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  • 1,306PODCASTS
  • 3,836EPISODES
  • 32mAVG DURATION
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  • May 27, 2022LATEST

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    Best podcasts about us china

    Show all podcasts related to us china

    Latest podcast episodes about us china

    The China in Africa Podcast
    U.S.-China Tech Competition in the Middle East

    The China in Africa Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 61:44


    While U.S. President Joe Biden is stepping up his efforts to confront China's dominance in the Asia-Pacific, he might also want to pay attention to what's happening in the Middle East.Chinese influence in the Mideast and Persian Gulf regions has been steadily rising over the two years, particularly in the tech sector where firms like Huawei, ZTE, and Hikvision among others are rapidly expanding. In fact, China is so far ahead, according to Mohammed Soliman, a non-resident scholar at the Middle East Institute in Washington, D.C., that unless the U.S. radically changes its policy, it may be too late to catch up.Mohammed joins Eric & Cobus to discuss his urgent warning for U.S. policymakers about China's growing technology dominance in the Middle East and what they need to do to meet the challenge.Show Notes:The National Interest: China Is Winning the Middle East's Data, Cyber, and Technology Race by Mohammed Soliman: https://bit.ly/3MVCIYiMiddle East Institute: The GCC, US-China tech war, and the next 5G storm by Mohammed SolimanJOIN THE DISCUSSION:Twitter: @ChinaGSProject| @stadenesque | @thisissolimanFacebook: www.facebook.com/ChinaAfricaProjectFOLLOW CAP IN FRENCH AND ARABIC:Français: www.projetafriquechine.com | @AfrikChineعربي: www.akhbaralsin-africia.com | @AkhbarAlSinAfrJOIN US ON PATREON!Become a CAP Patreon member and get all sorts of cool stuff including our Week in Review report, an invitation to join monthly Zoom calls with Eric & Cobus, and even an awesome new CAP Podcast mug!www.patreon.com/chinaafricaprojectSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    ChinaTalk
    US-China Tech Relations: A Guide for the Perplexed

    ChinaTalk

    Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 89:45


    Where should US-China tech relations go? What should “Competitive when it should be. Collaborative when it can be. Adversarial when it must be” actually mean in practice? To discuss, on this episode we have John Bateman, a newly minted senior fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and my Rhodium colleague Charlie Vest as co-host. We get into - Analyzing the China tech threat and current tech policy - US public strategy on China and tech and why it's not very clear. - How LCD panels made it onto the list of critical tech in mid-nineties but mobile phones didn't.  - Why it's so difficult for intelligence analysts to assess and predict the behavior of a foreign leader.   Outro music: Talkin' John Birch Paranoid Blues by Bob Dylan, live at Carnegie Hall 1963 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U5Xn9YOKPcQ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Sinocism
    Blinken on US-China policy; Struggling economy; Testing bills due; South Pacific

    Sinocism

    Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022


    Today’s Essential Eight: A long way from stabilizing the economy - The bureaucracies are starting to push out measures in response to the meeting chaired by Li Keqiang Wednesday, but nothing really matters until the dynamic zero-Covid policy evolves into something less deadly to the economy. That may be happening, but chalk up that more to a guess on my part than any real evidence.

    Sinica Podcast
    Covering the U.S.-China relations beat with the FT's Demetri Sevastopulo

    Sinica Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 74:28


    This week on Sinica, Kaiser welcomes veteran Asia reporter Demetri Sevastopulo, who covers the U.S.-China relationship for the Financial Times. They discuss some of Demetri's scoops, like the news that Vladimir Putin had requested military aid from Xi Jinping, leaked just before National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan's meeting in Switzerland with State Councillor Yang Jiechi and just three weeks after Russia's invasion; and the news that China had tested a hypersonic glide craft in October of last year. But the focus of the discussion is on the Biden administration's China policy and its Indo-Pacific Economic Framework — an Asia strategy that, by all accounts, has met with a tepid response in the region.1:47 – How Demetri landed a beat as U.S.-China relations correspondent5:24 – How the FT scooped the story on Putin's military assistance request to Xi Jinping in March 202212:05 – The Chinese hypersonic glidecraft24:42 – The DC China policy scene: A dramatis personae40:11 – The Indo-Pacific Economic Framework: all guns and no butter52:54 – The Quad and AUKUS: American-led security arrangementsA full transcript of this podcast is available at SupChina.comRecommendationsDemetri: Gunpowder, an Irish gin from County Leitrim; and Roku, a Japanese whiskey by SuntoriKaiser: Chokepoint Capitalism, a forthcoming book on how monopolies and monopsonies are ruining culture, by Rebecca Gilbin and Cory DoctorowSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    Sinocism
    Beijing outbreak pressure increasing; Follow in Xi's footsteps on the way to the 20th Party Congress; Xinjiang, US-China audit deal prospects

    Sinocism

    Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022


    20 year anniversary of Xi Zhongxun’s death Today’s essential Eight items: Shanghai slow reopening, Beijing pressure increasing, Tianjin and Xi’an to test everyone - Shanghai’s slow and bumpy reopening continues, Beijing is intensifying epidemic control after Sun Chunlan’s guidance, and Tianjin and Xi’an have announced they will test all their residents starting March 25.

    The Tea Leaves Podcast
    Hon. Kevin Rudd Details a Strategic Framework to Protect U.S.-China Stability

    The Tea Leaves Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 29:42


    Hon. Kevin Rudd served as Australia's 26th Prime Minister from 2007 to 2010 and again in 2013, and as its Foreign Minister from 2010 to 2012. Today, Kevin is global President and CEO of the Asia Society in New York, and President of the Asia Society Policy Institute. On this episode we discussed Kevin's new book, The Avoidable War: The Dangers of a Catastrophic Conflict Between the U.S. and Xi Jinping's China, which is available now everywhere books are sold. Kevin and Rexon explore the risk of conflict between the United States and China, and Kevin's recommendation for a strategic framework to maintain stability between Washington and Beijing.

    News Talk 920 KVEC
    Hometown Radio 05/23/22 6p: Chris Arend covers everything from immigration to U.S./China relations

    News Talk 920 KVEC

    Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 42:07


    Hometown Radio 05/23/22 6p: Chris Arend covers everything from immigration to U.S./China relations

    Hopkins Podcast on Foreign Affairs
    US-China Technological Decoupling

    Hopkins Podcast on Foreign Affairs

    Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022


    In recent years, growing tensions between the US and China have spurred increasing interest and action to “decouple” US and China's economic and technological ecosystems. This is evident in the increased use of technology restrictions, from export controls to sanctions and visa bans. And while there appears to be bipartisan support for technological decoupling in … Continue reading US-China Technological Decoupling

    CrossroadsET
    Monkeypox Outbreak Follows ‘Germ-Game' Preparations; Media Falsify '2000 Mules' Claims in Georgia

    CrossroadsET

    Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 93:27


    There is a new global outbreak of monkeypox, and the Biden administration is already purchasing millions of doses of recently-approved vaccines as the World Health Organization (WHO) weighs its response. A series of incidents positioned the WHO to be poised for a monkeypox outbreak, and with new powers potentially being granted to the WHO to manage global health policy, this monkeypox crisis could give the U.N. agency a serious boost to its powers. Meanwhile, dozens of news outlets having been falsifying the narrative around Dinesh D'Souza's documentary "2000 Mules." These outlets have been declaring that officials with the Georgia State Elections Board debunked claims of election fraud made in “2000 Mules,” and yet while officials did challenge some fraud claims, those claims were unrelated to the documentary. And in other news, the Disinformation Governance Board has been put on pause, and its director Nina Jankowicz has resigned from the position. However, the board has not been disbanded, and the Department of Homeland Security is already running similar programs. ⭕️ Stay up-to-date with Josh with the Crossroads NEWSLETTER

    Why It Matters
    S1E13: The US' and China's courtship of Asean: Power Play

    Why It Matters

    Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 11:30


    Synopsis: On the third Friday of every month, The Straits Times examines various facets of the US-China rivalry and its implications for Asia.  Join Charissa Yong and Danson Cheong - ST's US and China correspondents respectively based in Washington DC and Beijing - as they chat about the US and China, and their ongoing courtship of South-east Asia and Asean. May 12 and 13 saw US President Biden hosting Asean leaders to a special summit, and most of them descended on Washington. Eight out of 10 were there, except for the Myanmar junta leader and the Philippines, which had just had an election. Highlights (click/tap above): 01:45 Why the US wants to show it can be a reliable partner to South-east Asia and Asean 02:45 Reading the view in Beijing towards this summit; why Asean countries don't want to choose between both powers 04:30 The 3 key outcomes from the summit; why the US is still playing a catch-up game 07:53 Why the Indo-Pacific Economic Framework - America's soon-to-be-released strategy for economic engagement in the region was the elephant in the room at the summit 08:55 Singapore PM Lee Hsien Loong said US participation in the Asia-Pacific must also consist of economic cooperation, not just security and defence Produced by: Charissa Yong (charyong@sph.com.sg), Danson Cheong (dansonc@sph.com.sg), Eden Soh and Hadyu Rahim Edited by: Eden Soh Follow our Asian Insider Podcast channel Mondays to Fridays and rate us: Channel: https://str.sg/JWa7 Apple Podcasts: https://str.sg/JWa8 Google Podcasts: https://str.sg/wQsB  Spotify: https://str.sg/JWaX SPH Awedio app: https://www.awedio.sg/ Website: http://str.sg/stpodcasts Feedback to: podcast@sph.com.sg Read Charissa Yong's stories: https://str.sg/3xRa Read Danson Cheong's stories: https://str.sg/3xR2 Follow Danson on Twitter: https://twitter.com/dansoncj Read ST's Power Play articles: https://str.sg/3xRE Register for Asian Insider newsletter: https://str.sg/stnewsletters --- Discover ST's special edition podcasts: Singapore's War On Covid: https://str.sg/wsfD The Unsolved Mysteries of South-east Asia Embed: https://str.sg/ws76 Stop Scams: https://str.sg/wnBi --- Discover more ST podcast series: In Your Opinion Podcast: https://str.sg/w7Qt SG Extra Podcast: https://str.sg/wX8w  Asian Insider Podcast: https://str.sg/JWa7 Green Pulse Podcast: https://str.sg/JWaf Health Check Podcast: https://str.sg/JWaN #PopVultures Podcast: https://str.sg/JWad ST Sports Talk Podcast: https://str.sg/JWRE Bookmark This! Podcast: https://str.sg/JWas Lunch With Sumiko Podcast: https://str.sg/J6hQ Discover BT Podcasts: https://bt.sg/pcPL #STAsianInsider See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    The Straits Times Audio Features
    S1E13: The US' and China's courtship of Asean: Power Play

    The Straits Times Audio Features

    Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 11:30


    Synopsis: On the third Friday of every month, The Straits Times examines various facets of the US-China rivalry and its implications for Asia.  Join Charissa Yong and Danson Cheong - ST's US and China correspondents respectively based in Washington DC and Beijing - as they chat about the US and China, and their ongoing courtship of South-east Asia and Asean. May 12 and 13 saw US President Biden hosting Asean leaders to a special summit, and most of them descended on Washington. Eight out of 10 were there, except for the Myanmar junta leader and the Philippines, which had just had an election. Highlights (click/tap above): 01:45 Why the US wants to show it can be a reliable partner to South-east Asia and Asean 02:45 Reading the view in Beijing towards this summit; why Asean countries don't want to choose between both powers 04:30 The 3 key outcomes from the summit; why the US is still playing a catch-up game 07:53 Why the Indo-Pacific Economic Framework - America's soon-to-be-released strategy for economic engagement in the region was the elephant in the room at the summit 08:55 Singapore PM Lee Hsien Loong said US participation in the Asia-Pacific must also consist of economic cooperation, not just security and defence Produced by: Charissa Yong (charyong@sph.com.sg), Danson Cheong (dansonc@sph.com.sg), Eden Soh and Hadyu Rahim Edited by: Eden Soh Follow our Asian Insider Podcast channel Mondays to Fridays and rate us: Channel: https://str.sg/JWa7 Apple Podcasts: https://str.sg/JWa8 Google Podcasts: https://str.sg/wQsB  Spotify: https://str.sg/JWaX SPH Awedio app: https://www.awedio.sg/ Website: http://str.sg/stpodcasts Feedback to: podcast@sph.com.sg Read Charissa Yong's stories: https://str.sg/3xRa Read Danson Cheong's stories: https://str.sg/3xR2 Follow Danson on Twitter: https://twitter.com/dansoncj Read ST's Power Play articles: https://str.sg/3xRE Register for Asian Insider newsletter: https://str.sg/stnewsletters --- Discover ST's special edition podcasts: Singapore's War On Covid: https://str.sg/wsfD The Unsolved Mysteries of South-east Asia Embed: https://str.sg/ws76 Stop Scams: https://str.sg/wnBi --- Discover more ST podcast series: In Your Opinion Podcast: https://str.sg/w7Qt SG Extra Podcast: https://str.sg/wX8w  Asian Insider Podcast: https://str.sg/JWa7 Green Pulse Podcast: https://str.sg/JWaf Health Check Podcast: https://str.sg/JWaN #PopVultures Podcast: https://str.sg/JWad ST Sports Talk Podcast: https://str.sg/JWRE Bookmark This! Podcast: https://str.sg/JWas Lunch With Sumiko Podcast: https://str.sg/J6hQ Discover BT Podcasts: https://bt.sg/pcPL #STAsianInsider See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    The World Unpacked
    Showing Up in the Indian Ocean

    The World Unpacked

    Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 32:17


    The United States, India, France, and other major players all share interests in the Indian Ocean, making the region geopolitically important. While some of these countries developed policies that prioritized and engaged with the island nations that call the region home, the United States focused its priorities elsewhere. The recent security deal between China and the Solomon Islands only further demonstrates China's growing presence as the main competition for the United States in the region. President Biden's first trip to Asia since taking office starts tomorrow, and the stage is set for him to emphasize the United States' commitment to reprioritizing the region.  Darshana Baruah, a fellow in Carnegie's South Asia Program where she leads the Indian Ocean Initiative, joins Doug to unpack the strategic significance of the Indian Ocean region. Follow Doug on Twitter @DouglasLFarrar. Darshana M. Baruah. (2022, May 2). “The Strategic Importance of the Indian Ocean.” Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

    Communism Exposed:East and West
    US accuses Steve Wynn of acting as Chinese agent; Lobby group denounces US–China decoupling

    Communism Exposed:East and West

    Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 17:10


    US accuses Steve Wynn of acting as Chinese agent; Lobby group denounces US–China decoupling

    Simple English News Daily
    Thursday 19th May 2022. World News. Today: Finland, Sweden NATO. HRW Ukraine "war crimes". Russia expels embassy staff. Peace talks stalled.

    Simple English News Daily

    Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 7:19


    World News in 7 minutes. Thursday 19th May 2022.Transcripts at send7.org/transcriptsToday: Finland, Sweden NATO. HRW Ukraine "war crimes". Russia expels embassy staff. Peace talks stalled. UK NI legislation. Afghanistan mediates. Philippines China relations. US China talks. Mexico Guerrero abortion law. Brazil president sues. Burkina Faso mine. Mozambique polio. Kenya youngest pilot.Please leave a rating on Apple podcasts or Spotify.With Juliet MartinContact us at podcast@send7.org or send an audio message at speakpipe.com/send7SEND7 (Simple English News Daily in 7 minutes) tells the most important world news stories in intermediate English. Every day, listen to the most important stories from every part of the world in slow, clear English. Whether you are an intermediate learner trying to improve your advanced, technical and business English, or if you are a native speaker who just wants to hear a summary of world news as fast as possible, join Stephen Devincenzi and Juliet Martin every morning. Transcripts can be found at send7.org/transcripts. Simple English News Daily is the perfect way to start your day, by practising your listening skills and understanding complicated stories in a simple way. It is also highly valuable for IELTS and TOEFL students. Students, teachers, and people with English as a second language, tell us that they listen to SEND7 because they can learn English through hard topics, but simple grammar. We believe that the best way to improve your spoken English is to immerse yourself in real-life content, such as what our podcast provides. SEND7 covers all news including politics, business, natural events and human rights. Whether it is happening in Europe, Africa, Asia, the Americas or Oceania, you will hear it on SEND7, and you will understand it. For more information visit send7.org/contact

    NCUSCR Interviews
    Americans' Negative Views on China: Latest Pew Survey Results | Laura Silver

    NCUSCR Interviews

    Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 27:05


    According to a Pew Research Center report released in April, Americans view China's partnership with Russia as a serious problem for the United States, amid concerns over China's growing superpower status and economic might. More than 60 percent of American adults believe the Russia-China relationship is a very serious problem, more people than say the same about other critical issues, including China's involvement in American politics, its human rights policies, and tensions between China and Taiwan. Pew Research Center senior researcher Laura Silver discussed the survey findings in an interview conducted on May 10, 2022.

    The China in Africa Podcast
    Lightning Round: U.S. Summits, Huawei and Chinese Mining in the DRC

    The China in Africa Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 53:49


    In this Lightning Round edition of the show, CAP Managing Editor Cobus van Staden and CAP Francophone Editor Geraud Neema break down three of the week's big stories.First, Cobus explains why African leaders would be well advised to closely follow the events at this week's U.S.-ASEAN summit in Washington, D.C. Then, the State Department's #2 official, Wendy Sherman, restated longstanding warnings about the risks African countries face when they use Huawei equipment. Finally, Geraud breakdown a complex mining dispute between a Chinese and an Australian company over which one will control a massive new lithium mine in the DRC.JOIN THE DISCUSSION:Twitter: @ChinaAfrProject | @stadenesque | @christiangeraudFacebook: www.facebook.com/ChinaAfricaProjectFOLLOW CAP IN FRENCH AND ARABIC:Français: www.projetafriquechine.com | @AfrikChineعربي: www.akhbaralsin-africia.com | @AkhbarAlSinAfrJOIN US ON PATREON!Become a CAP Patreon member and get all sorts of cool stuff including our Week in Review report, an invitation to join monthly Zoom calls with Eric & Cobus, and even an awesome new CAP Podcast mug!www.patreon.com/chinaafricaprojectSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    Sinica Podcast
    The rise and fall of U.S.-China scientific collaboration, with Deborah Seligsohn

    Sinica Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 69:48


    This week on Sinica, Deborah Seligsohn returns to the show to talk about the sad state of U.S.-China scientific collaboration. As the Science Counselor at the U.S. Embassy in Beijing from 2003 to 2007 — arguably the peak years for collaboration in science — she has ample firsthand experience with the relationship. Debbi, who is now an assistant professor of political science at Villanova University in Philadelphia, sees the U.S. decision to dismantle what was a diverse and fruitful regime of collaboration as a consequence of the basic American conception of the relationship: our tendency to see that relationship as one of teacher and student. She also argues that the American obsession with intellectual property protection is fundamentally misguided and inapplicable to scientific collaboration, which rarely deals with commercial IP.3:15 – The rationale for prioritizing U.S.-China scientific collaboration in the 1970s9:11 – A highlight reel of Sino-American scientific collaboration across four decades31:03 – The stubborn American belief that freedom and democracy are necessary — or even sufficient — conditions for technological innovation39:37 – The price we've paid and will continue to pay for the collapse of collaboration44:00 – The end of collaboration and the DOJ's "China Initiative"48:17 – How to rebuild the U.S.-China scientific partnershipA full transcript of this podcast is available on SupChina.com.Recommendations:Deborah: A Buzzfeed story by Peter Aldous about the strange origins of the "lab-leak theory" in the right-wing of the animal rights activist community; and two podcasts — Bloomberg's Odd Lots podcast and the Brookings podcast by David Dollar, Dollar and Sense.Kaiser: The sci-fi thriller Severance on AppleTV.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    Got Science?
    Ep. 134: Nuclear Consequences: US and China's Nuclear Policy

    Got Science?

    Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 29:00


    US-China relations expert Dr. Gregory Kulacki discusses China's nuclear weapons strategy and what it means for the Russian war in Ukraine.

    New Books in History
    Jeff D. Colgan, "Partial Hegemony: Oil Politics and International Order" (Oxford UP, 2021)

    New Books in History

    Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 46:53


    When and why does international order change? The largest peaceful transfer of wealth across borders in all of human history began with the oil crisis of 1973. OPEC countries turned the tables on the most powerful businesses on the planet, quadrupling the price of oil and shifting the global distribution of profits. It represented a huge shift in international order. Yet, the textbook explanation for how world politics works-that the most powerful country sets up and sustains the rules of international order after winning a major war-doesn't fit these events, or plenty of others. Instead of thinking of the international order as a single thing, Jeff Colgan explains how it operates in parts, and often changes in peacetime. Partial Hegemony: Oil Politics and International Order (Oxford University Press, 2021) offers lessons for leaders and analysts seeking to design new international governing arrangements to manage an array of pressing concerns ranging from US-China rivalry to climate change, and from nuclear proliferation to peacekeeping. A major contribution to international relations theory, this book promises to reshape our understanding of the forces driving change in world politics. Jeff D. Colgan is Richard Holbrooke Associate Professor of Political Science at Brown University and the Watson Institute of International and Public Affairs. He is also author of Petro-Aggression: When Oil Causes War. Caleb Zakarin is the Assistant Editor of the New Books Network (Twitter: @caleb_zakarin). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

    New Books in World Affairs
    Jeff D. Colgan, "Partial Hegemony: Oil Politics and International Order" (Oxford UP, 2021)

    New Books in World Affairs

    Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 46:53


    When and why does international order change? The largest peaceful transfer of wealth across borders in all of human history began with the oil crisis of 1973. OPEC countries turned the tables on the most powerful businesses on the planet, quadrupling the price of oil and shifting the global distribution of profits. It represented a huge shift in international order. Yet, the textbook explanation for how world politics works-that the most powerful country sets up and sustains the rules of international order after winning a major war-doesn't fit these events, or plenty of others. Instead of thinking of the international order as a single thing, Jeff Colgan explains how it operates in parts, and often changes in peacetime. Partial Hegemony: Oil Politics and International Order (Oxford University Press, 2021) offers lessons for leaders and analysts seeking to design new international governing arrangements to manage an array of pressing concerns ranging from US-China rivalry to climate change, and from nuclear proliferation to peacekeeping. A major contribution to international relations theory, this book promises to reshape our understanding of the forces driving change in world politics. Jeff D. Colgan is Richard Holbrooke Associate Professor of Political Science at Brown University and the Watson Institute of International and Public Affairs. He is also author of Petro-Aggression: When Oil Causes War. Caleb Zakarin is the Assistant Editor of the New Books Network (Twitter: @caleb_zakarin). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/world-affairs

    New Books in Environmental Studies
    Jeff D. Colgan, "Partial Hegemony: Oil Politics and International Order" (Oxford UP, 2021)

    New Books in Environmental Studies

    Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 46:53


    When and why does international order change? The largest peaceful transfer of wealth across borders in all of human history began with the oil crisis of 1973. OPEC countries turned the tables on the most powerful businesses on the planet, quadrupling the price of oil and shifting the global distribution of profits. It represented a huge shift in international order. Yet, the textbook explanation for how world politics works-that the most powerful country sets up and sustains the rules of international order after winning a major war-doesn't fit these events, or plenty of others. Instead of thinking of the international order as a single thing, Jeff Colgan explains how it operates in parts, and often changes in peacetime. Partial Hegemony: Oil Politics and International Order (Oxford University Press, 2021) offers lessons for leaders and analysts seeking to design new international governing arrangements to manage an array of pressing concerns ranging from US-China rivalry to climate change, and from nuclear proliferation to peacekeeping. A major contribution to international relations theory, this book promises to reshape our understanding of the forces driving change in world politics. Jeff D. Colgan is Richard Holbrooke Associate Professor of Political Science at Brown University and the Watson Institute of International and Public Affairs. He is also author of Petro-Aggression: When Oil Causes War. Caleb Zakarin is the Assistant Editor of the New Books Network (Twitter: @caleb_zakarin). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/environmental-studies

    New Books in Economic and Business History
    Jeff D. Colgan, "Partial Hegemony: Oil Politics and International Order" (Oxford UP, 2021)

    New Books in Economic and Business History

    Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 46:53


    When and why does international order change? The largest peaceful transfer of wealth across borders in all of human history began with the oil crisis of 1973. OPEC countries turned the tables on the most powerful businesses on the planet, quadrupling the price of oil and shifting the global distribution of profits. It represented a huge shift in international order. Yet, the textbook explanation for how world politics works-that the most powerful country sets up and sustains the rules of international order after winning a major war-doesn't fit these events, or plenty of others. Instead of thinking of the international order as a single thing, Jeff Colgan explains how it operates in parts, and often changes in peacetime. Partial Hegemony: Oil Politics and International Order (Oxford University Press, 2021) offers lessons for leaders and analysts seeking to design new international governing arrangements to manage an array of pressing concerns ranging from US-China rivalry to climate change, and from nuclear proliferation to peacekeeping. A major contribution to international relations theory, this book promises to reshape our understanding of the forces driving change in world politics. Jeff D. Colgan is Richard Holbrooke Associate Professor of Political Science at Brown University and the Watson Institute of International and Public Affairs. He is also author of Petro-Aggression: When Oil Causes War. Caleb Zakarin is the Assistant Editor of the New Books Network (Twitter: @caleb_zakarin). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    New Books in Political Science
    Jeff D. Colgan, "Partial Hegemony: Oil Politics and International Order" (Oxford UP, 2021)

    New Books in Political Science

    Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 46:53


    When and why does international order change? The largest peaceful transfer of wealth across borders in all of human history began with the oil crisis of 1973. OPEC countries turned the tables on the most powerful businesses on the planet, quadrupling the price of oil and shifting the global distribution of profits. It represented a huge shift in international order. Yet, the textbook explanation for how world politics works-that the most powerful country sets up and sustains the rules of international order after winning a major war-doesn't fit these events, or plenty of others. Instead of thinking of the international order as a single thing, Jeff Colgan explains how it operates in parts, and often changes in peacetime. Partial Hegemony: Oil Politics and International Order (Oxford University Press, 2021) offers lessons for leaders and analysts seeking to design new international governing arrangements to manage an array of pressing concerns ranging from US-China rivalry to climate change, and from nuclear proliferation to peacekeeping. A major contribution to international relations theory, this book promises to reshape our understanding of the forces driving change in world politics. Jeff D. Colgan is Richard Holbrooke Associate Professor of Political Science at Brown University and the Watson Institute of International and Public Affairs. He is also author of Petro-Aggression: When Oil Causes War. Caleb Zakarin is the Assistant Editor of the New Books Network (Twitter: @caleb_zakarin). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/political-science

    New Books in Economics
    Jeff D. Colgan, "Partial Hegemony: Oil Politics and International Order" (Oxford UP, 2021)

    New Books in Economics

    Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 46:53


    When and why does international order change? The largest peaceful transfer of wealth across borders in all of human history began with the oil crisis of 1973. OPEC countries turned the tables on the most powerful businesses on the planet, quadrupling the price of oil and shifting the global distribution of profits. It represented a huge shift in international order. Yet, the textbook explanation for how world politics works-that the most powerful country sets up and sustains the rules of international order after winning a major war-doesn't fit these events, or plenty of others. Instead of thinking of the international order as a single thing, Jeff Colgan explains how it operates in parts, and often changes in peacetime. Partial Hegemony: Oil Politics and International Order (Oxford University Press, 2021) offers lessons for leaders and analysts seeking to design new international governing arrangements to manage an array of pressing concerns ranging from US-China rivalry to climate change, and from nuclear proliferation to peacekeeping. A major contribution to international relations theory, this book promises to reshape our understanding of the forces driving change in world politics. Jeff D. Colgan is Richard Holbrooke Associate Professor of Political Science at Brown University and the Watson Institute of International and Public Affairs. He is also author of Petro-Aggression: When Oil Causes War. Caleb Zakarin is the Assistant Editor of the New Books Network (Twitter: @caleb_zakarin). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/economics

    FT News Briefing
    US-China Tech Race: The great decoupling

    FT News Briefing

    Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 26:03


    In the final episode of this season of Tech Tonic, we ask if the growing tensions between the US and China could split the world into two competing technological spheres. It has been dubbed 'the great decoupling'. Some in the US want to see Chinese companies cut off from American investment, while hawkish factions in China have been fighting for a more self-sufficient and nationalistic tech sector. But what would decoupling really look like? And is it even possible? Presented by James Kynge, this episode features interviews with Lillian Li (author of Chinese Characteristics newsletter), Paul Triolo (senior vice-president of Albright Stonebridge Group), Roger Robinson Jr (president and founder of RWR Advisory) and Kevin Rudd (former prime minister of Australia and president of the Asia Society)Presented by James Kynge. Edwin Lane is senior producer. Josh Gabert-Doyon is producer. Manuela Saragosa is executive producer. Special thanks to Tom Griggs. Sound design is by Breen Turner, with original music from Metaphor Music. The FT's head of audio is Cheryl Brumley.News clips credits: CNBC Check out stories and up-to-the-minute news from the FT's technology team at ft.com/technologyFor a special discounted FT subscription go to https://www.ft.com/techtonicsaleAnd check out FT Edit, the new iPhone app that shares the best of FT journalism, hand-picked by senior editors to inform, explain and surprise. It's free for the first month and 99p a month for the next six months. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    ChinaEconTalk
    Twilight Struggle: Cold War Lessons for US-China Today

    ChinaEconTalk

    Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 86:37


    Hal Brands (@HalBrands), professor at the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies, is the author of The Twilight Struggle: What the Cold War Teaches Us about Great-Power Rivalry Today. Along with co-host Emily Jin @ew_jin) of the Center for a New American Security (CNAS), we discuss: How the US capitalized on Soviet heavy-handedness in the developing world How technology impacted the broader trajectory of the Cold War The US's never-ending cycles of self-confidence and self-doubt Today's Sinologists versus Cold War Sovietologists Why the only person who can stop the war in Ukraine is the one who started it Outro music: Nancy by Ak Benjamin ft. Marz23 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=agIvGYMA7Cw CHECK OUT THE CHINATALK SUBSTACK! https://chinatalk.substack.com Support us on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/ChinaTalk Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    ChinaTalk
    Twilight Struggle: Cold War Lessons for US-China Today

    ChinaTalk

    Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 86:37


    Hal Brands (@HalBrands), professor at the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies, is the author of The Twilight Struggle: What the Cold War Teaches Us about Great-Power Rivalry Today. Along with co-host Emily Jin @ew_jin) of the Center for a New American Security (CNAS), we discuss: How the US capitalized on Soviet heavy-handedness in the developing world How technology impacted the broader trajectory of the Cold War The US's never-ending cycles of self-confidence and self-doubt Today's Sinologists versus Cold War Sovietologists Why the only person who can stop the war in Ukraine is the one who started it Outro music: Nancy by Ak Benjamin ft. Marz23 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=agIvGYMA7Cw CHECK OUT THE CHINATALK SUBSTACK! https://chinatalk.substack.com Support us on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/ChinaTalk Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    NCUSCR Events
    Ping Pong Diplomacy: U.S.-China Exchange Then and Now | Pete Millwood, Jing Tsu, Keisha Brown

    NCUSCR Events

    Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 60:32


    After more than two decades of hostility, Ping Pong Diplomacy began a shift in the U.S.-China relationship towards exchange and engagement. In 1972, engagement was far from inevitable and, just as in 2022, anything but easy, with detractors on both sides. The National Committee hosted a virtual program on  April 18, 2022 with Pete Millwood and Jing Tsu as they reflected on the 50th anniversary of the Chinese ping pong team's historic visit to the United States and its continued relevance to the U.S.-China relationship today, in a conversation moderated by Keisha Brown.

    China Business Review
    What does the future of US-China decoupling look like?

    China Business Review

    Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 23:39


    The phrase “decoupling” is used frequently in the context of the US-China tech relationship, but what precisely does it mean? Just how coupled are the United States' and China's tech ecosystems and how is that relationship changing? And what does the future hold for those interconnections? We talk with Jon Bateman, a fellow in the […]

    The World Unpacked
    The Great U.S.-China Tech Divorce

    The World Unpacked

    Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 34:49


    The U.S.-China tech relationship has always been complex and intertwined. In the last few years, the United States and China have been undergoing a partial “decoupling”. With the two countries reducing their technological interdependence between each other, we could end up with two separate, competing technological domains. So, what does a decoupling in tech look like? And how should the United States decouple to make sure it comes out on top?Jon Bateman, a fellow in Carnegie's Technology and International Affairs Program who was a former intelligence officer in the Defense Department, joins Doug to unpack his new report on U.S.-China tech decoupling.Follow Doug on Twitter @DouglasLFarrar. Jon Bateman. (2022, April 25). “U.S.-China Technological “Decoupling”: A Strategy and Policy Framework.” Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

    Adam Carolla Show
    Part 1: Masturbation PSA + General Robert Spalding (ACS May 5)

    Adam Carolla Show

    Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 63:19


    Adam discusses awkward conversations with his father before Gina calls in to give an update on her surgery as well as the painkillers that came with it. Jodi Miller is back again to sit in for Gina and the gang discuss anti-masturbation PSA's and a new update on the Gilligan's Island theme song controversy. Next, Adam is joined by retired general, Robert Spalding, to talk about his new book, ‘War Without Rules: China's Playbook for Global Domination'. They discuss whether China is more of a threat or a competitor, how US policy is based in large on corporation's ties with China, and how COVID impacting US-China relations. THANKS FOR SUPPORTING TODAY'S SPONSORS: SimpliSafe.com/Adam Stamps.com enter ADAM Hyundai LifeLock.com enter ADAM

    Communism Exposed:East and West
    US-China 'Most Dangerous Period in History'; Who Is Trying to Throw China Overboard?

    Communism Exposed:East and West

    Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 9:44


    US-China 'Most Dangerous Period in History'; Who Is Trying to Throw China Overboard?

    Thoughts on the Market
    Michael Zezas: What's Next for U.S./China Trade?

    Thoughts on the Market

    Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 3:24


    As U.S. voters continue to show support for trade policy in regards to China, investors will want to track which actions could have consequences for China equities and currency markets.-----Transcript-----Welcome to Thoughts on the Market. I'm Michal Zezas, Head of Public Policy Research and Municipal Strategy for Morgan stanley. Along with my colleagues, bringing you a variety of perspectives, I'll be talking about the intersection between U.S. public policy and financial markets. It's Tuesday, May 3rd, at 2 p.m. in New York. You might recall that, for much of 2018 and 2019 financial markets ebbed and flowed on the tensions between the U.S. and China over trade policy that led to escalation of tariffs, export restrictions and other policies that still hinder commerce between the countries today. We remind you of those events because they could echo through markets this year as calls in the U.S. for concrete trade policy action have recently grown louder. The main catalyst for this has been reports showing that China has fallen short of its purchase commitments within the Phase One trade deal signed in February of 2020. And polls show that voters would continue to view U.S. trade protections favorably, which, of course, translates to strong political incentives for lawmakers to pursue 'tough on China' policies. So in light of this, it's worth calling out three potential policy actions and their potential effect on equities and currency markets. The first is a trade tool known as a '301 investigation.' I'll spare you the mechanics, but a 301 investigation allows the U.S. to impose tariff or non-tariff actions in response to unfair trade practices. Media reporting has indicated that the Biden administration is considering deployment of a 301 investigation. Should the U.S. adopt non-tariff measures under Section 301 against China, such as further restrictions on the technology supplied to Chinese firms, China may respond with non-tariff measures on specific American goods. For investors, a tariff escalation would likely be a drag on bilateral trade in affected sectors and discourage manufacturing capital expenditures. As a result, broad equity market sentiment in China would likely be dampened, and it could mean further downside to our already cautious view on China equities. The second potential action would be passage of the 'Make It In America Act,' which would enhance domestic manufacturing in some key industries and reduce reliance on foreign sources by reinforcing the supply chain in the U.S. The House and Senate have both passed versions of this bill, and we expect a blended version will become law this year. For investors, this event may be largely in the price. Currency markets will likely see it as just a continuation of ongoing competition between the two nations, without an immediate escalation. The effect on equity markets would be similarly mixed. Finally, the U.S. could escalate non-tariff barriers in places such as tech exports. This last policy action could be significant, since non-tariff measures negative effects tend to be bigger and more profound than direct tariff hikes. We expect China to respond in kind, perhaps by launching an 'unreliable entity' list, which would mean prohibitions on China-related trade, investment in China and travel and work permits. Currency markets would likely react, seeing this as a meaningful escalation, resulting in fresh U.S. dollar strength due to concerns about companies foreign direct investment into China. And for China equities, once again, it would mean further downside to our already cautious view. Thanks for listening. If you enjoy the show, please share Thoughts on the Market with a friend or colleague, or leave us a review on Apple Podcasts. It helps more people find the show.

    Sinocism
    Politburo on capital; Mass testing; Beijing outbreak; Blinken speech on US-China; Jack Ma

    Sinocism

    Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022


    On Friday afternoon, after the release of the Politburo meeting readout that injected positive energy into the markets just before the holiday, the Politburo held a study session. The topic of the study session was “regulating and guiding the healthy development of capital in China according to law 依法规范和引导我国资本健康发展 发挥资本作为重要生产要素的积极作用” and the discussant was Liu Yuanchun, vice president of Renmin U

    China Global
    Implications of Ukraine War, US-China Competition, and Southeast Asia's Role

    China Global

    Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 30:08


    In this episode, Bonnie Glaser hosts Singapore's Ambassador Bilahari Kausikan to discuss several international trends and their strategic significances. They discuss the implications of the war in Ukraine for the global order, particularly the Indo-Pacific, the consequences of growing strategic alignment between China and Russia, the possible endgame of the US-China strategic competition, and Southeast Asia's future. Ambassador Kausikan is a former Ambassador-at-Large in Singapore's Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Prior to this role, he served as the Second Permanent Secretary and then Permanent Secretary of the Foreign Ministry. He has held a variety of appointments during his career, including as Singapore's Permanent Representative to the United Nations in New York and as Ambassador to the Russian Federation. Currently, Ambassador Kausikan serves as Chairman of the Middle East Institute, an institute affiliated with the National University of Singapore.

    FT Tech Tonic
    US-China Tech Race: The great decoupling

    FT Tech Tonic

    Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 26:03


    In the final episode of this season of Tech Tonic, we ask if the growing tensions between the US and China could split the world into two competing technological spheres. It has been dubbed 'the great decoupling'. Some in the US want to see Chinese companies cut off from American investment, while hawkish factions in China have been fighting for a more self-sufficient and nationalistic tech sector. But what would decoupling really look like? And is it even possible? Presented by James Kynge, this episode features interviews with Lillian Li (author of Chinese Characteristics newsletter), Paul Triolo (senior vice-president of Albright Stonebridge Group), Roger Robinson Jr (president and founder of RWR Advisory) and Kevin Rudd (former prime minister of Australia and president of the Asia Society) Check out stories and up-to-the-minute news from the FT's technology team at ft.com/technologyFor a special discounted FT subscription go to https://www.ft.com/techtonicsaleAnd check out FT Edit, the new iPhone app that shares the best of FT journalism, hand-picked by senior editors to inform, explain and surprise. It's free for the first month and 99p a month for the next six months.Presented by James Kynge. Edwin Lane is senior producer. Josh Gabert-Doyon is producer. Manuela Saragosa is executive producer. Special thanks to Tom Griggs. Sound design is by Breen Turner, with original music from Metaphor Music. The FT's head of audio is Cheryl Brumley.News clips credits: CNBCRead a transcript of this episode on FT.com See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    FT News Briefing
    US-China Tech Race: brave new world

    FT News Briefing

    Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 27:54


    In this episode of Tech Tonic, how a mysterious death in Belgrade prompted Serbia to embrace Chinese surveillance technology, raising concerns among Serbian human rights and privacy activists. They've been fighting back against the Serbian government's use of Huawei facial recognition tech in public spaces. But Serbia is just one of many countries around the world that's adopted this cutting-edge Chinese mass monitoring equipment. What does it tell us about the spread of Chinese influence around the world?Presented by James Kynge, this episode features interviews with Danilo Krivokapic (director, Share Foundation), Andrej Petrovski (director of tech, Share Foundation), Stefan Vladisavljev (programme co-ordinator, Belgrade Fund for Political Excellence), Wang Huiyao (director, Beijing Center for Globalisation) and Wawa Wang (director, Just Finance).Presented by James Kynge. Edwin Lane is senior producer. Josh Gabert-Doyon is producer. Manuela Saragosa is executive producer. Special thanks to Marton Dunai and Bojan Radic. Sound design is by Breen Turner, with original music from Metaphor Music. The FT's head of audio is Cheryl Brumley.Read James Kynge, Valerie Hopkins, Helen Warrell and Kathrin Hille's previous reporting on Chinese surveillance tech in the Balkans: https://www.ft.com/content/76fdac7c-7076-47a4-bcb0-7e75af0aadabNews clips credits: PBS, CNBC, CGNT, DW, Moconomy, BBCCheck out stories and up-to-the-minute news from the FT's technology team at ft.com/technologyFor a special discounted FT subscription go to https://www.ft.com/techtonicsaleAnd check out FT Edit, the new iPhone app that shares the best of FT journalism, hand-picked by senior editors to inform, explain and surprise. It's free for the first month and 99p a month for the next six months. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    FT News Briefing
    FT Weekend: Morality in the Twitter era. Plus: China's language revolution

    FT News Briefing

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2022 30:43


    This weekend, we think about morality in the age of social media. According to writer Dan Brooks, we're great at pointing out where good is missing, but we've forgotten how to be good people. Then, Yale professor Jing Tsu tells us the story of how China standardised its complex language of 80,000 characters into something that could fit on a keyboard. It wasn't easy, but it helped make the country the global digital superpower that it is today.--------------Want to say hi? We love hearing from you. Email us at ftweekendpodcast@ft.com. We're on Twitter @ftweekendpod, and Lilah is on Instagram and Twitter @lilahrap. --------------Links and mentions from the episode: – Dan Brooks' FT Magazine piece, ‘What we need now that social media has fully weaponized morality': https://on.ft.com/3LyIE9c –The dreaded tweet that inspired Dan's piece: https://twitter.com/mimismartypants/status/1498332885362823170 –Jing's book is called Kingdom of Characters. The FT's review is here: https://on.ft.com/3nJqzey –Jing's 2020 piece for the FT, ‘Why sci-fi could be the secret weapon in China's soft-power arsenal': https://on.ft.com/3y2WbBF –Dan Brooks is on Twitter @dangerbrooks, and Jing Tsu is at @tsu_jing. –Tech Tonic Season 3, about the US/China tech race, is available now. Listen wherever you get your podcasts, or at https://www.ft.com/tech-tonic –Select coverage of the war in Ukraine is free to read at https://www.ft.com/freetoread—-------------Special offers for Weekend listeners, from 50% off a digital subscription to a $1/£1/€1 trial are here: http://ft.com/weekendpodcast.--------------The first US FT Weekend Festival is on Saturday, May 7 in Washington, DC! To attend virtually or in person, buy tickets at http://ft.weekendfestival.com – use the discount code FTFriends2022 for 50% off.--------------Original music by Metaphor Music. Mixing and sound design by Tommy Bazarian. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    FT Everything Else
    Morality in the Twitter era. Plus: China's language revolution

    FT Everything Else

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2022 29:46


    This weekend, we think about morality in the age of social media. According to writer Dan Brooks, we're great at pointing out where good is missing, but we've forgotten how to be good people. Then, Yale professor Jing Tsu tells us the story of how China standardised its complex language of 80,000 characters into something that could fit on a keyboard. It wasn't easy, but it helped make the country the global digital superpower that it is today.--------------Want to say hi? We love hearing from you. Email us at ftweekendpodcast@ft.com. We're on Twitter @ftweekendpod, and Lilah is on Instagram and Twitter @lilahrap. --------------Links and mentions from the episode: – Dan Brooks' FT Magazine piece, ‘What we need now that social media has fully weaponized morality': https://on.ft.com/3LyIE9c –The dreaded tweet that inspired Dan's piece: https://twitter.com/mimismartypants/status/1498332885362823170 –Jing's book is called Kingdom of Characters. The FT's review is here: https://on.ft.com/3nJqzey –Jing's 2020 piece for the FT, ‘Why sci-fi could be the secret weapon in China's soft-power arsenal': https://on.ft.com/3y2WbBF –Dan Brooks is on Twitter @dangerbrooks, and Jing Tsu is at @tsu_jing. –Tech Tonic Season 3, about the US/China tech race, is available now. Listen wherever you get your podcasts, or at https://www.ft.com/tech-tonic –Select coverage of the war in Ukraine is free to read at https://www.ft.com/freetoread—-------------Special offers for Weekend listeners, from 50% off a digital subscription to a $1/£1/€1 trial are here: http://ft.com/weekendpodcast.--------------The first US FT Weekend Festival is on Saturday, May 7 in Washington, DC! To attend virtually or in person, buy tickets at http://ft.weekendfestival.com – use the discount code FTFriends2022 for 50% off.--------------Original music by Metaphor Music. Mixing and sound design by Tommy Bazarian. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    The Rachman Review
    Putin's nuclear threat and China ‘friendship'

    The Rachman Review

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 29:03


    Russia raised the spectre of nuclear war this week as it struggles to make headway in Ukraine. How seriously should this threat be taken and can Vladimir Putin rely on his friendship with China's Xi Jinping? Gideon discusses these questions with US political scientist Graham Allison, author of the classic study of the Cuban missile crisis, ‘Essence of Decision', and of a book on US-China relations, ‘Destined for War'.Clips: ABC, BloombergWant to read more?‘At war with the whole world': why Putin might be planning a long conflict in UkraineBiden, Putin and the danger of VersaillesRussia's invasion of Ukraine in maps Subscribe to The Rachman Review wherever you get your podcasts - please listen, rate and subscribe.Presented by Gideon Rachman. Produced by Fiona Symon. Sound design by Jasiu SigsworthRead a transcript of this episode on FT.com See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    CrossroadsET
    Live Q&A: Durham Serves Trial Subpoenas to Clinton Team; EU Looks to Control ‘Truth' as Musk Buys Twitter—With Stephen Soukup

    CrossroadsET

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 91:19


    Members of the Hillary Clinton 2016 presidential campaign have been issued trial subpoenas from special counsel John Durham—along with subpoenas for the Democratic National Committee (DNC), Fusion GPS, and Perkins Coie. As the case unfolds into how Democrat officials paid for and spread disinformation against Trump to influence the 2016 election, questions are growing on how much was done unaware, and how much was intentional. Meanwhile, Disney's stocks have fallen more than 31 percent after it got into conflict with Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis over his Parental Rights in Education bill, which bans the instruction of sexual orientation or gender identity to children from kindergarten to third grade and requires age-appropriate content on sexual issues. To discuss the fallout Disney has faced, we've invited special guest Stephen Soukup, author of “The Dictatorship of Woke Capital: How Political Correctness Captured Big Business.” And in other news, Elon Musk's bid to purchase Twitter for $44 billion has been approved, and the billionaire Tesla CEO is pleading to open the platform to free speech. As this happens, however, the European Union is passing new laws to regulate online content, under the banner of fighting what it deems as disinformation and propaganda. In this live Q&A with Crossroads host Joshua Philipp, we'll discuss these stories and others, and answer questions from the audience. ⭕️ Stay up-to-date with Josh with the Crossroads NEWSLETTER

    NCUSCR Interviews
    U.S.-China Climate Finance Cooperation: Can We Avoid the Carbon Tsunami? | Kelly Sims Gallagher

    NCUSCR Interviews

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 28:19


    The United States and China, as the world's two largest economies and carbon emitters, have an opportunity to accelerate financing for low-carbon technologies, particularly in developing countries. One promising mechanism for action is climate finance; nevertheless, experts estimate an annual shortfall of $850 billion in climate-related financing in developing markets, which need it most.   In an interview conducted on April 6, 2022, Kelly Sims Gallagher discusses the importance of U.S.-China cooperation in accelerating global climate finance.