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Scientific intergovernmental body

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Latest podcast episodes about ipcc

The Leighton Smith Podcast
Leighton Smith Podcast: Best of 2022 - January 18th 2022

The Leighton Smith Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 73:56


Leighton is on summer break, so we are highlighting some of his favourite guests from 2022. New Zealand scientist Dr Kelvin Duncan dismembers the predictions of the IPCC. His new book ,“Global Warming, a Counter-blaste to the Man-made Global Warming Hypothesis”, provides counter-arguments to the many areas of official misinformation. File your comments and complaints at Leighton@newstalkzb.co.nz Haven't listened to a podcast before? Check out our simple how-to guide. Listen here on iHeartRadio Leighton Smith's podcast also available on iTunes:To subscribe via iTunes click here See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Do you really know?
What are warming stripes?

Do you really know?

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2023 4:34


If you've been to a climate demonstration in recent times, you may have noticed placards with a series of blue and red coloured stripes. Kind of like a barcode but in colour, with the shades varying from very light to very dark. You may have even seen them at political or sporting events, in the media, or on the cover of Greta Thunberg's The Climate Book. This set of graphics are known as warming stripes, and they're not as random as they might first seem. Indeed, the coloured stripes have become a go-to symbol for many climate activists, given that they feature no letters and no numbers, meaning anyone anywhere in the world can understand their meaning. Warming stripes were invented by Ed Hawkins in 2018. The British climatologist is a respected figure, having contributed to several IPCC reports as an author. What is the meaning? Why are they used on social media? How can such a simple graphic get across the complexity of climate change? In under 3 minutes, we answer your questions! To listen to more episodes, click here: Why do we consider Friday 13th unlucky? Why has my sense of smell changed because of Covid? What are nepo babies? A Bababam Originals podcast. Written and produced by Joseph Chance. In partnership with upday UK. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Signal Daily
Joshimath – The Chronicles of a Disaster Foretold

The Signal Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 12:34


Joshimath, a small town in the Chamoli district of Uttarakhand is sinking and with it the homes of many residing families who will now have to be evacuated. Experts have blamed the ongoing developmental projects for this disaster in the making. Will halting the construction work now help Joshimath? In today's deep dive, we are joined by Dr Anjal Prakash who is the author of IPCC reports. He is also the Research Director and Adjunct Associate Professor of Bharti Institute of Public Policy and the Indian School of Business.  In this episode, we also take a look at why Seattle public schools are suing big tech companies like TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, YouTube, and Snapchat. Tune in to The Signal Daily! You can listen to this show and other awesome shows on the IVM Podcasts app on Android, iOS or any other podcast app. You can check out our website at https://ivmpodcasts.com/. Do follow IVM Podcasts on social media. We are @IVMPodcasts on Facebook, Twitter, & Instagram. Follow the show across platforms: Spotify, Google Podcasts, Apple Podcasts,  Amazon Prime Music. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Podcasts 4 Brainport, featured by Radio 4 Brainport
Prof. Heleen de Coninck: Society is reaching a tipping point in a positive attutude to contain climate change

Podcasts 4 Brainport, featured by Radio 4 Brainport

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 12:16


Heleen de Coninck is frequently seen on stage to pitch her drive and her hope to contain climate change. As a co-author on IPCC climate reports, as professor of Technology, Innovation & Society at Eindhoven University of Technology and associate professor at Radboud University in Nijmegen, she feels the urgency to increase knowledge about environmental issues, but at the same time she is hopeful that we can revert the course towards catastrophic changes. At the Park Theater, in her "Moon speech", she pitched that we should change global systems in order to tackle the major environmental problems, thus apply major changes to industry, transport and mobility, but also the food system. Is the weather reaching tipping points in warming the planet, from where irreversible changes with set on and accelerate further warming? She sees social tipping points from the population really starts to think and behave differently, and collectively strive for new values. Jean-Paul Linnartz interviewed her for Radio 4 Brainport, followng her "maanrede". --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/podcasts-4-brainport/message

Das Klima
DK075 - Yoga für den Klimaschutz

Das Klima

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 71:35


"Das Klima”, der Podcast zur Wissenschaft hinter der Krise. Wir lesen den aktuellen Bericht des Weltklimarats und erklären den aktuellen Stand der Klimaforschung. In Folge 75 sind wir beim letzten Kapitel des letzten Teils des IPCC-Berichts angelangt. Und ganz am Ende taucht noch einmal alles auf, was wir bisher besprochen haben. Diesmal aber aus dem Blickwinkel der nachhaltigen Entwicklung. Denn wir dürfen nicht einfach nur auf den Klimaschutz schauen (was schon schwer genug ist), sondern müssen auch aufpassen, dass die klimafreundliche Welt für alle lebenswert ist und am besten lebenswerter als jetzt. Klimaschutz muss auch Armut, Hunger und jede Menge andere Probleme berücksichtigen. Wir reden in der Folge über Yoga, freiwillige Zielsetzungen, das Problem der fossilen Brennstoffe und am Ende beschließen wir, einen Spaziergang zu machen.

Spirituality & Mindfulness · The Creative Process
Highlights - Joëlle Gergis - Lead Author - IPCC Sixth Assessment Report - Author of “Humanity's Moment”

Spirituality & Mindfulness · The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2023 10:13


"So a lot of people ask, in my line of work as a climate scientist, 'How do you not just fall into a state of despair and really just see the really dark aspects of human behavior and our inability to correct our course and do the right thing?' And the truth is that we all have to reconcile it in some way. And you can either be really consumed by those darker emotions and that feeling that people don't care. Or you can just try and see beauty where it is and connect with other people who are also doing their very best. So I think this kind of binary thinking of black and white people are good or bad isn't quite right. There's just shades of gray and sometimes people do the best that they can from day to day, but other times we just have to. I guess it's a sense of being stubborn and believing that there is goodness out there."Dr. Joëlle Gergis is an award-winning climate scientist and writer at the Australian National University. She served as a lead author for the IPCC Sixth Assessment Report and is the author of Humanity's Moment: A Climate Scientist's Case for Hope and Sunburnt Country: The History and Future of Climate Change in Australia. Joëlle has also contributed chapters to The Climate Book by Greta Thunberg, and Not Too Late: Changing the Climate Story from Despair to Possibility, edited by Rebecca Solnit and Thelma Young Lutunatabua.http://joellegergis.comhttps://climatehistory.com.auwww.blackincbooks.com.au/authors/jo-lle-gergiswww.creativeprocess.info www.oneplanetpodcast.org IG www.instagram.com/creativeprocesspodcast

The Creative Process Podcast
Highlights - Joëlle Gergis - Lead Author - IPCC Sixth Assessment Report - Author of “Humanity's Moment”

The Creative Process Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2023 10:13


"We're really starting to witness serious climate extremes that can no longer be ignored. And the IPCC, one of our key conclusions to that report was that effectively the human fingerprint on the climate system is now undeniable. It is now an established fact that we have warmed every single continent, every ocean basin on the planet. And again, that's a pretty serious thing to contemplate that human activity from the burning of fossil fuels and the clearing of land has led to this energy imbalance in the earth system, which is leading to a rapidly shifting climate."Dr. Joëlle Gergis is an award-winning climate scientist and writer at the Australian National University. She served as a lead author for the IPCC Sixth Assessment Report and is the author of Humanity's Moment: A Climate Scientist's Case for Hope and Sunburnt Country: The History and Future of Climate Change in Australia. Joëlle has also contributed chapters to The Climate Book by Greta Thunberg, and Not Too Late: Changing the Climate Story from Despair to Possibility, edited by Rebecca Solnit and Thelma Young Lutunatabua.http://joellegergis.comhttps://climatehistory.com.auwww.blackincbooks.com.au/authors/jo-lle-gergiswww.creativeprocess.info www.oneplanetpodcast.org IG www.instagram.com/creativeprocesspodcast

Tech, Innovation & Society - The Creative Process
Joëlle Gergis - Lead Author - IPCC Sixth Assessment Report - Author of “Humanity's Moment”

Tech, Innovation & Society - The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2023 47:11


Dr. Joëlle Gergis is an award-winning climate scientist and writer at the Australian National University. She served as a lead author for the IPCC Sixth Assessment Report and is the author of Humanity's Moment: A Climate Scientist's Case for Hope and Sunburnt Country: The History and Future of Climate Change in Australia. Joëlle has also contributed chapters to The Climate Book by Greta Thunberg, and Not Too Late: Changing the Climate Story from Despair to Possibility, edited by Rebecca Solnit and Thelma Young Lutunatabua."So right now the world is fueled by the burning of oil, gas, and coal, and a lot of people are making a lot of money out of that. Whereas with things like renewable energy, you can put solar panels on your rooftop, and all of a sudden you're not paying anything in terms of an electricity price. If you happen to live in a sunny country like Australia, you end up getting your electricity for free from the sun, which is extraordinary, but actually renewable energy is the cheapest form of electricity over 60% of the Earth's surface, which again is an amazing thing to think about. And yet we haven't tapped the full potential, less than a third of global energy is generated by things like solar and wind, and other renewable energy sources. So there's a really huge potential, but it is that moment where we can transition into a low-impact, sustainable future.So I see that as a really positive thing, but we're in this moment where we're transitioning from an old technology into a new technology. And if you stop and think about history, where we went from people who used to have a horse and cart, and then they went to automobiles. It's the same sort of thing. We're just advancing our technology. So it's inevitable that it's going to happen. It is happening right now."http://joellegergis.comhttps://climatehistory.com.auwww.blackincbooks.com.au/authors/jo-lle-gergiswww.creativeprocess.info www.oneplanetpodcast.org IG www.instagram.com/creativeprocesspodcast

Tech, Innovation & Society - The Creative Process
Highlights - Joëlle Gergis - Lead Author - IPCC Sixth Assessment Report - Author of “Humanity's Moment”

Tech, Innovation & Society - The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2023 10:13


"So right now the world is fueled by the burning of oil, gas, and coal, and a lot of people are making a lot of money out of that. Whereas with things like renewable energy, you can put solar panels on your rooftop, and all of a sudden you're not paying anything in terms of an electricity price. If you happen to live in a sunny country like Australia, you end up getting your electricity for free from the sun, which is extraordinary, but actually renewable energy is the cheapest form of electricity over 60% of the Earth's surface, which again is an amazing thing to think about. And yet we haven't tapped the full potential, less than a third of global energy is generated by things like solar and wind, and other renewable energy sources. So there's a really huge potential, but it is that moment where we can transition into a low-impact, sustainable future.So I see that as a really positive thing, but we're in this moment where we're transitioning from an old technology into a new technology. And if you stop and think about history, where we went from people who used to have a horse and cart, and then they went to automobiles. It's the same sort of thing. We're just advancing our technology. So it's inevitable that it's going to happen. It is happening right now."Dr. Joëlle Gergis is an award-winning climate scientist and writer at the Australian National University. She served as a lead author for the IPCC Sixth Assessment Report and is the author of Humanity's Moment: A Climate Scientist's Case for Hope and Sunburnt Country: The History and Future of Climate Change in Australia. Joëlle has also contributed chapters to The Climate Book by Greta Thunberg, and Not Too Late: Changing the Climate Story from Despair to Possibility, edited by Rebecca Solnit and Thelma Young Lutunatabua.http://joellegergis.comhttps://climatehistory.com.auwww.blackincbooks.com.au/authors/jo-lle-gergiswww.creativeprocess.info www.oneplanetpodcast.org IG www.instagram.com/creativeprocesspodcast

Education · The Creative Process
Joëlle Gergis - Lead Author - IPCC Sixth Assessment Report - Author of “Humanity's Moment”

Education · The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2023 47:11


Dr. Joëlle Gergis is an award-winning climate scientist and writer at the Australian National University. She served as a lead author for the IPCC Sixth Assessment Report and is the author of Humanity's Moment: A Climate Scientist's Case for Hope and Sunburnt Country: The History and Future of Climate Change in Australia. Joëlle has also contributed chapters to The Climate Book by Greta Thunberg, and Not Too Late: Changing the Climate Story from Despair to Possibility, edited by Rebecca Solnit and Thelma Young Lutunatabua."It was difficult to actually write about my dad because as I mentioned in the book, he died in 2017, and he was obviously a really significant person in my life. He really instilled this whole idea that education is the key to a better life, and that it's the great equalizer. So my heritage is from Egypt, so they were not wealthy. When my dad studied at university, he was able to break out of his social background, and it allowed him to move into other areas and create a better life, not just for him but for us.And I think that it was very formative for me because it made me realize that anyone from anywhere can change their life if they're really determined - but it doesn't mean we all have equal access to equal resources. And my dad had to work really, really hard, as have I and many people around the world. It's like, at the end of the day, all you can do is really the best with what you've got. And I guess I've tried to do the best with what I've got and he certainly did his best with what he was able to do in his life.The reason why I became a scientist, to be honest, is because of my deep love for the natural world and living in a country like Australia, which is absolutely extraordinary. You know, we have more unique plants and animals than anywhere on the planet. So more than places like Brazil or Papua New Guinea or Madagascar, these places you think of as being richly biodiverse. Australia actually tops the list, just in terms of the uniqueness of our natural environment. And so growing up in a place like that really infuses into your pores. And so I would go into these beautiful places, whether it be rainforests or the coast, which I love. And then as a young person, I was really drawn into wanting to study science. And so that's why I became a scientist."http://joellegergis.comhttps://climatehistory.com.auwww.blackincbooks.com.au/authors/jo-lle-gergiswww.creativeprocess.info www.oneplanetpodcast.org IG www.instagram.com/creativeprocesspodcast

Education · The Creative Process
Highlights - Joëlle Gergis - Lead Author - IPCC Sixth Assessment Report - Author of “Humanity's Moment”

Education · The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2023 10:13


"It was difficult to actually write about my dad because as I mentioned in the book, he died in 2017, and he was obviously a really significant person in my life. He really instilled this whole idea that education is the key to a better life, and that it's the great equalizer. So my heritage is from Egypt, so they were not wealthy. When my dad studied at university, he was able to break out of his social background, and it allowed him to move into other areas and create a better life, not just for him but for us.And I think that it was very formative for me because it made me realize that anyone from anywhere can change their life if they're really determined - but it doesn't mean we all have equal access to equal resources. And my dad had to work really, really hard, as have I and many people around the world. It's like, at the end of the day, all you can do is really the best with what you've got. And I guess I've tried to do the best with what I've got and he certainly did his best with what he was able to do in his life.The reason why I became a scientist, to be honest, is because of my deep love for the natural world and living in a country like Australia, which is absolutely extraordinary. You know, we have more unique plants and animals than anywhere on the planet. So more than places like Brazil or Papua New Guinea or Madagascar, these places you think of as being richly biodiverse. Australia actually tops the list, just in terms of the uniqueness of our natural environment. And so growing up in a place like that really infuses into your pores. And so I would go into these beautiful places, whether it be rainforests or the coast, which I love. And then as a young person, I was really drawn into wanting to study science. And so that's why I became a scientist."Dr. Joëlle Gergis is an award-winning climate scientist and writer at the Australian National University. She served as a lead author for the IPCC Sixth Assessment Report and is the author of Humanity's Moment: A Climate Scientist's Case for Hope and Sunburnt Country: The History and Future of Climate Change in Australia. Joëlle has also contributed chapters to The Climate Book by Greta Thunberg, and Not Too Late: Changing the Climate Story from Despair to Possibility, edited by Rebecca Solnit and Thelma Young Lutunatabua.http://joellegergis.comhttps://climatehistory.com.auwww.blackincbooks.com.au/authors/jo-lle-gergiswww.creativeprocess.info www.oneplanetpodcast.org IG www.instagram.com/creativeprocesspodcast

Feminism · Women’s Stories · The Creative Process
Joëlle Gergis - Lead Author - IPCC Sixth Assessment Report - Author of “Humanity's Moment”

Feminism · Women’s Stories · The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2023 47:11


Dr. Joëlle Gergis is an award-winning climate scientist and writer at the Australian National University. She served as a lead author for the IPCC Sixth Assessment Report and is the author of Humanity's Moment: A Climate Scientist's Case for Hope and Sunburnt Country: The History and Future of Climate Change in Australia. Joëlle has also contributed chapters to The Climate Book by Greta Thunberg, and Not Too Late: Changing the Climate Story from Despair to Possibility, edited by Rebecca Solnit and Thelma Young Lutunatabua."It was difficult to actually write about my dad because as I mentioned in the book, he died in 2017, and he was obviously a really significant person in my life. He really instilled this whole idea that education is the key to a better life, and that it's the great equalizer. So my heritage is from Egypt, so they were not wealthy. When my dad studied at university, he was able to break out of his social background, and it allowed him to move into other areas and create a better life, not just for him but for us.And I think that it was very formative for me because it made me realize that anyone from anywhere can change their life if they're really determined - but it doesn't mean we all have equal access to equal resources. And my dad had to work really, really hard, as have I and many people around the world. It's like, at the end of the day, all you can do is really the best with what you've got. And I guess I've tried to do the best with what I've got and he certainly did his best with what he was able to do in his life.The reason why I became a scientist, to be honest, is because of my deep love for the natural world and living in a country like Australia, which is absolutely extraordinary. You know, we have more unique plants and animals than anywhere on the planet. So more than places like Brazil or Papua New Guinea or Madagascar, these places you think of as being richly biodiverse. Australia actually tops the list, just in terms of the uniqueness of our natural environment. And so growing up in a place like that really infuses into your pores. And so I would go into these beautiful places, whether it be rainforests or the coast, which I love. And then as a young person, I was really drawn into wanting to study science. And so that's why I became a scientist."http://joellegergis.comhttps://climatehistory.com.auwww.blackincbooks.com.au/authors/jo-lle-gergiswww.creativeprocess.info www.oneplanetpodcast.org IG www.instagram.com/creativeprocesspodcast

Feminism · Women’s Stories · The Creative Process
Highlights - Joëlle Gergis - Lead Author - IPCC Sixth Assessment Report - Author of “Humanity's Moment”

Feminism · Women’s Stories · The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2023 10:13


"It was difficult to actually write about my dad because as I mentioned in the book, he died in 2017, and he was obviously a really significant person in my life. He really instilled this whole idea that education is the key to a better life, and that it's the great equalizer. So my heritage is from Egypt, so they were not wealthy. When my dad studied at university, he was able to break out of his social background, and it allowed him to move into other areas and create a better life, not just for him but for us.And I think that it was very formative for me because it made me realize that anyone from anywhere can change their life if they're really determined - but it doesn't mean we all have equal access to equal resources. And my dad had to work really, really hard, as have I and many people around the world. It's like, at the end of the day, all you can do is really the best with what you've got. And I guess I've tried to do the best with what I've got and he certainly did his best with what he was able to do in his life.The reason why I became a scientist, to be honest, is because of my deep love for the natural world and living in a country like Australia, which is absolutely extraordinary. You know, we have more unique plants and animals than anywhere on the planet. So more than places like Brazil or Papua New Guinea or Madagascar, these places you think of as being richly biodiverse. Australia actually tops the list, just in terms of the uniqueness of our natural environment. And so growing up in a place like that really infuses into your pores. And so I would go into these beautiful places, whether it be rainforests or the coast, which I love. And then as a young person, I was really drawn into wanting to study science. And so that's why I became a scientist."Dr. Joëlle Gergis is an award-winning climate scientist and writer at the Australian National University. She served as a lead author for the IPCC Sixth Assessment Report and is the author of Humanity's Moment: A Climate Scientist's Case for Hope and Sunburnt Country: The History and Future of Climate Change in Australia. Joëlle has also contributed chapters to The Climate Book by Greta Thunberg, and Not Too Late: Changing the Climate Story from Despair to Possibility, edited by Rebecca Solnit and Thelma Young Lutunatabua.http://joellegergis.comhttps://climatehistory.com.auwww.blackincbooks.com.au/authors/jo-lle-gergiswww.creativeprocess.info www.oneplanetpodcast.org IG www.instagram.com/creativeprocesspodcast

Social Justice & Activism · The Creative Process
Joëlle Gergis - Lead Author - IPCC Sixth Assessment Report - Author of “Humanity's Moment”

Social Justice & Activism · The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2023 47:11


Dr. Joëlle Gergis is an award-winning climate scientist and writer at the Australian National University. She served as a lead author for the IPCC Sixth Assessment Report and is the author of Humanity's Moment: A Climate Scientist's Case for Hope and Sunburnt Country: The History and Future of Climate Change in Australia. Joëlle has also contributed chapters to The Climate Book by Greta Thunberg, and Not Too Late: Changing the Climate Story from Despair to Possibility, edited by Rebecca Solnit and Thelma Young Lutunatabua.“I guess removing the social license for the continued destruction of our planet has to shift. And this is where these social movements become really inspiring to think about it because it always just takes a small group of really committed people to shift a social norm. And I quote some research in the book, which basically says you only need about 25% of a population to shift a norm, and then the rest of the population goes with those progressive elements. So right now we're in this moment where we're basically saying No More Fossil Fuels. We are cooking the planet. This is what the world's scientific community - that's what we are saying. We're cooking the planet. We must stop. And I guess the challenge here is to get enough people from all over the world, from all different parts of society, not just the scientific community, because we're only just a very, very small fraction people that make up our communities, but we need to mobilize people in a huge way to vote for our politicians at every level. From the local to the federal level who are going to reflect our values around shifting to a sustainable future, and choosing to leave a legacy, which is more one of care and repair rather than just complete destruction.And we owe it to the young people. There's a chapter in my book where I talk about intergenerational damage. I don't think it's fair to leave this burden on the shoulders of young people. We have to take that responsibility here and now for all of us in positions where we do have political power or economic power through the way we consume. We have to do what we can. It's really up to decision-makers and the people in power because they're really doing that to put pressure on our decision-makers. And I guess that's really where the rest of the community can play a role in that. And that's where I think it's quite exciting because that's how all social movements happen. That's how you get political."http://joellegergis.comhttps://climatehistory.com.auwww.blackincbooks.com.au/authors/jo-lle-gergiswww.creativeprocess.info www.oneplanetpodcast.org IG www.instagram.com/creativeprocesspodcast

Spirituality & Mindfulness · The Creative Process
Joëlle Gergis - Lead Author - IPCC Sixth Assessment Report - Author of “Humanity's Moment”

Spirituality & Mindfulness · The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2023 47:11


Dr. Joëlle Gergis is an award-winning climate scientist and writer at the Australian National University. She served as a lead author for the IPCC Sixth Assessment Report and is the author of Humanity's Moment: A Climate Scientist's Case for Hope and Sunburnt Country: The History and Future of Climate Change in Australia. Joëlle has also contributed chapters to The Climate Book by Greta Thunberg, and Not Too Late: Changing the Climate Story from Despair to Possibility, edited by Rebecca Solnit and Thelma Young Lutunatabua."So a lot of people ask, in my line of work as a climate scientist, 'How do you not just fall into a state of despair and really just see the really dark aspects of human behavior and our inability to correct our course and do the right thing?' And the truth is that we all have to reconcile it in some way. And you can either be really consumed by those darker emotions and that feeling that people don't care. Or you can just try and see beauty where it is and connect with other people who are also doing their very best. So I think this kind of binary thinking of black and white people are good or bad isn't quite right. There's just shades of gray and sometimes people do the best that they can from day to day, but other times we just have to. I guess it's a sense of being stubborn and believing that there is goodness out there."http://joellegergis.comhttps://climatehistory.com.auwww.blackincbooks.com.au/authors/jo-lle-gergiswww.creativeprocess.info www.oneplanetpodcast.org IG www.instagram.com/creativeprocesspodcast

Social Justice & Activism · The Creative Process
Highlights - Joëlle Gergis - Lead Author - IPCC Sixth Assessment Report - Author of “Humanity's Moment”

Social Justice & Activism · The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2023 10:13


“I guess removing the social license for the continued destruction of our planet has to shift. And this is where these social movements become really inspiring to think about it because it always just takes a small group of really committed people to shift a social norm. And I quote some research in the book, which basically says you only need about 25% of a population to shift a norm, and then the rest of the population goes with those progressive elements. So right now we're in this moment where we're basically saying No More Fossil Fuels. We are cooking the planet. This is what the world's scientific community - that's what we are saying. We're cooking the planet. We must stop. And I guess the challenge here is to get enough people from all over the world, from all different parts of society, not just the scientific community, because we're only just a very, very small fraction people that make up our communities, but we need to mobilize people in a huge way to vote for our politicians at every level. From the local to the federal level who are going to reflect our values around shifting to a sustainable future, and choosing to leave a legacy, which is more one of care and repair rather than just complete destruction.And we owe it to the young people. There's a chapter in my book where I talk about intergenerational damage. I don't think it's fair to leave this burden on the shoulders of young people. We have to take that responsibility here and now for all of us in positions where we do have political power or economic power through the way we consume. We have to do what we can. It's really up to decision-makers and the people in power because they're really doing that to put pressure on our decision-makers. And I guess that's really where the rest of the community can play a role in that. And that's where I think it's quite exciting because that's how all social movements happen. That's how you get political."Dr. Joëlle Gergis is an award-winning climate scientist and writer at the Australian National University. She served as a lead author for the IPCC Sixth Assessment Report and is the author of Humanity's Moment: A Climate Scientist's Case for Hope and Sunburnt Country: The History and Future of Climate Change in Australia. Joëlle has also contributed chapters to The Climate Book by Greta Thunberg, and Not Too Late: Changing the Climate Story from Despair to Possibility, edited by Rebecca Solnit and Thelma Young Lutunatabua.http://joellegergis.comhttps://climatehistory.com.auwww.blackincbooks.com.au/authors/jo-lle-gergiswww.creativeprocess.info www.oneplanetpodcast.org IG www.instagram.com/creativeprocesspodcast

ESG Insider: A podcast from S&P Global
Setting the stage for sustainability in 2023

ESG Insider: A podcast from S&P Global

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 20:02 Very Popular


In this episode of ESG Insider, we're looking ahead to sustainability themes that will drive 2023 by revisiting our most popular episodes and some of our favorite interviews from the past year.    We'll hear from one of the world's largest banks; the Chair of the Network for Greening the Financial System, or NGFS; the Co-Chair of the Taskforce on Nature-related Financial Disclosures, or TNFD; some of the scientists behind reports by the UN's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, or IPPC; and more. To listen to full versions of the interviews highlighted in this episode, see the following links:  Listen to our April 2022 episode with Karen Fang, Global Head of Sustainable Finance at Bank of America, here: https://www.spglobal.com/esg/podcasts/why-bank-of-america-says-scope-3-emissions-biggest-challenge-for-banks   Hear our March 2022 episode with Victoria Gaytan, Vice President at BlackRock Investment Stewardship, here: https://www.spglobal.com/esg/podcasts/behind-the-scenes-with-blackrock-how-the-world-s-largest-asset-manager-is-engaging-with-companies   Listen to our February 2022 episode featuring Katie Schmitz Eulitt, in her role as Director of Investor Relationships at the Value Reporting Foundation, which subsequently consolidated with the IFRS, here: https://www.spglobal.com/esg/podcasts/how-to-keep-pace-with-the-fast-changing-landscape-for-esg-regulation-standards   Check out our April 2022 episode featuring IPCC report contributing author John Bistline: https://www.spglobal.com/esg/podcasts/path-to-net-zero-for-energy-systems-complicated-but-feasible-ipcc-finds   You can hear our March 2022 episode featuring Dr. Edward Carr, who was a lead author of the IPCC report on climate resilient development pathways, here: https://www.spglobal.com/esg/podcasts/ipcc-climate-report-warns-transformational-change-is-no-longer-optional   Listen to our December 2022 episode featuring Investor Leadership Network CEO Amy Hepburn at our first-ever ESG Insider Live event here: https://www.spglobal.com/esg/podcasts/live-the-year-the-human-component-of-nature-and-climate-comes-to-the-fore   Listen to our full August 2022 episode featuring NGFS Chair Ravi Menon here: https://www.spglobal.com/esg/podcasts/how-central-banks-help-combat-climate-change-an-interview-with-ngfs-chair-ravi-menon   You can hear our December 2022 episode featuring COP15 Executive Secretary and TNFD Co-Chair Elizabeth Mrema here: https://www.spglobal.com/esg/podcasts/cop15-preview-what-will-make-un-s-big-biodiversity-conference-a-success   Hear the full November 2022 episode featuring Capitals Coalition CEO Mark Gough here: https://www.spglobal.com/esg/podcasts/at-cop27-how-to-make-progress-in-the-face-of-uncertainty   We'd love to hear from you. To give us feedback on this episode or share ideas for future episodes, please contact hosts Lindsey Hall (lindsey.hall@spglobal.com) and Esther Whieldon (esther.whieldon@spglobal.com).   Photo source: Getty Images   Copyright ©2023 by S&P Global   DISCLAIMER    By accessing this Podcast, I acknowledge that S&P GLOBAL makes no warranty, guarantee, or representation as to the accuracy or sufficiency of the information featured in this Podcast. The information, opinions, and recommendations presented in this Podcast are for general information only and any reliance on the information provided in this Podcast is done at your own risk. This Podcast should not be considered professional advice. Unless specifically stated otherwise, S&P GLOBAL does not endorse, approve, recommend, or certify any information, product, process, service, or organization presented or mentioned in this Podcast, and information from this Podcast should not be referenced in any way to imply such approval or endorsement. The third party materials or content of any third party site referenced in this Podcast do not necessarily reflect the opinions, standards or policies of S&P GLOBAL. S&P GLOBAL assumes no responsibility or liability for the accuracy or completeness of the content contained in third party materials or on third party sites referenced in this Podcast or the compliance with applicable laws of such materials and/or links referenced herein. Moreover, S&P GLOBAL makes no warranty that this Podcast, or the server that makes it available, is free of viruses, worms, or other elements or codes that manifest contaminating or destructive properties.   S&P GLOBAL EXPRESSLY DISCLAIMS ANY AND ALL LIABILITY OR RESPONSIBILITY FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, CONSEQUENTIAL OR OTHER DAMAGES ARISING OUT OF ANY INDIVIDUAL'S USE OF, REFERENCE TO, RELIANCE ON, OR INABILITY TO USE, THIS PODCAST OR THE INFORMATION PRESENTED IN THIS PODCAST.   

One Planet Podcast
Joëlle Gergis - Lead Author - IPCC Sixth Assessment Report - Author of “Humanity's Moment”

One Planet Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 47:11


Dr. Joëlle Gergis is an award-winning climate scientist and writer at the Australian National University. She served as a lead author for the IPCC Sixth Assessment Report and is the author of Humanity's Moment: A Climate Scientist's Case for Hope and Sunburnt Country: The History and Future of Climate Change in Australia. Joëlle has also contributed chapters to The Climate Book by Greta Thunberg, and Not Too Late: Changing the Climate Story from Despair to Possibility, edited by Rebecca Solnit and Thelma Young Lutunatabua."It's unbelievable to stop and think that you've got such heat extending so far into polar regions that even these places are burning in the Arctic. I mean, it's extraordinary. And not just trees but also the permafrost, the frozen soils underneath. These frozen places in the Arctic are also starting to thaw. And when they start to thaw, that releases a lot of methane. Methane is a very, very powerful greenhouse gas. And along with carbon dioxide that really combines to accelerate warming. And so this is the thing. We're witnessing these changes in our lifetime. And to think as well that you have 40-degree temperatures in the United Kingdom. I mean, that's crazy stuff, but it just goes to show that we're really starting to witness serious climate extremes that can no longer be ignored. We're really starting to witness serious climate extremes that can no longer be ignored. And the IPCC, one of our key conclusions to that report was that effectively the human fingerprint on the climate system is now undeniable. It is now an established fact that we have warmed every single continent, every ocean basin on the planet."http://joellegergis.comhttps://climatehistory.com.auwww.blackincbooks.com.au/authors/jo-lle-gergiswww.creativeprocess.info www.oneplanetpodcast.org IG www.instagram.com/creativeprocesspodcast

One Planet Podcast
Highlights - Joëlle Gergis - Lead Author - IPCC Sixth Assessment Report - Author of “Humanity's Moment”

One Planet Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 10:24


"It's unbelievable to stop and think that you've got such heat extending so far into polar regions that even these places are burning in the Arctic. I mean, it's extraordinary. And not just trees but also the permafrost, the frozen soils underneath. These frozen places in the Arctic are also starting to thaw. And when they start to thaw, that releases a lot of methane. Methane is a very, very powerful greenhouse gas. And along with carbon dioxide that really combines to accelerate warming. And so this is the thing. We're witnessing these changes in our lifetime. And to think as well that you have 40-degree temperatures in the United Kingdom. I mean, that's crazy stuff, but it just goes to show that we're really starting to witness serious climate extremes that can no longer be ignored. We're really starting to witness serious climate extremes that can no longer be ignored. And the IPCC, one of our key conclusions to that report was that effectively the human fingerprint on the climate system is now undeniable. It is now an established fact that we have warmed every single continent, every ocean basin on the planet."Dr. Joëlle Gergis is an award-winning climate scientist and writer at the Australian National University. She served as a lead author for the IPCC Sixth Assessment Report and is the author of Humanity's Moment: A Climate Scientist's Case for Hope and Sunburnt Country: The History and Future of Climate Change in Australia. Joëlle has also contributed chapters to The Climate Book by Greta Thunberg, and Not Too Late: Changing the Climate Story from Despair to Possibility, edited by Rebecca Solnit and Thelma Young Lutunatabua.http://joellegergis.comhttps://climatehistory.com.auwww.blackincbooks.com.au/authors/jo-lle-gergiswww.creativeprocess.info www.oneplanetpodcast.org IG www.instagram.com/creativeprocesspodcast

Sustainability, Climate Change, Politics, Circular Economy & Environmental Solutions · One Planet Podcast
Joëlle Gergis - Lead Author - IPCC Sixth Assessment Report - Author of “Humanity's Moment”

Sustainability, Climate Change, Politics, Circular Economy & Environmental Solutions · One Planet Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 47:11


Dr. Joëlle Gergis is an award-winning climate scientist and writer at the Australian National University. She served as a lead author for the IPCC Sixth Assessment Report and is the author of Humanity's Moment: A Climate Scientist's Case for Hope and Sunburnt Country: The History and Future of Climate Change in Australia. Joëlle has also contributed chapters to The Climate Book by Greta Thunberg, and Not Too Late: Changing the Climate Story from Despair to Possibility, edited by Rebecca Solnit and Thelma Young Lutunatabua."The reason why I became a scientist, to be honest, is because of my deep love for the natural world and living in a country like Australia, which is absolutely extraordinary. You know, we have more unique plants and animals than anywhere on the planet. So more than places like Brazil or Papua New Guinea or Madagascar, these places you think of as being richly biodiverse. Australia actually tops the list, just in terms of the uniqueness of our natural environment. And so growing up in a place like that really infuses into your pores. And so I would go into these beautiful places, whether it be rainforests or the coast, which I love. And then as a young person, I was really drawn into wanting to study science. And so that's why I became a scientist. I guess I move through these landscapes in a slightly different way to say other people who maybe don't have that training, but I guess it's my love of the natural world that really is the fuel for the fire that keeps me going in this area. So I think it's fascinating, for example, that every single year trees can actually put down this growth ring and that is responding to things like temperature and rainfall. So, as long as that tree's been alive and some of these trees can grow up to 2000 years, you can have this really, really long record of climate that extends back beyond the official weather records that generally begin around about 1850 over most of the world. So it's one of these things that I just inherently find science really fascinating and being able to use these different types of records to reconstruct past climate allows us to look at these cycles of natural climate variability and then understand how they're shifting as the planet continues to warm."http://joellegergis.comhttps://climatehistory.com.auwww.blackincbooks.com.au/authors/jo-lle-gergiswww.creativeprocess.info www.oneplanetpodcast.org IG www.instagram.com/creativeprocesspodcast

The Creative Process Podcast
Joëlle Gergis - Lead Author - IPCC Sixth Assessment Report - Author of “Humanity's Moment”

The Creative Process Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 47:11


Dr. Joëlle Gergis is an award-winning climate scientist and writer at the Australian National University. She served as a lead author for the IPCC Sixth Assessment Report and is the author of Humanity's Moment: A Climate Scientist's Case for Hope and Sunburnt Country: The History and Future of Climate Change in Australia. Joëlle has also contributed chapters to The Climate Book by Greta Thunberg, and Not Too Late: Changing the Climate Story from Despair to Possibility, edited by Rebecca Solnit and Thelma Young Lutunatabua."We're really starting to witness serious climate extremes that can no longer be ignored. And the IPCC, one of our key conclusions to that report was that effectively the human fingerprint on the climate system is now undeniable. It is now an established fact that we have warmed every single continent, every ocean basin on the planet. And again, that's a pretty serious thing to contemplate that human activity from the burning of fossil fuels and the clearing of land has led to this energy imbalance in the earth system, which is leading to a rapidly shifting climate."http://joellegergis.comhttps://climatehistory.com.auwww.blackincbooks.com.au/authors/jo-lle-gergiswww.creativeprocess.info www.oneplanetpodcast.org IG www.instagram.com/creativeprocesspodcast

Books & Writers · The Creative Process
Joëlle Gergis - Lead Author - IPCC Sixth Assessment Report - Author of “Humanity's Moment”

Books & Writers · The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 47:11


Dr. Joëlle Gergis is an award-winning climate scientist and writer at the Australian National University. She served as a lead author for the IPCC Sixth Assessment Report and is the author of Humanity's Moment: A Climate Scientist's Case for Hope and Sunburnt Country: The History and Future of Climate Change in Australia. Joëlle has also contributed chapters to The Climate Book by Greta Thunberg, and Not Too Late: Changing the Climate Story from Despair to Possibility, edited by Rebecca Solnit and Thelma Young Lutunatabua."We're really starting to witness serious climate extremes that can no longer be ignored. And the IPCC, one of our key conclusions to that report was that effectively the human fingerprint on the climate system is now undeniable. It is now an established fact that we have warmed every single continent, every ocean basin on the planet. And again, that's a pretty serious thing to contemplate that human activity from the burning of fossil fuels and the clearing of land has led to this energy imbalance in the earth system, which is leading to a rapidly shifting climate."http://joellegergis.comhttps://climatehistory.com.auwww.blackincbooks.com.au/authors/jo-lle-gergiswww.creativeprocess.info www.oneplanetpodcast.org IG www.instagram.com/creativeprocesspodcast

Books & Writers · The Creative Process
Highlights - Joëlle Gergis - Lead Author - IPCC Sixth Assessment Report - Author of “Humanity's Moment”

Books & Writers · The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 10:24


Dr. Joëlle Gergis is an award-winning climate scientist and writer at the Australian National University. She served as a lead author for the IPCC Sixth Assessment Report and is the author of Humanity's Moment: A Climate Scientist's Case for Hope and Sunburnt Country: The History and Future of Climate Change in Australia. Joëlle has also contributed chapters to The Climate Book by Greta Thunberg, and Not Too Late: Changing the Climate Story from Despair to Possibility, edited by Rebecca Solnit and Thelma Young Lutunatabua.http://joellegergis.comhttps://climatehistory.com.auwww.blackincbooks.com.au/authors/jo-lle-gergiswww.creativeprocess.info www.oneplanetpodcast.org IG www.instagram.com/creativeprocesspodcast

Sustainability, Climate Change, Politics, Circular Economy & Environmental Solutions · One Planet Podcast
Highlights - Joëlle Gergis - Lead Author - IPCC Sixth Assessment Report - Author of “Humanity's Moment”

Sustainability, Climate Change, Politics, Circular Economy & Environmental Solutions · One Planet Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 10:13


"The reason why I became a scientist, to be honest, is because of my deep love for the natural world and living in a country like Australia, which is absolutely extraordinary. You know, we have more unique plants and animals than anywhere on the planet. So more than places like Brazil or Papua New Guinea or Madagascar, these places you think of as being richly biodiverse. Australia actually tops the list, just in terms of the uniqueness of our natural environment. And so growing up in a place like that really infuses into your pores. And so I would go into these beautiful places, whether it be rainforests or the coast, which I love. And then as a young person, I was really drawn into wanting to study science. And so that's why I became a scientist. I guess I move through these landscapes in a slightly different way to say other people who maybe don't have that training, but I guess it's my love of the natural world that really is the fuel for the fire that keeps me going in this area. So I think it's fascinating, for example, that every single year trees can actually put down this growth ring and that is responding to things like temperature and rainfall. So, as long as that tree's been alive and some of these trees can grow up to 2000 years, you can have this really, really long record of climate that extends back beyond the official weather records that generally begin around about 1850 over most of the world. So it's one of these things that I just inherently find science really fascinating and being able to use these different types of records to reconstruct past climate allows us to look at these cycles of natural climate variability and then understand how they're shifting as the planet continues to warm."Dr. Joëlle Gergis is an award-winning climate scientist and writer at the Australian National University. She served as a lead author for the IPCC Sixth Assessment Report and is the author of Humanity's Moment: A Climate Scientist's Case for Hope and Sunburnt Country: The History and Future of Climate Change in Australia. Joëlle has also contributed chapters to The Climate Book by Greta Thunberg, and Not Too Late: Changing the Climate Story from Despair to Possibility, edited by Rebecca Solnit and Thelma Young Lutunatabua.http://joellegergis.comhttps://climatehistory.com.auwww.blackincbooks.com.au/authors/jo-lle-gergiswww.creativeprocess.info www.oneplanetpodcast.org IG www.instagram.com/creativeprocesspodcast

The Creative Process in 10 minutes or less · Arts, Culture & Society
Joëlle Gergis - Lead Author - IPCC Sixth Assessment Report - Author of “Humanity's Moment”

The Creative Process in 10 minutes or less · Arts, Culture & Society

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 10:13


"We're really starting to witness serious climate extremes that can no longer be ignored. And the IPCC, one of our key conclusions to that report was that effectively the human fingerprint on the climate system is now undeniable. It is now an established fact that we have warmed every single continent, every ocean basin on the planet. And again, that's a pretty serious thing to contemplate that human activity from the burning of fossil fuels and the clearing of land has led to this energy imbalance in the earth system, which is leading to a rapidly shifting climate."Dr. Joëlle Gergis is an award-winning climate scientist and writer at the Australian National University. She served as a lead author for the IPCC Sixth Assessment Report and is the author of Humanity's Moment: A Climate Scientist's Case for Hope and Sunburnt Country: The History and Future of Climate Change in Australia. Joëlle has also contributed chapters to The Climate Book by Greta Thunberg, and Not Too Late: Changing the Climate Story from Despair to Possibility, edited by Rebecca Solnit and Thelma Young Lutunatabua.http://joellegergis.comhttps://climatehistory.com.auwww.blackincbooks.com.au/authors/jo-lle-gergiswww.creativeprocess.info www.oneplanetpodcast.org IG www.instagram.com/creativeprocesspodcast

Das Klima
DK074 - Wer erfindet die Weltrettungsmaschine?

Das Klima

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 82:53


"Das Klima”, der Podcast zur Wissenschaft hinter der Krise. Wir lesen den aktuellen Bericht des Weltklimarats und erklären den aktuellen Stand der Klimaforschung. In Folge 74 geht es um Innovation. Die wird ja gerne als Lösung für alles ins Feld geführt: Wir erfinden einfach in Zukunft irgendwas, und dann ist die Klimakrise gelöst! So einfach ist es aber nicht; der Innovationsprozess ist komplex und ihn wissenschaftlich zu beschreiben und politisch zu steuern ist noch viel komplexer. Wir reden über das, was Technologie daran hindert, ihr volles Potenzial zu erreichen (Spoiler: Politik) und wie man den Erfolg von Innovation messen kann - was den Blutdruck von Claudia ein wenig in die Höhe treibt. Außerdem: Klimakrisentipps von der Künstlichen Intelligenz.

Meio Ambiente
Em 2022, emergência climática se tornou mais ‘visível', mas países recuaram nas ações

Meio Ambiente

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 14:42


Em um tema em que as más notícias se transformaram na regra nos últimos anos, 2022 trouxe uma série de alertas particularmente flagrantes sobre a emergência climática – mas também sobre as incoerências entre o discurso e as práticas para combater as mudanças do clima. Já em fevereiro, a guerra na Ucrânia levou a Europa para um cenário de incertezas sobre o futuro do abastecimento de gás natural russo, até então crucial para países como a Alemanha, a Hungria e a Eslováquia. Mas como a transição energética rumo ao fim dos combustíveis fósseis está mais lenta do que deveria, diversos países não viram outra alternativa a não ser ativar as usinas a carvão, as mais nocivas para o meio ambiente. Face ao risco de apagões e de ficar sem aquecimento nos meses de frio, os europeus deixaram de lado os compromissos ambientais e as promessas de acabar com as centrais a carvão até 2030. Estas usinas respondem por mais de 40% das emissões mundiais de gases de efeito estufa, que provocam o aquecimento global. Até os países menos dependentes do gás, como a França, dona da mais vasta rede de usinas nucleares da Europa, também não conseguiram evitar o retrocesso. Para Neil Makaroff, coordenador da seção Europa da Rede Ação pelo Clima, hub de organizações ambientais francesas, o contexto geopolítico deveria representar uma oportunidade para o bloco: "Diante da crise exacerbada pela guerra na Ucrânia, a energia nuclear pode parecer uma solução, ao não emitir CO2. Mas não podemos esquecer que para construir uma central nuclear, precisamos de 15 a 20 anos. Por demorar tanto, essa opção não atende aos nossos objetivos climáticos até 2030, de reduzir pelo menos 55% das nossas emissões até o fim da década”, explica. “A única solução facilmente aplicável e barata são as energias renováveis, eólica, solar e biogás. Elas precisam decolar para substituir o gás, o petróleo, mas também o carvão russos." Calorão mais cedo, intenso e persistente Na sequência, como um golpe de ironia do destino, o verão castigou os europeus com temperaturas historicamente elevadas, as segundas mais altas desde o início das medições, em 1900. Os termômetros começaram a subir já em maio, algo totalmente excepcional. Privada de gás, a Europa passou a conviver também com racionamento de água e com incêndios florestais fora de controle, levando a graves prejuízos agrícolas. Em dois meses, a França teve 33 dias de calor além dos padrões. O agricultor francês David Peschard, instalado em Loir-et-Cher, na região central do país, jamais tinha vivido uma situação parecida. “Algumas plantações não estão recebendo água suficiente. Podemos ser otimistas e achar que é apenas uma fase e que voltaremos a períodos mais úmidos. Mas, se enfrentarmos essa situação com frequência, será necessário nos adaptarmos rapidamente”, observa. “Infelizmente, temos uma lição a aprender, e estamos aprendendo muito lentamente. O milho, por exemplo, está condenado a nã ser mais cultivado na nossa região", lamenta. No continente africano, a seca prolongada nas regiões do Sahel e do Chifre da África, além de países como Quênia e Nigéria, acentuou a insegurança alimentar. O Unicef alerta que mais de 20 milhões de crianças africanas chegaram ao fim do ano sob a ameaça da fome e da sede devido às mudanças climáticas, à falta de cereais, aos conflitos e à inflação mundial. Paquistão sob a água A elevação das temperaturas globais também leva ao aumento dos fenômenos extremos como enchentes, que devastaram o Paquistão em agosto. O país teve um terço de seu território inundado, com 33 milhões de pessoas atingidas. As chuvas de 2022 foram quase três vezes mais fortes do que a média dos últimos 30 anos, segundo levantamento da ONU. Em seguida, veio o outono mais quente registrado em décadas na Europa – para mostrar, mais uma vez, que algo está errado com o clima do planeta. Em outubro, os termômetros marcaram de 3 a 7 graus acima do normal para a estação. Em entrevista ao Planeta Verde, o economista ambiental Matthieu Glachant avaliou que, em relação à tomada de consciência sobre o problema, haverá um antes e um depois de 2022. "Eu acho que foi importante o que aconteceu porque, do nada, a mudança climática se transformou em uma experiência pessoal. Há muito tempo, conhecemos os relatórios do IPCC que nos alertavam sobre tudo isso – até que chegamos no momento em que as previsões se realizaram diante dos nossos olhos”, constatou. "Acho que isso provocará um verdadeiro impacto nos cidadãos e, por consequência, nos políticos." No Brasil, foco no desmatamento Já no Brasil, na área ambiental, foram os recordes de desmatamento e queimadas, sempre atualizados para pior durante o governo de Jair Bolsonaro, que continuaram a ocupar as manchetes no país e internacionais. Meses como setembro e outubro foram os piores registrados em 12 e sete anos, respectivamente. No período de um ano, 11,6 mil km² da Amazônia foram desmatados, o segundo pior índice desde 2009, de acordo com dados do Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (Inpe). “O desmatamento está crescente nos últimos quatro anos e está se propagando por lugares onde não ocorria antes. A gente não via fogo em grandes quantidades na região de Lábrea, por exemplo, ou no sul do Amazonas. Não era um tema naquela região”, apontou Tasso Azevedo, coordenador-geral do Mapbiomas, plataforma de referência no monitoramento de queimadas. “É um crescimento consistente que é resultado dos sinais que são dados no nível federal que, no fundo, diz que vai acabar com as punições e vai reinar a impunidade em relação aos crimes ambientais.” Esse quadro tem consequências não só para o clima, mas também para a economia. Em 2022 o Brasil deu um passo a mais rumo à perda de mercados para as suas exportações de matérias-primas, em represália à política ambiental destrutiva. Em dezembro, a União Europeia chegou a um acordo sobre uma nova lei para proibir a compra de produtos oriundos de áreas de florestas desmatadas ilegalmente. A medida atinge em cheio alguns dos carros-chefes do comércio internacional brasileiro, como a carne, a soja e a madeira. “É uma legislação muito bem-vinda e esperada por toda a comunidade de cientistas e socioambientalistas. De forma transversal, vejo que o grande impacto vai ser minar a pressão de especulação de terras no Brasil”, disse o cientista de uso da terra Tiago Reis, coordenador na América do Sul da Trase, uma iniciativa internacional especializada em rastrear a origem e o destino das matérias-primas no comércio mundial. “De 90 a 99% do desmatamento global de 2015 a 2019 foi para a agropecuária. Mas de 35 a 55% desse desmatamento foi improdutivo, ou seja, ele foi motivado pela perspectiva de lucro com a venda da terra, de olho nos preços futuros das commodities agropecuárias. Quando a UE define que não vai importar produtos de áreas desmatadas, ela está dizendo que essa terra não vai mais valer tanto assim, já que vai encontrar restrições de mercado”, salientou Reis. Neste contexto, a eleição de Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, em outubro, foi a melhor noticia ambiental do ano para o Brasil. Em sua primeira viagem internacional após o pleito, Lula foi à Conferência do Clima da ONU em Sharm el-Sheikh, no Egito (COP27), anunciar ao mundo o seu comprometimento com a preservação da maior floresta tropical do planeta. “Não há segurança climática para o mundo sem uma Amazônia protegida. Não mediremos esforços para zerar o desmatamento e a degradação de nossos biomas até 2030”, ressaltou. “Os crimes ambientais, que cresceram de forma assustadora durante o governo que está chegando ao fim, serão agora combatidos sem trégua.” Outra boa notícia para o país foi a eleição de duas deputadas indígenas, Sônia Guajajara e Célia Xacriabá, importantes defensoras das causas dos povos originários. “Estaremos juntas, comprometidas com a bancada do cocar, para fortalecer o futuro Ministério dos Povos Indígenas [a ser chefiado por Guajajara]. Se nós somos a solução número 1 para conter as mudanças climáticas, como afirma a própria ONU, nós queremos e precisamos marcar presença nos outros ministérios: no Meio Ambiente, na Cultura, na Educação”, afirmou Célia à RFI, em uma conversa em Sharm el Sheikh. “Nós chegamos para ‘mulherizar' e ‘indigenizar' a política, porque onde existe indígena, existe floresta.” COP27 tem avanço para países pobres, mas falha em responder à altura os desafios A conferência ambiental mais importante do ano ocorreu em novembro. O evento resultou na decisão de criar um financiamento específico para os países em desenvolvimento serem compensados, com recursos das nações desenvolvidas, pelas perdas e danos já sofridos devido às mudanças do clima – uma demanda história dos países pobres. Por outro lado, a conferência, abalada pelos efeitos da guerra na Ucrânia e realizada em um país que deixa a desejar na pasta ambiental, falhou ao paralisar os esforços por reduções de emissões de CO2 e encaminhar a diminuição do uso de combustíveis fosseis. Nos dois aspectos, essenciais para o cumprimento do Acordo de Paris, o texto final da COP27 apenas manteve o que já havia sido acordado na conferência anterior, em Glasgow.

The Climate Pod
Our 2022 Year in Review: Part One

The Climate Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 32:59


Another year has come to an end. In 2022, we saw a number of events unfold across the globe that further emphasized the need to address the climate crisis with greater urgency and accelerate the transition to clean energy. This is Part One of our look back of the year with some of the biggest newsmakers we spoke to in 2022. We'll review the first half of the year and remember how the conversation around the climate crisis evolved and responded to rapidly changing world events - from the Russian invasion of Ukraine, to spiking inflation, new IPCC reports, a promise of a major climate bill in the US and the potential for complete failure. Featuring excerpts from our 2022 interviews with White House National Climate Advisor Gina McCarthy, Paul Krugman, Bill McKibben, Rep. Ro Khanna, Don't Look Up co-writers Adam McKay and David Sirota, Professor Jeffrey Sachs, Dr. Marshall Shepherd, IPCC co-authors Joern Birkmann, Paulina Jaramillo, and Stephanie Roe, climate reporters David Roberts and Robinson Meyer, Gernot Wagner, and Norwegian Climate Minister Espen Barth Eide.  Subscribe to our Substack newsletter "The Climate Weekly" As always, follow us @climatepod on Twitter and email us at theclimatepod@gmail.com. Our music is "Gotta Get Up" by The Passion Hifi, check out his music at thepassionhifi.com. Rate, review and subscribe to this podcast on iTunes, Spotify, Stitcher, and more! Subscribe to our new YouTube channel! Join our Facebook group.

Product, Explained
S1E110 - Wren, Explained

Product, Explained

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 34:51


In this episode about Wren, Jeff and Mike talk about the size of a ton of carbon dioxide, climate anxiety, and how you can start making a difference today. Episode 110: Wren, Explained [00:40] Mike's passion and sustainability filibuster [1:30] MIT Technology Review - What is a ton of carbon dioxide? Hint - it's a cube full of telephone poles that weighs as much as a great white shark. [4:00] The IPCC, avoiding 1.5 degrees celsius warming, and how carbon dioxide/greenhouse gas emissions overfilling the earth's atmosphere are analogous to a bathtub overflowing with water. [5:00] Carbon Mitigation vs. Carbon Removal vs. Carbon Capture. Also - what do we do with all of this carbon that we capture? [6:45] What is Wren? Hint: your “All in One Climate Subscription” [7:30] What's the average carbon footprint in the US? Wren's carbon footprint calculator. [8:15] How do you choose how much carbon to offset? What about changing your behaviors like eating less meat or driving less? [10:30] Not all carbon credits are made equal; for example forest preservation to carbon removal efforts like Climeworks. John Oliver's expose on the pitfalls behind Carbon Capture: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6p8zAbFKpW0 [13:00] Scientific American published a study that in general, the more you earn - the higher your individual carbon footprint [14:00] What's the benefit for customers for paying for a service like this? For customers like Mike, they're deeply passionate about this space, much of the benefit is realized in feeling like you're ‘doing your part' vs. the Tragedy of the commons problem. [16:30] What will it take for real changes to occur? [19:30] What is Wren's business model? Wren indexes highly on transparency and brings a portfolio approach to your subscription dollars. [22:00] Some of Wren's portfolio projects include Biochar in California, Mineral weathering in Scotland, and tech enabled rainforest protection. [24:00] The History of Wren - and how the team was initially focused on HR software before heading to Y Combinator [27:15] Wren's target customers are likely climate conscious people that want to spend money to see climate action implemented. Also Climate Anxiety is real. [30:00] Other competitors in the space are great - like Zopeful, but no climate solution is a bad solution - we need all hands on deck. [31:20] ProdEx scores: Mike 4.9 stars and Jeff 4.3 out of 5; if you're interested in Wren - check out www.wren.co/join/mikealcazaren to get your first month free. [32:30] Season 2 is coming next year! Let us know who you'd like to hear us interview on the podcast!

Leadership and the Environment
653: Mark Z. Jacobson: Roadmaps for 100% clean renewable energy

Leadership and the Environment

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2022 51:00


After I shared episodes on the hazards of solar and wind, as well as my experiment disconnecting my apartment from the electric grid in Manhattan (in month 8 as I type these words), a listener pointed me to Mark Jacobs. I can't believe I hadn't found him yet.I dove into Mark's prolific research and writing. He makes plenty free on his site. As a professor of engineering at Stanford with great passion, he researches what he's talking about and makes it all available. He's not just talking or hoping for the best.His research helps form the Green New Deal. He contributed to the IPCC work that won the Nobel Prize. Coincidentally, he criticized podcast guest Mark P. Mills article I linked to in More Hopeful Calculations for the Energy Transition.We talked about his roadmaps for transitioning the world, countries, states, cities, and towns to 100% clean, renewable wind, water, and sunlight in all energy sectors and his books, 100% Clean, Renewable Energy and Storage for Everything (2020) and No Miracles Needed (2023). Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

SHIVA Be The Light
EP.1151 - Dr.SHIVA LIVE: ELON MUSK = AOC = ELIZABETH WARREN = CARBON TAX = $$$$ for THEM

SHIVA Be The Light

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 74:09


In this discussion, Dr. SHIVA Ayyadurai, MIT PhD, Inventor of Email, provides a SYSTEMS ANALYSIS of the common thread between Elon Musk, AOC, Elizabeth Warren, IPCC - based on a quasi-religion of carbon taxing to subjugate every human on the planet. Elon Musk serves the interests of the elites to sheeple conservatives in the FOLD.

Kosmographia
Episode #091: Deceptive US Heat Wave, Global Temps and Historic CO2 Levels Reporting

Kosmographia

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 122:03 Very Popular


RC is still feeling the effects of the Halloween shiny, reflective Foil Brother, so he discovers the differences between tin and aluminum. With clarity returned and napping mastered, he reviews the factors behind the phenomenon of the Urban Heat Island Effect, and relates how charts of heat waves in the US can be deceptive by manipulating data and wording descriptions that leave the actual point of the graphs unclear. Other more direct graphs blatantly show how comparably low current concentrations of CO2 are and how global temperatures were much higher than they have been the last five million years during the onset and cycling of ice ages. What is proposed as the optimum temperature that we should be striving toward? And what is being proposed as solutions to manage that temperature, that may leave us hamstrung in the face of natural climate change? Kosmographia Ep091 The Randall Carlson Podcast with Brothers of the Serpent – Kyle and Russ, Normal Guy Mike, and GeocosmicREX admin Bradley, from 11/03/22. In the name of liberty and freedom, we are moving this podcast to our new partner platform! Please join us here: https://www.howtube.com/channels/RandallCarlson  LINKS: Heat Waves: https://www.epa.gov/climate-indicators/climate-change-indicators-heat-waves Announcements about events and tours: https://randallcarlson.com/tours-and-events/ https://www.cliffviewresort.com/  Upper Cumberland Plateau Tour in Late March ‘23 RC's monthly updates on science news and his activities:  https://randallcarlson.com/newsletter  Cosmic Summit 2023 in Asheville June 16-18 in-person tickets: https://cosmicsummit2023.com/ Cosmic Summit 2023 howtube Livestream/VoD: https://www.howtube.com/14022 RC and Graham Hancock latest with Joe Rogan on the Netflix “Ancient Apocalypse” series: https://open.spotify.com/episode/2xvmTo09BFMd6tJfJPmmvT Get all things Graham directly: https://grahamhancock.com/   Mysterious Origins of Halloween and the Ancient Day of the Dead Festivals (Video on Demand $18) https://www.howtube.com/Dh4nrIFWkiSc?f=yt  Sacred Geometry introductory workshop (Video on Demand $72) https://howtube.com/SGwithRC Plato's Atlantis – 7 hours of deep-dive (Video on Demand $33) https://www.howtube.com/12513 Cool and fun Kosmographia and RC gear:  https://randallcarlson.com/shop (20% off til End of Year) New university/village “Sanctuary Project” : https://project.randallcarlson.com  Contact at the Cataracts May '23  https://contactatthecabin.com/scablands-with-randall-carlson/ Randall with Rogan ep1772  https://open.spotify.com/episode/190slemJsUXH5pEYR6DUbf Full listing of scientific papers about the Younger Dryas Impact Hypothesis: https://cosmictusk.com   CBD RECOMMENDED - Listen to Randall's experience with “CBD from the gods” after the mid-break at 56:44. They have some special deals going on right now, and in addition, for the Kosmographia audience - you can also get FREE shipping on your order!  Use code: “RCshipsFREE” (not case sensitive) when you check out at https://www.cbdfromthegods.com    Support Randall Carlson's efforts to discover and share pivotal paradigm-shifting information! Improve the quality of the podcast and future videos. Allow him more time for his research into the many scientific journals, books, and his expeditions into the field, as he continues to decipher the clues that explain the mysteries of our past, and prepare us for the future... Contribute to RC thru howtube: https://www.howtube.com/channels/RandallCarlson#tab_donate  Make a one-time donation thru PayPal, credit/debit card or other account here: https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=8YVDREQ9SMKL6&source=url Contribute monthly to receive bonus content and perks:  https://patreon.com/RandallCarlson   http://www.RandallCarlson.com has the podcast, RC's blog, galleries, and products to purchase! T-shirts and many new products and styles here: https://randallcarlson.com/shop/    Podcast crew email: Kosmographia1618@gmail.com Info on upcoming trips with Randall and the crew: TOURS@RandallCarlson.com Offer your time/services/accommodations here: VOLUNTEER@RandallCarlson.com Add to the expanding library of evidence here: RESEARCH@RandallCarlson.com Specific questions may get answered online: QUESTIONS@RandallCarlson.com   Small class lectures "Cosmography 101" from '06-'09 on Brad's original channel: https://youtube.com/geocosmicrex       Kosmographia logo and design animation by Brothers of the Serpent. Check out their podcast: http://www.BrothersoftheSerpent.com/ Theme “Deos” and bumper music by Fifty Dollar Dynasty: http://www.FiftyDollarDynasty.net/ Video recording, editing and publishing by Bradley Young with YSI Productions LLC (copyrights), with audio mastered by Kyle Allen and Chris James.   CBD FROM THE GODS LINK:  http://www.cbdfromthegods.com          COUPON CODE: RCshipsFREE   Climate Change, Heat Wave, Climate Data, Extreme Weather, Urban Heat Island, Carbon Dioxide, Phanerozoic, Pleistocene, Ice Ages, Tin Foil, San Antonio, Inconvenient Truth, Dust Bowl, Ice Cores, Insolation, Solar Irradiance, Cenozoic, Data Manipulation, Graphsmanship, Tesla, IPCC, Quaternary, La Brea, GEOCARB, GISP2, Sea Level Rise, Eustacy, Baltic Sea, Cyclic Catastrophe, Stomatal density, photosynthesis, COP27, Limestone, Holocene, Anthropocene, Fossil fuels, Hydrocarbons

Accidental Gods
Living Well within our Limits: Actions for systemic change with Prof Julia Steinberger

Accidental Gods

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 41:45


Professor Julia Steinberger researches and teaches in the interdisciplinary areas of Ecological Economics and Industrial Ecology.  She is the recipient of a Leverhulme Research Leadership Award for her research project 'Living Well Within Limits' investigating how universal human well-being might be achieved within planetary boundaries. She is Lead Author for the IPCC's 6th Assessment Report with Working Group 3.She has held postdoctoral positions at the Universities of Lausanne and Zurich, and obtained her PhD from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She has published over 40 internationally peer-reviewed articles since 2009 in journals including Nature Climate Change, Nature Sustainability, WIRES-Climate Change, Environmental Science & Technology, PLOS ONE and Environmental Research Letters.As part of our drive towards finding the people at the leading edge of change, we wanted to connect with Prof Steinberger really to unpick the detail of personal and collective action. Each of us is only one person and the nature of the change can feel overwhelming even while it feels urgent.  So we need to hear directly from the people whose entire lives are given to solving this problem and who have concrete ideas of what we can do and how, who can direct our priorities and show us where the best leverage points lie.  Prof. Steinberger has clear ideas of how our culture can live within planetary boundaries and we unpick them in this podcast.  Enjoy! Julia on Medium https://jksteinberger.medium.com/an-audacious-toolkit-actions-against-climate-breakdown-part-1-a-is-for-advocacy-7baa108f00e9Living Well Within Limits https://lili.leeds.ac.uk/Positive Money https://positivemoney.org/Fossil Banks, No Thanks https://www.fossilbanks.org/

Mamilos
COP27: para onde estamos caminhando?

Mamilos

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 54:56


Mamileiros e mamiletes, a Conferência da Organização das Nações Unidas sobre Mudanças Climáticas (COP27) foi realizada entre os dias 6 e 18 de novembro, em Sharm el-Sheikh, no Egito. O Mamilos, em mais uma parceria com Pacto Global da ONU no Brasil, teve a oportunidade de mediar conversas nesse encontro e acompanhar importantes discussões sobre os movimentos realizados para mitigar as mudanças climáticas. No programa de hoje, vamos trazer um apanhado geral sobre o evento e o resultado que essas conversas têm provocado no Brasil e no mundo. No início do programa, você vai ouvir a apresentação de Thelma Krug, matemática, professora e pesquisadora brasileira com atuação na área de mudanças climáticas. Ela é vice-presidente do IPCC (sigla em inglês para o Painel Intergovernamental sobre Mudanças Climáticas), uma organização criada pela ONU, desde 2015. Quem também participou do episódio foi Maitê Padovani Leite, gerente de Clima do Pacto Global da ONU Brasil, que esteve presente em diversas plenárias e nos contou o que mais chamou sua atenção no evento. Para entender o acordo oficial firmado na COP27 e como o documento foi construído, a gente conversou com Diego Casaes, diretor de campanha na Avaaz, rede para mobilização social global através da Internet. A gente sabe que para alcançar os objetivos traçados na COP27, muitas ações precisam acontecer no setor privado. Por isso, a gente vai ouvir exemplos práticos de empresas brasileiras que estão comprometidas com o Acordo de Paris e com as metas climáticas propostas na COP. Ouvimos Paulo Pianez, diretor de Sustentabilidade e Comunicação Corporativa América do Sul na Marfrig Global Foods, e André Ferretti, gerente sênior de Economia da Biodiversidade da Fundação Grupo Boticário de Proteção à Natureza. Mas de onde pode vir o dinheiro necessário para financiar as mudanças urgentes? Para falar sobre esse tópico do investimento, vamos entender como acontece a mobilização de capital para transição climática e econômica com Gustavo Montezano, que atualmente ocupa o cargo de presidente do Banco Nacional de Desenvolvimento Econômico e Social – BNDES. Aperta o play e vamos juntos nesse debate tão urgente! _____ FALE CONOSCO . Email: mamilos@b9.com.br _____ SADIA A Sadia é uma marca parceira em todos os momentos, do café da manhã ao jantar, do dia a dia àquela data especial. E agora, durante os jogos do mundial, você também pode contar com Sadia quando pensar naquele petisco delicioso para servir durante todos os jogos. A marca tem uma variedade de produtos que trazem muito sabor e praticidade à sua vida. Tem presunto, salame, nuggets, pizza, linguiça toscana, salsicha, lasanha bolonhesa e muitos outros produtos com várias possibilidades de preparo! É por isso que o Mamilos e a Sadia querem tornar os jogos do mundial um momento ainda mais inesquecível. É ano de hexa, é hora de se unir pra torcer e pra comemorar esse evento que a gente tanto ama e só acontece de quatro em quatro anos. E pra melhorar o clima, a Sadia disponibilizou em seu site a receita de Samosa, com o preferido dos brasileiros, o presunto Sadia, a pesquisa da Kantar Insights comprova! E se você também quer um petisco pra comer com a galera na sua casa, não fique só na vontade também, acesse o site da Sadia e confira essas e outras receitas em: www.sadia.com.br/receitas. Nesse mundial não importa sua rotina, sua torcida pede Sadia. _____ CONTRIBUA COM O MAMILOS Quem apoia o Mamilos ajuda a manter o podcast no ar e ainda participa do nosso grupo especial no Telegram. É só R$9,90 por mês! Quem assina não abre mão. https://www.catarse.me/mamilos _____ Equipe Mamilos Mamilos é uma produção do B9 A apresentação é de Cris Bartis e Ju Wallauer. Pra ouvir todos episódios, assine nosso feed ou acesse mamilos.b9.com.br Quem coordenou essa produção foi a Beatriz Souza. Com a estrutura de pauta e roteiro escrito por Eduarda Esteves. A edição foi de Mariana Leão e as trilhas sonoras, de Angie Lopez. A capa é de Helô D'Angelo. A coordenação digital é feita por Agê Barros, Carolina Souza e Thallini Milena. O B9 tem direção executiva de Cris Bartis, Ju Wallauer e Carlos Merigo. O atendimento e negócios é feito por Rachel Casmala, Camila Mazza, Greyce Lidiane e Telma Zenaro.

The Institute for Person-Centered Care Podcast

Host Ann Garton welcomes three special guests for World AIDS Day offering a global perspective:  Annamore Mutisi, MD, MPH, from Zimbabwe; Tsitsi Monera-Penduka, PhD, AAHIVP, from the United Kingdom; and Jessica Posner, MPH, from the Eastern United States.Annamore Mutisi, MD, MPH:Annamore Mutisi is a medical doctor and public health specialist who was born and based in Zimbabwe. She has 11 years of working experience in both the public health and private sectors.  Her experience is vast, as she has a strong clinical background working in government hospitals managing patients with various conditions and a growing public health portfolio working on various HIV care and treatment projects.  Currently, she is working as a Technical Advisor on a PEPFAR-funded, CDC-supported HIV Prevention, Care, and Treatment Project being implemented by the Zimbabwe Association of Church-related Hospitals (ZACH), a Zimbabwean NGO that works with church-related hospitals and Clinics in Zimbabwe. Tsitsi Monera-Penduka, PhD, AAHIVP:Tsitsi Monera-Penduka is a Clinical Pharmacologist from Zimbabwe who recently relocated to the United Kingdom.  She has worked mainly in academia, conducting research, and training healthcare professional students in HIV.  Dr Monera-Penduka established the Research Unit For Safety Of Herbs And Drugs (RUSHeD), which focuses on developing clinical evidence for the safe integration of herbal and conventional medicine in HIV care settings.  She has been involved in the implementation of several inter-professional education andtraining initiatives that promote patient-centred care, including the Strengthening Inter-professional Education for HIV (STRIPE HIV), Collaborative Inter-professional Partnership CHIP) and the Global Educational exchange in Medicine (GEMx) initiatives.Jessica Posner, MPH:Jessica Posner is the Strategic Information Lead with John Snow Inc.'s Center for HIV and Infectious Disease, who has twenty years of experience in a range of global health technical areas.  She currently leads JS Inc.'s Person-Centered Care Portfolio.  Jessica has an MPH in international public health from Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine and is fluent in Spanish and French.Connect with us!  Let us know topics YOU want us to explore!Email: ipcc@sau.eduFacebook: facebook.com/SAUIPCC/Twitter: @sau_ipccWeb: www.sau.edu/institute-for-person-centered-careSt. Ambrose University is located in Davenport, Iowa, USA.

Plant Based Briefing
419: Top 15 Meat and Dairy Producers Emit Nearly as Much Methane as the Entire EU, Study Finds by Nicole Axworthy at VegNews.com

Plant Based Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 7:47


Top 15 meat and dairy producers emit nearly as much methane as the entire EU, study finds. By Nicole Axworthy at VegNews.com    Original post:  https://vegnews.com/vegan-news/environment/top-meat-dairy-producers-methane-eu   Launched in 2000, VegNews is the largest vegan media brand in the world. They have a best-selling plant-based magazine, and they create amazing content from food and fashion to travel, celebrity interviews, beauty and health info, a meal planner, and vegan travel excursions. Their Guide section on their website is full of great information and they have an online shop where you can find cookbooks, foods, kitchen tools, vegan meal delivery services. They also have a website, VeganWeddings.com.  Please visit www.VegNews.com for a wealth of resources.    How to support the podcast: Share with others. Recommend the podcast on your social media. Follow/subscribe to the show wherever you listen. Buy some vegan/plant based merch: https://www.plantbasedbriefing.com/shop    Follow Plant Based Briefing on social media: Twitter: @PlantBasedBrief YouTube: YouTube.com/PlantBasedBriefing  Facebook: Facebook.com/PlantBasedBriefing  LinkedIn: Plant Based Briefing Podcast Instagram: @PlantBasedBriefing #vegan #plantbased #plantbasedpodcast #veganpodcast #plantbasedbriefing #vegnews #climatechange #climateemergency #climatecrisis #environment #animalagriculture #dairy #bigfood #bigdairy #methane #GHG #IPCC #JBS #Tyson #DairyFarmers #ditchdairy    

The Richie Allen Show
Episode 1499: The Richie Allen Show Wednesday November 30th 2022

The Richie Allen Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 111:33


Richie is joined by Professor Ian Plimer.Professor Plimer is Australia's best-known geologist. He is Emeritus Professor of Earth Sciences at the University of Melbourne.In his latest book, entitled "Green Murder," Plimer argues that It has never been shown that human emissions of Co2 drive global warming. He says that scientific evidence which doesn't fit the narrative has been ignored by IPCC, COP and self-interested scientists. In the book, he charges the green lobby with murdering people through impoverishment, murdering freedom of speech, suppressing scientists who dissent from the narrative and terrorising children with apocalyptic visions of a scorched earthDo NOT miss this interview. 

Can Marketing Save the Planet?
Episode 46: ‘Speak Up Now - Marketing in times of climate crisis' - creating credible Storylines with Author and Strategist - Wim Vermeulen

Can Marketing Save the Planet?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 33:08


  Do you ask yourself as a marketer, “with all the decisions I took today, did I accelerate the transition to net zero, or slow it down? If the conclusion at the end of the day is that you slowed it down - well you really don't want to be there. Accelerating the transition is where marketers need to be.” Wim advises that all marketers should ‘put the planet in the room' - literally. Tune in to the third question we ask all guests in our round up - as to how this action changes everything. It's a fantastic discussion - with loads of takeaways… we talk science, language, communication and more with Wim Vermeulen, Director of Strategy and Sustainability at Bubka, and author of ‘Speak up Now! Marketing in Times of Climate Crisis'. A book Wim felt he had to write so he could share all his learnings through the work he's been doing with the University of Ghent around when and how climate communication is successful and when it's not. From his research across a range of sectors reviewing the language and impact of sustainability focused storylines and campaigns - the findings show that there's a huge credibility gap in every sector - only 9.7% of sustainable campaigns are actually credible. The fact that over 90% of people don't believe sustainability storylines led the research team to dissect what actually does drive credibility. Wim shares 5 key drivers - and you really don't want to miss what he has to say around these. As they are critical drivers for marketers to consider with every brief or project. Wim highlights the need to not only look at ‘supply side', but equally urgent, the ‘demand side', and how a conversation he had with IPCC lead author Prof. Dr. Felix Creutzig explained the need for, ‘social norming of sustainable consumption, and the global reductions that can bring.' Addressing the ‘demand side' is something that cannot be ignored, but as Wim explained, “in 2021, in Europe, 48% of products launched were climate friendly, but then, if you look a pricing across industries and products, the average premium for a climate friendly product is 75-85%, so that's now a choice.” Wim goes on to explain that, “Bain calculated the average cost to decarbonise a product was less than 5% of the total cost on average”. This goes against the objective of changing behaviours as once again price becomes the default reason for purchase, demand isn't being created for climate friendly products in the way that it should be and, profit is being placed over planet and people. Sometimes as marketers, our need to call something by a different name to make it stand out, or more impactful can actually do more harm than good, and when the need for everyone to move in the same direction is so critical, we cannot afford there to be confusion, as it slows progress. “We need to stop inventing terms. Everything has been defined by scientists. Trust the science. There are 10 key terms - defined by climate scientists, that's the Bible - use it!” There is so much in this episode as Wim talks through some examples of organisations who are leading the way, leadership and once again the role of marketing and communications is highlighted as critical in moving us towards a more sustainable future. So, tune in and have a listen!! For more about Wim's work, books, research and documentaries visit https://www.wimvermeulen.com/ ________________________________________________________ You'll find the Podcast on all the usual pod platforms - and if you love it, do share it and spread the word. Talking about climate change and the role we play is one of the most important things we can do. So join the conversation. We're all in this together. Our podcasts are recorded purely via online conferencing platforms, we apologise for any minor sound quality issues.

The Learning Hack podcast
LH #71 Climate: Will We Ever Learn? with Robert Nicholls

The Learning Hack podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 39:17


  'We are on a highway to climate hell with our foot still on the accelerator' (António Guterres, United Nations Secretary General speaking at COP 27). Successive COPs have revealed a lack of will among the world's governments to make commitments that they'll actually stick by. So increasingly, people who aren't in government feel it's down to them to do something. Every institution and organization of any size, it seems, has an environmental policy, and it falls to HR, L&D and educators of all stripes to communicate these policies. Learning professionals are therefore heavily involved in the response to the climate emergency. In this episode, John discusses with a distinguished climate scientist exactly where we are with controlling climate change and how best learning professionals can contribute. Robert Nicholls is Professor and Director of the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research, based at the University of East Anglia. He has contributed extensively to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (the IPCC). His particular focus is the implications of sea-level rise, especially on coastal areas. He has published over 200 peer-reviewed papers and is the co-editor of six books. 0:00 - Intro 3:18 - The state of climate change 9:55 - Warming in coastal areas 14:02 - Effect of the energy crisis 23:50 - Confidence in engineering solutions 28:59 - Learning Departments' response 32:14 - Impact of grassroots activities 34:31 - What's improving? Follow Professor Robert Nicholls LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/robert-nicholls-2a97706 Website (Personal): https://www.southampton.ac.uk/engineering/about/staff/rjn.page Website (Tyndall Centre): https://tyndall.ac.uk/people/robert-nicholls/ Email: robert.nicholls@uea.ac.uk Contact John Helmer Twitter: @johnhelmer LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnhelmer/ Website: http://johnhelmerconsulting.com/ Download the white paper from Learning Pool written by John Helmer – The Spacing Effect: Harnessing the Power of Spaced Practice for Learning That Sticks https://learningpool.com/spacing-effect-harnessing-power-of-spaced-practice/

Malditos Veganos
78 – ¿Hay demasiadas personas en el planeta?

Malditos Veganos

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 46:26


Ha habido muchos comentarios últimamente sobre si hay demasiadas personas en el planeta. Esto debido a que hemos llegado a 8000mil millones. Podéis apoyarnos por sólo 1€ al mes podréis descargar de forma anticipada nuestro podcast, y por 4€ podréis tener acceso al videopodcast y a la hemeroteca de directos. Si quieres colaborar con nosotros puedes ver nuestro Media Kit desde: Malditosveganos.com/mediakit. Recordar que actualmente estamos grabando los podcast desde nuestro canal de Twitch, podéis acceder desde: Malditosveganos.com/directo. Y hemos abierto ya nuestro foro / comunidad de Discord, como punto de reunión para los veganers y no tan veganers del lugar, acceso disponible desde: Malditosveganos.com/foro. Antes de empezar con el tema en cuestión hablamos sobre el Mundial de de Qatar con todo lo que ello conlleva. Miriam nos comenta sobre un documental sobre el mundial así que os dejamos por aquí más información: https://vm.tiktok.com/ZMF9eWmnX/ Ya entramos en materia y pasamos a responder la pregunta principal del episodio de hoy. Vamos a aportar diferentes puntos de vista para ello, ¿acaso serán 8000 millones de personas demasiadas para el planeta? Sergio nos habla también de su punto de vista apoyándose sobre una opinión de un experto del IPCC. También vamos a resolver un par de dudas de nuestras oyentes, empezamos con pisar caracoles. Y hablamos de un artículo para reparar las conchitas de los caracoles. Por último hablamos sobre si consideramos los productos con trazas veganos o no. Esperamos que os haya gustado el capítulo y nos podéis comentar si os parecen muchas personas o no. Muchas gracias por suscribiros en Spotify, dejar vuestras valoraciones de 5 estrellas en Apple Podcasts, por formar parte de la iVooX Squad con vuestros me gusta y comentarios. Y también por supuesto, si nos escucháis desde Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, o incluso desde nuestro canal de YouTube o Twitch. Esperamos vuestro feedback, críticas, preguntas, opiniones y propaganda antinatalista en malditosveganos.com/contactar. Nada más, ¡nos vemos en el siguiente podcast! Este episodio se publicó originalmente en: malditosveganos.com/78

Environment and Climate News Podcast
Is the IPCC Spreading Science Fiction? (Guest: Dave White)

Environment and Climate News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 25:23


Heartland Daily Podcast
Is the IPCC Spreading Science Fiction? (Guest: Dave White)

Heartland Daily Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 25:23


Environment and Climate News Podcast
Is the IPCC Spreading Science Fiction? (Guest: Dave White)

Environment and Climate News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 28:19


Dave White's new environmental science textbook, Climate Crisis Changed: The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Are Deliberate Science Fiction, examines the basic science of what drives climate change. White dives into the evidence used by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change to claim that we face a climate crisis. The evidence doesn't support the position. Claims of climate catastrophe are based on a faulty understanding of the impact different greenhouses gases have on temperatures and related climate phenomena. White controversially writes that the present warming is impacted by shifts in the earth's tilt.

The Creative Process Podcast
Highlights - Kevin Trenberth - Nobel Prize Winner - Author of “The Changing Flow of Energy Through the Climate System”

The Creative Process Podcast