Podcasts about Hungary

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Country located in Central Europe

  • 3,295PODCASTS
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  • Nov 27, 2021LATEST
Hungary

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Best podcasts about Hungary

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Latest podcast episodes about Hungary

The John Batchelor Show
S4 Ep1827: 3/4 Sophie Pedder #UNBOUND. Révolution Française, the complete forty-minute interview, July 17, 2021.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 13:15


Photo: 3/4   Révolution Française, by Sophie Pedder.  @PedderSophie  CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow https://www.amazon.com/Revolution-Française-Emmanuel-Macron-reinvent/dp/1472948602 The extraordinary story of how an outsider candidate—an unknown technocrat and economics minister on the fringes of French politics—made his way to the Élysée palace, with expert analysis of his first year in office. Two years after Emmanuel Macron came from nowhere to seize the French presidency, Sophie Pedder, The Economist's Paris bureau chief, tells the story of his remarkable rise and time in office so far. In this paperback edition, published with a new foreword by the author, Pedder reflects on Macron's troubles and triumphs: his dwindling popularity; the 'gilets jaunes' protests and resulting civil unrest; his efforts to transform France and lead the global fight against climate change; the Benalla affair; his erratic relationships with Angela Merkel, Donald Trump, Vladimir Putin and Theresa May, and the future of the European project.  On the eve of important European elections, and with nationalist and populist forces rising across the continent, she considers whether Macron can hold the centre ground and defend the multilateral liberal order against the axis of such figures as Italy's Matteo Salvini and Hungary's Viktor Orbán. Pedder also analyses the domestic situation in France, the evolution of En Marche, and the fall-out from Macron's controversial reforms. Meticulously researched and written in Pedder's gripping and immensely readable style, this is the essential, authoritative account for anyone wishing to understand Macron and the future of France in the world.

The John Batchelor Show
S4 Ep1827: 4/4 Sophie Pedder #UNBOUND. Révolution Française, the complete forty-minute interview, July 17, 2021.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 7:25


Photo: 4/4     Révolution Française, by Sophie Pedder.  @PedderSophie  CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow https://www.amazon.com/Revolution-Française-Emmanuel-Macron-reinvent/dp/1472948602 The extraordinary story of how an outsider candidate—an unknown technocrat and economics minister on the fringes of French politics—made his way to the Élysée palace, with expert analysis of his first year in office. Two years after Emmanuel Macron came from nowhere to seize the French presidency, Sophie Pedder, The Economist's Paris bureau chief, tells the story of his remarkable rise and time in office so far. In this paperback edition, published with a new foreword by the author, Pedder reflects on Macron's troubles and triumphs: his dwindling popularity; the 'gilets jaunes' protests and resulting civil unrest; his efforts to transform France and lead the global fight against climate change; the Benalla affair; his erratic relationships with Angela Merkel, Donald Trump, Vladimir Putin and Theresa May, and the future of the European project.  On the eve of important European elections, and with nationalist and populist forces rising across the continent, she considers whether Macron can hold the centre ground and defend the multilateral liberal order against the axis of such figures as Italy's Matteo Salvini and Hungary's Viktor Orbán. Pedder also analyses the domestic situation in France, the evolution of En Marche, and the fall-out from Macron's controversial reforms. Meticulously researched and written in Pedder's gripping and immensely readable style, this is the essential, authoritative account for anyone wishing to understand Macron and the future of France in the world.

The John Batchelor Show
S4 Ep1827: 1/4 Révolution Française, by Sophie Pedder. @PedderSophie

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 11:00


Photo: 1/4   Révolution Française, by Sophie Pedder.  @PedderSophie  CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow https://www.amazon.com/Revolution-Française-Emmanuel-Macron-reinvent/dp/1472948602 The extraordinary story of how an outsider candidate—an unknown technocrat and economics minister on the fringes of French politics—made his way to the Élysée palace, with expert analysis of his first year in office. Two years after Emmanuel Macron came from nowhere to seize the French presidency, Sophie Pedder, The Economist's Paris bureau chief, tells the story of his remarkable rise and time in office so far. In this paperback edition, published with a new foreword by the author, Pedder reflects on Macron's troubles and triumphs: his dwindling popularity; the 'gilets jaunes' protests and resulting civil unrest; his efforts to transform France and lead the global fight against climate change; the Benalla affair; his erratic relationships with Angela Merkel, Donald Trump, Vladimir Putin and Theresa May, and the future of the European project.  On the eve of important European elections, and with nationalist and populist forces rising across the continent, she considers whether Macron can hold the centre ground and defend the multilateral liberal order against the axis of such figures as Italy's Matteo Salvini and Hungary's Viktor Orbán. Pedder also analyses the domestic situation in France, the evolution of En Marche, and the fall-out from Macron's controversial reforms. Meticulously researched and written in Pedder's gripping and immensely readable style, this is the essential, authoritative account for anyone wishing to understand Macron and the future of France in the world.

The John Batchelor Show
S4 Ep1827: 2/4 Sophie Pedder #UNBOUND. Révolution Française, the complete forty-minute interview, July 17, 2021.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 7:50


Photo: 2/4  Révolution Française, by Sophie Pedder.  @PedderSophie  CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow https://www.amazon.com/Revolution-Française-Emmanuel-Macron-reinvent/dp/1472948602 The extraordinary story of how an outsider candidate—an unknown technocrat and economics minister on the fringes of French politics—made his way to the Élysée palace, with expert analysis of his first year in office. Two years after Emmanuel Macron came from nowhere to seize the French presidency, Sophie Pedder, The Economist's Paris bureau chief, tells the story of his remarkable rise and time in office so far. In this paperback edition, published with a new foreword by the author, Pedder reflects on Macron's troubles and triumphs: his dwindling popularity; the 'gilets jaunes' protests and resulting civil unrest; his efforts to transform France and lead the global fight against climate change; the Benalla affair; his erratic relationships with Angela Merkel, Donald Trump, Vladimir Putin and Theresa May, and the future of the European project.  On the eve of important European elections, and with nationalist and populist forces rising across the continent, she considers whether Macron can hold the centre ground and defend the multilateral liberal order against the axis of such figures as Italy's Matteo Salvini and Hungary's Viktor Orbán. Pedder also analyses the domestic situation in France, the evolution of En Marche, and the fall-out from Macron's controversial reforms. Meticulously researched and written in Pedder's gripping and immensely readable style, this is the essential, authoritative account for anyone wishing to understand Macron and the future of France in the world.

Coronavirus 4 1 1  podcast
Coronavirus, COVID-19, coronavirus variants, and vaccine updates for 11-26-2021

Coronavirus 4 1 1 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 5:28


This is Coronavirus 411, the latest COVID-19 info and new hotspots for November 26th, 2021. The news we've been dreading, another variant of COVID-19 that is more mutated, more contagious, and more capable of evading the vaccines we have thus far. It's called B.1.1.529 and it's been identified in South Africa, Hong Kong, and Botswana. Senior scientists describe it as the worst variant they'd seen since the start of the pandemic with 32 mutations in the spike protein. That's twice as many as in the Delta variant. Because of the new variant, South Africa has been placed under England's red list travel restrictions. About 500 to 700 people usually go to the UK from South Africa every day. The ban will also cover flights from Namibia, Botswana, and Zimbabwe. Scotland says all arrivals from the countries must self-isolate and take two PCR tests, then starting 4am tomorrow, stay at a managed quarantine hotel. And Israel is banning citizens from traveling to southern Africa and barring the entry of foreign travelers from the region. If you're still arguing with a friend over which is the better vaccine, Pfizer or Moderna, a large scale study out of Hungary says Moderna beats Pfizer in effectiveness. In fact, so does Russia's Sputnik V vaccine. Moderna was 88.7% effective in protecting against infection vs Pfizer's 83.3%, and Moderna was 93.6% effective against COVID mortality vs Pfizer's 90.6%. As expected, the EU authorized Pfizer's vaccine for use on kids aged 5 to 11 years old. That means shots are coming to millions of elementary school pupils. Of course, at least one country didn't wait for authorization. Vienna, Austria had already started vaccinating 5 to 11-year-olds. So with cases surging, ICU's full, and staff vaccine mandates going into place, surely more healthcare workers are getting fully vaccinated, right? At the moment, as much as 30% of healthcare practitioners remain unvaccinated. HCPs working in children's hospitals had the highest vaccination rates at 77%, followed by short- and long-term care ACHs at 70.1% and 68.8%, respectively. Critical access hospitals had vaccination rates of just 64%. In the United States cases were up 20%, deaths are down 10%, and hospitalizations are up 11% over 14 days. The 7-day average of new cases has been trending up since November 3. The five states that had the most daily deaths per 100,000 are Montana, Kentucky, West Virginia, Oregon, and Michigan. There are 9,401,200 active cases in the United States. The five states with the greatest increase in hospitalizations per capita: New Hampshire 54%, Michigan 46%, Massachusetts 42%, Indiana 36%, and Illinois and Maine 31%. The top 10 counties with the highest number of recent cases per capita according to The New York Times: Big Horn, MT. Nome Census Area, AK. Scurry, TX. Dodge, MN. Mason, MI. Shiawassee, MI. Bethel Census Area, AK. Crawford, PA. Nodaway, MO. And Goodhue, MN. There have been at least 775,785 deaths in the U.S. recorded as Covid-related. The top 3 vaccinating states by percentage of population that's been fully vaccinated: Vermont at 72.7%, Rhode Island unchanged at 72.2%, and Maine at 72.1%. The bottom 3 vaccinating states are West Virginia unchanged at 41.5%, Wyoming unchanged at 45.3%, and Alabama at 46%. The percentage of the U.S. that's been fully vaccinated is unchanged at 59%. Globally, cases were up 16% and deaths were down 3% over 14 days, with the 7-day average trending up since October 15. There are 19,855,847 active cases around the world. With U.S. reporting affected by the Thanksgiving holiday, the five countries with the most new cases: Germany 76,132. The U.K. 47,240. Russia 33,796. France 33,464. And Poland 28,128. There have been at least 5,181,949 deaths reported as... See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Thursday, November 25, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsThursday of the Thirty-fourth Week in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 506, 943-947All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Catherine of AlexandriaAccording to the Legend of St. Catherine, this young woman converted to Christianity after receiving a vision. At the age of 18, she debated 50 pagan philosophers. Amazed at her wisdom and debating skills, they became Christians—as did about 200 soldiers and members of the emperor's family. All of them were martyred. Sentenced to be executed on a spiked wheel, Catherine touched the wheel and it shattered. She was beheaded. Centuries later, angels are said to have carried the body of Saint Catherine to a monastery at the foot of Mt. Sinai. Devotion to her spread as a result of the Crusades. She was invoked as the patroness of students, teachers, librarians and lawyers. Catherine is one of the 14 Holy Helpers, venerated especially in Germany and Hungary. Reflection The pursuit of God's wisdom may not lead to riches or earthly honors. In Catherine's case, this pursuit contributed to her martyrdom. She was not, however, foolish in preferring to die for Jesus rather than live only by denying him. All the rewards that her tormentors offered her would rust, lose their beauty, or in some other way become a poor exchange for Catherine's honesty and integrity in following Jesus Christ. Saint Catherine of Alexandria is a Patron Saint of: Lawyers Librarians Philosophers Students Teachers Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

Know Your Enemy
Retvrn of the National Conservatives

Know Your Enemy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 84:20


It's rare for nearly all the inhabitants of the KYE podcast universe to gather in one place, but it happened earlier this month in—as you might guess—Florida, where the National Conservatism 2 conference was held. The proceedings were littered with extraordinary claims of a "totalitarian cult" (liberals and the left) deliberately trying to destroy the United States, with the help of Big Tech, China, and...university professors. The conference seemed to mark the ascendency of national conservatism on the Right, and perhaps the Republican Party. Matt and Sam break it all down: what it means, what it portends, and why they're wrong.Sources:Watch all the National Conservatism conference videos (YouTube)David Brooks, "The Terrifying Future of the American Right," Atlantic, November 18, 2021J.G. Ballard, Super Cannes (Picador, 2000)Murray Rothbard, Man, Economy, and State (David van Nostrand Company/William Volker Fund, 1962)Background Listening:Know Your Enemy, "The Definitely Not-Racist National Conservatives," July 30, 2019                                            "The Rise of the Illiberal Right," July 12, 2019                                             "Frank Meyer: Father of Fusionism," November 10, 2021...and don't forget you can subscribe to Know Your Enemy on Patreon for access to all of our bonus episodes!

Invasion of the Remake Podcast
Ep.316 The 31 Days of Horror Challenge 2021 Part Two

Invasion of the Remake Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 136:29


Welcome to part two of Invasion of the Remake's annual horror movie challenge in which each host watched 31 movies over the 31 days of October which we have never seen before. Which ones will make you jump in terror and which ones will make your eyes bleed? We'll spill our guts on the good and bad in our conclusion to 31 Days of Horror! Sam's List: 17. Borgman (2013, Netherlands), 18. Idila aka Idyll aka Killbillies (2015, Slovenia), 19. Horsehead (2014, France), 20. The Wolf House (2018, Chile), 21. Treehouse (2014, US/UK), 22. Sensoria (2015, Sweden), 23. Jug Face (2013, US), 24. Let's Scare Julie (2019, US) , 25, Werewolf (2015, Poland, Netherlands, German), 26. The Doll (2017, Mongolia), 27. Alpha ( 2014, Greece), 28. Hell Night (1981, US), 29. The Tag-Along (2015, Taiwan), 30. Strangled (2016, Hungary), 31. Phantasm (1979, US) Trish's List: 17. Bad Candy (2020, US), 18. Zombie for Sale (2019, South Korea), 19. The Boat (2018, UK/Malta), 20. The Thing That Couldn't Die (1958, US), 21. Sky Sharks (2020, Germany), 22. Night Teeth (2021, US), 23. Escape Room: Tournament of Champions (2021, US), 24. Devil (2010, US), 25. Bingo Hell (2021, US), 26. Sacrifice (2020, UK), 27. Werewolves Within (2021, US), 28. Dark Woods (2003, Norway), 29. The Columnist (2021, Netherlands), 30. When the Darkness Comes (2014, Greenland), 31. Thirst (2019, Iceland) Jason's List: 17. Tremors: Shrieker Island (2020, US), 18. Lord of Tears (2013, UK), 19. Till Death (2021, US), 20. The Empty Man (2020, US/UK/South Africa), 21. Tigers Are Not Afraid (2017, Mexico), 22. The Manson Brothers Midnight Zombie Massacre (2021, US), 23. Anything For Jackson (2020, Canada), 24. The Conjuring: The Devil Made Me Do It (2021, US/UK), 25. Malignant (2021, US/China), 26. Werewolves Within (2021, US), 27. Bloody Hell (2020, Australia/US), 28. Spiral: From the Book of Saw (2021, US/Canada), 29. Don't Breathe 2 (2021, US/Serbia), 30. Candyman (2021,US/Canada/Australia), 31. Halloween Kills (2021, US/UK)

Expositors Collective
Every Passage Ultimately Points to Jesus - Nick Cady

Expositors Collective

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 96:51


The Bible makes sense in its deepest and richest capacity only when we read it through Jesus shaped goggles. When we see all of it through the lens of its Main Character - it should cause us to preach explicitly Christian sermons.Nick Cady (with some help from Pilgrim Benham) explains, shows and tells how to preach Gospel centered sermons that proclaim the gospel from every passage at our in-person training event in Colorado Springs. Register for our next training weekend in Costa Mesa California here: https://expositorscollective.regfox.com/expositors-collective-costa-mesa Nick Cady is the lead pastor of White Fields Community Church in Longmont, Colorado.Prior to moving to Longmont in 2012, Nick spent 10 years as a missionary, pastor and church planter in Hungary working with Calvary Chapel. He holds a Bachelors degree in Theology from the University of Gloucestershire in England and recently completed his Masters degree in Integrative Theology from London School of Theology.Nick can be heard on the radio every weekday from 2:30-3:00 PM Mountain Time all along Colorado's Front Range on GraceFM: 89.7 from Cheyenne to Castle Rock, and 101.7 in Colorado Springs, as well as online at gracefm.comHe also hosts the Calvary Live call-in show on GraceFM every Friday from 4:00-5:00 PM MST, which is syndicated on HopeFM in Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Maryland and on TruthFM in Tennessee and North Carolina.Nick is on the steering committee of the Expositors Collective, a growing network of pastors, leaders, and laypeople which exists to equip, encourage, and mentor the next generation of Christ-centered preachers by hosting training seminars and providing resources, including a weekly podcast.He also serves with Calvary Global Network as a Local Connector and the leader of the Training team, which is developing a program to assess, train, and deploy new church planters and missionaries.You can keep up with Nick on Twitter at @nickcady, on Instagram at @cadynick, or by subscribing to the White Fields Church podcast.Recommended Episodes: How to Preach Christ from Every Text: https://www.expositorscollective.com/podcast/2019/3/26/episode-40-how-to-preach-christ-from-every-text Heralding the Voice of Christ - Glen Scrivener : https://www.expositorscollective.com/podcast/2021/5/18/heralding-the-voice-of-christ-glen-scrivener Showing the Gospel in All of Scripture: https://www.expositorscollective.com/podcast/2020/10/7/showing-the-gospel-in-all-of-scripture-char-brodersen-pete-nelson-mike-neglia Is it a stretch to say that everything in the Bible points to Jesus? -https://anchor.fm/theologyforthepeople/episodes/Christ-Centered-Hermeneutics---Part-1-Is-it-a-stretch-to-say-that-everything-in-the-Bible-points-to-Jesus----with-Mike-Neglia-e17q0sd Responding to Objections to Christ-Centered Hermeneutics: https://anchor.fm/theologyforthepeople/episodes/Christ-Centered-Hermeneutics---Part-2-Responding-to-Objections-to-Christ-Centered-Hermeneutics---with-Mike-Neglia-e18563k The Expositors Collective podcast is part of the GoodLion podcast network, for more thought provoking Christian podcasts visit https://goodlion.io

The PoliticsGirl Podcast
The Republican Party You Knew Is Gone

The PoliticsGirl Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 28:28


Enough of the spin, the depressing headlines & the bad poll numbers. By almost every discernible metric, the Democrats are actually doing incredibly well.  We talk about the signed bipartisan Infrastructure Bill, the biggest investment in our country in over 50 years; the Build Back Better Act, that could be the greatest social spending bill in decades; and, we talk in depth about the party that voted AGAINST all of that because they've chosen Democratic failure over American success. We question who the Republican Party has become as they're no longer attempting to govern, but setting up to rule, and based on which voices they're abandoning and which they're elevating, it appears the future under the GOP will look a lot more like Hungary than America. If we're going to be ready to fight for our democracy, we must stop falling for the drama. See the parties through their actions and not the media's words.  Please rate and subscribe so we can grow the show, get more guests and inspire more change moving forward! Watch the show in video format on YouTube. Follow my Twitter. Follow my Instagram. Watch my Rants on TikTok. Like the Facebook Page. PoliticsGirl is a MeidasTouch original podcast produced by Happy Warrior Productions.

The CBN News Daily Rundown - Audio Podcast
Embracing the Family: Jennifer Wishon on Hungary and Motherhood

The CBN News Daily Rundown - Audio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021


After 13 years at CBN covering the intersection of faith and politics, CBN's treasured Senior Washington Correspondent Jennifer Wishon is redirecting her attention to follow another call on her life. From Capitol Hill to the open road to overseas, Jennifer followed the news and the Lord's call to deliver succinct and engaging stories from a biblical perspective. Her most recent trip took her to Hungary, where she reported on the country's pro-family agenda. Jennifer returned with encouraging news of how the country is experiencing increasing birth and marriage rates, and that she's decided to embrace a new phase of life - full-time motherhood. Jennifer is on the podcast today to reflect on her trip to Hungary, her time at CBN, as well as what she looks forward to in the next stage of life and why she considers it valuable.

Around The Outside: The American Formula One Podcast
The Wind in Your Losail - Qatar 2021

Around The Outside: The American Formula One Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 97:21


We are at the Losail International Circuit in Qatar.  Lewis Hamilton's rainbow helmet becomes his lucky charm as he & Mercedes discover a pot of gold for the second race in a row.  Ian & I discover we're color blind.  And The Rookie Alonso gets on the podium for the 98th time in his F1 career.  His first podium since Hungary 2014. Don't forget to subscribe & please follow us on Instagram @ato.podcast

Kings and Generals: History for our Future
2.60. History of the Mongols: Golden Horde #1

Kings and Generals: History for our Future

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 32:10


Having taken you, our dear listeners, through the Yuan, Chagatayid and Ilkhanates, we now turn our attention to the northwestern corner of the Mongol Empire: the Jochid ulus, the Golden Horde. Ruled by the line of Chinggis' eldest son Jochi, this single division of the Mongol Empire was larger than the maximum extent of most empires, dominating from the borders of Hungary and the Balkans, briefly taking the submission of Serbia, stretching ever eastwards over what is now Ukraine, Russia, through Kazakhstan before terminating at the Irtysh River. Under its hegemony were many distinct populations; the cities of the Rus' principalities, the fur trading centres of the Volga Bulghars along the Samara Bend, the mercantile outposts of the Crimean peninsula which gave the Jochid Khans access to the Mediterranean Sea, to the Khwarezm delta, giving them a position in the heart of the Central Asian trade. These distant frontiers, hundreds upon hundreds of kilometres apart, were connected by the western half of the great Eurasian steppe, the Qipchaq Desert as it was known to Islamic writers. Thus was the Golden Horde, and over the next few episodes we'll take you through its history, from its establishment under Batu, to the height of its glory under Özbeg, to its lengthy disintegration from the end of the fourteenth century onwards. This first episode will serve as an introduction to the history of the Golden Horde, beginning first with its very name and important historiographical matters, then taking you through its origins, up to the death of Berke and ascension of Möngke-Temür, the first ruler of the Golden Horde as an independent state.  I'm your host David, and this is Kings and Generals: Ages of Conquest.       As good a place to start as any is terminology, and the Golden Horde is known by a host of names. Firstly and most famously, we can note that the Golden Horde is a later appellation, given to the state centuries later in Rus' chronicles. In Russian this is Zolotaya Orda (Золотой Орды),  which in Mongolian and Turkish would be Altan Orda. The English word “horde” comes directly from Mongolian ordu, though also used in Turkic languages, and signifies, depending on the case, a command headquarters, the army, tent or palace- quite different from the image of uncontrolled rabble that usually comes to mind with the term. While commonly said that the Rus' chronicles took the term from the golden colour of the Khan's tents, we actually do see the term Golden Horde used among the Mongols before the emergence of the Golden Horde state. For the Mongols and Turks, all the cardinal directions have colour associated with them. Gold is the colour associated with the center; while the divisions of the army would be known by their direction and colour, the overall command or imperial government could be known as the center, the qol, or by its colour, altan. This is further augmented by the association of the colour gold with the Chinggisids themselves, as descent from Chinggis Khan was the altan urugh, the Golden Lineage; and the name of a well-known Mongolian folk band. For example, in 1246 when the Franciscan Friar John de Plano Carpini travelled to Mongolia as an envoy from the Pope, he visited a number of camps of the new Khan, Güyük. Each camp was named, and one of these was, as Carpini notes, called the Golden Horde. In this case, Carpini also describes Güyük's tent as being literally covered in gold, with even the nails holding the wooden beams being gold.       So Altan orda, or Golden Horde, may well have been in use within the Golden Horde khanate. However, the term is never used to refer to it in the thirteenth or fourteenth centuries. What we see instead is a collection of other terms. In the Ilkhanate, it was common to refer to the rulers as the Khans of Qipchap, and the state as the Desht-i-Qipchaq, the Qipchaq steppe or desert. Hence in modern writing you will sometimes see it as the Qipchap Khanate. But this seems unlikely to have been a term in use by the Jochid Khans, given that the Qipchaps were the Khan's subjects and seen as Mongol slaves; a rather strange thing for the Mongols to name themselves after them. Given that it was the pre-Mongol term for the region, and the Ilkhanid writers liked to denigrate the Jochid Khans whenever possible, it makes rather good sense that they would continue using it.       Many modern historians, and our series researcher, like to refer to it as the Jochid ulus, the patrimony of the house of Jochi, particularly before the actual independence of the Golden Horde following 1260. This term appears closer to what we see in Yuan and Mamluk sources, where the Golden Horde was usually called the ulus of Batu or Berke, or ulus of whoever was currently the reigning Khan. Either designating themselves by the current ruler, or by the more general ulug ulus, meaning “great state or patrimony,” with perhaps just the encampment of the Khan known as the altan ordu, the Golden Horde, among the Jochids themselves. Over the following episodes the term Jochid ulus will be used to refer to the state in general, and Golden Horde will be used specifically for the independent khanate which emerged after the Berke-Hülegü war in the 1260s.       There is another matter with terminology worth pointing out before we go further. The Jochid domains were split into two halves; west of the Ural river, ruled by the line of Batu, Jochi's second son. And east of the Ural River, ruled by the line of Orda, Jochi's first son. Now, Batu may have been the general head of the Jochids, or a first amongst equals, or Orda and Batu may have been given totally distinct domains. Perhaps the ulus of Orda simply became more autonomous over the thirteenth century. Opinions differ greatly, and unfortunately little information survives on the exact relationship, but the ulus of Orda was, by 1300, effectively independent and the Batuid Khans Toqta and Özbeg would, through military intervention, bring it under their influence. So essentially, there were two wings of the Jochids with a murky relationship, which is further obfuscated by inconsistent naming of them in the historical sources. Rus' and Timurid sources also refer to the White Horde and the Blue Horde. The Rus' sources follow Turko-Mongolian colour directions and have the White Horde, the lands ruled by the line of Batu, the more westerly, and Orda's ulus being the Blue Horde to the east.  Except in Timurid sources, this is reversed, with Batu's line ruling the Blue Horde, and Orda the White.        There has been no shortage of scholarly debate over this, and you will see the terms used differently among modern writers. This is not even getting into the matter if the Golden Horde was then itself another division within this, referring to territory belonging directly to the Khan within the Batuid Horde. For the sake of clarity, this podcast will work on the following assumptions, with recognition that other scholars interpretations may differ greatly: that following Jochi's death around 1227, the Jochid lines and lands were divided among Batu and Orda, with Batu acting as the head of the lineage. The western half of this division, under Batu, we will call the White Horde, and Orda's eastern division will be the Blue Horde. Together, these were the Jochid ulus, with the rest of their brothers given allotments within the larger domains. While Batu was the senior in the hierarchy, Orda was largely autonomous, which following the Berke-Hülegü war turned into the Blue Horde becoming effectively independent until the start of the fourteenth century, as apparently suggested by Rashid al-Din and Marco Polo,        One final note is that we have effectively no internal sources surviving from the Golden Horde. In the opinion of scholars like Charles Halperin, the Golden Horde simply had no chronicle tradition. Any records they maintained were likely lost in the upheavals of the late fourteenth century that culminated in the great invasion under Tamerlane in the 1390s, where effectively every major city in the steppe region of the Horde was destroyed.  The closest we come to Golden Horde point-of-view chronicles appear in the sixteenth century onwards, long after the dissolution of the Horde. The first and most notable was the mid-sixteenth century Qara Tawarikh of Ötemish Hajji, based in Khiva in the service of descendants of Jochi's son, Shiban. Sent to the lower Volga by his masters, there he collected oral folk tales which he compiled into his history. While often bearing intriguing and amusing tales, they reveal little in the way of the internal machinations of the Golden Horde. Luckily we are serviced from more contemporary sources, most notably Ilkhanid and Mamluk sources- once again our friend the Ilkhanid vizier Rashid al-Din is of utmost importance, who provides us an important outline of the Golden Horde's politics up to 1300. The Mamluks and Ilkhanid sources largely collected information from Jochid diplomats or refugees. Most of our understanding of Golden Horde political events, and the details of the following episodes, comes from these sources.   Post-Ilkhanid Timurid and Jalayirid authors help somewhat for the later fourteenth century, while the Rus' sources provide information on the Golden Horde almost exclusively in the context of its interactions with the principalities, similar to other European and Byzantine sources. A few details can be gleaned too from travellers like Marco Polo and Ibn Battuta, and even distant Yuan sources from China. Archaeology has provided some interesting details, particularly relating to trade and the extensive coinage circulation of the Jochids. Despite this, the Golden Horde remains, regardless of its fame, arguably one of the poorer understood of the Mongol Khanates.       So, with that bit of paperwork out of the way, let's get on with it! The kernel of the immense Golden Horde can be found in the first decades of the thirteenth century. In the first ten years of the Mongol Empire Jochi, Chinggis Khan's first son, was tasked with leading campaigns around Lake Baikal, as well as the first expeditions that brought their armies far to the west of Mongolia. While around Baikal he had been sent to subdue the local peoples, in 1216 Jochi and Sübe'edei pursued fleeing Merkits across Kazakhstan, to the region between the Aral Sea and the Caspian. Here, the Merkits had allied with Qangli-Qipchaps, beginning the long running Mongol animosity to the various Qipchap peoples. While Jochi was the victor here, he was forced into battle with the Khwarezm-Shah Muhammad on his return, as we have previously detailed. But the result seems to have been an association of these western steppes as Jochi's lands, in the eyes of the Mongol leadership.       Such an association was strengthened following the campaign against the Khwarezmian Empire. The Mongols saw conquering a region as making it part of the patrimony of a given prince, and such a belief fueled into the interactions between Jochi and his brothers, especially Chagatai. This was most apparent at the siege of the Khwarezmian capital of Gurganj, where Jochi sought to minimize destruction to the city- not out of humanity, but as it would be a jewel in his domains as one of the preeminent trade cities in Central Asia. Chagatai, in a long running competition with his brother, was not nearly so compassionate. The end result was Gurganj being almost totally annihilated, and Jochi and Chagatai's antagonism reaching the frustrated ears of their father. As you may recall, Jochi's mother Börte had been captured by Merkits before he was born, leaving an air of doubt around the true identity of his father. Chinggis, to his credit, always treated Jochi as fully legitimate, and indeed up until 1221, in the opinion of some scholars, appears to have been grooming him as his primary heir. However, the falling out between Jochi and Chagatai over the siege of Gurganj, and Chagatai's apparent refusal to accept Jochi as anything but a “Merkit bastard,” as attributed to him in the Secret History of the Mongols, left Chinggis with  the realization that should Jochi become Khan, it would only lead to war between the brothers. And hence, the decision to make Ögedai the designated heir.       It has often been speculated that Jochi's massive patrimony was essentially a means to keep him and Chagatai as far apart as possible,and appeasing Jochi once he was excluded from the throne.  Following the conquest of Khwarezm, Jochi seems to have taken well to the western steppe being his territory, the grasslands between the Ural and Irtysh Rivers. Juzjani, writing around 1260, writes of Jochi falling in love with these lands, believing them to be the finest in the world. Some later, pro-Toluid sources portray Jochi then spending the last years of his life doing nothing but hunting and drinking in these lands, but this seems to have been aimed at discrediting his fitness. Rather he likely spent this time consolidating and gradually pushing west his new realm, past the Aral Sea towards the Ural River, while his primary camp was along the Irtysh. Though effectively nothing is known of Jochi's administration, we can regard this period as the true founding of what became the Jochid ulus, and eventually the Golden Horde. Though he died between 1225 and 1227, either of illness, a hunting accident or poisoned by his father, Chinggis immediately confirmed upon Jochi's many offspring -at least 14 sons- their rights to their father's lands. And Chinggis, or perhaps Ögedai, made Jochi's second son Batu the head of the lineage. It was then that the division of the Jochid lands into two wings under Orda and Batu may have been first implemented.        By the start of Ögedai's reign, the western border of the Mongol Empire  extended past the Ural River, and Mongol armies were attacking the Volga Bulghars.  While we do not have much information on it, we may presume a level of involvement on the part of Batu and his brothers. Of course, in the second half of the 1230s Ögedai ordered the great invasion that overran the western steppe. Starting from the Ural River, within 5 years the Mongol Empire was extended some 3,000 kilometres westwards to the borders of Hungary. Whereas previously the urban area of the Jochid lands was restricted to the Khwarezm Delta and the scattered steppe settlements, now it included the cities of the Rus' principalities, Volga Bulghars, other Volga communities, and the Crimean peninsula. All in addition to the western half of the great Eurasian steppe, and the now subdued Cuman-Qipchaq peoples. By 1242, Batu was arguably the single most powerful individual in the Mongol Empire. Enjoying the rich grasslands along the Volga between the Black and Caspian Seas, Batu created a permanent capital, Sarai. Much like the imperial capital of Qaraqorum, Sarai served as a base to collect tribute, receive embassies, and house the administration and records, while Batu and the other Jochid princes continued to nomadize. The newly conquered territories were quickly incorporated in the Mongol tax system, and the Rus' principalities began to see Mongol basqaqs and darughachi come to collect the Khan's due.       But Batu was an ambitious man. There was clearly an understanding that the Jochids were granted the west of Asia as theirs, and he took this quite literally. As the Mongol Empire incorporated Iran, the Caucasus and Anatolia over the 1230s through 40s, Batu ensured that Jochid land rights were not just respected, but expanded. The administration in these regions was picked either from Batu's men, or from his consultation, such as Baiju Noyan, the commander of the Caucasian tamma forces and who brought the Rumi Seljuqs under Mongol rule.    In the turmoil following Ögedai's death, Batu extended his hold over western Asia. Naturally, this put him on a collision course with the Central Government. When Ögedai's widow, Törögene tried to hunt down her political rivals, such as the head of the Central Asia Secretariat Mas'ud Beg, Batu gave shelter to him. When her son Güyük took the throne, Batu did not attend his quriltai in person, putting off any meeting due to, Batu claimed, the severe gout he suffered from preventing his travel. Batu and Güyük had been rivals ever since the great western campaign, where Güyük had insulted Batu's leadership. Güyük hoped to put a cap on the decentralization of power which had occurred during the last years of his father's reign and during his mother's regency, and showed a willingness to execute imperial princes, such as the last of Chinggis Khan's surviving brothers, Temüge. When rumour came to Batu that Güyük was planning a massive new campaign to subdue the west, Batu must have suspected that Güyük planned on bringing him to heel too; either limiting his political freedom, or outright replacing him with Batu's older brother, Orda, with whom Güyük was on good terms with.    The news of Güyük's advance came from Sorqaqtani Beki, the widow of Tolui and sister of one of Jochi's most important wives. Sources like William of Rubruck have Batu preemptively poison Güyük in spring 1248, thus avoiding civil war. Batu and Sorqaqtani then promptly had many of Güyük's favourites executed and, in a quriltai in Batu's territory, had her son Möngke declared Khan of Khans in 1250, before an official ceremony in Mongolia the next year. The relationship was an effective one. In being key supporters for Möngke's otherwise illegal election, Jochid land rights were confirmed across the empire. Transoxania was cleared of Chagatayids and handed over the Jochids, Georgia confirmed for Batu's younger brother Berke, and travellers who passed through the empire in these years like William of Rubruck basically have the empire divided between Batu and Möngke. Most of western Asia, both north and south of the Caucasus, was overseen by Batu and his men. When Batu died around 1255, the Jochids enjoyed a preeminence second only to the Great Khan himself. The special place of the Jochid leader was recognized by numerous contemporary sources, and it is notable that while the rest of the empire was divided into the great branch secretariats, that the Jochid lands were not placed into one until late in Möngke's reign, and there is little indication it was ever properly established before Jochid independence.    However, despite even Möngke recognizing Batu's power, as a part of his wider centralizing efforts he reminded Batu of the leash on him. Batu's interactions with William of Rubruck indicate that Batu saw his power to conduct foreign diplomacy was limited; the Jochid lands were not exempted from Möngke's empire-wide censuses, and when Möngke demanded Batu provide troops for Hülegü's campaigns against the Nizari Ismailis and Baghdad, Batu duly complied. During Batu's lifetime it was the name of the Great Khan who continued to be minted on coinage in the Jochid lands, and Rus' princes still had to receive yarliqs, or confirmation, not from Batu but from Qaraqorum. And in 1257, Möngke ordered the Jochid lands to be incorporated into a new Secretariat, and thus bring them better under the control of the Central Government. There is no indication from the sources that Batu or his successors resisted Möngke in any capacity in these efforts   Following Batu's death, Möngke promptly ratified Batu's son Sartaq as his successor, but as Sartaq returned from Qaraqorum, he died under mysterious circumstances; in a few sources, the blame falls onto his uncles, Berke and Berkechir. Sartaq's son or brother Ilagchi was made Khan under the regency of Batu's widow Boraqchin Khatun, but soon both were dead. Though Ilagchi's cause of death is unmentioned, for Boraqchin the Mamluk sources note that Berke had her tried and executed for treason. Still, for Sartaq and Ilagchi the tendency for Mongol princes to die at inopportune times can't be forgotten, and Berke may have simply reacted to a favourable circumstance.  The fact that he stood with the most to gain from their deaths made him the likely scapegoat even to contemporary writers, even if he happened to actually be innocent of the matter. Much like how Batu may or may not have poisoned Güyük, the deaths are a little too convenient for the relevant Jochid princes to be easily dismissed.   Between 1257 and 1259, possibly waiting for Möngke to begin his Song campaign and be unable to interfere, Berke became the head of the Jochid ulus. As the aqa of the Jochids, that is, the senior member of the line of Jochi, he did this with the approval of his fellow Jochid princes and military leaders. But there is no indication that Berke ever received support from Qaraqorum for his enthronement. Given that Chinggis Khan had confirmed upon Batu the right to rule, the shift from brother-to-brother, though common in steppe successions, was still an extreme matter.   Part of the success of Berke's ascension may have been achieved through an agreement with Batu's family. According to the fourteenth century Mamluk author al-Mufaddal, the childless Berke designated Batu's grandson Möngke-Temür as his heir. Some historians like Roman Pochekaev have suggested that Berke's enthronement may have been leveraged as part of an agreement; that Berke, as the most senior member of the Jochids, could take the throne following the death of Ilagchi Khan. But, the prestige of Batu made his line the designated leaders of the White Horde. Without his own children, on Berke's death the throne would fall back to the line of Batu, under his grandson Möngke-Temür.  And so it would remain among Batu's descendants until the 1360s, almost 100 years after Berke's death.    As you likely know, Berke was the first Mongol prince known to convert to Islam. The exact time of his conversion varies in the sources, but a convincing argument has been put forward by professor István Vásáry. Essentially, that Berke, likely through a Muslim mid-wife that raised him (and not a Khwarezmian Princess, as sometimes suggested) was either in his youth a convert to Islam, or at least extremely influenced by it. By the time of the 1251 quriltai in Mongolia which confirmed Möngke as Great Khan, Berke is attested in independent sources writing at the same time to have sought to Islamize the event; getting the meat to be slaughtered for the feast to be halal, according to Juvaini, and trying to get Möngke to swear on the Quran, according to Juzjani. On his return from Mongolia, he was contacted by a Sufi shaykh in Bukhara, Sayf ad-Din Bakharzi, who is mentioned in a number of sources in connection with Berke's conversion. Having heard of a prominent Mongol prince's interest in Islam, the Shaykh invited Berke to Bukhara, and there gave him a formal education in the religion, leading to Berke to make a more official declaration of his faith likely around 1252. Berke's conversion was accompanied by the conversion of his wives, a number of other princes, members of his family and his generals, though all evidence suggests there was only limited spread of the faith among the rank and file Mongols at the time.    As Khan, Berke sought to ensure Jochid hegemony on frontier regions. His troops crushed a newly independent Ruthenian Kingdom in Galicia, and in 1259 his armies under Burundai Noyan led a devastating raid into Poland. Possibly in this time Bulgaria began paying tribute to the Jochids as well. Berke demanded the submission of the Hungarian King, Béla IV, and offered a marriage alliance between their families. As Hungary was spared any damage in Burundai's 1259 campaign, it has been suggested that Béla undertook a nominal submission to Berke, sending tribute and gifts in order to spare Hungary from another assault.    In Khwarezm and the Caucasus Berke continued to exercise influence. But tensions were fraying with his cousin Hülegü, who in 1258 sacked Baghdad and killed the ‘Abbasid Caliph. Obviously, as a Muslim Berke was not keen to learn of the Caliph's death. According to the contemporary author Juzjani, writing from distant Delhi, Berke had been in contact with the Caliph in the years preceding the siege. Much of Berke's anger though, as gleaned from his letters to the Mamluks and the writing of Rashid al-Din, was at Hülegü's failure to consult with Berke as the senior member of the family, and as the master of western Asia. Though Jochid troops partook in the siege, and we have no indication from the sources that Berke tried to prevent them taking part, it seems Hülegü did not reach out to Berke regarding the fate of Baghdad, or in the dispensation of loot.   Berke was greatly angered at this, and relations only worsened over the following years, once Hülegü killed the Jochid princes in his retinue on charges of sorcery; it just so happened that these same prince had previously annoyed Hülegü through attempting to enforce Jochid land rights over Iran and Iraq. The final straw came in early 1260 once Hülegü learned of Möngke's death. Hülegü by then had already set up in the pastures of Azerbaijan, land Berke considered his. As he learned of the fighting between his brothers Khubilai and Ariq Böke which broke out later that year, Hülegü decided to use the interregnum to seize the pastures of the Caucasus, as well as all of the land between the Amu Darya and Syria, for himself. Berke's officials in these lands were driven out or killed. With no Great Khan to intercede, Berke felt forced to resort to violence to avenge his fallen kinsmen and retake his lands; in 1262 he went to war with Hülegü, and so did the Mongol Empire in the west split asunder.   We've covered the Berke-Hülegü war in detail in a previous episode, so we don't need to repeat ourselves here. The end result was both Berke and Hülegü dead by 1266, and the frontier between them set along the Kura River, where Hülegü's son and successor Abaqa built a wall to keep out the Jochids- though the jury is out on whether he made them pay for it. The conflict set the border between the newly emerged Ilkhanate and the Jochid state for the next century, and the Jochids would not forget the sting of losing this territory to the Ilkhanids for that time either.    On Berke's death his coffin was carried back to Sarai.  Berke's reign, though much shorter than Batu's, had been a decisive one. For not only did it determine many aspects of the Golden Horde's diplomacy and character, notably antagonism to the Ilkhans, a predatory view to the Chagatayids who in the 1260s retook control of Transoxiana and killed Berke's officials, and a cool, distant view to Khubilai Khaan's legitimacy. He helped begin the alliance with the Mamluk Sultans, which never materialized into any actual military cooperation but uneased the Ilkhans and allowed the Mamluks to continue to purchase Qipchaq slaves from the steppe. This alliance too would survive essentially until the dissolution of the Golden Horde at the start of the fifteenth century.    But it also seeded the kernel for eventual islamization of the Khanate, a slow process which would only be fulfilled some sixty years later under Özbeg Khan. While their father was the true founder of the Jochid ulus in the 1200s, both Batu and Berke could argue for this title. Batu posthumously became the Sain Khan, the Good Khan, while to the Mamluks the Golden Horde rulers ascended to the throne of Berke. With his death, it seems at Sarai a quriltai was held to confirm the enthronement of his grand-nephew, Möngke-Temür, the first true independent ruler of what we can call the Golden Horde, and subject of our new episode, so be sure to subscribe to the Kings and Generals Podcast to follow. If you enjoyed this and would like to help us continue bringing you great content, consider supporting us on patreon a www.patreon.com/kingsandgenerals, or giving us a like, comment and review on the podcast catcher of your choice, and share with your friends, it helps immensely. This episode was researched and written by our series historian, Jack Wilson. I'm your host David, and we'll catch you on the next one.   

Go Chuck Yourself
Chris & Erin Versus ”Chuck Versus The Baby”

Go Chuck Yourself

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 64:18


We know our last, rather lengthy episode worked up quite an appetite, so, this week, we're following Team Bartowski to Hungary and whetting our whistle with "Chuck Versus The Baby"! While Chris questions the reliability of the CIA, Erin makes a long-term promise to listeners, and an old friend returns with a very special message. Whether you're a long-time listener or a Generation GCY newbie, tune in for creepy lullabies, Doctor Strange push attacks, and property damage by prospective homeowners who have a LOT of explaining to do…baby! "Chuck" out the complete archive of past GCY episodes at https://gochuckyourself.podbean.com/  LIKE and SUBSCRIBE wherever you get your podcasts! Follow us on Twitter and Instagram: @gochuckpodcast Email us at gochuckyourselfpodcast@gmail.com. Reddit: u/GoChuckYourselfPod Theme music: “Warm Up” by Hadokowa via freemusicarchive.org. Cover Art by Molly Gillespie @ www.mollyegillespie.com. Additional music: "Bye Bye Bye" by *NSYNC  

Orthometer
The Memorial of S. Elizabeth of Hungary.

Orthometer

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 2:28


CrabDiving Radio Podcast
CrabDiving – Fri 111921 – Nobody Is Surprised Vigilante Kyle Rittenhouse Got Away With Murder

CrabDiving Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 116:26


Nobody is surprised vigilante Kyle Rittenhouse got away with murder. Dandy right-wing loon Glenn Beck said he'd donate to murderer Kyle so the young killer could sue the crap out of corporate media. Army personnel must get the jab. An analysis of the earliest COVID 19 cases points to the Wuhan Market as the source. The Crabs played a clip of a prophetess declaring she was moving into a well-to-do community in an effort to infiltrate the rich. A MAGAT running for office blathered something about how laws contrary to the word of god should be made illegal. An opposition leader in Hungary vowed to restore his country's relationship to western alliances. Trump and Desantis have a strained relationship because Ron is stealing the spotlight and donations for the 2024 presidential election. Wanker Josh Bernstein said Biden is "probably a descendant of Satan." Mike Lindell blamed Hitler for a last-minute conspiracy to stop his Thanksgiving election reversal. Evangelical yank storm Jackson Lahmeyer said Fauci is a mass murders but dubbed Rittenhouse a hero.  

The Skeptic Zone
The Skeptic Zone #685 - 21.November.2021

The Skeptic Zone

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 60:46


0:00:00 Introduction Richard Saunders With Susan Gerbic, Rob Palmer, Michelle Bijkersma, Lara Benham and Lynden Shields. 0:05:00 The ESP We catch up with the team from the European Skeptics Podcast to congratulate them on reaching 300 episodes. The European Skeptics Podcast (The ESP) is a weekly podcast recorded in English and hosted by three skeptics from several different European countries: Andras Gabor Pinter from Hungary, Pontus Bockman from Sweden and Annika Harrison from Germany. https://theesp.eu 0:14:50 Australian Skeptics Awards for 2021 Tim Mendham presents The Fred Thornett Award - Prof Kristine Macartney The Barry Williams Media Award - Melissa Davey Jessica Singer presents The Bent Spoon Award - Craig Kelly Richard Saunders with in memoriam Michael Wolloghan Shelley Stocken Martin Hadley 0:19:00 The Book of Tim Loch Ness #2 - Tim takes a behind-the-scenes look at one of the most famous pictures of the Loch Ness monster, known as the surgeon's photograph. What is the truth behind this mysterious image? http://www.skeptics.com.au 0:29:52 Australian Skeptics Newsletter What skeptical news has caught the eye of Tim Mendham this week? Read by Adrienne Hill. http://www.skeptics.com.au 0:37:04 A Dive into a Trove A wander through the decades of digitised Australian newspapers on a search for references to Acupunture. http://www.trove.nla.gov.au Also Corona Conspiracy - Upload Images https://coronaconspiracy.cloud https://www.skepticon.org.au

SSJE Sermons
A Heavenly Treasure In A Concrete Life – Br. Sean Glenn

SSJE Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 5:24


“God comes to us where we are. God's call meets us in the concrete realities of life. Not where we think we should be; but where we actually are. And if we hold our vocational aspirations lightly, I believe that, like Blessed Elizabeth of Hungary, our treasure too will be where our heart is.” Br. Sean Glenn examines the surprising tension that can arise between our imagined vocation and the actual shape that it takes in the concrete realities of life.

Chasing Immortality
Elizabeth Bathory, aka It Gets Way, Way Worse

Chasing Immortality

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 54:11


Theunissen, Steve, and Jack Cole. Performance by Simon Whistler, Elizabeth Bathory – The ‘Blood Countess,' Biographics, 1 Nov. 2018, www.youtube.com/watch?v=3N3TSPZoY1o&lc=UgxS9zTiN2xi2FfEzel4AaABAg.Bon, Scott A. “The Unique Motives of Female Serial Killers.” Psychology Today , 24 June 2019, www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/wicked-deeds/201906/the-unique-motives-female-serial-killers.Craft, Kimberly L. "INFAMOUS LADY:THE TRUE STORY OFCOUNTESS ERZSÉBET BÁTHORY". Independent , 2009.“Elizabeth Báthory.” Serial Killers Wiki, serialkillers.wikia.org/wiki/Elizabeth_B%C3%A1thory.“Elizabeth Báthory.” Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, 2 Mar. 2021, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elizabeth_B%C3%A1thory.Fox, James Alan, and Jack Levin. “Multiple Homicide: Patterns of Serial and Mass Murder.” Crime and Justice: The University of Chicago Press, vol. 23, 1998, pp. 407–456., doi:https://www.jstor.org/stable/1147545.“Hungarian Countesses' Torturous Escapades Are Exposed.” History.com, A&E Television Networks, 13 Nov. 2009, www.history.com/this-day-in-history/bathorys-torturous-escapades-are-exposed.The Infographics Show, director. Serial Killer Who Killed Over 500 People - The Blood Countess, The Infographics Show, 2 June 2018, www.youtube.com/watch?v=hUQAEtPmxBA.Jewell, Tim. “The Macdonald Triad: Can 3 Behaviors Predict a Serial Killer?” Edited by Timothy J Legg, Healthline.com, 24 Mar. 2020, www.healthline.com/health/macdonald-triad.Kettler, Sara. “Elizabeth Bathory.” Biography.com, A&E Networks Television, 21 May 2020, www.biography.com/crime-figure/elizabeth-bathory.KYTKA. “Watch This: Bathory: Countess of Blood.” Everything Czech, 16 Nov. 2017, www.tresbohemes.com/2017/11/watch-bathory-countess-blood/#:~:text=Following%20her%20trial%2C%20one%20of,or%20bear%20her%20name%20anywhere!“The Legend of Elizabeth Báthory: The Blood Countess.” Medical Bag, 14 Jan. 2019, www.medicalbag.com/home/features/grey-matter/the-legend-of-elizabeth-bathory-the-blood-countess/.Scary Night Visit to Elizabeth Bathory's Castle, Researchers, 1 May 2017, www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Afj2siQnJM.Sharma, Pankaj. “Elizabeth Bathory: 10 Things You'll Learn About Her in Hungary.” TheTravel, 3 Nov. 2019, www.thetravel.com/elizabeth-bathory-history-education-hungary-travel/.Shelat, Amit E. “Muscle Function Loss: MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia.” MedlinePlus, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 4 Feb. 2020, medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003190.htm.Sherman, Elisabeth. “Did Elizabeth Bathory, The ‘Blood Countess," Actually Deserve Her Nickname?” All That's Interesting, All That's Interesting, 25 Mar. 2020, allthatsinteresting.com/elizabeth-bathory-true-story#:~:text=According%20to%20the%20reports%20and,feast%20on%20their%20exposed%20skin%3B.Slovakia From Above, director. Cachtice Castle - Ruins of Cachtice Castle - The Bloody Lady of Čachtice, Slovakia From Above , 25 Feb. 2018, www.youtube.com/watch?v=1QqGernWjns.Ugc. “Ruins of Cachtice Castle.” Atlas Obscura, Atlas Obscura, 17 Nov. 2009, www.atlasobscura.com/places/ruins-cachtice-castle.White, Conan. The Countess That Bathed In The Blood Of Her Victims! . Performance by Chris Kane, The Countess Who Bathed In The Blood Of Her Victims, Simple History, 8 Oct. 2020, www.youtube.com/watch?v=cdwVmbhCvs8. https://www.abc15.com/lifestyle/blood-facials-what-are-they-are-why-do-people-get-themhttps://shareably.net/bizarre-beauty-trends-you-wont-believe-real/https://www.elle.com/beauty/makeup-skin-care/news/a14931/kim-kardashians-vampire-facial/https://www.google.com/search?q=what+is+a+dermapen&source=lnms&tbm=shop&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjrsNGtgOjwAhVVHs0KHWfXDjcQ_AUoAXoECAEQAw&biw=1440&bih=732

Stories From Women Who Walk
60 Seconds for Story Prompt Friday: Whidbey Coffee & a Cinderella Mocha?

Stories From Women Who Walk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 2:00


Coming to you from Whidbey Island, Washington this is 60 Seconds for Story Prompt Friday with questions carefully chosen to help you collect stories in the oral tradition or spark your own writing. Either way, you'll say, "Thanks for the memories."Hello to you listening in Szolnok, Hungary!Coming to you from Whidbey Island, Washington this is 60 Seconds for Story Prompt Friday.Our local Whidbey Coffee dive-thru kiosk recently offered a Cinderella Mocha. I asked the coffee barista if the drink came with a glass slipper and a handsome prince. Not anymore, she said. We used to do that but we got so many returns. The glass slipper didn't fit, wasn't comfortable, too easily broken... And the handsome prince? Those were the worst! Seems all they wanted to do was sit on the couch and dream about their kingdom to come!But, she said, leaning out the window and giving me a wink, we still add a sprinkle of fairy dust on top of the whipped cream so you can write your own happy ending to the Cinderella Mocha Fairy Tale.Story Prompt: When have you dreamt a Happily Ever After ending to an episode of your life? Write that story!Practical Tip: The magic of stories is also in the sharing. If you wish share your story with someone or something.   All that matters is you have a story.60 Seconds is your daily dose of hope, imagination, wisdom, stories, practical tips, and general riffing on this and that. This is the place to thrive together. Come for the stories - stay for the magic. Speaking of magic, I hope you'll subscribe, follow, share a nice shout out on your social media or podcast channel of choice, including Android, and join us next time! You're invited to stop by the website and subscribe to stay current with Diane, her journeys, her guests, as well as creativity, imagination, walking, stories, camaraderie, and so much more: Quarter Moon Story ArtsStories From Women Who Walk Production TeamPodcaster: Diane F Wyzga & Quarter Moon Story ArtsMusic: Mer's Waltz from Crossing the Waters by Steve Schuch & Night Heron MusicAll content and image © 2019 - Present: for credit & attribution Quarter Moon Story Arts

Haymarket Books Live
The Austrian Revolution: Book Launch and Discussion w/ Mike Davis & more

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 82:14


Join us for a discussion of Otto Bauer's magisterial work, The Austrian Revolution. Austro-Marxism is best known for its municipal-policy reforms symbolized by ‘Red Vienna'―a vital part of the left's intellectual and historical heritage. Otto Bauer's book, available in English for the first time, tells the story of the Austrian Revolution with all the immediacy of a central participant, and all the insight of a brilliant and original theorist. This book charts the disintegration of Austria-Hungary's multinational empire and the revolutionary wave that led to short-lived council republics in Hungary and Bavaria. Along with a chronology of these revolutionary events, Bauer sets out his original views on the socialist transformation of capitalist society. His ideas are relevant to a multitude of contemporary strategies and movements, including Right to the City initiatives and the experiences of progressive municipal governments, making his work a crucial resource for the left today. Order a copy of the book: https://www.haymarketbooks.org/books/1480-the-austrian-revolution --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Speakers: Hilary Wainwright is a British sociologist, political activist and socialist feminist. She is a founding editor of Red Pepper magazine. Mike Davis is the author of City of Quartz, Late Victorian Holocausts, Buda's Wagon, and Planet of Slums. He is the recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship and the Lannan Literary Award. Walter Baier is a Vienna based economist and co-ordinator of the network transform! europe. He was National Chairman of the Communist Party of Austria (KPÖ) from 1994 to 2006. Dunja Larise (moderator) lectures on political theory and empirical studies of international politics. She holds a PhD in political theory from the University of Vienna. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/BAB4i2Fwt5U Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

Casting Through Ancient Greece
41: The Greek Periphery, Thrace

Casting Through Ancient Greece

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 35:09


North East of Greece would be a land seen as wild and untamed stretching from the modern-day nation of Hungary to the Ukraine, and then to the Black Sea and Aegean. The Greeks would view the people that inhabited these lands as barbarians, much the same way they did to other cultures that differed from theirs. Though these people that they would call the Thracians, seemed that much more uncivilised compared to the other barbarians they had encountered.Although the Greeks would call them Thracian, a united people they were not. these people would be a lose collection of tribes with a shared common culture. Herodotus would say of the Thracians; “If they could all be united under one ruler and think the same way, they would, in my opinion, be the most invincible and strongest of all nations. But that is impossible; it will never happen, since their weakness I that they are incapable of uniting and agreeing.”The Thracians would be a result of earlier Neolithic cultures that had formed in the Balkans thousands of years earlier. The Thracian identity that would come to describe their shared culture would be a result of these indigenous Balkan cultures interacting with the numerous Indo-European migrations that would take place as the Bronze Age developed.Thrace would enter into the Greeks memory as far back as the Trojan War through Homers epic poem the Iliad. Though it wouldn't be until the 7th and 6th centuries where Thrace would truly enter the Greek periphery. Greek colonies would begin to dot the Thracian coast lines, where trade of goods and ideas would take place in both times of peace and times of tension. Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/castingthroughancientgreece)

Carroll Campus Ministry Podcast
St. Elizabeth of Hungary

Carroll Campus Ministry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 6:10


November 17, 2021. Fr. Bart's homily at Wednesday evening mass on the Memorial of St. Elizabeth of Hungary. Enjoy! Gospel Lk 19:11-28 While people were listening to Jesus speak, he proceeded to tell a parable because he was near Jerusalem and they thought that the Kingdom of God would appear there immediately. So he said, “A nobleman went off to a distant country to obtain the kingship for himself and then to return. He called ten of his servants and gave them ten gold coins and told them, ‘Engage in trade with these until I return.' His fellow citizens, however, despised him and sent a delegation after him to announce, ‘We do not want this man to be our king.' But when he returned after obtaining the kingship, he had the servants called, to whom he had given the money, to learn what they had gained by trading. The first came forward and said, ‘Sir, your gold coin has earned ten additional ones.' He replied, ‘Well done, good servant! You have been faithful in this very small matter; take charge of ten cities.' Then the second came and reported, ‘Your gold coin, sir, has earned five more.' And to this servant too he said, ‘You, take charge of five cities.' Then the other servant came and said, ‘Sir, here is your gold coin; I kept it stored away in a handkerchief, for I was afraid of you, because you are a demanding man; you take up what you did not lay down and you harvest what you did not plant.' He said to him, ‘With your own words I shall condemn you, you wicked servant. You knew I was a demanding man, taking up what I did not lay down and harvesting what I did not plant; why did you not put my money in a bank? Then on my return I would have collected it with interest.' And to those standing by he said, ‘Take the gold coin from him and give it to the servant who has ten.' But they said to him, ‘Sir, he has ten gold coins.' He replied, ‘I tell you, to everyone who has, more will be given, but from the one who has not, even what he has will be taken away. Now as for those enemies of mine who did not want me as their king, bring them here and slay them before me.'” After he had said this, he proceeded on his journey up to Jerusalem.

Let's THINK about it
Step 50: The Hero Trendency

Let's THINK about it

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 27:11


The Hero Story Perhaps there has always been an effort towards optimization, and it generally looks like technology. When speaking of self optimization, or overcoming , we are speaking of the hero's journey popularized by Joseph Campbell. Campbell spoke a lot of the parallels of the external journey and the internal journey… the external circumstances gave the individual the opportunity to react and grow.In the 50's-70's there was a wave of belief in unlocking human potential through psycho-science-type things like intensive practice hypnosis and subliminal training… or just LSD. Some of these practices were previously used in religious awakening, but we wrapped them up under the guise of science, and then they were abused by programs like MK Ultra.During this time, people thought of the human as a blank slate that could be written, molded or shaped. (optimized?) An example of this is Laszlo Polgar, born in Hungary, and with an idea about raising children, ended up getting married and having his first child in 1969. He and his wife Clara, raised children around the idea that they could create a genius through specific narrow focus. They had three children, the Polgar sisters, who all excelled at chess, reaching amazing heights, and were declared National Treasures. In fiction, chess is too boring, so the blank slates are in the genre of assassin Killers: examples are Kill Bill, Atomic Blonde, or Leon the Professional where they are trained, usually for revenge or duty. On the darker side you have children raised by handlers or governments as weapons, like in John Wick, Black Widow, Hannah, or Kate. So what if instead of being a badass with Kalashnikovs and stilettos you're a phenom with golf clubs? This is the Tiger Woods story, a history of brutal authoritarian parenting generating mental resiliency and overcoming. A lot of success, but a lot of trauma.Physically, many of us are not capable of such heroic heights: we cannot optimize enough to overcome our genetics, despite how much protein we consume. Enter science to the rescue as the mythical augmented man: Perhaps the Six Million Dollar Man or the darker side of Robocop, more of an automaton cyborg. Talk about efficiency: just turn the man into a machine. We are culturally conditioned to accept this is the way of the future as far back as cartoons like Inspector Gadget: the bumbling doofus with all sorts of extensions and rockets and wheels that both saved the day and naturally lead to slapstick pratfalls.Backtrack: This takes us back to an earlier podcast, step 28, in which I mentioned Henri Bergson, and his summary of what makes something funny, which is “the mechanical encrusted upon the living.”Of course, the real warning: when we lean too heavily into external power, technology, optimization (or even habits and productivity), we cease to be human in a certain way. We trade in the hard path of “overcoming” for the easy path of instant power, and in that substitution, we lose something. Yet, an alternate form optimization technology exists: Arcane Magics. I'm going to suggest, this path of learning the secrets of Arcane magics of habit stacking and personal productivity is the most alluring current path to be super, to achieve your potential. From Fiction to Fact While I have been talking about science through fictional stories, in many ways it has stepped into reality.You want to see something insane: look up clips from the 1920's Olympics compared to todays Olympics: Over 100 years the science of optimization and dedicated practice works… physically at least… until they turn into that unhinged balance beam killer super model from “The Spy who dumped me.” In America, we seem to live in a society that links success and progress and achievement with wealth and appearance. This is the manifest destiny of self-actualization woven into the Protestant work ethic, capitalist, American Mythos… and technology is often the vehicle and the key.But dedication to science and technology is problematically deterministic and class eugenics can spring up from it, as played out in the movie Gattaca. The secret to tricking an unjust technocracy? Keep secrets, and work harder than everyone else.But in this age of the internet we need to know exactly how: what was his diet? What drugs was he on? Boxers or briefs?And this is the trap we are in today: there are so many paths laid out before us by the millionaires and self-hacking crowds that we have a myriad of paths to successful optimization. Yet when someone, like in Gattaca, has an overpowering, all-consuming goal to be more… or in Kill Bill to kill more… we find their dedication and focus grants results. This can be called “dedicated practice” and myths of a 10,000 hour rule to mastery circulate around it. The beauty of it is that maybe we don't need neural implants and bionic arms. Maybe the new magics are habit stacks, routines, the mystical arcana of time-blocking and flow state. The only thing left is to find an all-consuming, overpowering desire that we can shape our life around… and that is not so much hero stuff, as a very old question of all of mankind: what is my purpose? What is my mission?  The Superman, the Ubermensch, Nietzsche How can we do an episode on superheroes, and overcoming without at least bringing up Friedrich Nietzsche. He popularized the concept of Übermensch or Overman or Beyondman… now most commonly seen as Superman.(By the way, this concept is affiliated with the Nazi party due to Nietzsche's sister misusing his texts.)The Overman is really a man of overcoming… and to confuse it with physical power as the Superman warrior is quite superficial. In our society many people appear superhero, overcoming physicality, but staying in vanity. The hero's journey is ultimately a journey towards self-integration, towards wholeness, and as Jung said “individuation” through the unification of opposites.In Nietzsche's book thus spoke zarathustra the prophet Zarathustra, who comes down from his mountaintop to share his knowledge with masses is spurned by the people. He attempts to tell them of the Ubermensch, but they reject this hard life of overcoming. All spiteful and disappointed, Zarathustra decides to prophesy the disgusting concept of Last man: a lazy decadent person, born of a civilization incapable of standing up to challenge or hardship, only interested in comfort. The last man takes no risks, preferring security. This is the soft and secure rationalist who has forgotten how to dream and everything the Ubermensch would do appears as illness, or madness.Intentional hardship? Are you crazy? So, how do we push back against the zombie conformity of security that seems so rational? It seems – indeed – to be illogical to try. Isn't it in our best interest to protect ourselves and stay comfortably in the middle of the herd? Yes, for survival maybe, but what about thriving? What about self-actualization?One way is to find something external to ourselves that is more important, someway we can help: A hero uses the challenge, the tension and hardship, to manifest creativity, to innovate. Are scientists and technologists our superheroes, the innovators or our time? How about the optimizers, the overcomers?  The guys and gals hitting flow state, or testing intermittent fasting: testing, and testing, and suffering, and sharing all this data with us. Are they climbing the mountain and coming back down with the mountain-top insights? Perhaps. But what if their motivation is internet rewards, or just a whole bucket full of hacks? That would be a less than noble goal.Experimentation can happen culturally, too. Can we not appreciate the heroism of the alternate lifestyle?The real challenge, the wisdom handed down to us through some religion, philosophy, and myths is to blend all opposites: overcome and move beyond dualities of good and evil, conscious and unconscious, spiritual and earthly… this is how you become an individual.Most of us are what is called a “dividual”, not undivided, as an “individual.” We are the divided self. Fragmented. We have not overcome or transcended, or as Hegel would say “subsumed.” Sure, we might be fit, we may look like the image of the superhero, but is maintaining appearances more like the act of the lastman? I am not saying they cannot coincide, but the motivation is a vital distinction to understanding conformity and overcoming.What I do know, is we -in our society- are really good at superficial appearances… placing the signifier before the signified.  The point, I think, is that to become a real human, a whole and integrated self, is a harder and a more heroic a journey than scientific shortcutting or following formulas that guarantee results. Sure, science/tech is great and helpful, but it shouldn't do the overcoming for you: you have to do that. Also, the hero is often portrayed alone, the monk ascending the mountain to find enlightenment or Superman in his Fortress of Solitude after keeping secrets, but you do not have to do this alone. Sure, you will have to work and push back against mindless conformity, but take the journey with others and avoid the solipsistic individuality of the shallow villain. 

Inside Europe | Deutsche Welle
Inside Europe 18.11.2021

Inside Europe | Deutsche Welle

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 55:00


The EU positions itself for crisis intervention, violence and solidarity at the EU's borders, Austria gets tough on vaccine avoidance and France's Louvre museum battles islamophobia with art. Also on Inside Europe: why gas is at the centre of the EU's latest stand-off with Russia, questions over cash for influence in the UK, government propoganda in Hungary and dangerous driving in Italy.

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
Parsing Immigration Policy: Border Crisis: A European Perspective (#30)

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 30:50


Summary More than a million migrants entered Europe in 2015 triggering changes in national immigration policies and in public support for the securing of border and the limiting of migration. Fast forward six years, the United States has just set an all-time annual record for the number of illegal migrants apprehended at the Southwest border, […]

Horrible History
Episode 53 - Nyírbátor, Hungary & San Francisco, CA (Transylvania: A Real Place)

Horrible History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 75:39


First, Rachel heads to Nyírbátor, Hungary to tell the tale of Countess Elizabeth Báthory de Ecsed - a Hungarian noblewoman and purported serial killer & sadist that bathed in blood to stay young. Then, Emily honors Transgender Day of Remembrance (Nov. 20) by telling us the history of San Fransisco's brutality against trans people and the Compton's Cafeteria Riot of 1966, the first act of resistance against police brutality (even before Stonewall). If you are a member of the trans community and need support, several resources listed below: Trans Lifeline: US - (877) 565-8860Canada - (877) 330-6366The Trevor Project - https://www.thetrevorproject.org/get-help/  ACLU - https://www.aclu.org/ National Center for Transgender Equality - https://transequality.org/Allies of Trans Individuals, here are some great resources for you: GLAAD - https://www.glaad.org/transgender/allies Human Rights Campaign - https://www.hrc.org/resources/be-an-ally-support-trans-equalityLearn more about Horrible History, contact us and check out our new merch store at: www.horriblehistorypodcast.comSources:GLAAD - TDORThe GuardianAdvocateNPRBBCStudents for ChangeScreaming Queens documentary All That's InterestingSyFyHistory HitWikipediaTrip AdvisorNyirbator CsekokavehazHello Travel Europe Between East and West Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/horriblehistory)

This Date in Weather History
1421: Storm on European coastline causes 10k fatalities

This Date in Weather History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 2:49


On November 18, 1421, a storm in the North Sea slammed into the European coastline. Over the next several days, approximately 10,000 people in what is now the Netherlands died in the resulting floods. History.com tells us the lowlands of the Netherlands near the North Sea were densely populated at the time, despite their known vulnerability to flooding. Small villages and a couple of cities had sprung up in what was known as the Grote Waard region. The residents had built dikes throughout the area to keep the water at bay, but fatal floods still struck in 1287, 1338, 1374, 1394 and 1396. After each, residents fixed the dikes and moved right back in. Even the St. Elisabeth's flood of November 1404 (named after the November 19 feast day for St. Elisabeth of Hungary), in which hundreds died, could not dissuade the residents from living in the region. Seventeen years later, at the same time of year, another strong storm struck the North Sea. The resulting storm surge caused waves to burst hundreds of dikes all over Grote Waard. The city of Dort was devastated and 20 whole villages were wiped off the map. The flooding was so extensive this time that the dikes were not fully rebuilt until 1500. This meant that much of Zeeland and Holland–the area that now makes up the Netherlands–was flooded for decades following the storm. The town of Dordrecht was permanently separated from the mainland in the flood. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Critical Hour
Assange Suffering in Shocking Prison Conditions; US Diplomats Boycott China's Olympics

The Critical Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 116:13


Shane Stranahan, co-host of Fault Lines, joins us to discuss US foreign policy. A recent study shows that the US and its allies are causing a worldwide decay of democracies through attacks on voting rights, judicial independence, and freedom of the press. According to the report, "36% of all democratic "backsliding" has happened in the U.S. and U.S.-aligned countries, including Turkey, Hungary, and Israel."Jim Kavanagh, writer at thepolemicist.net and CounterPunch, joins us to discuss Julian Assange. Two unannounced inspections at Belmarsh Prison in London revealed that the embattled publisher is living in unbearable conditions. The inspections found that the deplorable conditions are not compatible with an inmate maintaining a reasonable state of mental health and that precautions to prevent self-harm are almost nonexistent.Nick Davies, peace activist and author of "Blood on Our Hands: The American Invasion of Iraq," joins us to discuss the Pentagon budget. Senator Bernie Sanders (I-VT) has said that the US needs to get its priorities straight as he plans for a no vote on the latest military budget. Also, retired US Army Major Danny Sjursen argues that the US empire is pinching pennies for its citizens and opening the financial floodgates for the military-industrial complex.K.J. Noh, peace activist, writer, and teacher, joins us to discuss China. President Xi Jinping has identified 3 basic principles and 4 priorities for the Asian world power. After he met with Biden, the Chinese leader made it clear that the US must turn his words of moderation into action. Scott Ritter, former UN weapon inspector in Iraq, joins us to discuss the likelihood of the US joining in a military engagement to support the Neo-Nazi government of Ukraine and/or the island of Taiwan. Patrick Lawrence argues that the people of the US would not be willing to accept the losses involved in such acts of folly and that the US government is well aware of that reality.John Burris, civil rights attorney, joins us to discuss two major US court cases. The jury continues to deliberate on the Kyle Rittenhouse case, and the European Union is calling on Oklahoma to commute the execution of Julius Jones. A petition for the commutation of Jones's execution has garnered over 6 million signatures.James Carey, editor/co-owner at Geopoliticsalert.com, joins us to discuss Israel. In a move that some observers view as propaganda, Israeli security personnel are drilling for a potential "dirty bomb" attack ostensibly by Hezbollah. Also, Defense Minister Benny Gantz continues to ramp up hawkish rhetoric against Iran as he claims that Israel is ready to go to war with the Islamic Republic.Ricardo Vaz, political analyst and editor at VenezuelAnalysis.com, joins us to discuss Venezuela. The US State Department is again condemning the Venezuelan elections before they occur. Venezuelan President Nicholas Maduro lambasted the regime change neocons, stating that “It is shameful how the Department of State intends to interfere in the internal affairs of Venezuela.”

Simple English News Daily
Thursday 18th November 2021. World News. Today: Sudan protests, Ethiopia detentions, Greece trials, Hungary asylum law, Afghanistan assets,

Simple English News Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 7:02


World News in 7 minutes. Tuesday 16th November 2021.Transcript at: send7.org/transcripts Today: Sudan protests, Ethiopia detentions, Greece trials, Hungary asylum law, Afghanistan assets, India smog, Pakistan voting, US booster vaccines, Chile vote, Nicaragua ban, Mexico Kahlo portrait. Support SEND7: send7.org/supportSend your opinion or experience by email to podcast@send7.org or send an audio message at send7.org for us to broadcast. With Juliet MartinSEND7 (Simple English News Daily in 7 minutes) tells news in intermediate English. Every day, listen to the most important stories in the world in slow, clear English. This easy English news podcast is perfect for English learners, people with English as a second language, and people who want to hear a fast news update from around the world. Learn English through hard topics, but simple grammar. SEND7 covers all news including politics, business, natural events and human rights. For more information visit send7.org/contact

Father Simon Says
Father Simon Says – November 17, 2021 – Talent Show!

Father Simon Says

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 51:08


Father talks about the history of St. Elizabeth of Hungary 2 Mc 7:1, 20-31 Father talks about the Mexican Cristeros and exhorts us to have the bravery to live well now. Lk 19:11-28 Father explains how much the talent was worth Mass Hysteria: Father discusses sacred music in the USA Letters: Are the Patriarchs in […]

I Thirst (John 19:28) with Father Khoi
Homily: St. Elizabeth of Hungary - 2021 #ithirstus

I Thirst (John 19:28) with Father Khoi

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 6:16


#Catholic #homily by Fr. Khoi V. Tran, given at Vandenberg Space Force Base Chapel, California, on Wednesday, November 17, 2021 — an "I Thirst" (John 19:28) #podcast #ithirstus

The Terry & Jesse Show
17 Nov 21 – Father John Lovell, Coalition of Canceled Priests

The Terry & Jesse Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 51:11


  Today's Topics: 1) Gospel -Lk 19:11-28 - Why did you not put my money in a bank... Bishop Sheen quote of the day Saint Elizabeth of Hungary, pray for us 2, 3, 4) Interview - Father John Lovell from Coalition of Canceled Priests

Divine Office Liturgy of the Hours  The Maine Catholic Guide
Nov 17, 2021 Liturgy of the Hours - Mem. St. Elizabeth of Hungary- Morning Prayer

Divine Office Liturgy of the Hours The Maine Catholic Guide

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 10:18


St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology
How to Tell a Person's Character - Memorial of St. Elizabeth of Hungary

St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 14:56


The St. Paul Center's daily scripture reflections from the Mass for the Memorial of St. Elizabeth of Hungary by Dr. John Bergsma. Elizabeth of Hungary, Married Woman, Religious Obligatory Memorial First Reading: Second Maccabees 7: 1, 20-31 Responsorial Psalm: Psalms 17: 1bcd, 5-6, 8b and 15 Alleluia: John 15: 16 Gospel: Luke 19: 11-28 Learn more about the Mass at www.stpaulcenter.com

Christian History Almanac
Wednesday, November 17, 2021

Christian History Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 6:15


Today on the Almanac, we reflect on the tale of St. Elizabeth of Hungary—an upside-down Cinderella story. #OTD #1517 #churchhistory — SHOW NOTES are available: https://www.1517.org/podcasts/the-christian-history-almanac GIVE BACK: Support the work of 1517 today CONTACT: CHA@1517.org SUBSCRIBE: Apple Podcasts Spotify Stitcher Overcast Google Play FOLLOW US: Facebook Twitter Audio production by Christopher Gillespie (gillespie.media).

Daybreak
Daybreak for November 17, 2021

Daybreak

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 51:15


Wednesday of the 33rd Week in Ordinary Time Memorial of St. Elizabeth of Hungary, 1207-1231; daughter of the King of Hungary; married at 14, bore three children; led a life of prayer, sacrifice, and service to the poor and sick; upon widowhood, she was thrown out of the palace by her in-laws, but reinstated upon […]

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Wednesday, November 17, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsMemorial of Saint Elizabeth of Hungary, Religious Lectionary: 499All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Elizabeth of HungaryIn her short life, Elizabeth manifested such great love for the poor and suffering that she has become the patroness of Catholic charities and of the Secular Franciscan Order. The daughter of the King of Hungary, Elizabeth chose a life of penance and asceticism when a life of leisure and luxury could easily have been hers. This choice endeared her in the hearts of the common people throughout Europe. At the age of 14, Elizabeth was married to Louis of Thuringia, whom she deeply loved. She bore three children. Under the spiritual direction of a Franciscan friar, she led a life of prayer, sacrifice, and service to the poor and sick. Seeking to become one with the poor, she wore simple clothing. Daily she would take bread to hundreds of the poorest in the land who came to her gate. After six years of marriage, her husband died in the Crusades, and Elizabeth was grief-stricken. Her husband's family looked upon her as squandering the royal purse, and mistreated her, finally throwing her out of the palace. The return of her husband's allies from the Crusades resulted in her being reinstated, since her son was legal heir to the throne. In 1228, Elizabeth joined the Secular Franciscan Order, spending the remaining few years of her life caring for the poor in a hospital which she founded in honor of Saint Francis of Assisi. Elizabeth's health declined, and she died before her 24th birthday in 1231. Her great popularity resulted in her canonization four years later. Reflection Elizabeth understood well the lesson Jesus taught when he washed his disciples' feet at the Last Supper: The Christian must be one who serves the humblest needs of others, even if one serves from an exalted position. Of royal blood, Elizabeth could have lorded it over her subjects. Yet she served them with such a loving heart that her brief life won for her a special place in the hearts of many. Elizabeth is also an example to us in her following the guidance of a spiritual director. Growth in the spiritual life is a difficult process. We can play games very easily if we don't have someone to challenge us. Saint Elizabeth of Hungary is the Patron Saint of: Bakers Catholic Charities Secular Franciscan Order Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

The Catholic Word Podcast
Memorial of Saint Elizabeth of Hungary, Religious

The Catholic Word Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 22:42


GLORIOUS MYSTERIES today.  I chose you from the world, to go and bear fruit that will last, says the Lord. (JN 15:16)

Fr. Kubicki’s 2 Minute Prayer Reflection – Relevant Radio
Father Kubicki – Prayer Reflections November 17, 2021

Fr. Kubicki’s 2 Minute Prayer Reflection – Relevant Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 2:00


Today, the Church honors a princess who became a saint – Elizabeth of Hungary. St. Elizabeth was only 14 when she was married and she had three children before her husband died. She then became a lay Franciscan and devoted the rest of her life to caring for the poor and the sick.

The Examen with Fr. James Martin, SJ
Saint Elizabeth of Hungary, Religious

The Examen with Fr. James Martin, SJ

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 18:01


We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the week. New reflections will be added every Sunday. *Due to Covid-19, our 2020 reflections are re-purposed from earlier examen episodes.

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours
11.17.21 Vespers, Wednesday Evening Prayer

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 17:14


Vespers, Evening Prayer for the 33rd Wednesday of Ordinary Time, November 17th, 2021. Memorial of St. Elizabeth of Hungary. Thanks for praying with us, for inquiries, requests, feedback, please email singthehours@gmail.com. To support this work, visit www.patreon.com/singthehours. Deus in Adjutorium – "O God come to my assistance" Hymn: "Caeli Deus Sanctissime," Pope St. Gregory the Great Psalm 27 (two parts) Canticle: Colossians 1v12-20 Reading: James 1v19-22, 25 Responsory: Claim me once more as your own, Lord, and have mercy on me. Canticle of Mary: Luke 1v46-55 Intercessions: Lord, show us your love. The Lord's Prayer Concluding Prayers The Liturgy of the Hours (Four Volumes), ©1974, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. All rights reserved. Readings and Old and New Testament Canticles (except the Gospel Canticles) are from the New American Bible © 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Washington, D.C.

Cup o' Joe
Receiving the Gift

Cup o' Joe

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 14:34


The Gospel of Luke, Chapter 19, verses 11 - 28On this Feast of St. Elizabeth of Hungary, we hear a longer parable from Jesus about a man who would be King going away for a long journey and putting his servants in charge of a certain sum of money. And when he returns, he wants to know how they have used that sum.Of course it begs the question of all of us - what have we been given? And have we received that gift?

Podcast Pray as you go
Wednesday 17 November - St Elizabeth of Hungary

Podcast Pray as you go

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021


The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours
11.17.21 Lauds, Wednesday Morning Prayer

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 16:18


Lauds, Morning Prayer for the 33rd Wednesday in Ordinary Time, November 17th, 2021, Memorial of St. Elisabeth of Hungary. Thanks for praying with us, for inquiries, requests, feedback, please email singthehours@gmail.com. To support this work, visit www.patreon.com/singthehours. For direct support, Venmo @singthehours Deus in Adjutorium – "O God come to my assistance" Hymn: "Nox Tenebrae et Nubila," Prudentius (4th century), translation by ©John Rose and Sing the Hours 2021 Psalm 36 Canticle: Judith 16v2-3a, 13-15 Psalm 47 Reading: Tobit 4v15a, 16a, 18a, 19 Responsory: Incline my heart according to your will, O God. Canticle of Zechariah Intercessions: Lord, help your brothers to grow in holiness. The Lord’s Prayer Concluding Prayers Ave Maria (Gregorian) The Liturgy of the Hours (Four Volumes), ©1974, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. All rights reserved. Readings and Old and New Testament Canticles (except the Gospel Canticles) are from the New American Bible © 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Washington, D.C.

Coronavirus 4 1 1  podcast
Coronavirus, COVID-19, coronavirus variants, and vaccine updates for 11-16-2021

Coronavirus 4 1 1 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 5:25


This is Coronavirus 411, the latest COVID-19 info and new hotspots for November 16th, 2021.A couple of openings to tell you travelers about. India started letting fully vaccinated foreign tourists enter the country on regular commercial flights. Infections are falling and vaccinations rising there. Visitors haven't been allowed in since March 2020. Or maybe Cambodia's more to your liking. It reopened its borders to fully vaccinated travelers two weeks earlier than planned and has one of the world's highest rates of immunization. But here's where not to go, especially if you're using the CDC as your travel agent. The agency has advised against travel to the Czech Republic, Hungary, and Iceland because of rising cases there. However, they moved some countries to the level one low risk category, including Japan, India, Pakistan, Liberia, Gambia, and Mozambique. Without waiting for authorization from the FDA or a recommendation from the CDC, all adults in New York City are now allowed to get booster shots. Three states, California, Colorado and New Mexico, are also shoving the federal government aside and taking matters into their own hands. COVID sure hurt the melting pot on U.S. college campuses. International student enrollment fell by 15% or 1.1 million students during the 2020-2021 academic year. That's the biggest drop since the late 1940s. Travel restrictions and delayed visa processing were largely to blame. Amazon agreed to pay $500,000 and be monitored by California officials to make sure that from now on, it notifies workers within a day about new coronavirus cases. It will also notify local health agencies within 48 hours. The half-million will go to enforce the state's consumer protection laws. All of this is because of California's “right-to-know” law that took effect last year. In the United States cases were up 14%, deaths are down 14%, and hospitalizations are down 7% over 14 days. The 7-day average of new cases has been trending up since November 3. The five states that had the most daily deaths per 100,000 are Wyoming, Montana, Kentucky, Alaska, and Ohio. There are 9,237,610 active cases in the United States. The five states with the greatest increase in hospitalizations per capita: Rhode Island 34%, Michigan 22%, Minnesota 20%, and New Mexico and South Dakota 15%. The top 10 counties with the highest number of recent cases per capita according to The New York Times: Nome Census Area, AK. Scotts Bluff, NE. San Juan, NM. Grant, NM. Scurry, TX. Big Horn, MT. Wadena, MN. Bethel Census Area, AK. Otsego, MI. And Washburn, WI. There have been at least 764,363 deaths in the U.S. recorded as Covid-related. The top 3 vaccinating states by percentage of population that's been fully vaccinated: Vermont unchanged at 72%, Rhode Island at 71.7%, and Connecticut and Maine at 71.4%. The bottom 3 vaccinating states are West Virginia at 41.2%, Wyoming unchanged at 44.8%, and Alabama at 45.5%. The percentage of the U.S. that's been fully vaccinated is 58.8%. Globally, cases were up 12% and deaths were down 3% over 14 days, with the 7-day average trending up since October 15. There are 19,303,850 active cases around the world. The five countries with the most new cases: The United States 70,823. The U.K. 39,705. Russia 38,420. Germany 30,483. And Turkey 23,852. There have been at least 5,106,593 deaths reported as Covid-related worldwide. For the latest updates, subscribe for free to Coronavirus 411 on your podcast app or ask your smart speaker to play the Coronavirus 411 podcast. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Tony Azevedo Podcast
Ep 40 - Spencer Dornin

The Tony Azevedo Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 35:13


Spencer was a member of the USA National Team from 2000-2007 and was an All-American/team captain at UC Berkeley before playing professionally in Hungary, Italy, and Australia. After retiring from professional water polo, he started coached in San Francisco before moving to Dallas with his wife, where he currently runs Pegasus Water Polo, a Texas powerhouse.   Follow Tony on Instagram  https://www.instagram.com/tonyazevedo8   Follow Dave on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/davewcomedy    See Tony's clinics/camps here:  http://tonyazevedo.com/azevedo-water-polo/   Catch Dave on Tour now:  https://www.davewilliamsoncomedy.com/    

The Slavic Connexion
Sports (History) Illustrated: Cold War Edition with Johanna Mellis

The Slavic Connexion

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 53:15


Dr. Johanna Mellis, a former D1 swimmer and current history professor at Ursinus College, joins Lera for a lively conversation on the history of sports in Hungary during the Cold War. They also touch on the Olympics (past and present), sport diplomacy, and the development of competitive sports on an international plane. For a great visual timeline of Sport in the Cold War and further related resources and collections, visit the Wilson's Center digital archive: https://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/theme/sport-in-the-cold-war ABOUT THE GUEST https://www.ursinus.edu/live/image/scale/3x/gid/7/width/250/height/250/38576_171-Ursinus2021_copy.rev.1635790475.jpg Dr. Mellis is assistant professor in the history department at Ursinus College. She was a D1 swimmer at the College of Charleston from 2004-2008 and co-captain of the team from 2006-2008. She was the Colonial Athletic Association (CAA) conference champion in the 400 Individual Medley in 2006, and a bronze medalist that year in the 200 butterfly. She later coached at High Tide Aquatics and Gator Swim Club in Gainesville, FL while getting her MA and PhD at the University of Florida. Dr. Mellis's research focuses on Cold War sport. Her manuscript, Changing the Global Game: Hungarian Athletes and International Sport During the Cold War, examines Hungarian sportspeople's interactions with the International Olympic Committee from 1948-1989. Changing the Global Game shows how Hungarian athletes, Socialist Hungarian state sport officials, and the IOC gradually realized by the 1960s that sporting cooperation with one another - and not East-West political clashes nor resistance - was the way to achieve their respective aims of sport success, career and financial stability, and political and institutional strength. Dr. Mellis is also a cohost of the End of Sport podcast with Drs. Nathan Kalman-Lamb and Derek Silva. They interview athletes, critical sports journalists, and fellow academics to explore all the ways that people use sport to harm others - i.e. through racist mascotry, the NCAA and higher ed's exploitation of Black and Brown college athletic workers, sexual abuse and harassment, transphobia, and more. Through the End of Sport (endofsport.com), she has co-authored pieces for public outlets such as The Chronicle of Higher Ed, The Guardian, Time, The Baffler, and more. She also has sole-authored pieces with The Washington Post and Arizona State University's Global Sport Matters. Follow her on Twitter @JohannaMellis and check out some of her articles referenced in this episode: The ISL article: https://ussporthistory.com/2020/10/16/the-international-swimming-league-is-trying-to-forge-a-new-path-for-professional-swimmers-but-it-is-working-with-an-authoritarian-country/ WaPo article on Biles: https://www.washingtonpost.com/outlook/2021/08/02/by-taking-care-herself-simone-biles-may-transform-sports/ The Guardian article on racial dynamics in sport: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2021/mar/17/college-sports-racial-dynamics Please send an email to slavxradio@utexas.edu with any questions, comments, or guest suggestions. Thank you and we look forward to connecting! PRODUCER'S NOTE: This episode was recorded on August 24th, 2021 via Zoom. CREDITS Host/Co-Producer: Lera Toropin (@earlportion) Co-Producer: Cullan Bendig (@cullanwithana) Assistant Producer: Zach Johnson Assistant Producer: Sergio Glajar Assistant Producer: Misha Simanovskyy Assistant Producer/Administrator: Kathryn Yegorov-Crate Executive Assistant: Katherine Birch Recording, Editing, and Sound Design: Michelle Daniel Music Producer: Charlie Harper (Connect: facebook.com/charlie.harper.1485 @charlieharpermusic) www.charlieharpermusic.com (Main Theme by Charlie Harper and additional background music by Charlie Harper and Michelle Daniel, Kai Engel, and Ketsa) Executive Producer & Creator: Michelle Daniel (Connect: facebook.com/mdanielgeraci Instagram: @michelledaniel86) www.msdaniel.com DISCLAIMER: Texas Podcast Network is brought to you by The University of Texas at Austin. Podcasts are produced by faculty members and staffers at UT Austin who work with University Communications to craft content that adheres to journalistic best practices. The University of Texas at Austin offers these podcasts at no charge. Podcasts appearing on the network and this webpage represent the views of the hosts, not of The University of Texas at Austin. https://files.fireside.fm/file/fireside-uploads/images/9/9a59b135-7876-4254-b600-3839b3aa3ab1/P1EKcswq.png Special Guest: Johanna Mellis.

The John Batchelor Show
1794: Sophie Pedder #UNBOUND. Révolution Française, the complete forty-minute interview, July 17, 2021.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 41:00


Photo:   Patriotic scene of the French Guards. Fraternization of the French Guards and People. Event of the Revolution of 1789.  Révolution Française, by Sophie Pedder.  @PedderSophie  CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow https://www.amazon.com/Revolution-Française-Emmanuel-Macron-reinvent/dp/1472948602 The extraordinary story of how an outsider candidate—an unknown technocrat and economics minister on the fringes of French politics—made his way to the Élysée palace, with expert analysis of his first year in office. Two years after Emmanuel Macron came from nowhere to seize the French presidency, Sophie Pedder, The Economist's Paris bureau chief, tells the story of his remarkable rise and time in office so far. In this paperback edition, published with a new foreword by the author, Pedder reflects on Macron's troubles and triumphs: his dwindling popularity; the 'gilets jaunes' protests and resulting civil unrest; his efforts to transform France and lead the global fight against climate change; the Benalla affair; his erratic relationships with Angela Merkel, Donald Trump, Vladimir Putin and Theresa May, and the future of the European project.  On the eve of important European elections, and with nationalist and populist forces rising across the continent, she considers whether Macron can hold the centre ground and defend the multilateral liberal order against the axis of such figures as Italy's Matteo Salvini and Hungary's Viktor Orbán. Pedder also analyses the domestic situation in France, the evolution of En Marche, and the fall-out from Macron's controversial reforms. Meticulously researched and written in Pedder's gripping and immensely readable style, this is the essential, authoritative account for anyone wishing to understand Macron and the future of France in the world. .