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Podcast of policy and book forums, Capitol Hill briefings and other events from the Cato Institute

The Cato Institute


    • Nov 8, 2022 LATEST EPISODE
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    Latest episodes from Cato Event Podcast

    Panel 1: What Have We Learned?

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 91:34


    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    Panel 2: The Fed's Operating System and New Monetary Framework: An Appraisal

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 74:03


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    The (Temporary?) Conquest of American Inflations

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 29:41


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    Panel 3: The Future of Money in a Fintech World

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 76:53


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    Election Reform and the Midterm Election

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 91:02


    Join Sphere Education Initiatives in advance of the election for a professional development webinar on Election Reform and the Midterm Election. Held via Zoom on November 1st from 7:30 – 9:00 pm eastern, we'll hear from a panel of experts on the Electoral Count Act, a major legislative initiative in Congress that aims to modernize federal law around presidential elections, particularly in response to the events of January 6th.Joining Sphere will be Andy Craig, staff writer for the Cato Institute, Kevin Kosar, senior fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, and Genevieve Nadeau, counsel for Protect Democracy. These experts will consider some of the events of January 6th and the need for Congressional action, the proposed legislation, and some of the broader issues around election reform. In addition to our panel conversation, David Olson of Retro Report will offer a professional development workshop on their Midterm Elections Collection, a suite of videos and classroom resources for teaching about Midterm Elections in your classroom. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    Can Prescribing Psychologists Help Solve the National Mental Health Crisis?

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 62:44


    t his 2022 State of the Union address, President Biden focused the nation's attention on “a national mental health crisis.” Mood disorders and suicidal thoughts and behaviors have been rising at alarming levels for years. The pandemic and government‐​mandated lockdowns increased anxiety, isolation, and despair while also reducing access to mental health services. Approximately 40 percent of Americans currently cannot access mental health services, particularly services requiring drug‐​based therapy.Clinical psychologists can play a greater role in meeting those needs. Some federal agencies, five states, and the territory of Guam authorize competent clinical psychologists to prescribe medications that affect mood and mental functions. Those jurisdictions refer to such psychologists as prescribing psychologists, medical psychologists, or RxPs. However, most states prohibit competent clinical psychologists from prescribing such medication. To address the mental health crisis, should state lawmakers expand the scope of practice of competent clinical psychologists to include prescribing?Joining us to discuss this are Dr. Beth Rom‐​Rymer, a clinical psychologist, chair and president of the board of directors of the National Register of Health Service Psychologists, and CEO of the Illinois Association of Prescribing Psychologists; Dr. Rebecca Weintraub Brendel, an assistant professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, director of the master's degree program at Harvard Medical School's Center for Bioethics, and president and distinguished fellow of the American Psychiatric Association; Dr. Thomas D. Lee, a psychiatrist at the Ascension Alexian Brothers Center for Mental Health in Arlington, Illinois, who supervises psychology fellows in the Ascension RxP Fellowship Program; and Dr. Claudia Mosier, a prescribing psychologist licensed in Illinois and Louisiana. The discussion will be moderated by Cato Institute senior fellow Jeffrey A. Singer, MD. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    How Does Government Jawboning Threaten Speech?

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 61:14


    The public's reliance on social media platforms has created new opportunities for censorship by proxy, despite the First Amendment's prohibition on government speech regulation. Will Duffield's recent policy analysis “Jawboning against Speech: How Government Bullying Shapes the Rules of Social Media” details how government officials increasingly use informal pressure to compel the suppression of disfavored speakers on platforms like Facebook and Twitter.However, the specifics of this bullying, and what to do about it, remain contested. Does jawboning require a threat? When can coordination between platforms and government be voluntary? Solutions to jawboning must respect platforms' rights and cannot inhibit congressional debate. What, then, can be done?Please join Will Duffield, Adam Kovacevich, and Jenin Younes at the Cato Institute or online for a conversation about this novel threat to free speech. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    Assessing Two Decades of Education Reform: Cato's Center for Educational Freedom Turns 20

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 91:35


    In 2001 there were only 12 private school choice programs in the country, including vouchers, tax credit scholarships, and personal tax credits and deductions. College prices were rising at “crisis” rates and calls for “free” government pre‐​kindergarten were regularly heard. During that same year, the idea to create Cato's Center for Educational Freedom (CEF) was born, and in 2002 CEF came to life.In this special event, we will examine the changing state of American education over the past 20 years. What has improved? What has gotten worse? What has CEF's impact been? And what might the next 20 years have in store?We hope you'll join CEF analysts and friends past and present as they tackle 20 years of change in American education. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    Domestic Extremism and Political Violence: The Threat to Liberty

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 91:16


    The January 6, 2021, assault on the U.S. Capitol and the related attempt to overturn the election results featured elements of three white supremacist or militia‐​type elements: the Oath Keepers, the Three Percenters, and the Proud Boys. The rise of such groups was a cause for concern well before January 6, and that concern has only intensified since.What has not received as much attention is the reaction from the far left to these developments.Groups such as the Socialist Rifle Association, Latino Rifle Association, Yellow Peril Tactical, and the multichapter John Brown Gun Clubs are populated with Americans with decidedly leftist—and even Marxist—political outlooks. Coupled with a facility with the latest versions of the popular AR-15 sporting rifle, precision rifle optics, body armor, and other gear normally seen on police or military personnel, they offer—in their own words—a direct response to the likes of the Patriot Front, Proud Boys, and anti‐​LGTBQ activists. These developments raise the specter of lethal confrontations between such armed right‐​wing and left‐​wing groups.How numerous are these ideologically oriented armed elements? What are the key political, legal, and social drivers leading to their formation and activities? How does the patchwork of federal, state, and local laws govern this kind of activity? Is the American political and judicial system capable of preventing these groups from becoming an endemic threat to public safety and the functioning of our republic? Join us as our expert panel delves into these and related issues. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    Student Debt Relief: Promise Fulfilled or Problematic Policy?

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 65:19


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    Luncheon Address - Jason Furman

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 48:34


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    Welcoming and Session 1: Fighting Back against Antitrust Populism

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 75:04


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    Session 2: Resisting the Protectionist Tide

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 57:00


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    Session 3: The Politicization of Business: What Gives?

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 51:37


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    Session 4: Does the Regulatory State Fuel Populism?

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 73:43


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    Session 5: Unsustainable Fiscal Policy—The One, True Bipartisan Commitment

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 62:15


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    Closing Speech - Douglas Holtz‐​Eakin

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 42:14


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    Panel I: Constitutional Structure

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 80:42


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    Panel II: Freedom of Speech, the Press, and Religion

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 75:12


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    Panel III: Guns, Drugs, and Abortion

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 65:20


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    Panel IV: Looking Ahead: October Term 2022

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 73:47


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    Annual B. Kenneth Simon Lecture Term Limits/​Time Rules for Future Justices: Eighteen Arguments for Eighteen Years

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 58:32


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    School Choice Is Good for Teachers Too

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 66:54


    We typically think of school choice as something that benefits students by helping them find the educational options that work best for them. But teachers also benefit from more options. In the past, the vast majority of teaching jobs have been in conventional public schools. But educational entrepreneurship—encouraged by expanded school choice programs—is changing the landscape.A recent Morning Consult teacher survey found high levels of support for a variety of school choice programs. For education savings accounts, which let parents use a portion of state education funding for a variety of education‐​related expenses, 76 percent of teachers expressed support—including 73 percent of district school teachers. But many teachers are unfamiliar with school choice programs and alternative education opportunities or don't realize how they can benefit from these options. Red tape, lack of autonomy, and inability to serve kids' needs are some of teachers' biggest complaints. School choice would help solve each of those problems.The Cato Institute will be hosting a virtual panel of former public school teachers sharing their experiences within a variety of teaching environments. This will be an opportunity for teachers to learn about other options and see how they can create their own paths with nearly limitless possibilities. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    FOIA and Government Transparency: A Report Card

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 115:57


    In the more than 50 years that the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) has been on the books, it has helped revolutionize Americans' understanding of how their government works in practice. But the agencies and departments of the executive branch that are covered by the FOIA have persistently attempted to thwart its effective implementation.The most recent statutory update to FOIA took place in 2016, and with several years of experience with the revised law behind us, it's fair to ask: Is FOIA working better now? If not, why not? What is it like to battle federal agencies and departments weekly to pry loose information dealing with immigration policy, telecommunications policy, and the national security establishment? What additional changes to FOIA are needed to truly make the law work as intended? Join our expert panel as we discuss these and related issues. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    A Conversation with Jerome Powell - Cato Institute 40th Annual Monetary Conference

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 49:59


    With massive U.S. debt and deficits, inflation at a 40‐​year high, and popular/​political pressure for expanding the Fed's mandate, it's time to assess the Fed's performance and future. Please join leading scholars and policymakers to discuss “The State of Monetary Policy after 40 Years.” Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    FOIA and Government Transparency: A Report Card

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 115:57


    In the more than 50 years that the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) has been on the books, it has helped revolutionize Americans' understanding of how their government works in practice. But the agencies and departments of the executive branch that are covered by the FOIA have persistently attempted to thwart its effective implementation.The most recent statutory update to FOIA took place in 2016, and with several years of experience with the revised law behind us, it's fair to ask: Is FOIA working better now? If not, why not? What is it like to battle federal agencies and departments weekly to pry loose information dealing with immigration policy, telecommunications policy, and the national security establishment? What additional changes to FOIA are needed to truly make the law work as intended? Join our expert panel as we discuss these and related issues. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    Classified: The Untold Story of Racial Classification in America

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 68:29


    Racial classification is ubiquitous in American life. Job applications, university admissions, government contracts, and much more involve checking a box stating whether one is black, white, Asian, Hispanic, or Native American.David Bernstein has written a surprising and revealing book on how these classifications came about, with the federal government playing a leading role. It asks:Should Pakistani, Chinese, and Filipino Americans be in the same category despite obvious differences in culture, appearance, religion, and more?Why does the government not allow Americans to classify themselves as biracial or multiracial?How did a dark‐​complexioned, burka‐​wearing Muslim Yemeni come to be classified as generically white while a blond‐​haired, blue‐​eyed newcomer is classified as minority if arriving from a country where Spanish is spoken?Why does the government require biomedical researchers to classify study participants by official racial categories that have no scientific basis?Bernstein's provocative book ends with a call for a separation of race and state. Commenting will be Jane Coaston, host of the New York Times's podcast The Argument, and Prof. Robert Cottrol, a scholar of race and legal history at George Washington University Law School. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    Superabundance: The Story of Population Growth, Innovation, and Human Flourishing on an Infinitely Bountiful Planet

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 88:17


    Generations of people have been taught that population growth makes resources scarcer. In 2021, for example, one widely publicized report argued, “The world's rapidly growing population is consuming the planet's natural resources at an alarming rate.… The world currently needs 1.6 Earths to satisfy the demand for natural resources … [a figure that] could rise to 2 planets by 2030.” But is that true? After analyzing the prices of hundreds of commodities, goods, and services spanning two centuries, Marian Tupy and Gale Pooley found that resources became more abundant as the population grew. That was especially true when they looked at “time prices,” which represent the length of time that people must work to buy something. The authors also found that resource abundance increased faster than the population―a relationship that they call “superabundance.” They conclude that, on average, every additional human being creates more value than he or she consumes. Please join us for the official launch of Cato's latest book: Superabundance: The Story of Population Growth, Innovation, and Human Flourishing on an Infinitely Bountiful Planet. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    Pandemic Policy Postmortem: Lessons from Sweden

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 92:07


    The virus that causes COVID-19 has now become endemic after it first emerged two and a half years ago. In the pandemic's early days, many countries' public health officials curtailed economic and social activity to various degrees, prescribed social distancing, enforced lockdowns, required masking, and pushed for other nonpharmaceutical interventions (NPIs) to reduce illness and death. Those NPIs imposed an enormous economic and social cost by greatly reducing individual liberty in exchange for promised health benefits. Elsewhere, most famously in Sweden, public health officials were fiercely criticized for implementing less‐​harsh “light touch” NPI measures. Sweden's approach presents a fascinating quasi‐​natural experiment to evaluate the merits and demerits of the more liberal approach to managing the COVID-19 pandemic and to evaluate whether the loss in personal and economic freedom was partly compensated by a decrease in illness and death. Sweden's outcomes on viral spread, excess mortality, and the socioeconomic consequences of COVID-19 compare well with other countries and suggest that strict NPI policies imposed more harm than good.Joining us to discuss how well Sweden's approach worked are Jeanne Lenzer, an independent investigative journalist and regular contributor to The BMJ who has studied this issue; Vinay Prasad, MD, MPH, an epidemiologist and public health policy analyst who is an associate professor at University of California San Francisco School of Medicine; Jay Bhattacharya, MD, PhD, professor of medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine and coauthor of the Great Barrington Declaration that urged a pandemic policy of “focused protection”; and Johan Norberg, senior fellow at the Cato Institute, who resides in Stockholm, Sweden, and has studied as well as experienced his country's pandemic policy. The discussion will be moderated by Cato Institute senior fellow Jeffrey A. Singer. Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

    Bringing Civil Discourse to Your Classroom

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 50:36


    Planning difficult conversations in your classroom this year? Join us for the last of our Summer with Sphere webinar series and learn techniques and how to plan for these conversations. Hear from a MS and HS teacher on how they prepare their students for civil discourse in their classes. Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

    America's Great‐​Power Opportunity Revitalizing U.S. Foreign Policy to Meet the Challenges of Strategic Competition

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 90:15


    Since the early years of the Trump administration, “great power competition” has been Washington's go‐​to formula to describe its approach to foreign policy. The concept holds that Russia and China represent the biggest challenge to U.S. interests and demands a robust, competitive policy response. In a new book, Ali Wyne lays out a thoughtful critique of great power competition and proposes an alternative guiding framework for U.S. foreign policy that is proactive instead of reactive, mindful of the limits of Russian and Chinese power, and leaves greater room for great power cooperation on common threats. Please join us for a discussion with the author and a panel of experts. Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

    The Taliban Today

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 90:29


    The Taliban has held power in Afghanistan for one year. While the United States and its allies maintain sanctions on the group, Afghans are living through a humanitarian and economic disaster. The Taliban has made several promises, such as offering amnesty to soldiers who were members of the Afghan National Security Forces, working toward an “Afghan Islamic–inclusive government,” engaging other stakeholders in a “transition council,” and allowing girls to attend schools. However, the group also “grossly violated” its commitment not to give shelter to al Qaeda, according to the Biden administration, by allowing Ayman al‐​Zawahiri to stay in a safe house in Kabul. What does the Taliban's evolution (if any) mean for U.S. policy? Does the United States have tools available to push the group in the direction policymakers want it to go? What U.S. interests remain in Afghanistan? To discuss these questions, please join our distinguished panel of experts. Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

    Tunisia's Authoritarian Turn

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 60:54


    More than a decade ago, Tunisia's Jasmine Revolution gave hope to the Arab world, showing oppressed peoples that longtime dictators can be peacefully ousted. That hope soon failed, brutally, in Egypt, Syria, and Yemen, but Tunisia kept on track throughout the 2010s, proving to be the best democratic hope in an otherwise autocratic and turbulent Middle East.Yet since July 2021, Tunisia's trajectory has taken an increasingly worrisome reversal as well. President Kais Saied suspended the parliament, claimed all executive power, prohibited public gatherings, arrested political opponents, and imposed travel bans. As Cato senior fellow Doug Bandow recently observed on a visit to Tunisia, this authoritarian turn risks the freedoms Tunisians have been enjoying in the past 10 years and can throw the country back to arbitrary rule by a strongman. The change is concerning for the broader Arab and Muslim world, where Tunisia used to be a rare example and source of inspiration. Join us as we discuss these changes and what Tunisia's future may hold. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    The United States of Anonymous: How the First Amendment Shaped Online Speech

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 120:47


    Why did those opposed to or in favor of the Constitution write under pseudonyms? Why did Occupy Wall Street protestors wear Guy Fawkes masks? Why do so many people seek to maintain a level of anonymity in their online activities—including web surfing and posting on social media? In the debate over the right to conceal one's identity versus the potential harms of anonymity, is it possible to strike a constitutionally sound balance? In his latest book, The United States of Anonymous: How the First Amendment Shaped Online Speech, Jeff Kosseff tackles these and other questions through primary‐​source research and interviews with participants in the debates, as well as through court cases that have shaped the current legal and political climate impacting anonymous speech and the First Amendment. Join us for a discussion about Jeff Kosseff's timely new book. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    What Will Be the Impact of the War in Ukraine for the Future of European Security?

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 59:30


    Russia's invasion of Ukraine has produced big changes in NATO and EU states. But shock at Russia's aggression and fear of its future intentions seem to point in one direction, whereas its dismal military performance and its vulnerability to economic punishment seem to point in another. NATO and EU expansion are once again on the table. Will the aftermath of the war strengthen NATO and, with it, the central U.S. position in European security? Or can Russian aggression impel greater non‐​NATO security cooperation, giving European states and the EU a larger role to play and a greater say over security affairs in Europe? On the first day of NATO's summit in Madrid, please join Nicole Koenig and Barry Posen for a discussion of what the war in Ukraine suggests about the future of European security. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Black Liberation through the Marketplace: Hope, Heartbreak, and the Promise of America

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 94:33


    The experiences of black Americans do not fit neatly into our nation's political culture. As the authors argue, those on the right fail to acknowledge the gravity of past injustices and rights violations, while those on the left ignore decades of failed paternalism and unintended consequences of government policy. But there is an alternative: classical liberalism, a philosophy based on free markets, individual rights, and vibrant civil society.Exhausted by extremism on both sides, in their new book, Black Liberation through the Marketplace: Hope, Heartbreak, and the Promise of America, economic philosopher Rachel Ferguson and historian Marcus Witcher argue that classical liberalism provides the building blocks for a free and prosperous society for all. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    How Drug Paraphernalia Laws Undermine Harm Reduction

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 62:59


    State‐​level drug paraphernalia laws increase the risk of infection or overdose for drug users by preventing legal access to clean needles, syringes, and products to test drugs for deadly contaminants. Every state except Alaska criminalizes the possession and/​or sale of illicit drug paraphernalia. Thus, Alaskans can legally operate needle exchange programs and other harm‐​reduction measures. Recognizing that harm‐​reduction strategies reduce overdoses and disease, many states are considering reforms to their drug paraphernalia laws. To discuss the impact of drug paraphernalia laws on health and how states can implement better rules, we are pleased to have Corey S. Davis, the director of the Harm Reduction Legal Project of the Network for Public Health Law and adjunct faculty at the Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University; Robin Lutz, executive director of the Alaskan AIDS Assistance Association, which has provided harm‐​reduction services in Alaska since 1985; and Haley B. Coles, executive director of Sonoran Prevention Works, which has been engaged in harm‐​reduction and syringe services in Arizona since 2010. The discussion will be moderated by Cato Institute senior fellow Jeffrey A. Singer. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Taxation and Democracy Webinar

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 64:05


    Tax policy not only funds governmental efforts but is often itself a driver of policy outcomes. Elected officials in recent years have pushed for or acted upon tax policy as a means for shaping everything from childcare to environmental policy. In this webinar, we'll explore the role taxation plays in our democracy, the many ways in which it affects our lives, and the current state of debate around taxation in America.Our panel will feature Alex Muresianu, federal tax analyst at The Tax Foundation and Niko Lusiani, the director of the Corporate Power Program at the Roosevelt Institute. Allan Carey, director of Sphere Education Initiative, will moderate the conversation. Zoe Callaway, manager of education and outreach at the Tax Foundation will offer professional development. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Financial Privacy in a Digital Era

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 59:33


    The digitalization of financial services has made banking and trading more convenient than ever. But laws that were written before the digital era now collect untold amounts of consumer data to which the government has easy—and often unfettered—access. Recent legislative attempts have sought to expand that access even more. Does financial convenience have to come at the cost of financial privacy? Can cryptocurrency provide better privacy protection? Is it time to rethink how financial privacy is treated in a digital era? Join us for an outstanding virtual program featuring Marta Belcher, Paul Belonick, Michael Mosier, and Jennifer Schulp to discuss financial privacy in the digital era. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Luncheon Address: Moral Courage for Divided Times

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 42:55


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    Back to the Future? The Return of Major War in Europe

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 23:22


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    Why We Need a Movement for Freedom.

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 39:40


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    Reducing Risk from Arms Sales

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 58:19


    The United States remains the world's dominant exporter of weapons. Between 2017–2021, the U.S. share of the global arms market was 108 percent greater than that of Russia, which is the second‐​largest exporter. Since 2009, the United States has approved more than $1 trillion in weapons sales and delivered roughly $736 billion worth of weapons to 167 countries during the Obama, Trump, and Biden administrations.A new Cato Institute update to the Arms Sales Risk Index evaluates the risk that these exports create for global human rights, international stability, and U.S. security.Representative Sara Jacobs (D‑CA), Cato's Jordan Cohen, and Jeff Abramson from the Arms Control Association will discuss the 2021 Arms Sales Risk Index and current efforts to weigh and mitigate risks that the sale of U.S. weapons can pose. The discussion will be moderated by Cato's Eric Gomez. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    The Status of Homeschooling Two Years into the Pandemic

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2022 90:42


    On March 26, 2020—two weeks after schools around the country were shuttered and suddenly almost everyone was receiving education at home—Cato convened an expert panel to give advice and answer questions about homeschooling. It is unlikely anyone who participated in that discussion expected we would still be dealing with school closures two years later.While there are lags in official data, it appears that homeschooling has greatly increased since March 2020. Is that accurate? What has the experience been like for families, including longtime homeschoolers and newbies who started during the pandemic? What lessons have been learned?We'll mark the two‐​year anniversary of school closures with a panel discussion on homeschooling today. Featuring a diverse group whose experiences include urban homeschooling, hybrid homeschooling, and forest schools, this panel is designed to assess the current state of homeschooling and help parents understand the wide variety of options available to them. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Peace through School Choice: Examining the Evidence

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2022 89:09


    Public schooling, by forcing people with diverse values and needs to fund a single system of government schools, inevitably produces conflict. Such conflict has reached a fever pitch over the last several years, with Americans battling over critical race theory, LGBTQ issues, COVID-19 masking, and more. Logically, school choice would defuse such conflict, enabling diverse people to choose what they think is best rather than having to fight for control of a single system. But is there evidence of that working? If so, where? And how does that not lead to Balkanization?Three experts in education and pluralism will discuss whether and how school choice can foster peace in a large, diverse society. The event will focus on questions and comments from audience members. We hope anyone interested in the role of education in bringing diverse people together will join us. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

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