in Muslim South Asia (Stanford University Press, 2018), she locates the voices of Muslim women who rejected taboos against women speaking out, by telling their life stories in written autobiography.  To chart patterns across time and space, materials dated from the sixteenth century to the present are drawn from across South Asia – including present-day India, Pakistan and Bangladesh. Lambert-Hurley uses many rare autobiographical texts in a wide array of languages to elaborate a theoretical model for gender, autobiography, and the self beyond the usual Euro-American frame. In doing so, she works toward a new, globalized history of the field. Ultimately, Elusive Lives points to the sheer diversity of Muslim women's lives and life stories, offering a unique window into a history of the everyday against a backdrop of imperialism, reformism, nationalism and feminism. In our conversation we discuss autobiographical writing, travelogues, letters, diaries, interviews, low literacy rates, the social and physical geographies of authors, reasons Muslim women narrated their life, the role of editors, translators, on publishers, intended and unintended audiences, the actress Begum Khurshid Mirza, and gender difference across autobiographies. Kristian Petersen is an Assistant Professor of Philosophy & Religious Studies at Old Dominion University. You can find out more about his work on his website, follow him on Twitter @BabaKristian, or email him at kpeterse@odu.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/gender-studies

News Du Jour
Thursday, October 14th 2021

News Du Jour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 12:52


Today on News Du Jour, we cover an earthquake in Pakistan, suburban couple attempts to sell US military secrets, a man with a bow and arrow killed several people in Norway, and a loud BOOM in New Hampshire still has experts scratching their heads. — BECOME A PATRON OF OUR PODCAST: www.patreon.com/sugarfreemedia Wear our merch! www.sugarfreemedia.co/shop Connect with us: + EMAIL: team@sugarfreemedia.co + WEBSITE + SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTER: www.sugarfreemedia.co + INSTAGRAM: www.instagram.com/sugarfreemedia.co + TIKTOK: www.TikTok.com/@sugarfreemedia + TWITTER: www.twitter.com/sugarfree_media ☕️ News Du Jour is a short daily news recap. We condense each day's stories into a 10-15 minute format and always relay the stories in a calm, digestible format. We cover everything from politics, to fashion, to art, to business, to tech, to celebrity, to world news and more. Be sure to subscribe so you to stay up to date with day-to-day unfolding news stories. ☕️ If you enjoy the News Du Jour, be sure to leave us a review/rating! We would also REALLY appreciate you sharing our podcast with your friends/ family/ colleagues or via all your favorite social media platforms.You can also always READ the News Du Jour on our website at: https://sugarfreemedia.co/category/news-du-jour/ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/newsdujour/support

Making a Killing
Ep. 25: Pandora Papers Fallout

Making a Killing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 29:56


Casey, Nate and Paul discuss the biggest stories emerging from Azerbaijan, Chile, Czech Republic, Pakistan and elsewhere, amid calls for heightened scrutiny of the professional enablers of transnational corruption—including many American lawyers.

Borderline
Will Buckingham | Leave the door open to strangers

Borderline

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 42:10


Will Buckingham gave me my new favourite word. He's a philosopher so it's only right the word should be Greek. Philoxenia is the word. Love of the foreign. It's that sense of curiosity, desire to connect and good will that make us seek out those we don't know and invite them to share our hearth. It's the cat that runs up to a house guest to smell his hand and rub against new legs. But we fear the stranger too as much as we wish for him. The cat hisses, scratches and hides under the sofa. You know that word – xenophobia. Will Buckingham explores what the stranger means to us and why philoxenia is worth cultivating. In this episode: 

Thought Behind Things
155 | Earning Passive Income Through Stocks Ft. Ali Farid Khwaja

Thought Behind Things

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 53:25


Be part of our community by joining our Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/thoughtbehindthings Exploring stocks, trading, and investments with tonight's guest, Ali Farid Khwaja. Where has he done his high schooling and college from? How he was one of the top technology analysts in Europe? Where has he worked before K-trade? What's K-trade? Wasn't it known as KASB before and how this structure works? What are the average age demographics of the investors they have? What is a zero-risk product? How stock investment is more powerful? Why should one invest in business partnerships? How does K-trade plan to attract Gen-Z and the non-investors majority in Pakistan? Tune in know more on trading, PSX, earning through stocks, and investment as part of pop culture! Do not forget to subscribe and press the bell icon to catch on to some amazing conversations coming your way! Connect with us: • https://www.instagram.com/thoughtbehindthings • https://www.instagram.com/muzamilhasan Ali Farid Khwaja's LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/alifaridkhwaja --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/syed-muzamil-hasan-zaidi3/support

The World of Intelligence
Cryptocurrency and Terrorist Financing in the Middle East and North Africa

The World of Intelligence

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 36:09


In this episode we discuss the use of various cryptocurrencies in terrorist financing in the Middle East and Africa. Ahmed Buckley is an independent expert serving on the Analytical Support and Monitoring Team supporting the UN Security Council Committee concerning sanctions. An ACAMS Certified Global Sanctions Specialist, Ahmed co-designed and delivered trainings on sanctions implementation and compliance to national authorities, financial institutions, as well as to trainees at NATO's Defense Against Terrorism Centre of Excellence. He co-drafted the Joint Report on Actions Taken by Member States to Disrupt Terrorism Finance pursuant to UNSC resolution 2462 (2019). He was previously Deputy Director of the Global Counterterrorism Unit at Egypt's Ministry of Foreign Affairs and served diplomatic postings in Pakistan and Canada.

The Intelligence
Keep your friends close: Pakistan's shifting role

The Intelligence

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 21:01


As the Taliban's closest ally, the country bears a big responsibility for Afghanistan's fate. We examine its diplomatic risks and opportunities. Mastercard is pressing porn purveyors this week; we look at how financial companies are reluctantly stepping up as the internet's police. And a timely social-inequality take drives South Korea's “Squid Game” to the top of Netflix's charts worldwide.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Economist Radio
Keep your friends close: Pakistan's shifting role

Economist Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 21:01


As the Taliban's closest ally, the country bears a big responsibility for Afghanistan's fate. We examine its diplomatic risks and opportunities. Mastercard is pressing porn purveyors this week; we look at how financial companies are reluctantly stepping up as the internet's police. And a timely social-inequality take drives South Korea's “Squid Game” to the top of Netflix's charts worldwide.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jacobin Radio
Dig: Afghanistan with Tariq Ali

Jacobin Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 115:41


Legendary socialist scholar Tariq Ali on the long history of Afghanistan: the 19th and early 20th-century wars against the British Empire; the communist coup, Soviet invasion, and US-backed mujahideen war; the rise of the Taliban; and the 2001 US-led NATO invasion through the recent US defeat and withdrawal. Plus, a lot about Pakistan. Pre-order Ali's forthcoming book The Forty-Year War in Afghanistan: A Chronicle Foretold versobooks.com/books/3939-the-forty-year-war-in-afghanistanSupport this podcast at Patreon.com/TheDig and receive our weekly newsletter

The Dig
Afghanistan with Tariq Ali

The Dig

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021


Legendary socialist scholar Tariq Ali on the long history of Afghanistan: the 19th and early 20th-century wars against the British Empire; the communist coup, Soviet invasion, and US-backed mujahideen war; the rise of the Taliban; and the 2001 US-led NATO invasion through the recent US defeat and withdrawal. Plus, a lot about Pakistan. Pre-order Ali's forthcoming book The Forty-Year War in Afghanistan: A Chronicle Foretold versobooks.com/books/3939-the-forty-year-war-in-afghanistan Support this podcast at Patreon.com/TheDig and receive our weekly newsletter

Very Good Trip
Voix et sons du monde entier, d'Elaha Soroor (Afghanistan) à Arooj Aftab (Pakistan)

Very Good Trip

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 53:42


durée : 00:53:42 - Very Good Trip - par : Michka Assayas - Ce soir, Very Good Trip vous emmène sur un tapis volant. On décolle et on s'envole au cœur une belle nuit étoilée.

ThePrint
CutTheClutter: Good news as India dumps diesel cars — how fuel pricing led to behaviour change

ThePrint

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 19:21


Data identifies a positive new trend in the collapse of the sale of the more polluting Diesel cars. Shekhar Gupta explains what is the surprising correlation between the price of diesel and the sale of diesel cars since the Modi government withdrew fuel subsidy. And why the stalemate in new ISI chief's appointment underlines a power tussle in Pakistan. Episode 855 of CutTheClutter. Brought to you by  @Kia India  ----more----Read Nikhil Rampal's article on diesel here: https://theprint.in/economy/from-58-to-17-market-share-why-indians-dont-like-diesel-cars-anymore/747710/----more----Read Snehesh Alex Philip's article here: https://theprint.in/defence/latest-india-china-military-talks-fail-as-beijing-refuses-to-disengage-de-escalate-in-ladakh/748781/----more----Read India's statement on 13th India-China corps commander level meeting here: https://mea.gov.in/press-releases.htm?dtl/34372/13th+round+of+IndiaChina+Corps+Commander+Level+Meeting----more----Read China's statement on India-China military talks here: http://eng.mod.gov.cn/news/2021-10/11/content_4896453.htm

Made in Germany: Your Business Magazine
Sustainable jeans: Made in Pakistan

Made in Germany: Your Business Magazine

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 7:12


The Crescent Bahuman Group is one of Asia's largest textile manufacturers and a poster child for ethical manufacturing. Crescent prides itself on fair conditions and pay. Consumers can trace the clothes they buy back to the producer.

The Grade Cricketer
173. Squad Game, with Graeme Swann

The Grade Cricketer

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 133:03


Cops turning up to stop a net? Ok. BBL nightmare rule changes. Australian women are the best in the world.. for now. Ali Martin from The Guardian to discuss the announcement of England's Ashes squad. Do runs in The Sheffield Shield count anymore? The IPL gets to the pointy end. The World Cup is around the corner. Graeme Swann is sensational and gives us many, many Ashes stories + what it was like playing in the Pakistan spot-fixed game at Lord's in 2010. #AskTGC questions how much cricket knowledge a romantic partner should have, ideally. If you want to be a part of TGC's Visceral Minute, hit the link below:https://www.speakpipe.com/TGCCheck out our Patreon for exclusive content every single week at https://www.patreon.com/gradecricketerThis episode is brought to you by Budgy Smuggler. You can get free shipping on your order by using the code 'CHAMP' at https://www.budgysmuggler.com.auT20 Stars products are made from one of the best cricket manufacturers in the world and they have cut out the middle person so the cricket gear goes straight from the manufacturer to you. Free shipping and free returns - visit www.t20stars.comYou can follow The Grade Cricketer on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter:https://www.facebook.com/gradecricketerhttps://www.instagram.com/thegradecricketer/https://twitter.com/gradecricketerThe Grade Cricketer hosts are Ian Higgins and Sam Perry.You can follow them on Instagram and Twitter:Ian Higgins:https://www.instagram.com/higgins_ian/https://twitter.com/1an_HigginsSam Perry:https://www.instagram.com/sj_perry/https://twitter.com/sjjperry

Oborne & Heller on Cricket
A great umpire raises his finger against discrimination in cricket

Oborne & Heller on Cricket

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 51:50


After a first-class career as a pace bowler for Hampshire, John Holder became one of England's finest umpires. He was a popular expert on Test Match Special and the regular Observer newspaper feature “You Are The Umpire.” On the first-class list from 1983 to 2009 , he joined the Test panel in 1988 and after only a handful of matches was chosen to be one of the first “third-country” Test umpires for a dramatic series between Pakistan and India. But his Test career was interrupted without explanation for ten years after his report on a controversial home Test match. As the latest guest of Peter Oborne and Richard Heller in their cricket-themed podcast he explains why, years after retirement, he brought a legal action against the England and Wales Cricket Board not only for himself but also to ventilate racial discrimination issues in English cricket.  In Peter's absence in Pakistan, author and broadcaster Mihir Bose takes over at the Pavilion End.Read the full description here: https://chiswickcalendar.co.uk/episode-67-a-great-umpire-raises-his-finger-against-discrimination-in-cricket/Get in contact by emailing obornehellercricket@outlook.com

81 All Out
'A match that you watch from the stadium is a sacred thing': an interview with the historian Mukul Kesavan

81 All Out

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 124:46


In this episode, we chat with author, essayist, and perceptive cricket columnist Mukul Kesavan Click here to support 81allout on Kofi Talking Points: Viswanath - 'this extraordinarily skilled and beautiful Teddy Bear playing cricket' | Watching Imran Khan bowl live for the first time | The "neat perfection" of Sunil Gavaskar | Neville Cardus - and "everything undesirable about cricket writing | The thunderous silence around Wasim Jaffer | The IPL in Delhi during the the pandemic | The significance of Mohammad Siraj Participants: Mukul Kesavan; Siddhartha Vaidyanathan (@sidvee); Mahesh Sethuraman (@cornerd) Related: Beyond borders; Watching, hoping, praying; The Viswanath problem; No room for bigotry; Jaffer alone; The nation state and modern sport - The India Forum; A fairy tale on the field; India; Cricketing memory and a quest for rare videos; Men in White; Brightly Fades the Don; Cricket Crisis; Pundits from Pakistan; Chinaman; The Match; A Corner of a Foreign Field; Anyone But England; Beyond a Boundary; Triumph and Tragedy in Mudville

The John Batchelor Show
1757: #AfterAfghanistan: What is the TTP (Movement of the Taliban in Pakistan) threat to Pakistan? @BillRoggio @ThomasJoscelyn @LongWarJournal

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 9:00


Photo: Flag of Tehrik-i-Taliban (the Pakistani Taliban) CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow #AfterAfghanistan:  What is the TTP (Movement of the Taliban in Pakistan) threat to Pakistan?  @BillRoggio @ThomasJoscelyn @LongWarJournal https://www.longwarjournal.org/archives/2021/10/movement-of-the-taliban-in-pakistan-ttp-consolidates-power-in-tribal-areas.php

PBS NewsHour - Segments
A look at the life of A.Q. Khan, scientist behind Pakistan's nuclear weapons program

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 4:16


The father of Pakistan's atomic bomb and a proponent of nuclear proliferation, Abdul Qadeer Khan, died Sunday at the age of 85 after a lengthy battle with COVID-19. He was a figure mired in controversy who launched Pakistan's nuclear weapons program, but also admitted to sharing nuclear technology secrets with Iran, Libya, and North Korea. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - World
A look at the life of A.Q. Khan, scientist behind Pakistan's nuclear weapons program

PBS NewsHour - World

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 4:16


The father of Pakistan's atomic bomb and a proponent of nuclear proliferation, Abdul Qadeer Khan, died Sunday at the age of 85 after a lengthy battle with COVID-19. He was a figure mired in controversy who launched Pakistan's nuclear weapons program, but also admitted to sharing nuclear technology secrets with Iran, Libya, and North Korea. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Simple English News Daily
Tuesday 12th October 2021. World News. Today: Yemen oil tanker. Pakistan PM attacks India. Iraq shia wins. Australians go outside. Ethiopia

Simple English News Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 7:52


World News in 7 minutes. Tuesday 12th October 2021.Transcript at: send7.org/transcripts Today: Yemen oil tanker. Pakistan PM attacks India. Iraq shia wins. Australians go outside. Ethiopia army attacks. Burkina Faso assassination trial. Brazil Bolsonaro blocks tampons. Chile Piñera corruption. Austria new chancelor. Poland Pro EU protests. Greece robot postmen.Send your opinion or experience by email to podcast@send7.org or send an audio message at send7.org for us to broadcast. With Stephen Devincenzi.SEND7 (Simple English News Daily in 7 minutes) tells news in intermediate English. Every day, listen to the most important stories in the world in slow, clear English. This easy English news podcast is perfect for English learners, people with English as a second language, and people who want to hear a fast news update from around the world. Learn English through hard topics, but simple grammar. SEND7 covers all news including politics, business, natural events and human rights. For more information visit send7.org/contact

Thought Behind Things
154 | Raising Millions For Your Startup Ft. Dastgyr - Saif Ali

Thought Behind Things

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 68:22


Be part of our community by joining our Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/thoughtbehindthings In conversation with Saif Ali from Dastgyr, this episode explores startup culture in Pakistan. What's Dastgyr? What is the mafia effect? How to get fundings for your startup? How to raise millions for your startups? What is Pakistan's image to global investors? What role government can play to support startups? Do we have talent in Pakistan? What's the failure of banks in Pakistan? How difficult it is to get a credit card in Pakistan? What's the power of a good credit score? How to sell your product to consumers? Tune in to know more on Evergrande China, loan paybacks, retail e-commerce, microfinancing, and Pakistan of 2050! Connect with us: • https://www.instagram.com/thoughtbehindthings • https://www.instagram.com/muzamilhasan Saif Ali's LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/saifali1 Dastgyr's Insta: https://www.instagram.com/dastgyrtech/ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/syed-muzamil-hasan-zaidi3/support

Westminster Institute talks
Taliban Treatment of Women and Minorities in Afghanistan with Farahnaz Ispahani

Westminster Institute talks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 57:20


Farahnaz Ispahani is a Public Policy Fellow at the Wilson Center in Washington, DC and the author of the book Purifying The Land of The Pure: The History of Pakistan's Religious Minorities (Oxford University Press, 2017). In 2015, she was a Reagan-Fascell Scholar at the National Endowment for Democracy, where she worked on women and extremist groups with a particular focus on the women of ISIS. A Pakistani politician, Ispahani served as a Member of Parliament and Media Advisor to the President of Pakistan from 2008-2012. She returned to Pakistan with Former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto in 2007 after opposing the Musharraf dictatorship in the preceding years. In Parliament she focused on the issues of terrorism, human rights, gender based violence, minority rights and US-Pakistan relations. The most notable pieces of legislation enacted with her active support include those relating to Women's Harassment in the Workplace and Acid Crimes and Control, which made disfiguring of women by throwing acid at them a major crime. She was also a member of the Women's caucus in the 13th National Assembly, which was instrumental in introducing more legislation on women's issues than has ever been done before during a single parliamentary term. Ms. Ispahani spent the formative years of her career as a print and television journalist. Her last journalistic position was as Executive Producer and Managing Editor of Voice of America's Urdu TV. She has also worked at ABC News, CNN and MSNBC. She has contributed opinion pieces to The Wall Street Journal, Foreign Policy, The National Review, and others.

Mango Bae
Mango Bae #141: "Facial Recognition (ft. Fizaa Dosani)"

Mango Bae

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 37:18


Actress and comedian Fizaa Dosani tells us about her mental health issues, her existentialist childhood in Florida, a mid-coital medical emergency, motel etiquette, her hustler's work ethic, and lots more. We love you. Subscribe here, on youtube, spotify, apple podcasts, Instagram, and PATREON for hours of bonus content, early access to episodes, and archived eps!

The Nugget Climbing Podcast
EP 90: Josh Wharton — Onsight Tips and Tricks, Training to Flash El Capitan, and Risk Assessment as a Parent

The Nugget Climbing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 136:01


Josh Wharton is one of the most badass climbers you've never heard of. He does it all at an elite level. We talked about tips for hard flashing and onsighting, how alpine climbing relates to rock climbing, training to flash El Cap, the value of taking risks in life, being a climbing parent, climbing in Pakistan, how to find an adventure without flying overseas, and the benefits of stiff shoes.Support the Podcast:thenuggetclimbing.com/supportBecome a Patron:patreon.com/thenuggetclimbingShow Notes:  thenuggetclimbing.com/episodes/josh-whartonNuggets:3:55 – Josh's age, and physical vs. technical/tactical progression5:40 – How Josh manages to be such a good all-arounder and still climb 5.149:13 – Trying to do every route in the Black Canyon and Rifle 11:42 – Uber loc(al)s, and using obscure easy routes to prepare for big mountains13:02 – Josh's flash and onsight ability, tips and tricks, and climbing with a lot of confidence17:01 – How to get better at onsighting and flashing18:49 – Why Josh made the decision to stop redpointing routes he knows he can do20:11 – Overlapping flashing or onsighting22:30 – Josh's go-to schedule for combining onsighting with projecting on a trip24:22 – How being a parent has changes Josh's climbing priorities, rock climbing and alpine climbing as different sports, and the rewards of alpine climbing30:53 – “Everything is training, and nothing is training”, and alpine climbing in the Canadian Rockies35:43 – Having dinner with Barry Blanchard37:03 – A message from Jonah, and what Josh has learned from each type of climbing40:26 – Variety as a source of motivation42:20 – A glimpse into Josh's experience climbing Wheeler Peak48:04 – Patron question from Timothy: Why did Josh climb in the Black Canyon so much? What routes had the biggest impact on him? 54:03 – Latok and Ogar56:21 – The cost of a trip to Pakistan59:48 – What a trip to Pakistan looks like, and “Expectations often define an experience.”1:01:17 – More about Latok1:03:50 – How Josh would prepare for another attempt on Latok1:09:02 – Sport dry tooling, and winning the Uray Ice Fest three years in a row1:12:48 – Learned about training from dry tooling competitions1:16:27 – The evolution of Josh's training, and principles of training1:22:05 – The secret sauce1:25:02 – Josh's training staples, and working with Lattice1:29:54 – Getting away from having to perform well every time you go climbing1:32:24 – Prioritizing climbing vs. training1:33:24 – Josh's 60-degree campus board (joke), and how the Lattice training is going1:37:04 – Josh's goal for 2021 (try to flash Freerider)1:39:55 – How Josh set the boulder problem on Freerider to spec1:41:37 – Preparing for the Monster Offwidth1:43:50 – Yuji's article about trying to onsight El Cap1:45:14 – Patron questions from Henry: How much has parenthood reduced your tolerance for risk?1:50:55 – Hera, and Josh's parallel universe in the NBA1:52:40 – Using climbing as a tool for travel, and more about climbing as a parent1:55:26 – Josh's early climbing with his dad1:57:16 – Patron question from Garret: Any CO areas that don't get the respect they deserve?1:59:12 – Patron question from Randall: Favorite zone or route in Montana? Other favorites in the States?2:02:10 – Patron question from Benjamin: Thoughts on the new Scarpa Boostic?2:05:35 – Shoe stiffness for Rifle, and analyzing the soft shoe trend2:07:42 – Shoe sizes, and Josh's shoe plan for Freerider2:10:03 – Patron question from Benjamin: If Josh could only climb in one discipline for the rest of his life, what would he choose?2:10:41 – What's next for Josh?2:14:55 – Gratitude

Global News Podcast
Czech president in hospital amid election upheaval

Global News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 32:00


Milos Zeman is in intensive care the day after a surprise opposition win in parliamentary elections. Also: the "father of Pakistan nuclear bomb" AQ Khan dies aged eighty-five, and UK to resettle teenage Afghan women footballers.

Newshour
Polls close in Iraqi elections

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 48:23


Iraqis have voted in their fifth national parliamentary elections since the US invasion of 2003: but why was turnout so low? We hear from Jane Arraf, the New York Times bureau chief in Baghdad. Also in the programme: the controversial life and career of A.Q.Khan, who helped Pakistan build its nuclear bomb and supplied nuclear know-how to other countries including Iran and North Korea. And a new artistic presence in a Paris Museum that commemorates a murdered Jewish family. (Photo: Parliamentary elections in Iraq. Credit: EPA/AHMED JALIL)

The Signal
Are we doing enough for Afghan refugees?

The Signal

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 21:59


Since the Taliban retook the country, millions of Afghans have been trying to get out. Many go first to Iran or Pakistan, and from there try for resettlement elsewhere. But it's a difficult, bureaucratic process, and for most it ends in disappointment. So is Australia doing enough to help? Today on The Signal, we're hearing about a group of Afghan orphans who've made it Sydney. How is Australia helping them, and their compatriots back in Afghanistan? Featured: Latifa, Afghan refugee Emily Clark, Reporter, ABC news international desk Kate Ogg, Associate Professor, Australian National University College of Law, Canberra

ThePrint
CutThe Clutter: Abdul Qadeer Khan, father of Pakistani ‘bomb,' global don of nuclear spying & smuggling passes away

ThePrint

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 25:17


In the light of the passing of nuclear physicist Abdul Qadeer "AQ" Khan on Sunday morning at the age of 85, Shekhar Gupta traces the life and times of the father of Pakistan's nuclear bomb, from his birth in Bhopal, espionage in the Netherlands and tacit nuclear threat to India in the late 1980s. What was the AQ Khan network, footprints in Iran, North Korea, Europe. Episode 853 of #CutTheClutter

The Pakistan Experience
Ethics of Therapy and the Psychology of Violence - Dr. Amna and Dr. Sharmeen - TPE # 135

The Pakistan Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 105:50


Please consider supporting us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/thepakistanexperience Dr. Amna Salman is a Forensic Psychologist who has recently completed her PhD from the University of Birmingham. Dr. Sharmeen Khan is a Clinical Psychologist with years of experience in the field. After the recent cases of violence against women, we decided to bring both of them on to discuss the ethics of Therapy and the Psychology of Violence. Why is Pakistan prone to mob violence? Is cancel culture toxic? Does 'Mental Health' excuse violence crimes? Does the news demonize Mental Health? Find out this and more on this week's episode of The Pakistan Experience. Please consider supporting us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/thepakistanexperience And Please stay in touch: https://twitter.com/ThePakistanExp1 https://www.facebook.com/thepakistanexperience https://instagram.com/thepakistanexpeperience The podcast is hosted by comedian and writer, Shehzad Ghias Shaikh. Shehzad is a Fulbright scholar with a Masters in Theatre from Brooklyn College. He is also one of the foremost Stand-up comedians in Pakistan and frequently writes for numerous publications. He can be found on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and Tinder. Instagram.com/shehzadghiasshaikh Facebook.com/Shehzadghias/ Twitter.com/shehzad89 Chapters: 0:00 Introduction 2:00 Ethics of Therapy 8:30 Seeing humanity in everyone 20:00 Mob Violence 32:00 Are we all unconsciously racist/sexist and discriminatory? 35:00 How to protect yourself from the news 41:00 The Therapy industry in Pakistan 55:00 Demonizing Mental Health and Schizophrenia 1:00:00 Mental Health, Crime and the Law 1:08:00 You are not your diagnosis 1:14:10 At what point should a therapist intervene to prevent violence 1:20:00 Risk factors for violence against women 1:24:00 Distinguishing Mental Health illnesses and Mental Health problems 1:28:38 The toxicity of Social Media and cancel culture 1:34:30 Lovism

Tuk Tuk Till I Die
Is Pakistan's WT20 Squad Selection and Unselection Senseless?

Tuk Tuk Till I Die

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 17:30


The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts
10/8/21 John Kiriakou on the Torture of Abu Zubaydah

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 34:57


Scott interviews former CIA Officer John Kiriakou about a recent article he wrote. Kiriakou was personally involved in the 2002 capture of Abu Zubaydah in Pakistan. At the time, the CIA believed Zubaydah to be Al Qaeda's third highest-ranking member. In truth, he was simply a logistician. Still, the Bush Administration used Zubaydah to make it look like dangerous terrorists were being captured and were handing over information thanks to “enhanced interrogation techniques.” Scott and Kiriakou observe that the Americans executed Japanese soldiers after WWII for using those very same techniques on American POWs. Kiriakou details the torture that Abu Zubaydah has been put through since his capture, all without a single charge being brought against him. Scott and Kiriakou also discuss other victims of the torture program, some of whom were killed without even being charged. Finally, Kiriakou explains the legal action Zubaydah is attempting to take against certain CIA contractors.  Discussed on the show: “Supreme Court to hear whether Abu Zubaydah's torture is ‘secret'” (Responsible Statecraft) A Question of Torture by Alfred McCoy Murder at Camp Delta by Joseph Hickman  John Kiriakou is a former CIA officer and author of The Convenient Terrorist: Two Whistleblowers' Stories of Torture, Terror, Secret Wars, and CIA Lies and Doing Time Like A Spy. He is the host of Loud and Clear on Sputnik Radio. Follow him on Twitter @JohnKiriakou. This episode of the Scott Horton Show is sponsored by: The War State and Why The Vietnam War?, by Mike Swanson; Tom Woods' Liberty Classroom; ExpandDesigns.com/Scott; EasyShip; Dröm; Free Range Feeder; Thc Hemp Spot; Green Mill Supercritical; Bug-A-Salt; Lorenzotti Coffee and Listen and Think Audio. Shop Libertarian Institute merch or donate to the show through Patreon, PayPal or Bitcoin: 1DZBZNJrxUhQhEzgDh7k8JXHXRjYu5tZiG.

Scott Horton Show - Just the Interviews
10/8/21 John Kiriakou on the Torture of Abu Zubaydah

Scott Horton Show - Just the Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 34:57


Scott interviews former CIA Officer John Kiriakou about a recent article he wrote. Kiriakou was personally involved in the 2002 capture of Abu Zubaydah in Pakistan. At the time, the CIA believed Zubaydah to be Al Qaeda's third highest-ranking member. In truth, he was simply a logistician. Still, the Bush Administration used Zubaydah to make it look like dangerous terrorists were being captured and were handing over information thanks to “enhanced interrogation techniques.” Scott and Kiriakou observe that the Americans executed Japanese soldiers after WWII for using those very same techniques on American POWs. Kiriakou details the torture that Abu Zubaydah has been put through since his capture, all without a single charge being brought against him. Scott and Kiriakou also discuss other victims of the torture program, some of whom were killed without even being charged. Finally, Kiriakou explains the legal action Zubaydah is attempting to take against certain CIA contractors.  Discussed on the show: “Supreme Court to hear whether Abu Zubaydah's torture is ‘secret'” (Responsible Statecraft) A Question of Torture by Alfred McCoy Murder at Camp Delta by Joseph Hickman  John Kiriakou is a former CIA officer and author of The Convenient Terrorist: Two Whistleblowers' Stories of Torture, Terror, Secret Wars, and CIA Lies and Doing Time Like A Spy. He is the host of Loud and Clear on Sputnik Radio. Follow him on Twitter @JohnKiriakou. This episode of the Scott Horton Show is sponsored by: The War State and Why The Vietnam War?, by Mike Swanson; Tom Woods' Liberty Classroom; ExpandDesigns.com/Scott; EasyShip; Dröm; Free Range Feeder; Thc Hemp Spot; Green Mill Supercritical; Bug-A-Salt; Lorenzotti Coffee and Listen and Think Audio. Shop Libertarian Institute merch or donate to the show through Patreon, PayPal or Bitcoin: 1DZBZNJrxUhQhEzgDh7k8JXHXRjYu5tZiG.

ThePrint
Cut The Clutter: Pakistan shifts Kabul ‘superstar' ISI chief Lt-Gen Faiz Hameed, race begins for Bajwa successor

ThePrint

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 20:28


As controversial ISI chief Lt. Gen Faiz Hameed is shifted out of ISI and made Corps Commander, Peshawar, Shekhar Gupta throws light on the recent reshuffle in Pakistani Army. Is his removal from the powerful post a demotion or a promotion? Also, countdown to the next Army chief.  Episode 852 of CutTheClutter.

Tabadlab Presents...
Pakistonomy - Episode 79 - Disrupting Agriculture in Pakistan

Tabadlab Presents...

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 51:10


Uzair talks to the co-founders of Tazah Technologies, a startup in the agriculture space that recently raised $2 million in pre-seed round. The B2B marketplace is based in Lahore and is seeking to disrupt the country's agriculture sector, which represents 24 percent of GDP. Abrar is part of the famous "Careem Mafia", where he led operations for and executed the financial and operational turnaround for the business despite the pandemic. In his last engagement as General Manager at Swvl, Abrar helped build a strong team and developed the post covid recovery strategy for bus hailing business. Mohsin joined Careem in 2017 as an Operations Manager where his first engagement entailed launching and scaling Ricksha category, the category now contributes to over 10% of revenue for the organisation. Mohsin's role grew from leading a single category to managing Lahore's P&L and eventually managing P&L for the entire Ride hailing business for Pakistan. Reading recommendations: - Zero to One by Peter Thiel - Good to Great by Jim Collins - Sapiens by Yuval Noah Hariri

ThePrint
ThePrintUninterrupted: Pro-Pak terrorists killing Kashmiri Hindus, Sikhs, trying to fragment society : Srinagar mayor Mattu

ThePrint

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 29:39


In this edition of #ThePrintUninterrupted, Mayor of Srinagar and Apni party member, Junaid Azim Mattu, tells ThePrint's Senior Consulting Editor Jyoti Malhotra that recent attacks on Kashmiri Pandits and Sikhs by Pakistan-supported terrorists will further disrupt the process of their rehabilitation. A multidimensional approach, he said, by Jammu and Kashmir as well as the community can make the process easier and help bring normalcy back to Kashmir.

PBS NewsHour - Segments
News Wrap: More than 120,000 U.S. children lost a caregiver to COVID-19

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 4:45


In our news wrap Thursday, a new study published in the medical journal "Pediatrics" found more than 120,000 American children lost a primary caregiver during the pandemic. The U.S. Labor Department reported the number of new jobless claims fell by 38,000 last week -- for the first time in a month -- to 326,000. A 5.9 magnitude earthquake killed at least 23 people in Pakistan, and injured 200 more. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Global News Podcast
Texas abortion law temporarily blocked by judge

Global News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 28:03


The White House praised the ruling as an important step to restoring women's constitutional rights. Also, Pakistan earthquake kills many in Balochistan province, and Juji, the Afghan mynah bird, is now living in a French ambassador's residence.

Langsam gesprochene Nachrichten | Deutsch lernen | Deutsche Welle
07.10.2021 – Langsam gesprochene Nachrichten

Langsam gesprochene Nachrichten | Deutsch lernen | Deutsche Welle

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 9:20


Trainiere dein Hörverstehen mit den Nachrichten der Deutschen Welle von Donnerstag – als Text und als verständlich gesprochene Audio-Datei.Erstes Dreier-Gespräch zur Regierungsbildung Elf Tage nach der Bundestagswahl treffen sich an diesem Donnerstag SPD, Grüne und FDP erstmals zu einer Dreier-Sondierung in Berlin. Das Ziel ist, eine sogenannte Ampel-Koalition in Deutschland zu bilden. Nach Zweier-Gesprächen auch mit den Unionsparteien CDU und CSU hatten sich Grüne und FDP am Mittwoch für Gespräche mit den Sozialdemokraten entschieden. Parallele Verhandlungen mit der Union über eine sogenannte Jamaika-Koalition soll es nicht geben. Nach Angaben von FDP und Grünen bleibt ein Bündnis mit CDU/CSU aber weiterhin eine Option. IS-Anhängerinnen zurückgeholt Deutschland hat acht deutsche Frauen samt Kindern aus Syrien geholt, die sich in der Vergangenheit der Terrormiliz "Islamischer Staat" angeschlossen hatten. Sie seien mit einer Chartermaschine in der Nacht zum Donnerstag in Frankfurt gelandet, teilte Außenminister Heiko Maas mit. Die Frauen müssten sich nun vor der Strafjustiz verantworten, ein Großteil von ihnen sei nach ihrer Ankunft in Haft genommen worden. Deutschland hatte die Aktion laut Maas gemeinsam mit Dänemark organisiert, das 14 Kinder und drei Frauen zurückholte. Alle lebten in einem kurdischen Gefangenenlager. Die USA leisteten logistische Unterstützung. UN verschärfen Ton gegenüber Äthiopien UN-Generalsekretär António Guterres hat vor einer "immensen humanitären Krise" in Äthiopien gewarnt, die ein sofortiges Handeln erfordere. In einer Sondersitzung des Sicherheitsrats der Vereinten Nationen in New York rief er die Regierung in Addis Abeba dazu auf, humanitäre Helfer ihre Arbeit machen zu lassen. Bis zu sieben Millionen Menschen sind laut Guterres in den Regionen Tigray, Amhara und Afar dringend auf Hilfslieferungen angewiesen, um zu überleben. Scharf kritisierte der UN-Generalsekretär die Entscheidung der äthiopischen Regierung, vor einer Woche sieben UN-Vertreter des Landes zu verweisen. Texanisches Abtreibungsverbot gestoppt Ein US-Bundesrichter hat das neue Gesetz für ein weitgehendes Abtreibungsverbot im Bundesstaat Texas vorläufig ausgesetzt. Richter Robert Pitman gab damit einer Klage der Regierung von US-Präsident Joe Biden statt. Diese hält das texanische Gesetz für verfassungswidrig. Texas kann gegen die Gerichtsentscheidung allerdings Widerspruch einlegen. Das strengste Abtreibungsgesetz der USA war Anfang September in Kraft getreten und verbietet Schwangerschaftsabbrüche ab dem Zeitpunkt, zu dem der Herzschlag des Fötus festgestellt werden kann - also etwa ab der sechsten Schwangerschaftswoche. Parlament in Ankara bestätigt Klimaabkommen Als letztes Mitglied der G20-Gruppe hat die Türkei das Pariser Klimaschutzabkommen ratifiziert. Das Parlament in Ankara votierte einstimmig dafür. Präsident Recep Tayyip Erdogan hatte den Schritt im September vor der UN-Vollversammlung in New York angekündigt. Bislang deckt die Türkei ihren Energiebedarf zum größten Teil aus Kohle, Gas und Öl. Im Klimaabkommen von 2015 verständigte sich die Weltgemeinschaft darauf, die Erderwärmung wenn möglich auf weniger als 1,5 Grad Celsius zu begrenzen. Die nächste Weltklimakonferenz findet im November in Glasgow in Schottland statt. Durchbruch bei Malaria-Bekämpfung Die Weltgesundheitsorganisation WHO hat erstmals die breite Anwendung eines Impfstoffes gegen Malaria empfohlen. Das Vakzin RTS,S solle an Kinder in Afrika südlich der Sahara und in anderen Malaria-Regionen verabreicht werden, hieß es aus der UN-Behörde in Genf. Dies sei ein historischer Moment, sagte WHO-Chef Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus. Zusammen mit bisherigen Präventionsmaßnahmen könnten nun jährlich Zehntausende junge Leben gerettet werden, sagte er. Die Empfehlung beruht auf Pilotversuchen mit rund 800.000 Kindern in Ghana, Kenia und Malawi. Tote und Verletzte bei Beben in Pakistan Ein starkes Erdbeben hat einen abgelegenen, bergigen Teil im Südwesten Pakistans erschüttert, in dem viele Kohleminen liegen. Die Behörden sprechen von mindestens 20 Todesopfern und mehr als 200 Verletzten. Das Unglück ereignete sich am frühen Morgen, als viele Bergleute bereits in den Minen arbeiteten. Nach Angaben des Innenministeriums der Provinz Belutschistan hatte das Beben eine Stärke von 5,7. Das Epizentrum lag etwa 14 Kilometer nordöstlich des besonders heftig getroffenen Bezirks Harnai. Zahlreiche Menschen befinden sich laut Katastrophenschutz noch unter den Trümmern eingestürzter Gebäude.

The John Batchelor Show
1739: #AfterAfghanistan: Al Qaeda in Afghanistan @BillRoggio @ThomasJoscelyn @LongWarJournal

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 7:55


Photo: .Mujahideen crossing in from Pakistan border, Afghanistan CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow #AfterAfghanistan: Al Qaeda in Afghanistan  @BillRoggio @ThomasJoscelyn @LongWarJournal https://www.longwarjournal.org/archives/2021/09/testimony-to-receive-testimony-on-afghanistan.php https://www.diffen.com/difference/Al-Qaeda_vs_Taliban ...  ..  ..  ..  ..  ..  .. Permissions Mujahideen crossing in from Pakistan border, Afghanistan Date | 1985 Source | Private collection Author | Erwin Franzen This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 1.0 Generic license. | You are free: to share – to copy, distribute and transmit the work; to remix – to adapt the workUnder the following conditions: attribution – You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use.