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Rio Bravo qWeek
Episode 119: Nurse Practitioner Week

Rio Bravo qWeek

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 15:20


Episode 119: Nurse Practitioner WeekAmy Arreaza is a family nurse practitioner who explains what this career is all about. She tells the history and the future of this profession.  By Amy Arreaza, FNP. Comments by Hector Arreaza, MD.Hector: When I moved to Utah from my home country, I went to a clinic to investigate why I was so fatigued. I wasn't a practicing physician at that time. I got seen by a family physician who was very brief and somewhat cold. During my follow-up appointment, I was attended to by a very pleasant lady doctor. She made good eye contact, smiled, and explained the results in a simple and easy way. In summary, my second visit was very enjoyable. Later, I learned that this lady was a nurse practitioner. I had no idea what it meant, but after many positive interactions, I became a fan of nurse practitioners in general. Today, I want you to learn more about this profession, and I invited my favorite nurse practitioner in the whole world, my wife Amy. Welcome, Amy Arreaza.Tell us who you are.Amy: First of all, thank you for inviting me to your podcast to talk about this wonderful profession. And second, I must reciprocate in kind, you are my favorite family physician. So, as you said, I am a nurse practitioner, but more specifically, I am a family nurse practitioner, or FNP for short. I've been an FNP for 14 years and currently work in central CA in a federally qualified health center as a primary care provider for the medically vulnerable.  Caring for this patient population is where my passion truly lies. What is a Nurse Practitioner?A nurse practitioner is an advanced practice registered nurse. This means they are RNs who have completed either a master's degree or a doctorate degree in nursing practice. With their extra education and training, they have similar job duties as a physician, and there is actually a lot of overlap in the roles of nurse practitioners and physicians. NPs' serve as primary care providers or as specialty care providers. They examine and assess patients' needs, order and interpret labs and imaging tests, diagnose disease, and provide treatment, which includes prescribing medication. In the United States, the scope of practice of a nurse practitioner is regulated by state law. As of this year, NPs have full practice authority in 26 states, the District of Columbia, and 2 US territories. This means that NPs can work independently in those states without the supervision of a physician. In the remaining states, NPs need to have a collaborative agreement with a physician or work under the supervision of a physician. How was this career created?Well, in the 1960s, Loretta Ford, a public health nurse in Colorado, recognized a deficit in health care in rural communities. She believed nurses could fill the healthcare gaps in rural America, and through the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education in Nursing, she was given an opportunity to help develop a specialized clinical curriculum for community health nurses.  In 1965, Loretta Ford joined forces with Dr. Henry Silver, a pediatrician, to create the first pediatric nurse practitioner program at the University of Colorado.  So, 57 years ago, the NP profession was created to help alleviate the physician shortage at that time. And today, with a continued shortage of physicians, the NP profession has become essential in meeting primary care needs across the United States. Hector: There are 24 states that still do not offer full practice authority to NPs. Those states are more likely to have “geographic health care disparities, higher chronic disease burden, primary care shortages, higher costs of care and lower standings on national health rankings.”Amy: That's right, research shows that states with full practice authority for NPs' rank highest in the nation for best access to care, while 9 of the bottom 10 states ranked as the least healthy states in the US have not yet granted NPs full practice authority.How do you become an NP?The first step in becoming an NP is to become a registered nurse with either an Associate's Degree or Bachelor's Degree in Nursing Science. You can then enroll in an associate's-to-master's degree NP program or a bachelor's to master's  degree NP program.  At the minimum, you must complete a Master of Science in Nursing (or MSN) Degree. However, you may choose to advance your education with a Doctorate of Nursing Practice (or DNP) degree.  After graduation, NPs take a national certification exam to get certification from the specialty board that oversees their practice area. For example, I graduated from the University of Utah family nurse practitioner program and then took the national Family Nurse Practitioner Certification Exam from the American Nurses Credentialing Center. This makes me a board-certified FNP. How many kinds of NPs are there?There are multiple kinds of NPs. I am a family nurse practitioner, meaning I can treat patients from infancy through their golden years to the end of life. Many FNPs work in family practice clinics; however, FNPs have a broad scope of practice which makes them very versatile, and they can work in different specialty care clinics as well. For example, as an FNP, besides working in family practice, I have worked in wound care and in urgent care. FNPs work in cardiology, pulmonology, dermatology, orthopedics, and various other specialty clinics. NP programs are generally patient-population focused, so besides the family nurse practitioner program, there are Adult, Emergency Care, Gerontology, Pediatric, Neonatal, Nurse Anesthetist, Nurse Midwife, Psychiatric, and Women's Health nurse practitioner programs. How can IMG MDs become NPs?I understand that it can be very difficult for an international medical graduate to be able to practice as an MD in the United States. If an IMG is interested in becoming an NP, I would recommend that they look for a university nursing program that offers an accelerated RN option for those who already hold a bachelor's degree in another field, then find out if the program will accept their international bachelor's degree. They will most likely need to validate their international degree before applying to the accelerated RN program. After graduating with a Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree, they could apply to a nurse practitioner program. Another option for IMGs is to look into physician assistant programs. Current statistics about NPs': In 2020, there are about 210,00-270,000 practicing NPs in the United States. The number of nurse practitioners is expected to grow in the following years by about 52% between 202 and 2030, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Currently, Americans make more than 1 billion visits to NPs'every year. The growth of NPs' is expected to address the current physician shortage.  Thank you, Nurse Practitioners.____________________________Conclusion: Now we conclude episode number 119, “Nurse Practitioner Week.” Amy Arreaza, FNP, explained the basics about Nurse Practitioners and how they contribute to the health of our patients. This episode is a tribute to all the nurse practitioners who work shoulder to shoulder-as key members of the healthcare teams across the United States. We thank all of you and look forward to your continued support for healthier communities.This week we thank Hector Arreaza and Amy Arreaza. Audio edition by Adrianne Silva.Even without trying, you go to bed a little wiser every night. Thanks for listening to Rio Bravo qWeek Podcast. We want to hear from you. Send us an email at RioBravoqWeek@clinicasierravista.org, or visit our website riobravofmrp.org/qweek. See you next week!_____________________References:Royalty-free music used for this episode: Simon Pettersson – good vibes_ Fashionista, downloaded on October 1, 2022, from https://www.videvo.net

Fight Laugh Feast USA
Daily News Brief for Wednesday, November 16th, 2022 [Daily News Brief]

Fight Laugh Feast USA

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 17:30


This is Garrison Hardie with your CrossPolitic Daily Newsbrief for Wednesday, November 16th, 2022. Just a reminder, that Gabe Rench, the Waterboy and I will be gone the rest of this week in Canada! So no Daily Newsbrief after today… but not to worry ladies and gentleman, assuming Gabe and I don’t get arrested, I’ll be back bringing you the news next week! Club Membership Plug: Let’s stop and take a moment to talk about Fight Laugh Feast Club membership. By joining the Fight Laugh Feast Army, not only will you be aiding in our fight to take down secular & legacy media; but you’ll also get access to content placed in our Club Portal, such as past shows, all of our conference talks, and EXCLUSIVE content for club members that you won’t be able to find anywhere else. Lastly, you’ll also get discounts for our conferences… so if you’ve got $10 bucks a month to kick over our way, you can sign up now at fightlaughfeast.com. https://thepostmillennial.com/breaking-greg-abbott-to-deploy-national-guard-gun-boats-to-secure-texas-border-against-invasion-of-illegal-aliens?utm_campaign=64487 Greg Abbott to deploy National Guard, gun boats to secure Texas border against invasion of illegal aliens On Tuesday, Texas governor Greg Abbott announced that he had invoked the Invasion Clauses of both the state and federal Constitutions in an attempt to put an end to Biden's border crisis. In a statement posted to Twitter, Abbott explained that by treating the flow of illegal migration as an "invasion," Texas would be able to tackle the problem with unprecedented vigor. "I invoked the Invasion Clauses of the US & Texas Constitutions to fully authorize Texas to take unprecedented measures to defend our state against an invasion," Abbott stated, adding that he's "using that constitutional authority, & other authorization & Executive Orders to keep our state & country safe." Abbott revealed that his government will deploy both the National Guard and Texas Department of Public Safety to "repel," turn back and arrest those trying to enter the country illegally. In addition, he expressed intentions of constructing a border wall in multiple counties, deploying gun boats, and designating Mexican drug cartels as foreign terrorist organizations. Abbott noted that Texas does not intend to act alone in this endeavor, and will enter into agreements with other states and foreign nations to secure the border. Over 2 million migrant encounters were recorded in Fiscal Year 2022. https://www.foxnews.com/politics/mccarthy-wins-gop-nomination-for-house-speaker McCarthy wins GOP nomination for House speaker Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy won the Republicans' designation for House speaker on Tuesday, but questions remain over his ability to lock up the spot on the floor in January. McCarthy, R-Calif., beat back a challenge by more conservative elements in the House Republican Conference represented by Rep. Andy Biggs of Arizona. The final vote tally was 188-31. Most of Biggs’ support came from members of the hard line House Freedom Caucus. Biggs had previously chaired the group, which counts more than two dozen House Republicans among its membership, between 2019 and 2022. McCarthy, meanwhile, was able to assemble a large cross-section of the House GOP conference behind his candidacy. That included conservative hardliners like Georgia Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene and centrists like Rep. Brian FitzPatrick of Pennsylvania. But the number of people who opposed him could cause trouble. "Losing 31 means he is in serious danger of not having the votes in January which would mean he’d need to drop out either that day or he could decide to before," said a senior aide to GOP leadership. "At that point, others would pounce." To become speaker in January, McCarthy will need at least 218 votes if the entire 435-member House is seated and voting. Currently, the potential Republican majority looks to be anywhere between 218 seats, the bare minimum needed to control the House, and 228 seats. The latter would constitute a sweep of all outstanding races, including some in which Democrats are favored, but still falls far short of the 60 seats McCarthy predicted could be possible under a GOP wave that never materialized. https://townhall.com/tipsheet/spencerbrown/2022/11/15/key-inflation-metrics-surges-again-n2615978 Key Inflation Metric Makes Biggest Jump Since June The October read on producer inflation showed some of the highest numbers in months on key indicators of price increases that have come as a result of the Biden administration and congressional Democrats' tax-and-spend agenda. Month-over-month, headline PPI inflation advanced 0.2 percent in October — the same as in September — and prices upstream from consumers increased a full eight percent in the 12 months ending in October. The core PPI number that excludes more volatile foods, energy, and trade services also saw prices increase 0.2 percent for an annual advance of 5.4 percent. Some of the more alarming data points in the latest Producer Price Index report include the index for final demand goods, which advanced 0.6 percent in October — the largest advance since June when that metric increased 2.2 percent. The Biden administration's war on safe, cheap, and reliable energy has also taken a toll on inflation, as seen again in October's PPI report in which most of the month-over-month increases "can be traced to a 2.7-percent jump in prices for final demand energy," the Bureau of Labor Statistics noted in its latest report. What's more, 60 percent of October's price increases for final demand goods are attributable to the index for gasoline which jumped 5.7 percent. At the same time, prices also increased for diesel fuel, fresh and dry vegetables, residential electric power, chicken eggs, and oil and gas field machinery. The only potential bright spot in October's PPI report is the 0.1 percent decrease seen in final demand services, its first downward movement since November of 2020. However, final demand services excluding trade, transportation, and warehousing increased by 0.2 percent. https://thepostmillennial.com/bus-carrying-illegal-aliens-to-arrive-in-philadelphia-this-week?utm_campaign=64487 Bus carrying illegal aliens to arrive in Philadelphia this week Philadelphia is preparing for the potential arrival of a busload of migrants coming from Del Rio, Texas, later this week. A spokesperson for the city told Fox News that information regarding the bus and its arrival are still not clear. Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney told NBC Philadelphia that the city would welcome the migrants "with open arms," though he also remained unclear of the timeline. The city is confident that they have enough of a plan in place, including shelter, food, and clothing. There are also plans to try and expedite work permits for the migrants so that they may become self-sufficient sooner. Other self-proclaimed sanctuary cities that have received migrant buses in the last few months have reported being overwhelmed by the influx of illegal immigrants, so much so that a public emergency was declared. Texas Governor Greg Abbott first announced that he would be transporting busloads of migrants out of Texas back in April. He has since then sent out hundreds of migrant buses to sanctuary cities across the country. The 300th bus filled with migrants from Texas left for Chicago last week. The migrant buses have been dismissed by Democrats as simply a publicity stunt, but Abbott insists that the move is to relieve pressure from the overwhelmed border towns that take the brunt of Biden's failing immigration policies. Classical Conversations Classical Conversations supports homeschooling parents by cultivating the love of learning through a Christian worldview in fellowship with other families. They provide a classical Christ-centered curriculum, local like-minded communities across the United States and in several countries, and they train parents who are striving to be great classical educators in the home. For more information and to get connected, please visit their website at ClassicalConversations.com. Again that’s ClassicalConversations.com. https://www.boundingintosports.com/2022/11/u-s-soccer-embraces-acts-of-grave-depravity-by-making-the-traditional-crest-rainbow-colored-to-support-and-embrace-the-lgbtq-community/ U.S. Soccer Embraces Acts Of Grave Depravity By Making The Traditional Crest Rainbow Colored “To Support And Embrace The LGBTQ Community” As reported by The Daily Mail, USMNT’s Chief Communications Officer Neil Buethe explained the decision to include the rainbow crest, “As part of our approach for any match or event, we include rainbow branding to support and embrace the LGBTQ community, as well as to promote a spirit of inclusiveness and welcoming to all fans across the globe.” He added, “As a result, locations that we will manage and operate at the FIFA World Cup, such as the team hotel, media areas and parties, will feature both traditional and rainbow U.S. Soccer branding.” Buether provided another statement to Reuters explaining the rainbow crest, “Our rainbow badge has an important and consistent role in the identity of U.S. Soccer. As part of our approach for any match or event, we include rainbow branding to support and embrace the LGBTQ community, as well as to promote a spirit of inclusiveness and welcoming to all fans across the globe.” He then reiterated, “As a result, locations that we will manage and operate at the FIFA World Cup, such as the team hotel, media areas and parties, will feature both traditional and rainbow U.S. Soccer branding.” USMNT coach Gregg Berhalter also addressed the rainbow flag being displayed at the team’s training facility in Qatar. https://youtu.be/TNchAw4Bjsc -Play 6:38- Be The Change was started in the wake of George Floyd’s death. The U.S. Soccer website explains, “Back in late 2020, following the death of George Floyd and the continued importance of the Black Lives Matter movement, the U.S. Men’s National Team players came together and had conversations about the social injustices that exist at home and across the world.” The message doesn’t just include promotion of the violent Black Lives Matter movement that destroyed numerous cities and lives that have still not recovered to this day, the promotion of the immoral LGBTQ lifestyle that Catechisms declare as “acts of grave depravity” and “intrinsically disordered,” but it also spawned into an anti-self defense campaign. By the way, if the US really wanted to make a stand as opposed to just virtue signaling, how about you just not play? What about instead of virtue signaling, we saw some virtue doing? Just a thought. Even though homosexuality isn’t virtuous…

Daily News Brief
Daily News Brief for Wednesday, November 16th, 2022

Daily News Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 17:30


This is Garrison Hardie with your CrossPolitic Daily Newsbrief for Wednesday, November 16th, 2022. Just a reminder, that Gabe Rench, the Waterboy and I will be gone the rest of this week in Canada! So no Daily Newsbrief after today… but not to worry ladies and gentleman, assuming Gabe and I don’t get arrested, I’ll be back bringing you the news next week! Club Membership Plug: Let’s stop and take a moment to talk about Fight Laugh Feast Club membership. By joining the Fight Laugh Feast Army, not only will you be aiding in our fight to take down secular & legacy media; but you’ll also get access to content placed in our Club Portal, such as past shows, all of our conference talks, and EXCLUSIVE content for club members that you won’t be able to find anywhere else. Lastly, you’ll also get discounts for our conferences… so if you’ve got $10 bucks a month to kick over our way, you can sign up now at fightlaughfeast.com. https://thepostmillennial.com/breaking-greg-abbott-to-deploy-national-guard-gun-boats-to-secure-texas-border-against-invasion-of-illegal-aliens?utm_campaign=64487 Greg Abbott to deploy National Guard, gun boats to secure Texas border against invasion of illegal aliens On Tuesday, Texas governor Greg Abbott announced that he had invoked the Invasion Clauses of both the state and federal Constitutions in an attempt to put an end to Biden's border crisis. In a statement posted to Twitter, Abbott explained that by treating the flow of illegal migration as an "invasion," Texas would be able to tackle the problem with unprecedented vigor. "I invoked the Invasion Clauses of the US & Texas Constitutions to fully authorize Texas to take unprecedented measures to defend our state against an invasion," Abbott stated, adding that he's "using that constitutional authority, & other authorization & Executive Orders to keep our state & country safe." Abbott revealed that his government will deploy both the National Guard and Texas Department of Public Safety to "repel," turn back and arrest those trying to enter the country illegally. In addition, he expressed intentions of constructing a border wall in multiple counties, deploying gun boats, and designating Mexican drug cartels as foreign terrorist organizations. Abbott noted that Texas does not intend to act alone in this endeavor, and will enter into agreements with other states and foreign nations to secure the border. Over 2 million migrant encounters were recorded in Fiscal Year 2022. https://www.foxnews.com/politics/mccarthy-wins-gop-nomination-for-house-speaker McCarthy wins GOP nomination for House speaker Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy won the Republicans' designation for House speaker on Tuesday, but questions remain over his ability to lock up the spot on the floor in January. McCarthy, R-Calif., beat back a challenge by more conservative elements in the House Republican Conference represented by Rep. Andy Biggs of Arizona. The final vote tally was 188-31. Most of Biggs’ support came from members of the hard line House Freedom Caucus. Biggs had previously chaired the group, which counts more than two dozen House Republicans among its membership, between 2019 and 2022. McCarthy, meanwhile, was able to assemble a large cross-section of the House GOP conference behind his candidacy. That included conservative hardliners like Georgia Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene and centrists like Rep. Brian FitzPatrick of Pennsylvania. But the number of people who opposed him could cause trouble. "Losing 31 means he is in serious danger of not having the votes in January which would mean he’d need to drop out either that day or he could decide to before," said a senior aide to GOP leadership. "At that point, others would pounce." To become speaker in January, McCarthy will need at least 218 votes if the entire 435-member House is seated and voting. Currently, the potential Republican majority looks to be anywhere between 218 seats, the bare minimum needed to control the House, and 228 seats. The latter would constitute a sweep of all outstanding races, including some in which Democrats are favored, but still falls far short of the 60 seats McCarthy predicted could be possible under a GOP wave that never materialized. https://townhall.com/tipsheet/spencerbrown/2022/11/15/key-inflation-metrics-surges-again-n2615978 Key Inflation Metric Makes Biggest Jump Since June The October read on producer inflation showed some of the highest numbers in months on key indicators of price increases that have come as a result of the Biden administration and congressional Democrats' tax-and-spend agenda. Month-over-month, headline PPI inflation advanced 0.2 percent in October — the same as in September — and prices upstream from consumers increased a full eight percent in the 12 months ending in October. The core PPI number that excludes more volatile foods, energy, and trade services also saw prices increase 0.2 percent for an annual advance of 5.4 percent. Some of the more alarming data points in the latest Producer Price Index report include the index for final demand goods, which advanced 0.6 percent in October — the largest advance since June when that metric increased 2.2 percent. The Biden administration's war on safe, cheap, and reliable energy has also taken a toll on inflation, as seen again in October's PPI report in which most of the month-over-month increases "can be traced to a 2.7-percent jump in prices for final demand energy," the Bureau of Labor Statistics noted in its latest report. What's more, 60 percent of October's price increases for final demand goods are attributable to the index for gasoline which jumped 5.7 percent. At the same time, prices also increased for diesel fuel, fresh and dry vegetables, residential electric power, chicken eggs, and oil and gas field machinery. The only potential bright spot in October's PPI report is the 0.1 percent decrease seen in final demand services, its first downward movement since November of 2020. However, final demand services excluding trade, transportation, and warehousing increased by 0.2 percent. https://thepostmillennial.com/bus-carrying-illegal-aliens-to-arrive-in-philadelphia-this-week?utm_campaign=64487 Bus carrying illegal aliens to arrive in Philadelphia this week Philadelphia is preparing for the potential arrival of a busload of migrants coming from Del Rio, Texas, later this week. A spokesperson for the city told Fox News that information regarding the bus and its arrival are still not clear. Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney told NBC Philadelphia that the city would welcome the migrants "with open arms," though he also remained unclear of the timeline. The city is confident that they have enough of a plan in place, including shelter, food, and clothing. There are also plans to try and expedite work permits for the migrants so that they may become self-sufficient sooner. Other self-proclaimed sanctuary cities that have received migrant buses in the last few months have reported being overwhelmed by the influx of illegal immigrants, so much so that a public emergency was declared. Texas Governor Greg Abbott first announced that he would be transporting busloads of migrants out of Texas back in April. He has since then sent out hundreds of migrant buses to sanctuary cities across the country. The 300th bus filled with migrants from Texas left for Chicago last week. The migrant buses have been dismissed by Democrats as simply a publicity stunt, but Abbott insists that the move is to relieve pressure from the overwhelmed border towns that take the brunt of Biden's failing immigration policies. Classical Conversations Classical Conversations supports homeschooling parents by cultivating the love of learning through a Christian worldview in fellowship with other families. They provide a classical Christ-centered curriculum, local like-minded communities across the United States and in several countries, and they train parents who are striving to be great classical educators in the home. For more information and to get connected, please visit their website at ClassicalConversations.com. Again that’s ClassicalConversations.com. https://www.boundingintosports.com/2022/11/u-s-soccer-embraces-acts-of-grave-depravity-by-making-the-traditional-crest-rainbow-colored-to-support-and-embrace-the-lgbtq-community/ U.S. Soccer Embraces Acts Of Grave Depravity By Making The Traditional Crest Rainbow Colored “To Support And Embrace The LGBTQ Community” As reported by The Daily Mail, USMNT’s Chief Communications Officer Neil Buethe explained the decision to include the rainbow crest, “As part of our approach for any match or event, we include rainbow branding to support and embrace the LGBTQ community, as well as to promote a spirit of inclusiveness and welcoming to all fans across the globe.” He added, “As a result, locations that we will manage and operate at the FIFA World Cup, such as the team hotel, media areas and parties, will feature both traditional and rainbow U.S. Soccer branding.” Buether provided another statement to Reuters explaining the rainbow crest, “Our rainbow badge has an important and consistent role in the identity of U.S. Soccer. As part of our approach for any match or event, we include rainbow branding to support and embrace the LGBTQ community, as well as to promote a spirit of inclusiveness and welcoming to all fans across the globe.” He then reiterated, “As a result, locations that we will manage and operate at the FIFA World Cup, such as the team hotel, media areas and parties, will feature both traditional and rainbow U.S. Soccer branding.” USMNT coach Gregg Berhalter also addressed the rainbow flag being displayed at the team’s training facility in Qatar. https://youtu.be/TNchAw4Bjsc -Play 6:38- Be The Change was started in the wake of George Floyd’s death. The U.S. Soccer website explains, “Back in late 2020, following the death of George Floyd and the continued importance of the Black Lives Matter movement, the U.S. Men’s National Team players came together and had conversations about the social injustices that exist at home and across the world.” The message doesn’t just include promotion of the violent Black Lives Matter movement that destroyed numerous cities and lives that have still not recovered to this day, the promotion of the immoral LGBTQ lifestyle that Catechisms declare as “acts of grave depravity” and “intrinsically disordered,” but it also spawned into an anti-self defense campaign. By the way, if the US really wanted to make a stand as opposed to just virtue signaling, how about you just not play? What about instead of virtue signaling, we saw some virtue doing? Just a thought. Even though homosexuality isn’t virtuous…

Real Estate News: Real Estate Investing Podcast
The Real Estate News Brief: Inflation Report Optimism, Housing Affordability, 10 Fastest Growing Cities

Real Estate News: Real Estate Investing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 6:41


In this Real Estate News Brief for the week ending November 12th, 2022… what's next after a really good report on inflation, the NAHB's latest report on housing affordability, and the ten fastest growing U.S. cities.Hi, I'm Kathy Fettke and this is Real Estate News for Investors. If you like our podcast, please subscribe and leave us a review.Economic News We begin with economic news from this past week, and a report on inflation that shows the Fed is making progress with its rate hikes. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported a lower-than-expected .4% increase in the October Consumer Price Index which brought the annual rate down to 7.7%. It was 8.2% in September. Stock market investors were pleased that inflation appears to be subsiding, and the Dow closed up more than 1,000 points. But that doesn't mean that the fight is over. Although Fed officials are expressing some amount of optimism, several spoke out about the danger of pausing too soon on the rate hikes. (1)Richmond Fed president Thomas Barkin told CNBC that the Fed had its foot on the gas and is now ready to “pump the brakes.” He explained that likely means the Fed will call for “a slower pace of increases, a longer pace of increase and a potentially higher point.” He sees the Federal Funds rate going as high as 5%, or higher, in smaller increments, before the Fed gets inflation back down to the 2% level. (2)San Francisco Fed president Mary Daly said the CPI report was “indeed good news,” but that 7.7% inflation is still far too high. She said: “It's better than over 8% but it's not close enough to 2 in any way for me to be comfortable. So it's far from a victory.” (3)Dallas Fed President Lorie Logan had similar comments saying the CPI report was “a welcome relief” but that more rate increases are probably needed. She said: “I believe it may soon be appropriate to slow the pace of rate increase so we can better assess how financial and economic conditions are evolving.”The Fed's next meeting in December happens right after the November report on the CPI, so that data will surely impact any rate hike decisions made at that meeting.Mortgage RatesMeanwhile, mortgage rates fell sharply right after the release of the CPI. According to Mortgage News Daily, the average rate on the 30-year fixed-rate loan fell 60 basis points from 7.22% to 6.62%. The Daily's chief operating officer Matthew Graham says: “This is the best argument to date that rates are done rising, but confirmation requires next month's CPI to tell the same story.” (4)Jobless ClaimsThe number of people applying for unemployment was up 7,000 last week to a total of 225,000 initial claims. That's the highest it's been in a month but it's still a low number, although some big companies are announcing layoffs. Jefferies economist Tom Simons says that “Layoff announcements from larger companies have become more frequent. So we are likely to see this number rise in the weeks and months ahead.” Continuing claims were up 6,000 to a total of 1.49 million. (5)In other news making headlines...NAHB: Housing Affordability More Americans are finding it's too expensive to buy a home of their own. The National Association of Home Builders released its third quarter report on housing affordability and it shows that affordability has fallen to its lowest point since the Great Recession. According to the NAHB, just 42.2% of new and existing homes that were sold in Q3 were affordable for families making a median income of $90,000. That percentage was 42.8% in the second quarter. (6)That data includes a drop in the national median home price from $390,000 to $380,000 and an increase in the average mortgage interest rate from 5.33% to 5.72%. Home Equity FallsLower home prices mean that homeowners are also losing some of their equity. According to Black Knight, about $2.5 trillion in home equity has disappeared since May, with the average borrower losing $30,000. Although home equity could fall further, Black Knight's president of data and analytics, Ben Graboske, says that “homeowner positions remain broadly strong.” (7)The report shows that the number of people who are underwater on their loans is only .85%. That's fewer than 500,000 borrowers out of about 53 million U.S. mortgage holders. That's double what it was in May, but it's still considered quite low.Fastest Growing CitiesSome U.S. cities are doing much better than others when it comes to economic growth. The Kenan Institute of Private Enterprise issued a list of the ten fastest growing cities in the nation, and New York is not one of them. (8)It may not surprise you however, that the San Francisco/Bay Area is number one on the list with a 2022 GDP of $1.4 trillion and a GDP growth rate of 4.8%. Austin, Seattle, Raleigh/Durham, and Dallas round out the top five. Denver, Salt Lake City, Charlotte, New Orleans, and Orlando are in the fifth through tenth positions.A few markets that we like for residential investment include the Dallas and Orlando metro areas. The 2022 GDP for Dallas is $682 billion with a 3.1% growth rate. And for Orlando, the GDP is $246 billion with a growth rate of 2.4%.That's it for today. Check the show notes for links. And please remember to hit the subscribe button, and leave a review!You can also join RealWealth for free at newsforinvestors.com to find out more about real estate investing. As a member, you have access to our Learning Center as well as our market data, our experienced investment counselors, and our list of top-notch real estate professionals that can help get you going, or keep you on track, with your investment goals.Thanks for listening. I'm Kathy Fettke.Links:1 -https://www.marketwatch.com/story/coming-up-consumer-price-index-for-october-11668086355?mod=economy-politics2 -https://www.cnbc.com/2022/11/04/fed-officials-barkin-and-collins-see-possibility-for-slower-rate-hikes-ahead.html3 -https://www.cnbc.com/2022/11/10/fed-officials-welcome-inflation-news-but-still-see-tighter-policy-ahead.html4 -https://www.cnbc.com/2022/11/10/mortgage-rates-fall-sharply-to-under-7percent-after-inflation-eases.html5 -https://www.marketwatch.com/story/jobless-claims-tick-higher-in-latest-week-116680877256 -https://eyeonhousing.org/2022/11/unsurprisingly-housing-affordability-continues-to-fall/7 -https://www.cnbc.com/2022/11/07/homeowners-lost-1point5-trillion-in-equity-since-may-as-home-prices-drop.html8 - https://www.cnbc.com/2022/11/09/fastest-growing-us-cities-kenan-institute.html

CrossPolitic Studios
Daily News Brief for Wednesday, November 16th, 2022 [Daily News Brief]

CrossPolitic Studios

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 17:30


This is Garrison Hardie with your CrossPolitic Daily Newsbrief for Wednesday, November 16th, 2022. Just a reminder, that Gabe Rench, the Waterboy and I will be gone the rest of this week in Canada! So no Daily Newsbrief after today… but not to worry ladies and gentleman, assuming Gabe and I don’t get arrested, I’ll be back bringing you the news next week! Club Membership Plug: Let’s stop and take a moment to talk about Fight Laugh Feast Club membership. By joining the Fight Laugh Feast Army, not only will you be aiding in our fight to take down secular & legacy media; but you’ll also get access to content placed in our Club Portal, such as past shows, all of our conference talks, and EXCLUSIVE content for club members that you won’t be able to find anywhere else. Lastly, you’ll also get discounts for our conferences… so if you’ve got $10 bucks a month to kick over our way, you can sign up now at fightlaughfeast.com. https://thepostmillennial.com/breaking-greg-abbott-to-deploy-national-guard-gun-boats-to-secure-texas-border-against-invasion-of-illegal-aliens?utm_campaign=64487 Greg Abbott to deploy National Guard, gun boats to secure Texas border against invasion of illegal aliens On Tuesday, Texas governor Greg Abbott announced that he had invoked the Invasion Clauses of both the state and federal Constitutions in an attempt to put an end to Biden's border crisis. In a statement posted to Twitter, Abbott explained that by treating the flow of illegal migration as an "invasion," Texas would be able to tackle the problem with unprecedented vigor. "I invoked the Invasion Clauses of the US & Texas Constitutions to fully authorize Texas to take unprecedented measures to defend our state against an invasion," Abbott stated, adding that he's "using that constitutional authority, & other authorization & Executive Orders to keep our state & country safe." Abbott revealed that his government will deploy both the National Guard and Texas Department of Public Safety to "repel," turn back and arrest those trying to enter the country illegally. In addition, he expressed intentions of constructing a border wall in multiple counties, deploying gun boats, and designating Mexican drug cartels as foreign terrorist organizations. Abbott noted that Texas does not intend to act alone in this endeavor, and will enter into agreements with other states and foreign nations to secure the border. Over 2 million migrant encounters were recorded in Fiscal Year 2022. https://www.foxnews.com/politics/mccarthy-wins-gop-nomination-for-house-speaker McCarthy wins GOP nomination for House speaker Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy won the Republicans' designation for House speaker on Tuesday, but questions remain over his ability to lock up the spot on the floor in January. McCarthy, R-Calif., beat back a challenge by more conservative elements in the House Republican Conference represented by Rep. Andy Biggs of Arizona. The final vote tally was 188-31. Most of Biggs’ support came from members of the hard line House Freedom Caucus. Biggs had previously chaired the group, which counts more than two dozen House Republicans among its membership, between 2019 and 2022. McCarthy, meanwhile, was able to assemble a large cross-section of the House GOP conference behind his candidacy. That included conservative hardliners like Georgia Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene and centrists like Rep. Brian FitzPatrick of Pennsylvania. But the number of people who opposed him could cause trouble. "Losing 31 means he is in serious danger of not having the votes in January which would mean he’d need to drop out either that day or he could decide to before," said a senior aide to GOP leadership. "At that point, others would pounce." To become speaker in January, McCarthy will need at least 218 votes if the entire 435-member House is seated and voting. Currently, the potential Republican majority looks to be anywhere between 218 seats, the bare minimum needed to control the House, and 228 seats. The latter would constitute a sweep of all outstanding races, including some in which Democrats are favored, but still falls far short of the 60 seats McCarthy predicted could be possible under a GOP wave that never materialized. https://townhall.com/tipsheet/spencerbrown/2022/11/15/key-inflation-metrics-surges-again-n2615978 Key Inflation Metric Makes Biggest Jump Since June The October read on producer inflation showed some of the highest numbers in months on key indicators of price increases that have come as a result of the Biden administration and congressional Democrats' tax-and-spend agenda. Month-over-month, headline PPI inflation advanced 0.2 percent in October — the same as in September — and prices upstream from consumers increased a full eight percent in the 12 months ending in October. The core PPI number that excludes more volatile foods, energy, and trade services also saw prices increase 0.2 percent for an annual advance of 5.4 percent. Some of the more alarming data points in the latest Producer Price Index report include the index for final demand goods, which advanced 0.6 percent in October — the largest advance since June when that metric increased 2.2 percent. The Biden administration's war on safe, cheap, and reliable energy has also taken a toll on inflation, as seen again in October's PPI report in which most of the month-over-month increases "can be traced to a 2.7-percent jump in prices for final demand energy," the Bureau of Labor Statistics noted in its latest report. What's more, 60 percent of October's price increases for final demand goods are attributable to the index for gasoline which jumped 5.7 percent. At the same time, prices also increased for diesel fuel, fresh and dry vegetables, residential electric power, chicken eggs, and oil and gas field machinery. The only potential bright spot in October's PPI report is the 0.1 percent decrease seen in final demand services, its first downward movement since November of 2020. However, final demand services excluding trade, transportation, and warehousing increased by 0.2 percent. https://thepostmillennial.com/bus-carrying-illegal-aliens-to-arrive-in-philadelphia-this-week?utm_campaign=64487 Bus carrying illegal aliens to arrive in Philadelphia this week Philadelphia is preparing for the potential arrival of a busload of migrants coming from Del Rio, Texas, later this week. A spokesperson for the city told Fox News that information regarding the bus and its arrival are still not clear. Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney told NBC Philadelphia that the city would welcome the migrants "with open arms," though he also remained unclear of the timeline. The city is confident that they have enough of a plan in place, including shelter, food, and clothing. There are also plans to try and expedite work permits for the migrants so that they may become self-sufficient sooner. Other self-proclaimed sanctuary cities that have received migrant buses in the last few months have reported being overwhelmed by the influx of illegal immigrants, so much so that a public emergency was declared. Texas Governor Greg Abbott first announced that he would be transporting busloads of migrants out of Texas back in April. He has since then sent out hundreds of migrant buses to sanctuary cities across the country. The 300th bus filled with migrants from Texas left for Chicago last week. The migrant buses have been dismissed by Democrats as simply a publicity stunt, but Abbott insists that the move is to relieve pressure from the overwhelmed border towns that take the brunt of Biden's failing immigration policies. Classical Conversations Classical Conversations supports homeschooling parents by cultivating the love of learning through a Christian worldview in fellowship with other families. They provide a classical Christ-centered curriculum, local like-minded communities across the United States and in several countries, and they train parents who are striving to be great classical educators in the home. For more information and to get connected, please visit their website at ClassicalConversations.com. Again that’s ClassicalConversations.com. https://www.boundingintosports.com/2022/11/u-s-soccer-embraces-acts-of-grave-depravity-by-making-the-traditional-crest-rainbow-colored-to-support-and-embrace-the-lgbtq-community/ U.S. Soccer Embraces Acts Of Grave Depravity By Making The Traditional Crest Rainbow Colored “To Support And Embrace The LGBTQ Community” As reported by The Daily Mail, USMNT’s Chief Communications Officer Neil Buethe explained the decision to include the rainbow crest, “As part of our approach for any match or event, we include rainbow branding to support and embrace the LGBTQ community, as well as to promote a spirit of inclusiveness and welcoming to all fans across the globe.” He added, “As a result, locations that we will manage and operate at the FIFA World Cup, such as the team hotel, media areas and parties, will feature both traditional and rainbow U.S. Soccer branding.” Buether provided another statement to Reuters explaining the rainbow crest, “Our rainbow badge has an important and consistent role in the identity of U.S. Soccer. As part of our approach for any match or event, we include rainbow branding to support and embrace the LGBTQ community, as well as to promote a spirit of inclusiveness and welcoming to all fans across the globe.” He then reiterated, “As a result, locations that we will manage and operate at the FIFA World Cup, such as the team hotel, media areas and parties, will feature both traditional and rainbow U.S. Soccer branding.” USMNT coach Gregg Berhalter also addressed the rainbow flag being displayed at the team’s training facility in Qatar. https://youtu.be/TNchAw4Bjsc -Play 6:38- Be The Change was started in the wake of George Floyd’s death. The U.S. Soccer website explains, “Back in late 2020, following the death of George Floyd and the continued importance of the Black Lives Matter movement, the U.S. Men’s National Team players came together and had conversations about the social injustices that exist at home and across the world.” The message doesn’t just include promotion of the violent Black Lives Matter movement that destroyed numerous cities and lives that have still not recovered to this day, the promotion of the immoral LGBTQ lifestyle that Catechisms declare as “acts of grave depravity” and “intrinsically disordered,” but it also spawned into an anti-self defense campaign. By the way, if the US really wanted to make a stand as opposed to just virtue signaling, how about you just not play? What about instead of virtue signaling, we saw some virtue doing? Just a thought. Even though homosexuality isn’t virtuous…

Ayana Explains It All
Ayana Explains Why Your Thanksgiving May Look a Little Strange This Year

Ayana Explains It All

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 52:50


This Thanksgiving, some turkeys will be left behind...cause there's a shortage and they cost too damn much. Works used in this episode: “The Myths of the Thanksgiving Story and the Lasting Damage they Imbue.” Claire Bugos. Smithsonian Magazine, 11/26/2019. Available at: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/thanksgiving-myth-and-what-we-should-be-teaching-kids-180973655/ US Bureau of Labor Statistics, Consumer Price Index October 2022 published 11/10/2022. Available at: https://www.bls.gov/news.release/cpi.nr0.htm

Landaas & Company Money Talk Podcast
Money Talk Podcast, Friday Nov. 11, 2022

Landaas & Company Money Talk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 19:50


  Landaas & Company newsletter  November edition now available. Advisors on This Week's Show Kyle Tetting Steve Giles Kendall Bauer (with Max Hoelzl and Joel Dresang, engineered by Jason Scuglik) Week in Review (Nov. 7-11, 2022) Significant Economic Indicators & Reports Monday The Federal Reserve reported that revolving consumer credit rose at an annual rate of 8.7% in September. The increase suggests consumer spending – which drives about two-thirds of the U.S. economy – remained resilient in the face of high inflation and rising interest rates. It also indicates consumers are financing more of their spending as government subsidies from the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic have dwindled and as wage increases have not kept up with inflation. The pace of credit card debt slowed from an 18% annual rate in August and was the slowest since May. The indicator took two years to recover from its pre-pandemic peak. It took a decade to recover from the financial collapse and the Great Recession. Tuesday No major releases Wednesday No major releases Thursday The broadest measure of inflation showed price increases easing in October, though they're still outpacing Federal Reserve Board targets. The Consumer Price Index gained 0.4% from September and 7.7% from October 2021. Shelter costs, the price of gasoline and food bills weighed heavily on the monthly increase, though food prices rose at the slowest pace since December, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported. The year-to-year inflation rate marked four months of declines from 9.1% in June, which was the steepest pace since 1982. The core CPI, which excludes the volatile categories of food and energy, rose 0.3% from September, the lowest in three months. Compared to October 2021, the core CPI was up 6.3%, just under the 6.6% peak hit in September, the highest in 40 years. The Fed's long-range target for inflation is 2%. The four-week moving average for initial unemployment claims declined marginally for the second week in a row. Data from the Labor Department showed the four-week average still down 41% from its 55-year average but 14% above its low just before the COVID-19 pandemic. Nearly 1.3 million Americans were claiming jobless benefits in the latest week, up 1% from the week before but down from 2.6 million the year before. Friday The University of Michigan said consumer sentiment declined from the end of October, losing about half of the gains made since slumping to an all-time low in June. Uncertainty from global factors and U.S. election outcomes mean continued instability for sentiment, which economists consider key to consumer spending. Survey respondents registered broad declines in their both their outlooks and their assessments of current conditions. Rising interest rates and high inflation dampened plans to buy big-ticket durable goods. Expectations for inflation were little changed at about 5% for a year from now and around 3% long term. MARKET CLOSINGS FOR THE WEEK Nasdaq – 11323, up 848 points or 8.1% Standard & Poor's 500 – 3993, up 222 points or 5.9% Dow Jones Industrial – 33748, up 1343 points or 4.1% 10-year U.S. Treasury Note – 3.81%, down 0.32 point Not a Landaas & Company client yet? Click here to learn more. More information and insight from Money Talk Money Talk Videos Follow us on Twitter. Landaas newsletter subscribers return to the newsletter via e-mail.

Zen Trading Magazine
Supermercados: a la caza de compradores

Zen Trading Magazine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 5:16


La inflación en Estados Unidos en agosto de 2022 fue de 8.3%. Aunque se redujo con respecto a periodos anteriores, sigue golpeando duramente a sectores como el de los supermercados, que en el mismo mes registraron alzas en los precios de los alimentos cercanas al 13.5%. Ese fue el porcentaje más alto registrado desde 1979, de acuerdo con el Bureau of Labor Statistics’ August Consumer Price Index (CPI). El cereal y los productos horneados lideraron el ranking de altos precios con un incremento de 16.4%, pero el caso más llamativo fue el de harina y mezclas preparadas de harina con un incremento del 23.3%.

The Dirt
34. The Future of Work is Remote

The Dirt

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 48:59


As the future of work increasingly moves remote, how do you build and scale an organization that can operate successfully with limited interaction? Liam Martin, cofounder of Time Doctor and Staff.com, joins Jim Barnish to discuss all things remote work. At the start of 2020 only about 5% of the workforce worked remotely (per Bureau of Labor Statistics). The pandemic propelled the world forward in a global shift that hasn't been seen since the advent of the internet. Many tech startups are finding it relatively easy to work remotely. But what about the big fortune 500 companies? Is remote work here to stay? What changes do companies need to make to implement remote work successfully?3 Key TakeawaysSuccessful remote work requires “asynchronous management” - the ability to manage without direct interaction. You can accomplish your work without needing constant permission from others to get it done.Remote work isn't synonymous with working from home. It's the choice to work from whatever location you want. Empowering your employees to choose their location and hours is the real game changer.Accepting product feedback? Make sure it comes from the right customers. Freemium users are valuable for word of mouth references to expand your customer base, but leave feedback for those paying for a seat at the table. ResourcesLiam's LinkedInTimeDoctor.comRunningRemote.comRunning Remote YouTube ChannelRunning Remote by Liam MartinZero to One by Peter ThielAbout Liam runs one of the most popular time tracking and productivity platforms in use by top brands today - Time Doctor. He is also a co-organizer of the world's largest remote work conference — Running Remote. Whenever possible, Liam encourages others to work remotely and actively promotes remote work. His products and services are defined by the concept of giving workers the flexibility to work wherever they want, whenever they want.Liam has also co-authored a book - Running Remote - focused on remote work methodology. In this revolutionary guide, Liam and his co-founder, Rob Rawson, have unearthed the secrets and lessons discovered by remote work pioneering entrepreneurs and founders who've harnessed the async mindset to operate their businesses remotely in the most seamless, hassle-free, and cost-effective manner possible.Liam holds an undergraduate and graduate degree in Sociology from McGill University.If you love what you are getting out of our show please SUBSCRIBE.For more information on how we dig into the dirt check out our other episodes here: https://www.orchid.black/podcastAll contents of this show are rights of Orchid Black©️ and are not to be used unless authorized by written consent.

First Move with Julia Chatterley
Feature interview: ADP Chief Economist Nela Richardson

First Move with Julia Chatterley

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 45:26


Despite the Fed's historic series of interest rate hikes intended to slow the economy and tame white-hot inflation, just-released numbers from the Bureau of Labor Statistics show the US added another 261,000 jobs in October, significantly exceeding expectations. Joining Julia to discuss is Nela Richardson, Chief Economist at ADP.To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

Landaas & Company Money Talk Podcast
Money Talk Podcast, Friday Nov. 4, 2022

Landaas & Company Money Talk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 23:35


  Landaas & Company newsletter  November edition now available. Advisors on This Week's Show Kyle Tetting Dave Sandstrom Adam Baley (with Max Hoelzl, Joel Dresang, engineered by Jason Scuglik) Week in Review (Oct. 31-Nov. 4, 2022) Significant Economic Indicators & Reports Monday no significant reports Tuesday The manufacturing sector expanded in October for the 29th month in a row, though at the slowest rate in that stretch, according to the Institute for Supply Management. The trade group's index, based on surveys of industry purchase managers, suggested further weakening in the sector with new orders contracting for the second month in a row. Employment grew after shrinking in September, though employers reported being more careful about adding to staff. As demand has receded, the group reported supplier deliveries have been the smoothest since 2009. The Commerce Department said construction spending rose slightly in September, aided by multi-family housing. At a seasonally adjusted annual rate of $1.8 trillion, expenditures were up 0.2% from the August pace and up 11% from the year before. Spending on residential construction was unchanged from August and up 13% from September 2021, although single-family unit spending declined for both periods. Expenditures on factory construction rose 8% from August and was up 43% from the year before. Job openings recovered some of their losses in August, suggesting continued strength in the labor market in September. Openings rose 4% to 10.7 million positions, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported. It was the indicator's second rise in six months after posting a record 11.9 million openings in March. Demand for workers kept outpacing the number of unemployed jobseekers in September. The number of workers quitting their jobs – a measure of worker confidence – declined slightly for the fifth time in six months but remained historically elevated at 4.1 million. Wednesday no significant reports Thursday The U.S. trade deficit widened 11.6% in September to $73.3 billion, the Bureau of Economic Analysis reported. Imports rose 1.5%, led by cell phones, semiconductors and pharmaceutical preparations. The value of exports declined 1.1% from August, led by soybeans and crude oil. Through three quarters, the trade gap expanded by 20% from the same time in 2021. Trade deficits detract from the gross domestic product, the chief measure of economic growth. The four-week moving average for initial unemployment claims declined for the first time in five weeks. Although the level remained 14% above the low point just before the COVID pandemic, it was 41% below the average since 1967. The Labor Department said 1.2 million Americans claimed jobless benefits in the latest week, up 2% from the week before but below the year-before level of 2.7 million claims. The Bureau of Labor Statistics said the annual rate of worker productivity rose in the third quarter by 0.3%, reversing a decline of 4.1% in the second quarter. Measuring year to year, though, third-quarter productivity sank 1.4% for the third consecutive decline — the first time that happened in data going back to 1982. Over the last four quarters, productivity fell because output, which rose 1.9%, didn't keep pace with hours worked, which rose 3.4%. Unit labor costs rose 6.1% from the third quarter of 2021, down from a 7.6% increase in the second quarter. The service sector of the U.S. economy grew in October at the slowest rate in 29 straight months of expansion, according to the Institute for Supply Management. The trade group said its survey of purchasing managers found reports of cooling growth and business activity amid hiring challenges and economic uncertainty. Managers surveyed cited fewer snags from supply chains and logistics compared to earlier in the year. The Commerce Department said the value of factory orders rose in September for the 18th time in 19 months,

World Business Report
Strong US jobs growth slowing amid inflation fight

World Business Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 27:11


The Bureau of Labor Statistics reported on Friday that the US economy added 261,000 nonfarm payroll jobs in October, while the unemployment rate rose slightly to 3.7%. Jobs growth in the US is continuing, but why is it a worrying sign for the US economy? Michelle Fleury, our New York Business Correspondent explains how unemployment rates are affecting inflation. Meanwhile, Chris Low, a Wall Street markets analyst at FHN Financial discusses todays fall in value of the dollar. Also in the programme, we speak to environment correspondent Matt McGrath about the upcoming COP27 summit in Egypt which kicks off this weekend. And we talked to Mitali Nikore, an economist from Delhi about the cost of air pollution in India. (Picture: A mature woman driving a truck. Credit: Getty Images)

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Means of Production

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 161:08


Today on Boston Public Radio: Chuck Todd updated us on the latest political headlines, focusing on upcoming midterm elections and America's worsening political divide. Todd moderates “Meet the Press,” and co-hosts “Meet the Press Now” on NBC Now. We then opened up phone lines, asking listeners about what's on their minds ahead of the midterm elections. Art Caplan weighed in on whether it's time to declare pandemic amnesty. Caplan is the Drs. William F. and Virginia Connolly Mitty Professor and founding head of the Division of Medical Ethics at NYU School of Medicine in New York City. Dr. Kimberly Parker discussed the potential impact of the Supreme Court hearing on cases regarding affirmative action. Parker is a former teacher and authority on all things education. Currently, she directs the Crimson Summer Academy at Harvard. She was formerly president of the Black Educators' Alliance of Massachusetts. Her latest book is "Literacy is Liberation: Working Towards Justice Through Culturally Relevant Teaching.” Corby Kummer remembered the lives of food writers Julie Powell, the blogger behind “The Julie/Julia Project,” which served as the inspiration for Nora Ephron's “Julie & Julia” movie, and Gael Greene, restaurant critic and founder of Citymeals on Wheels. Kummer is executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. Jon Gruber explained how the Federal Reserve could fight inflation by raising interest rates – and the implications of doing so. Gruber is the Ford Professor of Economics at MIT. His latest book is “Jump-Starting America: How Breakthrough Science Can Revive Economic Growth and the American Dream.” We ended the show by talking about a decrease in worker productivity, according to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Lead Thru Values
63. Plugging A $1 Million Leak In Your Company

Lead Thru Values

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 15:22


Call James at (319) 929-2604 Connect with James on https://www.linkedin.com/in/jamesrmayhew/ (LinkedIn) Learn more about how James helps companies attract and retain great people, improve how teams work together, increasing employee engagement at https://jamesmayhew.com (JamesMayhew.com) On today's episode... A trillion dollars. That's what US businesses are losing every year due to voluntary turnover.  But here's a hard truth for you:  most of this is self-inflicted. Hey, Team welcome back to Lead Thru Values. This podcast exists to help you ensure that every person on your team has the skills, knowledge and confidence to do their job exceptionally well. And today, I want to share something I'm seeing in my work companies across a variety of industries and sizes. Turnover is expensive. According to Gallup the cost of replacing an individual employee can range from one-half to two times the employees annual salary (a very conservative estimate.) So a company with 100 employees that provides an average salary of $50,000 could have turnover and replacement costs anywhere between $660,000 and $2.6 million per year. That's according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics report that measured an annual turnover rate of 26.3%… in 2017. That's 5 years ago and pre-pandemic. Losing your best people means you have a leadership performance gap. And there's no denying it. But, that means it is also fixable. It would be too easy to say that this is natural or inevitable.  Yes, people move. Get married. Get divorced. Some people pursue their own dream to start their own company. Here are some additional statistics. 52% of voluntary exiting employees say their manager or organization could have done something different to prevent them from leaving their job. It would be easy to assume or say, “we did everything to make it right and keep that person…” But over half of exiting employees tell that in the 3 months prior to them leaving, neither their manager or any other leader spoke with them about their job satisfaction or future with the company. Don't miss that! In 3 months, nobody asked them how they felt about their job. No one talked with them about their future. This is the leak that I'm seeing and I want to help you know how to plug it. You train your managers to have consistent, meaningful conversations with employees. I train and coach my clients on how to have a real Progress Meeting where a productive, 2-way conversation occurs every 30 days. Now before you stop listening because you either *think* you're already doing this, or you can't stomach the thought of another meeting, stick with me. Here are 3 keys:The meeting gets scheduled out a year every 30 days. The goal is that a minimum of 10 meetings occur per calendar year.  Why is scheduling them ahead of time so vital? Because what's easy to do is also easy not to do. Getting them on the calendar creates accountability and an expectation that they'll happen. All too often this simple step is taken for granted, resulting in gaps of 2, 3 or even 4 months. The progress meeting must be a conversation. Conversations create clarity, but you cannot get clarity without be an active listener. Managers, it's not your job to do all the talking. You should be asking questions and listening to learn, not to respond. How are things going on the XYZ project? Have you run into any unexpected challenges or roadblocks? Do you have everything you need to hit the target? And the best managers learn the communication and behavior style of themselves AND of each of their team members. This is absolutely vital, because a more direct manager who loves to ask rapid fire questions will easily intimidate the person who's processing the situation. This one example is one I've seen played out many, many times. And it erodes respect and ultimately trust between both sides. Create a space for radical candor. Conscientious leaders and managers

Latin American Educational Opportunities
#69 Latinos Are The Engine That Drives America's Economy, And Here's The Data To Prove It

Latin American Educational Opportunities

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 15:18


For today's episode, we're going to be going over some stats from the 2020 U.S. Census as well as data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics that shows the average monthly income of a Hispanic worker and some other important relevant data. BONUS EPISODES Patreon: ✨www.patreon.com/latinamericaneo✨

Agency Journey
5 Steps To An Amazing Hiring Process For Agencies

Agency Journey

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 31:28


According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, demand for labor is at an all-time high. Earlier this year, there were on average 40 more jobs available than unemployed workers.And to make matters worse, most agency owners don't even begin the hiring process until they are well beyond capacity. They wait until their employees start to feel overwhelmed before they even write the job description. Hence the reason why burnout has become an even bigger factor in today's work environment. This leads to current talent leaving, and now adding an additional replacement hire that needs to be made.JobRack is a company that helps agency owners through this process. Their mission is to help online business owners hire amazing remote team members from Eastern Europe.On this episode of Agency Journey, Gray sat down with Noel Andrews, Owner and Founder at JobRack, to discuss how agencies can improve their hiring process to bring better team members on board and keep them around for longer.Topics discussed in the episode: Noel's Journey to aquiring and growing JobRack How Noel increased JobRack's revenue 4,000x JobRack's mission and who they serve JobRack's internal team structure The 5 steps to creating an amazing hiring process Defining the outcome Defining the tasks needed to be done Crafting the job description Crafting an amazing applicant experience Setting clear expectations Injecting yourself into the process Providing social proof Creating take home tests  And asking for references The Negotiation, offer, acceptance and leading up to day-one Additional resources for hiring  Presenting Sponsor: ZenPilotBe sure to check out ZenPilot, where we help agencies optimize their operations using our proven systems and processes.ZenPilot knows that you are tired of wasting time on trial-and-error — that's why we provide tried-and-true solutions that will help you grow and scale quickly and sustainably.So, what are you waiting for?Go to zenpilot.com to learn more.Resources mentioned in this episode: JobRack Noel Andrews - LinkedIn Gray Mackenzie - LinkedIn "The Who" - A great book on The A Method of Hiring "Die With Zero" - A great book on personal finances and life Workable - An awesome Applicant Tracking System

Lets Have This Conversation
Helping Businesses Build Championship Teams With: Jason Skeesick

Lets Have This Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 33:35


Only 4.5 percent of the more than 3.6 million people who have served in the U.S. military since September 11, 2001, have launched a company, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Jason Skeesick is a US Army veteran, coach, and an entrepreneurial evangelist. He is a father, husband, fighter, and carrier of heavy things. His company Spear and Clover helps businesses with good leaders, talented teams, and strong playbooks go from contenders to championship teams. You can find Jason hosting the weekly Spear and Clover Podcast available on YouTube and across all audio platforms. He joined me this week to tell me more. For more information: https://www.spearandclover.com/ Email: jason@spearandclover.com Instagram: @spearandclover Instagram: @jasonskeesick

Masters in Business
Marta Norton on Direct Indexing and Investments

Masters in Business

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 53:50 Very Popular


Bloomberg Radio host Barry Ritholtz speaks with Marta Norton, CFA, who is an investment manager with Morningstar Investment Management. Norton's responsibilities include equity, alternative and fixed income research, asset allocation and portfolio management. Before joining Morningstar in 2005, Norton was an economist with the Bureau of Labor Statistics and a research analyst at LECG LLC.Atika Valbrun See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Pharm5
Eliquis v. Xarelto, Adderall shortage, loan forgiveness, and more!

Pharm5

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 4:11


This week on Pharm5: Eliquis v. Xarelto for AFib Improve M&M by quickly titrating HFrEF treatments National Adderall shortage Novavax ok'd as booster Student loan forgiveness application Connect with us! Listen to our podcast: Pharm5 Follow us on Twitter: @LizHearnPharmD References: Dawwas GK, Cuker A, Barnes GD, Lewis JD, Hennessy S. Apixaban versus rivaroxaban in patients with atrial fibrillation and valvular heart disease. Annals of Internal Medicine. October 2022. doi:10.7326/m22-0318 Strong-HF study in patients admitted for acute heart failure (HF) terminated early for superior efficacy. STRONG-HF study in patients admitted for acute heart failure (HF) terminated early for superior efficacy. https://prn.to/3sbDrMv. Published October 13, 2022. Accessed October 14, 2022. Safety, tolerability, and efficacy of rapid optimization, helped by NT-probnp testing, of heart failure therapies - full text view. Safety, Tolerability and Efficacy of Rapid Optimization, Helped by NT-proBNP testinG, of Heart Failure Therapies - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov. https://bit.ly/3MQktVd. Accessed October 14, 2022. Brooks M. FDA confirms nationwide Adderall shortage. Medscape. https://wb.md/3DfXS0O. Published October 14, 2022. Accessed October 14, 2022. FDA drug shortages. FDA. https://bit.ly/3yZiAzG. Accessed October 14, 2022. CDC allows Novavax monovalent COVID-19 boosters for adults ages 18 and older. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://bit.ly/3VM10J9. Published October 19, 2022. Accessed October 20, 2022. Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research. Novavax COVID-19 vaccine. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. https://bit.ly/3eMcbkC. Accessed October 20, 2022. Federal Student Aid. https://bit.ly/3ToNLwC. Accessed October 20, 2022. Duster C. How to qualify for Biden's new student loan forgiveness plan. CNN Politics. https://cnn.it/3ALjKjF. Published Wednesday August 24, 2022. Accessed August 24, 2022. Occupational Employment and Wages, May 2021 - Pharmacists. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. https://bit.ly/3PObHXm. Published March 31, 2022. Accessed August 24, 2022. Smoot C. What is the average pharmacy school debt in 2022? SuperMoney. https://bit.ly/3PHqZNK. Published April 26, 2022. Accessed August 24, 2022.

The FOX News Rundown
The Durham Probe And The Challenge Of Reigning In Abuse Of Power

The FOX News Rundown

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 35:26 Very Popular


On Tuesday, a federal jury acquitted Igor Danchenko on four counts of lying to the FBI. Danchenko was involved in the infamous Steele Dossier, which contained allegations towards former President Donald Trump during his 2016 presidential campaign and his dealings with Russia. Since the investigation, multiple pundits and lawmakers have raised concerns over FBI misconduct and questions about how to hold the intelligence agency accountable. Former Assistant US Attorney for the Southern District of New York and FOX News Contributor Andy McCarthy joins the Rundown to discuss why it's so difficult to stop the abuse of power, as well as what's next for the Durham probe.   Wages have not kept pace with growing inflation and as a result the childcare industry is experiencing a shortage in workers, with many reportedly leaving the profession in pursuit of higher paying jobs. Childcare costs have long been a major issue for American parents balancing work and family but now the Bureau of Labor Statistics shows there are 100,000 less childcare workers than pre-pandemic. Carolina Reyes is the owner and Director of Arco Iris Bilingual Children's Center and she joins the Rundown to break down how the high prices in the country are preventing many from working in child care, the immense cost and effort that goes into running a child care facility, and why she believes the United States must begin valuing child care services as an accessibility issue.   Plus, commentary by Fox News Medical Contributor and author of "Panic Attack," Dr. Nicole Saphier. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

From Washington – FOX News Radio
The Durham Probe And The Challenge Of Reigning In Abuse Of Power

From Washington – FOX News Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 35:26


On Tuesday, a federal jury acquitted Igor Danchenko on four counts of lying to the FBI. Danchenko was involved in the infamous Steele Dossier, which contained allegations towards former President Donald Trump during his 2016 presidential campaign and his dealings with Russia. Since the investigation, multiple pundits and lawmakers have raised concerns over FBI misconduct and questions about how to hold the intelligence agency accountable. Former Assistant US Attorney for the Southern District of New York and FOX News Contributor Andy McCarthy joins the Rundown to discuss why it's so difficult to stop the abuse of power, as well as what's next for the Durham probe.   Wages have not kept pace with growing inflation and as a result the childcare industry is experiencing a shortage in workers, with many reportedly leaving the profession in pursuit of higher paying jobs. Childcare costs have long been a major issue for American parents balancing work and family but now the Bureau of Labor Statistics shows there are 100,000 less childcare workers than pre-pandemic. Carolina Reyes is the owner and Director of Arco Iris Bilingual Children's Center and she joins the Rundown to break down how the high prices in the country are preventing many from working in child care, the immense cost and effort that goes into running a child care facility, and why she believes the United States must begin valuing child care services as an accessibility issue.   Plus, commentary by Fox News Medical Contributor and author of "Panic Attack," Dr. Nicole Saphier. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The WorldView in 5 Minutes
Million Mexicans march for life; Iranian Christian man, with Parkinson's disease, in jail; Update on Christian baker Jack Phillips

The WorldView in 5 Minutes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022


It's Wednesday, October 19th, A.D. 2022. This is The Worldview in 5 Minutes heard at www.TheWorldview.com. I'm Adam McManus. (Adam@TheWorldview.com) By Jonathan Clark Iranian Christian man, with Parkinson's disease, in jail Iranian authorities detained a Christian couple in Tehran's Evin Prison back in August. This month, Christian Solidarity International asks for prayer for Homayoun Zhaveh–who suffers from advanced Parkinson's disease–and his wife, Sara Ahmadi. The two have been sentenced to years in prison for participating in a house church. Christian converts in Iran are not recognized, and house churches are frequently raided as “illegal” groups. Dozens of Iranian Christians in recent years have received prison sentences of up to 15 years. Iran is ranked ninth on the Open Doors' World Watch List of nations where it is most difficult to be a Christian.  China President Xi Jinping headed to third term China's Communist Party is meeting this week for their 20th National Congress. President Xi Jinping is expected to get an unprecedented third term as the leader of the Communist Party and the head of China's military forces. Meanwhile, the U.S. is cracking down on American companies selling advanced semiconductors to China. The goal is to slow China's technological and military development. Taiwan, South Korea, and the U.S. continue to outperform China in the manufacturing of high-end computer chips. Million Mexicans march for life Last weekend, over a million people marched across Mexico for the protection of human life. Activists read a manifesto in Mexico City, calling for the life of every human being to be protected equally before and after birth. Most of Mexico's states still have protections for unborn babies, but the lawmakers are facing international pressure to legalize abortion on demand. Update on Christian baker Jack Phillips Colorado Christian baker Jack Phillips is back in court. Phillips of Masterpiece Cakeshop is appealing a ruling from last year that found him guilty of discrimination. He had refused to bake a cake to celebrate someone pretending to be the opposite sex. The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favor of Phillips in 2018 in a similar case. The case involved his refusal to bake a cake to celebrate homosexuality.  Alliance Defending Freedom continues to represent Phillips in his fight for religious freedom. You can support his defense through a link in our transcript today at TheWorldview.com.  Psalm 14:4 asks, “Have all the workers of iniquity no knowledge, who eat up My people as they eat bread, and do not call on the LORD?” Poll: 76% of voters say education important A new poll from Rasmussen found education is an important issue for U.S. voters. Seventy-seven percent of likely voters believe education issues will be important in this year's congressional elections, and 45% believe it will be very important.  Sixty-eight percent of voters are worried that public schools are promoting controversial beliefs and attitudes with 49% saying they are very concerned. Last October, 76% of voters were concerned about what public schools were teaching. Social Security recipients get 8.2% increase The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that prices rose by 8.2% last month on an annual basis. In the face of surging inflation, Social Security recipients will get an 8.7% increase in their benefits next year. It's the largest cost-of-living adjustment in 40 years. A survey by the American Advisors Group found nearly a third of seniors say they are delaying retirement or are never planning to retire as consumer costs continue to rise. The impact of Scripture And finally, the American Bible Society released their latest findings from the 2022 State of the Bible report. The study found 92% of Bible Users say the Bible has transformed their life. Even 38% of non-Bible Users say the same. Bible Users are defined as those who read the Bible at least three to four times a year on their own.  The report also found people who are “Scripture Engaged” were the most likely to strongly agree they can forgive others. “Scripture Engaged” individuals are impacted daily by the Bible and regularly read and engage with the Bible. 2 Peter 1:19 says, “We also have the prophetic word strongly confirmed, and you will do well to pay attention to it, as to a lamp shining in a dark place, until the day dawns and the morning star rises in your hearts.” Close And that's The Worldview in 5 Minutes on this Wednesday, October 19th, in the year of our Lord 2022. Subscribe by iTunes or email to our unique Christian newscast at www.TheWorldview.com. Or get the Generations app through Google Play or The App Store. I'm Adam McManus (Adam@TheWorldview.com). And here, to conclude the newscast, is my son, Honor, who turns 13 today and becomes a man. Seize the day for Jesus Christ.

Daily Signal News
Economist Explains Why 'Americans Are Being Absolutely Crushed Right Now'

Daily Signal News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 11:56


The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported on Thursday that the consumer price index rose 0.4% in September, showing that inflation remained at a near four-decade high of 8.2%. "Today's report shows some progress in the fight against higher prices, even as we have more work to do. Inflation over the last three months has averaged 2%, at an annualized rate," President Joe Biden said in a statement. EJ Antoni, a research fellow for regional economics in the Center for Data Analysis at The Heritage Foundation, couldn't disagree more. "This is just the latest example of how Americans are being absolutely crushed right now by these higher prices. And it's not yachts and caviar that are driving these increases. It's necessities. It's the basic staples," Antoni says. "It's eggs, bread, milk. We're not talking about filet mignon here. We're talking about ground beef. And sadly, Americans are really paying the price for what has been going on the last two years in terms of the government just spending, borrowing, and printing trillions and trillions of dollars," says Antoni.Antoni joins "The Daily Signal Podcast" to take a deeper dive into what the consumer price index means, how it compares to the producer price index, and even offer some spending advice ahead of the holiday season. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
Daily Signal Podcast: Economist Explains Why ‘Americans Are Being Absolutely Crushed Right Now’

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022


The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported on Thursday that the consumer price index rose 0.4% in September, showing that inflation remained at a near four-decade high of 8.2%. “Today's report shows some progress in the fight against higher prices, even as we have more work to do. Inflation over the last three months has […]

HPS Macrocast
Macrocast: You're Sacked

HPS Macrocast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 40:40


On this week's Macrocast, host Tony Fratto is joined by Brendan Walsh from Markets Policy Partners and Brai Odion-Esene from SW4 Insights to discuss the unexpected turn of events in the UK and the hotter-than-expected CPI data released this week. The group also dives into the IMF/World Bank Annual Meetings and shares their key takeaways from the week's gatherings, including the strong dollar, the outlook on oil prices, and debt in emerging markets. Read more about SW4 Insights founder Brai Odion-Esene here.Check out the September CPI report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics here.Learn more about Markets Policy Partners here.

Landaas & Company Money Talk Podcast
Money Talk Podcast, Friday Oct. 14, 2022

Landaas & Company Money Talk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 23:01


  Landaas & Company newsletter  October edition now available. Advisors on This Week's Show KYLE TETTING ART ROTHSCHILD Kendall Bauer (with Max Hoelzl, Joel Dresang, engineered by Kevin Lofy, Jason Scuglik) Week in Review (Oct. 10-14, 2022) SIGNIFICANT ECONOMIC INDICATORS & REPORTS Monday No major announcements Tuesday No major announcements Wednesday Prices on the wholesale level rose in September, the first increase in three months and another reminder of stubbornly high inflation. The Bureau of Labor Statistics said its Producer Price Index rose 0.4% from August largely affected by higher costs for services as well as increases for food and home heating. The core index number, which excludes volatile prices for food, energy and trade services, also rose 0.4%. Compared to the year before, the PPI gained 8.5%, slowing for the third month in a row and the lowest wholesale inflation since July 2021. Core PPI rose 5.6% from September 2021, the same as in August; that was down from as high as 7.1% in March. Thursday The Bureau of Labor Statistics said its Consumer Price Index rose at a slower annual pace, though its core rate increased at its fastest since 1982. Considered the broadest measure of inflation, the CPI gained 0.4% from August, led by higher prices for shelter, food and medical care. The core rate, stripping out volatile costs for food and energy, increased by 0.6%. Year to year, headline inflation rose 8.2%, its lowest since February. The core CPI was up 6.6% from the year before, the biggest gain since August 1982. The core increase was led by a 15% rise in shelter costs and a 9% gain in new car prices. Based on CPI data, the Social Security Administration announced an 8.7% adjustment to benefits in 2023. That was the biggest raise for Social Security recipients since an 11.2% boost in 1981. The four-week moving average for initial unemployment claims rose for the second week in a row but also the second time in nine weeks. Claims averaged 211,500 in the most recent reading from the Labor Department, 43% below the 55-year average. Altogether, more than 1.2 million Americans claimed jobless benefits in the most recent week, up 0.6% from the week before but one-third of the 3.6 million claims one year earlier. Friday With consumer spending driving about 70% of the U.S. gross domestic product, no change in retail spending in September suggests at least a momentary pause in momentum. Of 13 retail categories, seven experienced lower sales in September, the Commerce Department reported. Among the decliners were gas stations, electronics and appliance centers and furniture stores. Bars, restaurants and grocery stores were among the top gainers. Adjusted for inflation, retail sales fell for the fifth time in seven months and were 13% above the level just before the COVID-19 pandemic. A preliminary October reading of consumer sentiment suggested that uncertainty continued to dampen outlooks. The survey-based index from the University of Michigan rose marginally from September furthering a gradual recovery from an all-time low in June. suppress expectations amid lingering coronavirus concerns and supply-chain disruptions. Opinions of current conditions rose slightly, but expectations stayed low because of doubts about prices, economies and financial markets globally. Anticipation of higher gas prices in the next year rose for the first time in three months. MARKET CLOSINGS FOR THE WEEK Nasdaq – 10321, down 331 points or 3.1% Standard & Poor's 500 – 3584, down 56 points or 1.5% Dow Jones Industrial – 29644, up 347 points or 1.2% 10-year U.S. Treasury Note – 4.01%, up 0.13 point Send us a question for our next podcast. Not a Landaas & Company client yet? Click here to learn more. More information and insight from Money Talk Money Talk Videos Follow us on Twitter. Landaas newsletter subscribers return to the newsletter via e-mail.

Pharm5
Pharmacy technician day, ISMP guidance for codes, and more!

Pharm5

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 4:05


This week on Pharm5: Pharmacy Technician Day Boostrix during pregnancy AMA reviews PBMs COVID boosters for kids ISMP guidance for pharmacists in codes Connect with us! Listen to our podcast: Pharm5 Follow us on Twitter: @LizHearnPharmD References: Pharmacy technician day. ASHP. https://bit.ly/3exFuaj. Accessed October 13, 2022. 29-2052 pharmacy technicians. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. https://bit.ly/3VuX0wr. Published March 31, 2022. Accessed October 13, 2022. Resume CV development. ASHP. https://bit.ly/3EGX2LY. Accessed October 13, 2022. FDA approves vaccine for use during third trimester of pregnancy to prevent whooping cough in infants younger than two months of age. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. https://bit.ly/3CAlc82. Accessed October 13, 2022. New AMA report calls for state regulation of drug price middlemen. Yahoo! Finance. https://yhoo.it/3rWe0hQ. Accessed October 13, 2022. Guardado JR. AMA. Competition in Commercial PBM Markets and Vertical Integration of Health Insurers with PBMs. https://bit.ly/3MwDSdx. Accessed October 13, 2022. Coronavirus (COVID-19) update: FDA authorizes Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech bivalent COVID-19 vaccines for use as a booster dose in younger age groups. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. https://bit.ly/3TiXjZA. Accessed October 13, 2022. CDC Covid Data tracker. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://covid.cdc.gov/covid-data-tracker/#demographicsovertime. Accessed October 13, 2022. Survey results from pharmacists provide support to enhance the organizational response to codes. Institute For Safe Medication Practices. https://bit.ly/3gaqejW. Published October 6, 2022. Accessed October 13, 2022.

MID-WEST FARM REPORT - MADISON
Ukraine Events And Transportation Cause For Concern

MID-WEST FARM REPORT - MADISON

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 50:10


With feed ingredient prices climbing Drew Johnson, an independent dairy consultant in Western Wisconsin, shares some of the smart swaps and moves he's seen farmers make. From adjusting ration inclusions based on falling protein prices, updates on some of the possible byproducts out there, and plans for spring planting, he shares what he sees as the best options to better manage feed inputs. The 2019 data for the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics indicates that the agricultural sector is the most dangerous in America with an equivalent of 23 deaths per 100,000 workers. Fall harvest time can be one of the busiest and most dangerous seasons of the year for the agriculture industry. Angela Bunker, Senior Loss Control Specialist with American Family Insurance shares more on recognizing hazards and minimizing loss. John Heinberg, Market Advisor with Total Farm Marketing shares how current events win Ukraine are affecting wheat prices, transportation concerns, and outlook for livestock and soybean prices.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

IEN Radio
Worker Lockout Could Cost Exxon Tens of Millions

IEN Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 1:48


On Monday, the U.S. National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) filed a complaint against what it calls Exxon Mobil's "unlawful" effort to boot the United Steelworkers union that represented workers at a Texas plant. Some 600 workers at the Exxon refinery in Beaumont were locked out of the refinery and lube oil plant for 10 months, from May 2021 to March 2022. According to Reuters, among the damages, the NLRB is asking the court to issue back pay to employees, which could cost the company tens of millions of dollars. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, refinery workers average about $73,830 per year as of 2019. Let just say that 600 workers made the average, that works out to about $35 million in back wages. A hearing is scheduled for January and an Exxon spokesperson says the company acted in accordance with the law. The sticking point appears to be messages the company sent to locked-out workers. According to the NLRB, the correspondence told employees that they could come back to work as long as they decertified the union. The union issued a strike notice during contract talks in January 2021. Exxon says it initiated the lockout to prevent supply disruptions at the facility, which processes nearly 370,000 barrels per day. The company kept the plant running with replacement workers and transfers from other facilities. Despite the company's efforts, in March, workers voted to retain its union representation. 

Human Insight Podcast
Solving business problems with big 'D' design

Human Insight Podcast

Play Episode Play 55 sec Highlight Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 38:40


The digital acceleration is changing everyone's lives, especially for designers who are more and more in demand across companies, industries and geographies. The past decade has seen incredible changes to design, and who is a designer.In fact, the US Bureau of Labor Statistics this year officially recognized the job of “web and digital interface designer,” says Andrew Hogan, who leads insights and analysis at Figma and was this week's guest on the Human Insight Podcast. “And there's also this realization that design can impact things at a business level, call it Big D design,” Hogan said. “It's not just about moving pixels, it's also about solving business problems.”Podcast co-hosts Andy MacMillan and Janelle Estes talked with Andrew before Adobe's announced its intentions to acquire Figma for $20 billion.In addition to discussing how much design has changed, as well as what's ahead, they also discussed what are the best practices across the industry, especially as it pertains to big, global, and/or enterprise organizations. Follow us on LinkedIn or Twitter Co-host Janelle Estes | @janelle_estes Co-host Andy MacMillan | @apmacmillan Producer Nathan Isaacs...

Creating Wealth Real Estate Investing with Jason Hartman
1906: Unemployment Rate Driving the Fed Nuts! Wes Gray, Alpha Architects

Creating Wealth Real Estate Investing with Jason Hartman

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 38:47


Welcome to The Creating Wealth Show where rents in suburbia are higher than rents in cities and the Fed wants to see you unemployed! Think we're kidding, right? Think again! You couldn't make up fiction this good if you tried! Jason Hartman takes you through the latest news stories and predictions affecting the economy and is joined by Wesley Gray, CEO of Alpha Architect for a fascinating discussion on inflation hedges and future scenarios for commodities and crypto. Last Friday, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported over 200K new jobs were added in September. Sounds like great news for the economy and people in general, right? Strangely, it runs directly counter to what the Federal Reserve wants to see; they don't want to see the unemployment rate fall, they don't want to see you have a job. They want to see you unemployed. That low unemployment rate has to be driving the Fed nuts! Americans working and spending money is something they don't want to see, as they have forecasted a recession next year, and are looking for the unemployment rate to reach 4.4%.  How should we allocate risk right now? Why is crypto performing so poorly? Are we truly becoming a Banana Republic that does not end well? Jason and Wesley discuss a few things that you should always consider including keeping your tax rates down as much as possible. Fees and taxes are things you can often control, whereas we can't control what the economy or inflation is going to do.  And why is crypto doing so poorly when it should, at least in theory, be the inflation hedge asset? Where's Michael Saylor? Isn't Bitcoin digital gold? Without a military behind it, will cryptocurrencies ever be truly viable? Key takeaway: Jason's editorial 0:00 The Creating Wealth Show, episode 1906 3:01 Jason's 2020 prediction - the rise of suburbia 6:21 Cities saw rent increases almost 17% since the beginning of pandemic 7:39 Weekend in Vegas at Richard Branson's Virgin Hotel 9:48 Thanks for attending the Recession Proof Investing Summit 10:10 HousingWire article: Why a good jobs report is bad news for the Federal Reserve 14:06 Over 109,000 followers on Instagram! Instagram.com/JasonHartman1 17:20 Register now for our LIVE event in Scottsdale AZ! EmpoweredInvestor.com/Live Wes Gray Interview 20:10 Welcome Wesley Gray, CEO & Co-CIO, Alpha Architect - Empowering investors through education 20:51 How do we allocate risk? 22:17 What assets should you be owning right now? Stocks, commodities? 25:24 Controlling your tax rates 26:49 Will we see incredibly high interest rates needed to tame inflation? 27:31 We are becoming a Banana Republic and it won't end well 29:05 Alpha Architect investment philosophies 30:38 Following trends in crypto, bonds & stocks 32:19 Why is crypto doing so poorly right now? 34:00 Ponzi schemes backed by military 35:07 The ability to inflict violence is what makes the world run 35:50 Freedom in Iraq vs Freedom in the US 37:03 Learn more and check out Wesley's blog at AlphaArchitect.com and follow on Twitter! @alphaarchitect Wesley R. Gray, Ph.D. CEO & Co-CIO, Alpha Architect After serving as a Captain in the United States Marine Corps, Dr. Gray earned an MBA and a PhD in finance from the University of Chicago where he studied under Nobel Prize Winner Eugene Fama. Next, Wes took an academic job in his wife's hometown of Philadelphia and worked as a finance professor at Drexel University. Dr. Gray's interest in bridging the research gap between academia and industry led him to found Alpha Architect, an asset management firm dedicated to an impact mission of empowering investors through education. Wes has published multiple academic papers and four books, including Embedded (Naval Institute Press, 2009), Quantitative Value (Wiley, 2012), DIY Financial Advisor (Wiley, 2015), and Quantitative Momentum (Wiley, 2016). Follow Jason on TWITTER, INSTAGRAM & LINKEDIN Twitter.com/JasonHartmanROI Instagram.com/jasonhartman1/ Linkedin.com/in/jasonhartmaninvestor/ Call our Investment Counselors at: 1-800-HARTMAN (US) or visit: https://www.jasonhartman.com/ Free Class:  Easily get up to $250,000 in funding for real estate, business or anything else: http://JasonHartman.com/Fund CYA Protect Your Assets, Save Taxes & Estate Planning: http://JasonHartman.com/Protect Get wholesale real estate deals for investment or build a great business – Free Course: https://www.jasonhartman.com/deals Special Offer from Ron LeGrand: https://JasonHartman.com/Ron Free Mini-Book on Pandemic Investing: https://www.PandemicInvesting.com

Monday Morning Minutes
MMM Episode 86: JOLTS and a Hawk-Provoking Labor Market

Monday Morning Minutes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 39:24


For their topic of the week, Jeff Mayberry and Samuel Lau (20:51) delve into the Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey (JOLTS), conducted monthly by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. The hosts kick off their review of the Oct. 3-7 market week with a positive but volatile showing for stocks (3:05), round-tripping yields in the Treasury market (4:46) and a 5% rally in commodities (8:31) led by double-digit gains in the energy complex following OPEC's decision to cut crude oil production by 2 million barrels a day. Looking at the week's macro news (11:55), they take note of unanimously hawkish public comments by four different Fed officials, including the once-dovish Neel Kashkari, and Friday's strong employment reports. The week ahead (32:49) promises a raft of important data points, including the September Producer Price Index on Wednesday Oct. 12, the September Consumer Price Index on Thursday and the University of Michigan 5-to-10-year inflation expectations survey, a reading that is on the radar of Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell.

First Move with Julia Chatterley
Feature interview: ZipRecruiter's Julia Pollak

First Move with Julia Chatterley

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 46:09


According to figures released today by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the US added 263,000 jobs in September, while the unemployment rate dropped from 3.7% to 3.5%. Joining us to discuss the latest numbers is Julia Pollak, chief economist at ZipRecruiter.  Also on today's show: Board of the British Chambers of Commerce (BCC) Director General Shevaun Haviland.To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

Landaas & Company Money Talk Podcast
Money Talk Podcast, Friday Oct. 7, 2022

Landaas & Company Money Talk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 16:26


  Landaas & Company newsletter  October edition now available. Advisors on This Week's Show KYLE TETTING DAVE SANDSTROM PAIGE RADKE (with Max Hoelzl, Joel Dresang, engineered by Jason Scuglik) Week in Review (Oct. 3-7, 2022) SIGNIFICANT ECONOMIC INDICATORS & REPORTS Monday The Institute for Supply Management reported that its manufacturing index signaled expansion in September for the 28th month in a row, although at the slowest pace in that period. Based on surveys of purchasing managers, the index showed demand for factory goods contracting but also found supply-chain clogs easing. The trade group said the index suggests the U.S. gross domestic product grew at a 0.8% annual pace in September. The Commerce Department said the annual rate of construction spending fell in August for the third month in a row. The rate of $1.78 trillion was 8.5% above the year-ago rate. Residential expenditures, which account for more than half of total spending, also declined for the third straight month, but was 49% higher than the level just before the COVID pandemic. Tuesday The Commerce Department reported such a slight decline in manufacturing orders in August that it rounded the estimate off to “unchanged.” Orders fell 1% in July and were 13% ahead of where they were in August 2021. Declines in commercial aircraft and automotive orders held back the indicator of industrial demand. Excluding transportation, orders rose 0.2% for the month and were up 12% from the year before. Core capital goods orders, a proxy for business investments, rose 1.4% for the month and were up 10% from August 2021. Employers reined in on job openings in August, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The number of help-wanted posts declined 6% to 10.1 million openings. Demand for workers still hovered near the highest levels in more than 20 years of data, while the number of active job seekers in August (according to a separate BLS report) was near the lowest in that period. Job openings declined most in the health care field along with retail trades and other services. Hiring rates and separations were little changed from July. The number of workers quitting their jobs – a sign of worker confidence – rose for the first time in three months to 4.1 million. Wednesday The U.S. trade deficit shrank 4.3% in August to $67.4 billion. The deficit, which detracts from gross domestic product, narrowed as the value of imports declined at a faster rate than exports. Through the first eight months of 2022, the trade gap grew 24% from the year before as imports rose by 21% and exports increased by 20%. The U.S. services sector continued expanding in September, though at a slightly slower pace, according to the Institute for Supply Management. The pace of growth also was below the 12-month average. The trade group's services index showed the 28th consecutive month of growth, expanding all but two of the latest 152 months. Purchase managers surveyed for the index reported improved supply chain efficiency, operating capacity, materials availability and employment. Thursday The four-week moving average for initial unemployment claims rose for the first time in eight weeks but only because of a downward revision to the week-before numbers. Data from the Labor Department showed average new applications for jobless benefits remained 44% below the 55-year average. More than 1.2 million Americans were receiving unemployment benefits in the latest week, down 4% from the week before and down from 4.2 million the same week in 2021. Friday Employers added 263,000 jobs in September, the lowest addition since April 2021 and below the 420,000 average so far in 2022. The Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that payroll jobs rose 0.3% above the level just before the pandemic. Job gains were broadly spread across industries, led by leisure and hospitality, although that group remained 1.1 million or 6.7% behind its pre-pandemic level.

TechCheck
AMD Cuts Revenue Guidance, Tech Plunges on September Jobs Report & Chinese EV Makers Push to Gain Share in Europe 10/7/22

TechCheck

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 43:19


Our anchors begin today's show with CNBC's Steve Kovach breaking down chipmaker AMD's decision to cut revenue guidance for the quarter. Then, Rosenberg Research Chief Strategist David Rosenberg and Citi U.S. Equity Strategist Scott Chronert offer their take on Fed rate hikes, September's jobs report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics and more. Next, CNBC's Frank Holland reports on FedEx forecasting lower holiday volume than expected, and CNBC's Kayla Tausche shares details on two new federal rules restricting the export of certain semiconductors to China. We also circle back to AMD's sales outlook with Wedbush Securities analyst Matt Bryson, and Bernstein analyst Richard Clarke joins after initiating coverage on Airbnb with an outperform rating. Later, CNBC's Eunice Yoon covers the push by Chinese EV makers to gain share in Europe.

Bombshell Business Podcast with Amber Hurdle
5 Wins & 5 Fails Forward in 10 Years of Business: The Anniversary Episode (141)

Bombshell Business Podcast with Amber Hurdle

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 70:09


I cannot believe I've been in business for TEN YEARS! Apparently, I become a busy gal in October. After all, it's my birthday month! It's also the month that I tend to…well…birth things! 

Group Chat
Stay Away From The Repo Man | Group Chat News Ep. 689

Group Chat

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 70:08 Very Popular


Today, Dee and Anand are joined by Ali from Car Trackers. Then, the gentlemen discuss the stock market's comeback, the Bureau of Labor Statistics' terrible stat, Elon Musk's new Twitter offer, Musk's texts, Poshmark's new corporate daddy, and Kanye's YZY 9 show. Connect with Group Chat! Watch The Pod #1 Newsletter In The World For The Gram Tweet With Us Exclusive Facebook Content We're @groupchatpod on Snapchat

Wintrust Business Lunch
Wintrust Business Lunch 10/04/22: Job openings, how leaders can learn from NASA, McHugh Construction celebrating 125 years, and learn more about Midwest Tankermen

Wintrust Business Lunch

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022


Segment 1: Tom Gimbel, founder and CEO of LaSalle Network, joins John to talk about the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Job Openings & Labor Turnover Survey report published today. Segment 2: Philippe Weiss, President, Seyfarth at Work, talks to John about leadership lessons that can be learned from NASA's recent asteroid deflection test. Segment 3: Michael Meagher, President of […]

The Mike Broomhead Show Audio
Did you hear this?

The Mike Broomhead Show Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 5:52


Mike reacts to the hottest news stories of the day, including the latest job numbers from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Manager Minute-brought to you by the VR Technical Assistance Center for Quality Management
VRTAC-QM Manager Minute: National Disability Employment Awareness Month - See how Self-Employment Serves a Critical Need in Wyoming with Inge Huband and Nicky Harper

Manager Minute-brought to you by the VR Technical Assistance Center for Quality Management

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 23:44


Joining Carol Pankow in the studio today is Inge Huband, Program Consultant for the Wyoming Department of Workforce Services Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Small Business and Employment First programs, and Nicky Harper, Vocational Rehabilitation Administrator for Wyoming VR. This year, the National Disability Employment Awareness Month (NDEAM) has a theme of Disability: Part of the Equity Equation in recognition of the vital role people with disabilities play in making the nation's workforce diverse and inclusive. For our listeners, Wyoming VR does not participate in the Randolph Sheppard program; however, they have concentrated for almost two decades on their small business program that focuses on self-employment. Learn how this focus has attained over a 50 percent success rating for small businesses through partnerships, creativity, education, and community networking.   Listen Here   Full Transcript   VRTAC-QM Manager Minute: National Disability Employment Awareness Month - See how Self-Employment Serves a Critical Need in Wyoming with Inge Huband and Nicky Harper   {Music} Speaker1: Manager Minute brought to you by the VRTAC for Quality Management, Conversations powered by VR, one manager at a time, one minute at a time. Here is your host Carol Pankow.   Carol: Well, welcome to the Manager Minute. Joining me in the studio today is Inge Huband, Program Consultant for the Wyoming Department of Workforce Services, Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, Small Business and Employment First Program, and Nicky Harper, Vocational Rehabilitation Administrator for Wyoming VR. And wow, was that a mouthful? So good to have you both. Inge, how are things going in Wyoming?   Inge: Oh, they're pretty good. We had a very hot summer. We're looking forward to some cool down here.   Carol: Absolutely. And Nicky, how about you? How are things going?   Nicky: I am well, Carol, thank you for having us. Life is good in Wyoming.   Carol: Excellent. Well, you're some of our favorite people, that's for sure. So this year, the National Disability Employment Awareness Month, or NDEAM, has a theme of disability: Part of the equity equation in recognition of the vital role people with disabilities play in making the nation's workforce diverse and inclusive. So this past year, my colleague Alison Flanagan and I had the opportunity to participate in the Wyoming VR on site monitoring review by RSA. And during the week we spent together, Alison was sitting in the session discussing your small business program in Wyoming and was completely blown away. She told me immediately, She's like, You got to follow up with them and get a podcast together. So for our listeners out there, Wyoming VR does not participate in the Randolph Shepard program. However, they have had a focus for almost two decades on their small business program that focuses on self-employment. The Bureau of Labor Statistics states that over 10% of US workers are self-employed, and self-employed workers also represent many of the country's entrepreneurs who are responsible for creating jobs for other workers. So let's dig in. So I'm really excited about your small business program, and I wanted to talk a little bit more about that. So Nicky, can you give us a little context about Wyoming does not participate in the Randolph Shepard program?   Nicky: That is correct, Carol. We don't have a Randolph Shepard program for a couple of reasons. Primarily, incidents of visually impaired individuals is very low. So when the cafeteria programs went away, oh gosh, several years ago, it was set up that funding was coming into vocational rehabilitation. So at that time, my predecessor and I believe the field services administrator took a look at that and said, well, there's still funding coming in. So instead of a cafeteria program, can we still continue to look at the vending program and how can we get some legislation and statutes written so that vending income could be utilized to still support individuals with disabilities wanting to develop small businesses? So instead of doing vending cafeteria with Randolph Shepard, we kind of went a slightly different avenue.   Carol: So Wyoming has their own take on this. So you actually have your own legislation that governs what you're doing.   Nicky: We do, yes.   Carol: Excellent. I was very curious about that. So how does the funding work for this program?   Nicky: So the legislation or the statute allows for us to go out for bid for individuals in the communities. They don't necessarily have to be an individual with a disability, but I do believe this score additional points on an RFP, if they have a disability to set up vending machines in state owned buildings. So they set up the vending machines with understanding that a percentage of the earnings come to vocational rehabilitation. So we then use those earnings as match dollars when we set up a small business so that we use federal dollars obviously, and that vending income is used as a non-federal match portion.   Carol: Gotcha. Thank you for clearing that up. So do you partner with the Wyoming Small Business Administration?   Inge: Not directly. So I would call that an indirect partnership. We put a couple of years. We have partnered with the Wyoming Women's Business Center and they receive part of their funding through the Small Business Administration. So what we have started doing is to refer some of our clients. Not all of them will work for this program. Some of them can be referred with the approved loan amount, and then they will actually have to go through a loan process through the Wyoming Women's Business Center. The amount that DVR has approved for their small business is the loan amount that they're applying for, and we are able to pay that loan and the client will have to provide us with showing that they actually purchase what they have. So that's another layer of responsibility for the clients. It's no longer just gives me money. It's like, Oh no, I have to fill out a loan application and I have to talk to the loan officer and put everything out there and they have to have a. That's account ready. They have to have their legal entity already registered before they can even receive those funds. So it puts everything in another level of reality. And then they have the responsibility of purchasing all the approved items and approved that they did purchase them. And they have to send that also to the Women's Business Center as well as to us. So that's kind of how we keep track of all of that. But it does help with the diverse things that clients need. It's sometimes very difficult for, say, to purchase certain items through the process that we have. And so that makes it a lot easier, a lot more efficient than quicker for the client to obtain those needed items.   Carol: I know your state is very you know, you have the rural component. There's sort of a little bit of the bigger city areas and such. But what are some unique challenges that people face in Wyoming with creating a small business?   Inge: It is probably infrastructure. Internet sometimes is an issue, just being in very small communities and very rural, having to drive to places and it causes a lot of issues. But as I said, people are very resourceful when they buy into their idea and they see their idea growing from, Oh, here's that concept that I have in my head and through the process of business planning, it becomes a tangible idea of something that really makes sense and we help them really understand, okay, where you're at in this particular situation, does it really make sense to have a ginormous warehouse? For example? Would it not be better to utilize drop shippers or whatever we're considering in that situation? And then the idea grows from this big monstrosity to something small, functional and doable, and the client is able to just move forward with it. And also, I think giving them the future outlook of you can always grow your business, you can always change. And Wyoming has a really great network of support for small business. We work with local economic development chambers. I encourage the clients to work with all of these entities to really get into the nitty gritty of their small business idea and figure things out.   So it's not uncommon that I ask clients to do surveys, talk to their community and say, Do they really want this service? Because being online works sometimes, but not all the time. It's difficult. It's a big market out there. So when you have a following in your local community and get started, it's a lot easier to transition online or go into a warehouse. So for example, in a small town here in Wyoming called Buffalo, we have a saddle maker and he was visited by our governor. And because of that, we had another visitor from a local retailer who wants to help him with some free space. And so now he's able to move from his own property into a free rented location down the road. We'll probably have to pay rent, right now it's free and he'll have a little retail location. So what he can offer are smaller items. So he doesn't just rely on saddles and so he's really excited and things are moving.   Carol: Well, that sounds like a super smart approach, especially when you talked about having some of the Internet issues that can happen in rural areas too. So you want to have somewhat of a following in that community because people may not be able to get to you online either. That makes some sense. So you talked about this saddle maker. So what are some of the other interesting businesses that have been pursued?   Nicky: Oh, my gosh, quite a few. We get really, really creative. And Inge is a really good job with ensuring that the business is viable and they can be successful. The clients have to put together a pretty detailed business plan. The one that I kind of laugh about is we call it the pole dancing business.   Carol: Do tell!   Inge: This one was a client who just came to me and said, Well, I'm this athletic person. I teach pole dancing. I want to do that as a business. And I wasn't sure if we could do that, being tied to federal funding and all of that. So sure. And I didn't understand the idea of that being just physical exercise and all of that. So there were all these other things with it. But she opened up a studio and a really small town. It worked really well. She had a nice clientele. She was big enough to open a second studio in adjacent small town that worked also well, and then her injury got worse. Unfortunately, she had to sell to local studios. She moved and she's still selling her choreography and her merchandise online. And so that one was a really fun one to work with because it was so out of the ordinary, something different.   Nicky: We have done some really cool ones like. On supporting horses for Wyoming that works out. There's a lot of rodeo and that kind of stuff happening, and individuals may not always have the capacity to transport their animals across state lines. So we've done that kind of business and sometimes even to some micro-businesses kind of thing. One that comes to mind that was pretty cool was the latest craze of like essential oils and that kind of business. So we have really supported from large businesses, from mowing companies to moving horses to one was a t shirt company. This guy, he would get this product and then resell it. I think in his second year of business he cleared like 70,000. Well, that was.   Carol: Well that is cool though, because you guys have been super creative and it's worked for Wyoming, you know, and what people have needed there, because I know you definitely have a lot of challenges with the geographic nature of your state.   Nicky: Absolutely.   Carol: Very, very cool. So how do your outcomes look and how did the pandemic impact your customers and their businesses?   Inge: So our outcomes on general, when we check our numbers, they're about 50% success rate, which is pretty good because nationwide, when you look at all the small businesses that start in the first year, you have a 90% failure rate. And of those 90% within five years, you have another 50% failure rate of those remaining business. So it's very tough. So we are doing pretty good. The pandemic really didn't do that much to us. I was as busy as before the pandemic actually even busier. People were really hunkering down, thinking, well, what can I do? How can I support myself? And we did a lot throughout the pandemic. So the pandemic itself did not. We're seeing a slowdown right now. That is because there are a lot of jobs available. I believe right now the unemployment is at about 3% in Wyoming.   Carol: Oh, excellent.   Inge: So there is that natural slowdown that happens with that. So when work is available, micro slows down a little bit. When it's not available, we get really busy. And so we have that here. But yeah, the pandemic itself was a busy time for me.   Carol: Good. That's good to hear. So how do you partner with the VR counselor in making all of this happen?   Inge: Yeah, so that is a really good relationship. The counselor works with our clients. Sometimes clients get to refer to me right away. Sometimes they have good working with a VR counselor for some time before they even come my way. And then the counselor reaches out. Here's the client, here's what they want to do. So I provide services to our counselors as well as to our clients. I encourage our counselors to contact me if they have a client that has, let's call it a harebrained idea that may not work. So we do research with the client together to figure out is that even a decent idea or these pyramid schemes that people sometimes get involved with. We research stuff like that. So when a counselor isn't sure, I encourage them to contact me. When we're ready, the client gets referred to me and I start working and that looks different for different clients. So sometimes they're very proactive. Other clients, they want their counselors with them. So we just schedule phone calls again, virtual meetings or something to work together and then make sure that the client has all the support that they need. Usually, once the client is comfortable with working with yet another person, they are okay with working with me. That helps lead the process up a little bit because we don't need to coordinate all of our calendars and so we can solve this on that. Again, it depends on the client, but in general, the client can get a bland easy in three months.   They have to do financial projections. So at minimum we have to do a one year, month by month financial projection to see what is your projected income, your expenses, what's the bottom line looking like? How much money do you want to take out of that business? Where is all going to go? That's kind of what determines the whole process and everyone is of a different level. So some people you will have to explain everything to them. You have to teach them entrepreneurship, you have to guide them through the process while others come in with some knowledge already. Sometimes I get completed business class before I even have met the individual, and then once a plan is approved, the client goes back to their VR counselor and then they work together on finalizing the business. They start up their business. The VR counselor meets with them regularly to ensure that everything is on par, and if not, I hope that they will contact me and let me in. And that works pretty well that way. Working with the Women's Business Center. Has been really tremendous because that long counseling that they're receiving is just another way to make sure that everything that we try to teach them, try to put into this plan and process is being reinforced and someone else tells them, know some of the same things that we have went through with them already.   Carol: So that sounds like a great partnership that you have.   Inge: Yeah, it took me a long time to get that build out because outside of vocational rehabilitation, we're considered a brand and to educate those partners, it's not a grant and it's a different kind of process and program and people have different kinds of needs. We need to sometimes slow it down or speed it up, depending on where they are on that continuum, then that's where we need to be. And so that's not always easy. So it took me a long, long time to get through and it took a food truck business who needed a loan, couldn't get a loan through a bank, and the Women's Business Center was able to make a loan. So that client, they finally understood our process. And then I was approached for a contract. We actually entered a contract to make sure that everything is being all the confidentiality and all of that of oversight. And there's information that I cannot share and they cannot share because of lending rules and all of that. So we do have to have all of that information and continually work together.   Carol: So how does that work when you close a case? Because I understand that you're opening a case for the consumer in some situations. So how do you determine when you're closing in the case and consider it successful?   Nicky: Usually it's part of the business plan. They have to be able to demonstrate self-sufficiency, you know, and sometimes we might support them for a good couple of years just following them along for additional supports, just like a regular rehab closure, so to speak. We want to ensure that they are earning adequately, that they can self-sustain their business, that they don't have any additional supports from the division that they need to sustain business. We usually ask for regular paystubs and that kind of stuff to track that. They are doing well and by the time we are looking at closing the case, they have also established a working relationship and develop their credit through the Women's Business Center, which is where we funnel the funds through, so to speak. So they have established credit and I think each closure is very individualized, just like every case is so individualized, the counselor and the client and Inga works together to ensure that things are going well. The client does believe that they can self-sustain by themselves. And we did have a recent success story, which was really cool. We helped an individual set up a small business. I think it was like car detailing, if I'm not mistaken, and because the division helped him and he became really successful, this client then started hiring other V.R. clients to work for him, which was just really neat.   Carol: Wow. That is good stuff right there. Yeah. So what are you most proud of regarding this program?   Nicky: Oh, wow. Most proud of. That's a difficult question. I think it's the fact that we have some flexibilities in the program because we have a client who would essentially be eligible for VA services and considered to have a significant disability can potentially qualify. And if it is a viable business idea, we are always open to exploring it. And I think I really like is that we don't just say, okay, here's a set of funds now what do we walk them through that process? And then our recent engagement with the Women's Business Center, where the clients then get the opportunity to start developing their own credit as well, because we all know a lot of individuals with disabilities have challenges in that area where they don't necessarily have good credits or try to borrow in the future becomes difficult. Trying to borrow from the state small business might be challenging, so this really sets the client up for success and we're not necessarily doing for them, we're doing with them. And I think that's what I like to see, that we just don't say, Well, here's a set amount of dollars. Just like our individualized plans. Business plans are very individualized too. So depending on the need and the business, sometimes it might be 5000, sometimes it might be 50,000. I like that we can individualize it and work with the clients to help them out and help them out in their communities. Most recently, we sent a client to Nashville. He is super talented in the music industry and as a counselor, I was always hesitant to support someone to get a music degree right. But this individual, we sent him to Nashville. He's doing amazingly well. And one of the final things we are going to assist with is so the v r program is going to purchase the vehicle and the small business program will purchase kind of a mobile studio that he can. Around recording, and he already has multiple offers for recording contracts in Nashville. So that's really.   Carol: Cool. Wow, that is super cool. Well, and it speaks to what Inge said earlier about the percent of people that are successful because most small businesses, 90%, fail in that first year. But you guys are seeing a success rate well over 50%, which is good stuff. And that just speaks to what you're talking about with all of that support that you're giving to individuals the entire way through.   Nicky: Absolutely. And it's kind of a comprehensive support group of the counselor working with them, the area manager, getting involved when needed, the community support. I mean, it really does take a village, right, to support folks. And we have some really good success stories.   Carol: I love that. I love that. So, Nick, is there anything else you'd like to share with our listeners out there about your small business program or if they're considering something like that? I know most of the states have a Randolph Shepard program, but you have expanded obviously out to working with other people with other types of disabilities.   Nicky: I think sometimes we just get so stuck in bureaucratic, can we do this? Can't we do this? Is it allowable just giving clients and counselors the flexibility and the freedom to get creative, but then also having someone like Inga on staff who really have the expertise to determine if that business actually has the viable to be successful in your state, in that community, being able to do some fiscal projections for that said business, like I said, you know, the pole dancing thing, we were like, Wait a minute, worked. But they were very successful in that community. There was a lot of research that happened, went in to determine that there was a need for specialized exercise kind of thing and that there wasn't anyone providing it. So we do a lot of research and it is time consuming. But I think I go back to our staff, just us can be very creative and we need to believe in our clients too. So giving people the opportunity, being realistic, saying they want to start a small business to mirror Elon Musk might not be feasible, but being realistic and working within your boundaries, but sometimes stretching comfort zones and being curious and exploring options. So that's what I would suggest.   Inge: I would just say, know your local economy, get to know the people, talk to local people. Because if you hear for the third time that you want to have another woodworker opening up shop, you really need to know can that community support another business?   Carol: Yeah. Good stuff. Well, thank you so much for joining us today and I really appreciate you highlighting what's happening in Wyoming and helping us to celebrate National Disability Employment Awareness Month. Best of luck to you all.   Nicky: Thank you so much. Yep. And like you said, the beauty of what we do is just giving opportunities for individuals with disabilities to do what they think maybe that they were not going to be able to do to be contributing members of society. Again, we contribute to their families and we all come together. We can all make a difference.   Carol: Thanks much.   Nicky: Thank you, Carol.   Inge: Thank you, Carol. I appreciate it.   {Music} Speaker1: Conversations powered by VR, one manager at a time, one minute at a time, brought to you by the VR TAC for Quality Management. Catch all of our podcast episodes by subscribing on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts. Thanks for listening!