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Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast
S31E11 - Inspiring TED Talks Rewind - Everyday Leadership, with Drew Dudley

Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2022 23:37


In this "Inspiring TED Talks Rewind" HCI Podcast episode, Dr. Jonathan H. Westover explores Drew Dudley's famous 2010 TED Talk,"Everyday Leadership." Check out the video here: https://www.ted.com/talks/drew_dudley_everyday_leadership/up-next. Video Overview: "Drew Dudley's whole approach is to make sure everyone understands how to bring out the leader within. Too many people think great leadership is reserved for extraordinary people. His humorous take will remind you of all the little things leaders do each day. Leadership may be self-taught, but certainly isn't reserved to a special segment of society. Dudley reminds us that leadership is an everyday act that should be celebrated." Prior to founding Day One, Drew Dudley (https://www.linkedin.com/in/dayonedrew) spent 8 years as the Director of one of Canada's largest leadership development programs at the University of Toronto and served as National Chair of Canada's largest post-secondary charity, which mobilized 35,000 volunteers annually to support the work of Cystic Fibrosis Canada. Recognized as one of the most dynamic keynote speakers in the world, Drew has spoken to over 250,000 people on 5 continents, been featured on The Huffington Post, Radio America, Forbes.com, and TED.com, where his "TED talk" has been voted "one of the 15 most inspirational TED talks of all time". Time, Business Insider and INC. magazines have all included his talk on their lists of "speeches that will make you a better leader". Drew's clients have included some of the world's most dynamic companies and organizations, including McDonald's, Proctor & Gamble, JP Morgan Chase, Hyatt Hotels, the United Way and over 75 colleges and universities. Check out Dr. Westover's book, 'Bluer than Indigo' Leadership, here: https://www.innovativehumancapital.com/bluerthanindigo. Check out Dr. Westover's book, The Alchemy of Truly Remarkable Leadership, here: https://www.innovativehumancapital.com/leadershipalchemy. Check out the latest issue of the Human Capital Leadership magazine, here: https://www.innovativehumancapital.com/hci-magazine. Ranked #6 Performance Management Podcast: https://blog.feedspot.com/performance_management_podcasts/  Ranked #6 Workplace Podcast: https://blog.feedspot.com/workplace_podcasts/  Ranked #7 HR Podcast: https://blog.feedspot.com/hr_podcasts/  Ranked #12 Talent Management Podcast: https://blog.feedspot.com/talent_management_podcasts/  Ranked in the Top 20 Personal Development and Self-Improvement Podcasts: https://blog.feedspot.com/personal_development_podcasts/  Ranked in the Top 30 Leadership Podcasts: https://blog.feedspot.com/leadership_podcasts/ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/hcipodcast/support

PWTorch Dailycast
PWTorch Dailycast - PWTorch ‘90s Pastcast - Moynahan & McDonald discuss issue #156 of the PWTorch (1-16-92) including Herd exits WCW, more

PWTorch Dailycast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2022 152:10


Patrick and Alex kick off the third episode of "PWTorch ‘90s Pastcast" by running down Jim Herd's resignation from WCW, including how it went down, and how his tenure has aged thirty years later. They then discuss Herd's replacement, Kip Frey, and where WCW may be headed under his direction. A litany of other topics are discussed, including the Nasty Boys stabbing incident, Sensational Sherri managing Shawn Michaels, the world title potential of Ted Dibiase, and WCW's talent depth. The two wrap things up by covering Wade's Torch Talk with David Schultz, as well as previewing Royal Rumble 1992 and discussing how recent Rumbles compare.

The Jason & Scot Show - E-Commerce And Retail News
EP285 - 2021 Full Year and Holiday Data Deep Dive

The Jason & Scot Show - E-Commerce And Retail News

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 60:46


EP285 - 22021 Full Year and Holiday Data Deep Dive The US Dept of Commerce December Advanced Retail Sales Data is out, which gives us a full look at 2021 and the 2021 holiday season. So Episode 285 is a data deepdive into 2021. If you want to follow along, we've made a deck with all the data available at https://retailgeek.com/2021-commerce-recap Data Sources US Retail & E-Com Sales Data: US Dept of Commerce E-Commerce Estimates: eMarketer Retail Foot Traffic Data: Placer.ai Web Traffic Data: Similar Web Holiday Estimates: Adobe, Salesforce, Mastercard Episode 285 of the Jason & Scot show was recorded on Thursday Jan 20th, 2022. http://jasonandscot.com Join your hosts Jason "Retailgeek" Goldberg, Chief Commerce Strategy Officer at Publicis, and Scot Wingo, CEO of GetSpiffy and Co-Founder of ChannelAdvisor as they discuss the latest news and trends in the world of e-commerce and digital shopper marketing. Transcript Jason: [0:23] Welcome to the Jason and Scot show this is episode 285 being recorded on Thursday January 20th 2022 that's a heck of a lot of 2012's. I'm your host Jason retailgeek Goldberg and as usual I'm here with your Cohoes Sky Wingo. Scot: [0:41] Hey Jason and welcome back Jason Scott chaussures Jason is kind of a shame we neither of us were able to make it in our F but, one of the things I don't miss is every year that I've gone to in our f for the last three times I've went I've had trouble getting there or been stuck there so I think then our F should use this opportunity to move that show out of January and maybe look at something like March or something if they're going to be in New York. Jason: [1:09] Or to the like Bahamas or something. Scot: [1:12] Yeah even better yeah let's make it a destination of it. Jason: [1:17] You know you have my vote I'm not sure you have a majority of votes see you if you have mine that would be awesome. Scot: [1:24] Yeah just watching and it seemed like some folks went and then they had a lot of cancellations so seemed like it was in kind of one of those weird. Hybrid states were if you went and then, person you are going to go see present canceled you sat there in a room with people watching a zoom so that's number Super satisfying but I do think it seemed like some folks you and I know got together and had some dinners and had fund so hopefully that was that was good for everyone. Jason: [1:50] Yeah I had a little bit of foam oh I think you know some people I would have liked to see you know I saw you know social media of them getting together and whatnot and. It's just super bad luck I have a feeling if this show was a month later it would be a lot less controversial that traveled to. Scot: [2:09] Yeah and what did you want to talk about this week. Jason: [2:14] Well you know if we had gone to NRF one of the things that I always like to do it in our f is kind of check in with a lot of our co-workers in the industry and kind of you know get a consensus, about how the year ended up for everyone and what they thought the big issues were going to be for 20 21. So since we didn't get to do that at shop at NRF I thought maybe we could do it on this podcast for our listeners. Scot: [2:42] Yeah that sounds good and then I know you always put together a little for your clients kind of the summary deck and I know that's hard for our podcast listeners so do you have a way to solve that. Jason: [2:55] Yeah so what I thought I would do I put together like a 36 slide deck completely full of numbers and what I thought I would do is describe all of the graphs on the podcast. Scot: [3:09] Sounds good that sounds good and it's going to be a we'll go through it and intricate detail data point by day. Jason: [3:14] Yeah because the one complaint I get about the show is that it's not hard enough to listen to. Scot: [3:18] That's that's from your mom. Jason: [3:22] So that probably isn't going to work but here so here's what I did think I do like instead of, just charging the fortune that we charge clients to go through this presentation I thought I would make a version of the whole deck available to all our listeners so in the event you do want to follow along with the visuals and see the actual data, we will put a link in the show notes you can hit pause for a second, you can open up the deck and I will tell you what slides were talking about in case you want to follow along but but Scott keep me honest here we'll try to make sure we're talking about in a way that you can kind of just, just listen along on the podcast and then look at the deck later if that's the way you prefer to do it. Scot: [4:03] Yeah this is a good time if you like receiving awesome decks for your subscription here which is essentially free this is a good time to hit the five star review we always appreciate that and yeah because we because this is a audio medium we are going to paint pictures with our words and you will see the slides form before your very eyes almost like augmented virtual reality we're going to take you to the metaverse on this thing. Jason: [4:31] Exactly it's a meta verse deep dive into a retail in 2021 and let's jump right into it so. [4:42] Super quick recap last week the US Department of Commerce publishes published their December Advanced Data so that gives us the last month of data we need to see the whole year so it's super exciting for all of us get data Geeks because we now have a complete set of data the one thing to remember is. It's an advanced look and so it doesn't have the granularity of categories that we would like and one of the categories it doesn't have is e-commerce which is highly unfortunate so, the the Deep dive for the whole year with e-commerce broken out will actually be available in mid-February and that's also when they published their quarterly. They're q4u Commerce data which is a separate report so so we have most of the interesting facts there maybe a couple things that filter in last, next month but the top line if we add up all retail sales for 2021 we sold just over six point six trillion dollars of stuff last year which is eighteen percent growth over 20. [5:53] And it's 22 percent growth over 2019 and so, if you do have the deck and you were looking at slide for I show you the last 30 years of growth and the thing that will stand out at you is that this year's growth. Is is almost double the average growth we've had in any of the last 30 years so unprecedentedly good year. Scot: [6:20] This is all retail or not talking e-commerce has. Jason: [6:22] Yeah this is this is pure retail will we will double click into e-commerce a little bit later and you know reminder there's a lot of controversy about what the definition of retail is and so you'll see millions of different numbers out there and it's because. 11 data set has automobiles in it and one has doesn't one has gas in it and one doesn't you know they're all these different things I'm using. The unadulterated numbers from the US Department of Commerce so it does include automobiles it does include gas it does not include restaurants it's what we call, in a ICS code 44,000. Scot: [7:03] Cool good old code it 44,000. Jason: [7:07] If anyone wants to catch me offline and ask for like a different spin I'm happy to talk about how the numbers change when you change your definition but I think that's too complicated for for the podcast but so before I go any further. Like is that does that surprise you at all it has is that has that been your perception that these are Monster year that 2020 and 2021 more Monster years for retail because I feel like that's not necessarily the narrative we've been getting in some of the Commerce media. Scot: [7:37] Yeah no it feels that is a surprise it makes sense and I'm looking at the slide but it makes sense that we were effectively spring-loaded right because you had the shutdown people really, you know couldn't or didn't buy things from March 20 through and so there's put up demand but what's interesting is you really don't see, unlike the Great Recession about it no nine you don't see a retraction before this the splurge and this is way way bigger than that period of time so it is it is surprising. Jason: [8:08] Yeah so so, in aggregate retail did awesome and then on slide 5 I give you this fun way of looking at the data that you and I helped help kind of evolved together but the idea is that we give you a separate line chart for 2019 2020 and 2021 and so you can kind of see. You know how the year stack up against each other and you know. [8:35] 20:19 was the unaffected by the pandemic than 20/20 happen and of course there was this huge dip in April when the pandemic first got real for everyone because the NBA cancelled games and it recovered super quick and then you know the rest of 20/20 was actually above 2019 so retail grew. From 2019 and 2020 even though we were like right in the thick of the pandemic and then in 2021 retail really shot up and the. The hypothesis here is there are two things that really caused this number one there was a bunch of. Economic stimulus that was poured into the economy right like there's a lot of extra money available and consumers were in, like generally really good Financial shape so there was a lot of potential to spend and then a lot of the things that might have gotten some of that money experiences like travel in restaurants and vacations, we're not available in the most consumers so instead of paying money for a gym you bought a Peloton instead of going to a restaurant you bought groceries and instead of going on vacation you you got new patio furniture right and so you know the combination of, more money and less things to spend and on ended up being super favorable to retail overall. Scot: [9:59] Yeah that makes it so that it's really a factor of the stimulus is what you're saying. Jason: [10:06] Yeah and we'll talk about the downside of that if they end of this podcast but so that's the industry average and I would remind everyone to be cautious. In thinking about averages because, very few retailers experience the average right like in general there were big winners and losers based on categories and I'm for the purposes of the podcast we're not going to talk about category growth or foot traffic. From 2022 2021 because 2020 was such a weird year because of the pandemic I actually am going to jump ahead in the deck to slide 9 which is where we start talking about, comparing. Last year to 2019 so like what the cumulative changes were over the from before the pandemic to you know at the end of the second year of the pandemic so. Over that two-year growth we grew 22% as I mentioned earlier and so I actually. [11:09] Put together look at what the average to your growth was every year for the last 30 years and in general the average two-year growth is around 10 to 12 percent so 22% is, unprecedentedly High. Two year growth and remember like you know there was in 2008 there was this recession and there was negative growth so you'd think the the year-over-year from that recession would be super high but but this. 2020 and 2021 year is basically the the best years of retail in our lifetime. And so then I go to slide 10 where I show you how fast each category grew and remember if the industry grew 22%. You really want to be growing faster than that 22% so the categories that one the grew faster than 22% we're your new favorite category automobiles. So they grew at 24 percent which was mildly surprising to me because you, you know early on you would assume Car Sales slowed down significantly and then of course there have been all these chip shortages that's made it slightly hard to buy cars, and yet cars were still one of the bright spots does that surprise you at all or were you totally dialed into that. Scot: [12:30] Yeah the counter is the used markets on fire and they're marking the cars up so there's kind of like an inflation of car prices in there that I think. One of the reasons so if there is a car dealers are taking these pretty exorbitant markups on those, which is kind of short-sighted but that's what they're doing and yeah so so it doesn't surprise me too much when you know what surprises me is where did it all go so we had this like tsunami you know anything about retail it's you know it hasn't been over. You know like what, 10% for a long time and then you've got in the two year ago comparison you get up to maybe like 15% so it's like a surge year where did it show up like I can't think. You know amongst the public companies the Walmarts the targets and that kind of stuff I don't really see it I don't see them just like, blowing up expectations and saying oh my God so much money flooded into our coffers. I kind of wonder where it went or maybe it's going to show up and you know in when you when you chart it out it looks like a lot of it came at the end of 21 so maybe we haven't seen it come out and the public markets but it's going to be you know I kind of wonder where it went. Jason: [13:42] Yeah so I would argue that we are seeing it like in the big companies in the Amazon Walmart Target Kroger and certainly Home Depot and dicks we are seeing it. And so I think the car one is a harder one to see because the car you know the actual car dealers are so fragmented because they're all franchisees. Scot: [14:05] Carvanha has seen it carvanha. Jason: [14:06] The Used Car Guys for sure saw it so let's come back to that in one second let's talk about the other two categories that were above the industry average building materials and garden supplies right so that's Home Depot and Lowe's and you know they're there to your growth Stacks were like significantly up from previous years and again. Part of the reason they would be up as people spend a lot more money on their homes when they were traveling last and then and so that category group thirty percent over two years and then Sporting Goods grew 38 percent over two years so that's you know dicks and sporting goods and and those folks and they were seeing like like I want to say the two year growth stack on dicks would be is like 94% or something so. Scot: [14:56] Yeah. Jason: [14:59] So and then the categories that still like had, by historic standards great growth but did not grow as fast as the industry average grocery stores so only grew 16 percent I have to say that surprised me a little bit because I would have. Expected you know with the hit that restaurants took that the grocery would have outperformed the industry average but you know it doesn't seem like it. It did and then, furnishings and furniture and Home Furnishings grew at 21 percent so about the industry average and again because of all the money people spend on their homes I kind of would have expected that to be higher so those two things. Surprise me a little bit. And then the the categories that were you know more significantly hurt by the pandemic like gas and clothing, you know clothing was still up 13% gas was up 15%. And that's what hurt looks like right like so you know up 13 percent against the industry average of 22 percent like that's. You know kind of the the low end and you know I think if you talk to apparel people during the pandemic they would have said like oh we're you know we're experiencing Armageddon if you compare this 13% growth too you know any of the last five or six years for apparel this would have been a great year. [16:23] And then the most inexplicable to me of all and I think it just has to do with the mix in this category is Electronics and appliances are only up 6%. And I I'm totally open if you have a hypothesis cop but like I think everybody bought a lot of extra Home Tech. So especially the beginning of the pandemic everyone's buying extra computers for their kids for homeschooling and everybody's updating their work from home stuff, and you know over the two-year course of the pandemic you know everybody remodeled their kitchen about new appliances so I'm a little befuddled. Why that you know that category is literally the bottom of the Barrel in this the US Department of Commerce data and it's only six percent of growth. Scot: [17:13] Yeah let me look at the year. Jason: [17:18] I have a so while you're looking I'll just I'll tell you I my. My unfortunate hypothesis so there's an enormous flaw in the US Department of Commerce data and that flaw is that they call e-commerce or non stores. A category. So you're either a Peril sale if you sell the clothes through a store or your Anon store sale if you sell the clothes online, and so if you sell a TV out of Best Buy you're in electronic sale but if you sell the TV online for curbside pickup. You're a. Non-store sale and so I didn't mention this earlier but the category that actually grew the most by far during the pandemic is non store sales which are 38% and we, have any good way to know how that breaks down by category so my hypothesis is the electronics category actually probably did better but the it over index to sales going online and therefore it gets office gated in this US Department of Commerce data. Scot: [18:32] Yeah and then accentuating this is the supply chain problems hashtag Supply pain where you know a lot of that stuff you would go into the store for especially big appliances where you kind of want to see it and touch it and feel it before you order it, I know on the order of 10 people that cannot get washers and dryers. So you know that that was all like this big appliances are in and they've been waiting since you know, Q3 last year to get these things it's insane so that could have you know so you have this kind of double edged double whammy of a lot of stuff moving online or non-store from the store in the store or struggling because they can't get inventory for the shelves and you know every electronics item has a chip. Jason: [19:20] Yeah so I do like that I will say it from the data it looks like more of the group The Slowdown was in, 20/20 than 2021 which like kind of argues it like. Scot: [19:35] Yeah attribution. Jason: [19:37] Yeah so but I don't I don't know and so then so that so far everything we've talked about is US Department of Commerce data so I'm also super interested in how many people walked into a store so I asked our friends at Placer AI which is a, a company that has access to a huge panel of consumers that have software on their phones and it tracks where they go anonymously and they use that data to forecast. Retail foot traffic across the country and so I put together a data set so on Slide. [20:21] 11 of the deck you can see how the 20 21 foot traffic every month compared to 2019 and so for the first half of 2021, um foot traffic in retail was still down between 10% and 0%, versus 2019 so fewer people are going to stores in 2021 then we're going to stores before the pandemic. And then by July we had our first kind of Positive Growth since the pandemic so July and August we're kind of up for and six percent over 20 19 respectively, then we had another slight dip in September and then we had a pretty prominent dip in December of 2021 which was probably the Omicron variant kicking in. [21:12] But so in aggregate. There are still fewer people walking in a brick-and-mortar stores in the United States of America in 2021 than walked in a brick-and-mortar stores in 2019. Scot: [21:24] There are some it almost like it seems to be correlated an inverse correlation with case count right so in the summer cases were kind of low everything was feeling pretty good and then we had kind of the surge the Omicron surged kind of come back and here at the very tail end of 21 we saw a really plummet. Jason: [21:42] Yeah no for sure and there are lots of people that I have been correlating these statistics to case counts or hospitalizations or. Or mortality or any of those things in there are strong correlations so you're certainly right. [21:56] Um so then I I said all right well let's double-click on some of the categories that might be interesting and one category that I mainly double clicked on for you was Automotive so for folks that don't know Automotive is the biggest. Category of retail spending and which kind of makes sense because it's the. The highest ticket item so 1.5 trillion dollars in in car sales in 2021 which is 23 percent of all retail spending so we said 6.6%. Six point six trillion in retail 1.5 trillion of it was cars and that's up as we said earlier 24% from 2019 and then I give you kind of the, the shape of that Demand right and and you know so again, the best month in the history of car sales was April of 2021 and then it's been, tapering off a little bit since then but still up significantly from 2020 and 2021 is up nominally from from 2019 so a very vibrant year even though per your point you know it's actually hard to get vehicles right so a lot of this this. Increase in sales is an increase in price points and inflation versus unit sold but I think it is a little bit of both. Scot: [23:20] Yeah the other changes there's a pull forward because what dealers have started doing is pre sailing Vehicles so it's almost like an auction where they'll say Jason I know you want this IMA Mustang and we got three coming in and August but if you want one of those I'm going to need you to, pay me to there now I don't know how that correlates to these numbers but we're seeing this big pull forward of the consumer dollars into the auto category because of this pre-sale thing where, historically it was you would go test-drive negotiate and then buy the car and it was sitting on the lot the inventory model is kind of flipped right now which is interesting. Jason: [23:59] Yeah yeah and I know not not related to sales velocity necessarily but another interesting thing is. The amount of test drives per sale is way down like it used to be like three test drives per sale and now it might be less than one test drive per sale. Scot: [24:17] Yeah it's kind of it's fun being in the auto category because some in some ways I feel like I've seen the movie before right so for example remember when Zappos came out and they disrupted the shoe category by saying free 365 returns, well then everyone would just buy would say well sometimes I'm an 11 sometimes in 11 half and 10 half I'll just order all three in return to. So then everyone had to adapt that new model because consumers flocked to it and the car industry carvanha has had a seven day return for a vehicle and that's how they got around the test drive and everyone laughed at him and was like why would you do that that's ridiculous and then the pandemic it and everyone had to kind of adopt that model so that's that's gotten rid of the test drive most dealers now have had to adapt to that that more customer friendly model and effectively have like a seven day return window. Jason: [25:06] Yeah and you know you've heard me say this before but I've been following the ottoman of category relatively closely and the grocery category for two big reasons they're they're the two biggest pieces of consumer spending but also before the Pandemic those were the two categories that were released digitally disrupted like a small percentage of cars were sold online a small percentage of groceries sold online and so those two categories were the most disrupted by digital they they got the most digital fastest as a result of the pandemic so I've been super interesting because per your point a lot of the learnings that we've had over the last 20 years in the apparel industry in the consumer electronics Industry and the home industry like are now you know playing out in an accelerated basis in the automobile industry and in the grocery industry. Scot: [25:57] Yeah 11 cool example and I know you know these guys so yeah I tell folks a lot about how Walmart budget and it was kind of like this this analog kind of old-school company building bringing deep digital DNA and we would see a lot of that not emotive category and sure enough Discount Tire which is a brick-and-mortar tire shop family-owned what are they like 100 years old or something like that and they just bought Tire Rec which is kind of the you know the online incumbent and they're merging those two companies together so it's funny because everyone thinks I'm kind of a Nostradamus of this stuff because but it's really just, the exact same thing we saw happen in e-commerce with other categories as happening in the automotive category. Jason: [26:42] Groundhog Day yeah sometimes when I'm impatient I really have to avoid telling clients so I know you need to figure this out for yourself but I know how it is. Scot: [26:52] Yeah. Jason: [26:54] But so I mentioned the grocery category that's the next category that I want to talk about briefly so now we're on slide 14 of the deck, and groceries the second biggest category of consumer spending it's fourteen percent of all retail spending so it's, 901 billion dollars in 2021 and and I mentioned grocery was up pretty significantly up 16 percent but but that you know that is a little less than the industry average and I give folks that that same kind of three-year year-over-year graph if they want to see it but then a bonus data breakdown I always like to do for the grocery industry is on slide 16 and this is a, a line graph with two data points grocery store sales and restaurant sales, and what's interesting about that is for like a pretty significant period of time about a 10-year period. Sales were split almost 50/50 between restaurants and grocery stores so all the the American calories were kind of divided 50/50 between McDonald's on Applebee's and Walmart and Kroger and in the pandemic exactly what you would expect to happen grocery sales shot up and restaurant sales you know took a nosedive. [28:13] Over the course of the pandemic they've moved back closer and kind of come summer of 2021 they actually came back to where they used to be so they were kind of level again and we were like I wonder if that, if if that Gap is over but then Omicron appears to have open that Gap backup so at the moment there is still about a ten billion dollar a month discrepancy between spending on on groceries and spending on restaurant so potentially bad news for the restaurants. Scot: [28:48] Yeah well you wouldn't know it at my restaurants or so they're they're they're super busy. Jason: [28:53] Nice. Scot: [28:55] Could be you know we you know it's interesting traveling around the country a little bit now it's like living in 50 different. Countries the way they're covid policies are so you go to you go to Florida and Texas and everything's just open and normal and then you go to the north east or the west coast and things are very much shut down, and here in our kind of a kind of in the middle but we're still struggling our restaurants part of it could be that they're just closing all the time so we have several restaurants that just can't keep their doors open due to this kind of constant struggle between in team members employees and supply chain so you'll you'll go and they'll have to close early because they didn't have anyone to work that shift and then you'll go and they'll be like we're out of you know it'll be a salad place in they'll be out of lettuce you're like yeah guess may not have needed open but they'll be in there with nothing to do so so it's really. The economy is having a really hard time it's really kind of sputtering right now across those things which which could fall into restaurants and bars you know this, looking into this year into 22. There's a lot of grocery stores are have bare shelves and I don't I was going to actually because you're the grocery guy I don't know what's broken in the supply chain there because obviously we don't rely on China for you know, a lot of that stuff so it's not the that specific thing but that seems to have really become discombobulated as well. Jason: [30:21] Yeah so yeah for sure there it turns out like there is for a, a fair segment of the grocery products there is an international component right like so there are weird ingredients that we do depend a lot on on Imports for right so you know even if the Mondelez cookies are made in the US the sugar for the Mondelez cookies is not and so it it is possible for the shipping to to have an impact on Oreo availability it just it tends to be delayed because it's it's more the ingredient than the finished goods that that is getting in. Scot: [31:01] Catching you know maybe the package. Jason: [31:03] The cpg guys even more so right so a lot of the chemicals that get used in cpg products and a lot of the the, the packaging like blue ink for a while was one of the the the constraining factors and so you know, Brands did have a hard decision to make do we like change the color of our packaging so we keep stay on the shelf or do we you know try to stay true to our brand and wait for morning. Which are not decisions you imagine ever have having to make. Um and then you know grocery is have its groceries a very fragile ecosystem margins are really thin and so. More so than other categories of retail the wage inflation has a Major Impact in it it actually. There's a low-wage workers all the way along that supply chain and so you know a big thing that takes out. Domestic food is you know there's a round of covid at the meat processing plant. And that that can you know be a big Regional hit I walked into a breakfast place last weekend and they were out of eggs, and I'm like wait a minute I haven't heard about an egg shortage or like are we having an egg shortage and the guys I know are our manager just screwed up the hole. [32:27] Yeah but I was I was with you I guess yeah what it's questionable why you open if you're a breakfast, restaurant and you don't have any eggs or you should at least put a vegan sign up or something I don't know. So I always like to talk about a parallel because for a long time apparel is like one of the crown jewels of the retail category and people are super excited about that and you know there was an ERA when those were the best jobs so up, Peril is much more it's about five percent of retail sales it was 303 billion despite the fact that we all have been living in sweatpants for the last two years apparel sales were still up 13%, that definitely was a mostly due to a 2022 2021 recovery 2020 was a really bad year for apparel and it started to come back so apparel is one of the few categories on Slide, 18 where I give you the three-year graph of the the category it's one of the few categories where the 2020 sales were consistently below the 2019 sales and then 2021 they, they came back up to the top and you know one interesting fact about a parallel that I give you a data breakdown on 19 is. [33:41] Apparel has just been getting cheaper over time that in the 1990s apparel was seven percent of retail spending and now it's about four and a half percent of retail spending and that's a largely because good clothes are just less expensive and and you know the same closet that an American would have had in 1990 Hassel asks in 2022 and so if you're growing in the apparel industry you're you're growing in a shrinking Market which is you know always a challenge to do. Scot: [34:15] The entire Farm it's kind of shocking to see April 2020 you know touching effectively zero sales and monthly apparel that's crazy that I feel for those guys that must have been a scary. Jason: [34:28] For most of these graphs I change edit the scale to make the graph as high resolution as possible so the bottom of the graph isn't zero but in a Peril it absolutely is. Scot: [34:38] Yeah might as well be easier yeah. Jason: [34:40] Um and so, so that's enough of the categories I know a lot of listeners on our show were particularly interested in e-commerce I wanted to talk about e-commerce for a minute I mentioned the official. Breakdown of e-commerce you know we won't get for December until the middle of February we do get a, a kind of proxy for e-commerce which is called non store sales it is a it is a bigger bucket and it has more other stuff in it than just e-commerce but if I look at, the 11 months of internet data and then the the one month of non store sales data. It's pretty clear that we're going to come in around a trillion dollars in e-commerce sales so if the official numbers work out the way I think this will be the first year the e-commerce in the u.s. is over a trillion dollars. Um that would represent 16 percent of retail sales so 16 doesn't sound like a huge number, but again it just depends on what your denominator is that 16 percent is you know overall of retail which includes, cars which are getting more digital but still aren't very digital it includes gas which is you know only digital in a couple neighborhoods in San Francisco, um and so I you know you start pulling out some of those traditionally non-digital categories and you know. [36:02] That one trillion dollars represents about you know between 20 and 25% of all the categories that that you know people are willing to buy online and so it's become a very meaningful mix and obviously. It was the fastest growing because of the pandemic but inside 21 I show you the the. The three-year breakdown and the thing that's unique about e-commerce versus some of these other categories. [36:32] E-commerce head its monster growth in 2020. So the two-year growth numbers are still amazing but the one year growth numbers from 2021 to 2020 are not so great because we're comping against. [36:46] A monster year and it's been interesting because like Shopify stock is down because their comps aren't very good right but really there you know. They're comping against these monster numbers. You know lots of retailers are calling me right now and they're in a panic because they're not they didn't hit their goals and their their you know numbers are wrong and I'm like. I mean they're you know their numbers are soft and I'm like well but let's look at what really happened like you had unprecedented growth over the last two years and you're you know you potentially are. Thinking about it in the right way so on slide 22 I give you my, entire story of the world going digital in one slide and it's a little hard, hard to follow but basically what I show you is I show you the brick-and-mortar sales every year or every quarter and then on top of that I show you the e-commerce sales so you can see the e-commerce growing you can see kind of, as a portion of retail what it is and then I show you the rate of growth for for retail and e-commerce and until the pandemic we had a pretty consistent story, e-commerce was growing at like between 15 and 20% a year and brick-and-mortar was growing at three to four percent a year and that was pretty reliable, so then the pandemic happens and brick-and-mortar shrinks for a quarter and e-commerce explodes by you know over 40%. [38:10] And since that time they've been coming back and so for the first time in my life time in Q2 of 2021. Brick-and-mortar actually grew faster than e-commerce for the first time ever. Largely because of the you know they're comping against these these you know huge huge March of 2020 and you know I will see you when the data comes out next month but I have a feeling we're regressing pretty quickly now back to the kind of the the pre-pandemic rates of growth like we absorbed all this big e-commerce growth for two years and I can you know I kind of think we're gonna see e-commerce level back down at that 10 to 15 percent growth every quarter and and Retail drop back down to the 45 percent growth of quarter. Scot: [39:06] Well I think it's you know I think the silver lining for me is and I'm the e-commerce guy here is we had the Surge and then we actually did kind of even better than the surgeon you know you could have painted a story that said this will kind of flip – for your to as it kind of the subsides and then then we get back to normal so so the rising tide kind of stuck and created a new high and then we have continued to grow from there how does I know this this agitates you which is why I bring it up but you know this does not support you know that Theory out there that we pulled forward like five years of e-commerce. Jason: [39:43] Yeah no we we didn't and most of the evidence now is that. We're we're not even way ahead of where we would have been that like like we we got the sales early but that. The future growth is. Slightly slower as a result so that like five or 10 years from now you know will see this this blip on the graph but we'll kind of you know end up at the same same place we would have end up without the the pandemic is most people's projections that's less to true in some of these, digitally immature categories like grocery or automobiles where we really did probably pull in you know kind of accelerate two to three years into the future. And so I did on slide 23 I give you the our estimates of the 2021 e-commerce sales for a bunch of retailers because I'm often surprised people. Don't necessarily have. [40:52] The the best perception about how the relative size of all these retailers so these estimates come from emarketer there there gmv us estimate for Amazon is on the high side of all the estimates I. I look at but they have 20 21 gmv for Amazon and about three hundred seventy six billion. Walmart's the second largest e-commerce site by a lot at 60 billion so quite a bit smarter than Amazon. Until recently eBay would have been the second biggest site and Walmart's approaching twice as big as eBay now so they have shot past eBay. To get to 60 billion eBay's at 38 billion apple is at 37 billion and then like people people forget how big a player apple is alone I saw a funny stat that like. If the air buds alone the air pods alone were a company like it would be the 10th largest company. Scot: [41:50] Yeah that's crazy. Jason: [41:52] And so then you get like a Home Depot is almost 20 billion targets 8 almost 19 billion Best Buys on you know over 16 billion, Costco who's the bane of my existence Costco like pays the least attention to digital they you know always talk about how unimportant digital is and how they don't like it, and I tell everyone what a horrible mistake that is and then Costco continues to Excel and despite not trying they sell 14 billion dollars a year on line. [42:24] So then you can see the rest of the the top 15 on that slide on slide 23 if you're interested but it's interesting to understand the. The relative size of some of these companies. And so then you know one of the things that people always ask about is what did holiday look like particularly so the next section of this deck is, a double click on on holiday 2021 and so. I'm defining holiday as November and December sales that somewhat controversial because there's a lot of different ways to think about it. If we just look at November and December sales this holiday period was the the largest retail holiday ever. And it drew about 16.1%, which is vastly faster growth than any other holiday like the next biggest holiday was 10% so so kind of the same story for the whole year we get in Holiday it was a monster holiday, um You know again that depends a little bit on how you Define retail in RF likes to pull gas out of their number so they're there they would say holiday was 14 percent growth which is still. A monster number. So then I went back to our friends and place Rai and said hey what is foot traffic look like every week of holiday. [43:49] And that to me was kind of interesting so. You know December foot traffic was down overall I'll remind you because of Omicron but if we kind of look at the the weekly data for Holiday foot traffic was actually up versus 2019. Leading into the Thanksgiving weekend and so then the weekend that was way down was Thanksgiving weekend way less people went to stores on Black Friday, then went to stores in 2019 about six percent less, and then you know the rest of holiday was slightly above so if it weren't for the decline in Black Friday traffic I would say foot traffic and Retail was up about 2%, over 2019 but that Black Friday dip pulled the whole thing down to where we still aren't back to 2019 levels does that kind of make sense. [44:44] And so one of the things that is a common narrative about holiday and I've even contributed to this narrative is, man retailers are really trying to pull sales in and holiday starting earlier in October and you know holidays flattening it's less about these big, spikes on on Black Friday and Cyber Monday and so now that we have real data I'm like oh well let's see how, how that really held up in the first thing to know is. The early sales in October was kind of a myth like there was not an unusual spike in sales in October and so you know. [45:20] There was not a huge success in pulling sales into October and so then what I did is I went to similarweb which similar web has a data set of e-commerce site visits and what I like about that is, we can get much more accurate granular data than we can on like foot traffic or you know foot traffic or lucky to get weekly data but for e-commerce we can get daily number of sessions or unique visitors or things like that so I said hey let's take the hundred biggest e-commerce sites in the US and let's see total visits and let's compare, 2019 with 2021 and the first thing to remember is. You know Thanksgiving doesn't fall on the same day every year and so what I did is I normalize those I said let's not do November 1st through December 31st, let's do the 25 days before Black Friday in the 32 days after Black Friday so that we could kind of. Match up the the flow and what you'll see is there was a lot more traffic on e-commerce sites every day of holiday in 2021 than 20 then 20, except for two days Black Friday and Cyber Monday and Black Friday and Cyber Monday 2021 with still above. 2019 but they were nearly the same and so. The I guess what this would say is this partially Bears out our hypothesis. [46:48] E-commerce visits did level out like the traffic did get spread out to the whole 60 days more than ever before but those those two tent poles are still tent poles and they still are by far the busiest days, so I you know I definitely you know think that the narrative that like those Temple days don't matter anymore is kind of a misnomer and they you know they got nearly twice as many visits as a normal holiday day. Did that surprise you at all. Scot: [47:20] The surgeon the chart 21 is interesting at the end I think that's my procrastinator people. Jason: [47:28] So so yeah so. Scot: [47:29] It's where I shop. Jason: [47:29] It's God's talking about is the gap between 2019 and 2020 is pretty consistent but then opens up the most ever has, um the very end of the holiday and my hypothesis for that is again this is e-commerce it's Omicron again so I. There was pent-up demand to go to stores people were going the store store traffic was going up and then store traffic fell off a cliff the last half of December as people started getting nervous and so I think that you know drove more people to e-commerce again as my least is my hypothesis. [48:03] And so so that I think is a super interesting data set I definitely am grateful to have access to the similarweb stuff and wow I was diving into their data Isles one of the cool things there's we can see traffic on individual website so I said, well let's see who the winners and losers are in terms of traffic and the story here is. The the traffic is disproportionately going to the the big high-performing sites so you know not surprisingly, Amazon gets the most traffic but they also got the biggest chunk of traffic growth so sometimes you'd say hey the biggest most established players should be the hardest to grow. Amazon Druids traffic faster than any other top 10 retailer which is pretty impressive, and then the next biggest grower was Walmart so this is kind of the story of the rich getting richer and you know traffic and sales consolidating on the, those those very big a sites which is kind of the story you see on slide 29 if you're following along on the deck. Scot: [49:12] The thing that fascinates me about this data is you have like Etsy with the fourth most traffic but then they're like one of the smaller e-commerce sites right so does that, yeah it does that mean no well that's apples and oranges I guess that's all of retail in the previous comparison. Jason: [49:30] No that was at Seas. These e-commerce sales are about little less than 8 billion in the u.s. versus like Walmart at 60 billion but then Ed C does have like like nearly as much traffic as Walmart right like. I want to say they did 600 million, visits over the holiday period versus Walmart did like 1.1 billion so, so you know despite Walmart being 10 times as large they only had twice as much traffic and I think part of the reason for that is the the. Kind of thin long tail nature of Ed c means that their overall conversion rate and the amount of you know pay visits you have to do to find what you want is. Is higher than then it is on Walmart where you're more likely to go to Walmart with with high purchase intent for a particular item and these days it's pretty easy to find that item and get out. Um and that kind of is born out Ebay is still the second large just traffic site even though they're they're shrinking and again eBay's almost half the size of Walmart but eBay is traffic is still higher than Walmart's. Scot: [50:52] Yeah it's a huge it's kind of sad in one way but it's a huge opportunity Bay could get their act together and convert that traffic the way Walmart is they. Jason: [51:00] Yeah if I could redo our. Our predictions episode so you know I talked about in a number of times on this that one of the big trends is retail media networks and you know people selling ads what this data set uncovers more than anything else is the untapped opportunities Ed C needs to get a retail media Network up as soon as possible because I, as far as I know they don't have one. So they should be monetizing that traffic because that that that that's a valuable asset they're not they're not leaning into yet for all our Etsy listeners so then I will just say in this is you know the Chrome Legend in me, during holiday we talk a lot about these estimates from companies right so Adobe you know you know we have on the show and they give us their real time estimates based on on all the customers they see we have sales force on the show every year and they give us real time estimates and then you know when we talk about that I don't think we've had on the show is Mastercard has this product called spending pulse which is, kind of an anonymous aggregated view of all the people that buy stuff with MasterCard and. [52:08] Just just for interest Adobe MasterCard in Salesforce all agree, um that the e-commerce grew about 10% in in Holiday 9 or 10% and holiday of 2021 and that passes the smell test again we don't have the e-commerce data for for December yet so I don't really know but that. That feels like the right order magnitude so I think you know these guys all credibly predicted, the shape of holiday e-commerce but the only one of these guys that predicts brick and mortar is Mastercard right Adobe and Salesforce are pure online retailers and every year I always get weird data from MasterCard and I say this because the whole. The whole world and especially the media like publish this MasterCard data far and wide and and treat it as fax MasterCard like on December 26th said that, retail sales were going to be up 8.5% and that meant they were going to be up 10.7% versus 2019. And so we now know from the US Department of Commerce data that that they were off by 50%. So just call out to my friends at MasterCard that I'd be curious to understand what's going on there from my. Scot: [53:31] Your category thing. Jason: [53:32] Yeah from my seat Well they argue it's not but from my seat there consistently off on the brick-and-mortar number so I'm I'm curious and so then. [53:42] Every time I have this conversation with a colleague or a client the especially someone that maybe doesn't live and breathe e-commerce every day is soon as you start talking about this monster growth number, what everyone asks is yeah Jason but how much of that is inflation right because the thing we hear about in the media the most. Is is inflation inflation inflation and so you know it stands to reason if. [54:09] You know if something grew by 10% and people are paying more you know ten percent more for everything then that explains it and this you know this is an inflation story not a growth in consumer demand story and so I like to put in. Just a little kind of inflation picture at the end. The so I give I give folks a graph of the government, inflation numbers for for for these three years and and what you can see is that like for most of the pandemic inflation. Kind of stayed in the normal range and then we started this, this huge climb not until January of 2021 so if you remember like all a lot of this growth were talking about was 2020 growth, inflation doesn't explain that growth at all there is significant inflation in all of 2021 and it's historically High it's you know depending on how you want to count it could be a 40-year high and so it finished in December. [55:14] At seven percent and so if you figure normal inflation, is a about 11 and a half percent inflation was already high before the pandemic at 2.3 percent. You know if you say alright it should have been at 2.3 percent and it's at seven percent then you could. Say that the kind of back half of 2021 sales that you know. That three or four percent of it can be explained by inflation but definitely not this 22% were talking about. [55:48] And I don't know if you been thinking about her talking about the inflation a lot it's kind of. It's it's kind of funny because I always like to remind people the long-term picture we're all paying way less for goods than we ever did before so I kind of pull this. This 20-year inflation number to remind people that like we're paying fifty percent for a pair of what we paid 20 years ago we're paying, 30% last for personal products and beauty products were paying 17 percent last four cars we're paying 12% less for food all the tangible stuff we buy is getting cheaper because we're getting better at making, and where the American family's budget is going is to Services right so you know the American families having to pay way less for hard goods and food and way more for housing education and Healthcare and that's the big macro picture, but then we've had like the we talked about a lot of the growth in retail coming from all this economic stimulus, the the downside of that economic stimulus is. [56:47] It actually is one of the contributing factors to inflation right like the people have more money to spend, um they buy more the supply chain wasn't prepared for that buy more and so we have, supply chain disruption and so now you have Supply going down and demand going up and what do people do in a rational Market when they they have high demand and low Supply they they charge more, um and so then you know people say hey everything I buy is more expensive I need to get paid more and we have this unprecedented leverage that workers have right now because the labor shortage so they're all negotiating better prices and guess what that means they can afford. Pay more again and and manufacturers are you know having more costs of labor for making stuff so they're charging more and what's been super interesting and all this is, you know it's kind of an excuse for manufacturers to charge you more like most of these manufacturers that are raising their prices are also setting record profits so it's not like. True that like. All of this information is manufacturers passing costs on to Consumers it's a little bit of the the you know opportunity of the moment of you. Scot: [58:01] Yep it's complicated to the inflation a lot of its gas and then to your point a lot of it's stuff that doesn't have this inherent deflationary element to it like healthcare and we're paying more and more for healthcare education anything that has a service component is shooting way up. But even even in the short term though like yeah everything at the grocery store is insane right now it's crazy. Jason: [58:27] Yeah and food and gas are historically more volatile so inflation goes up and down more like side note you have to take all these numbers with a grain of salt because the way they measure it is, they measure the cost of a basket of goods that an average American bought but they built the basket of goods in like 1945. And so it's not the right past it's for today there's no iPhone in that basket. Scot: [58:50] Yeah. Jason: [58:52] So yeah so it's interesting fun it's fun for me because I'll actually be on Good Morning America this weekend talking about inflation. Yeah always fun but yeah I. I'm with you if you take what's called core inflation where you pull gas and food out inflation's like 4.5% so for most of these retail categories, it's part of the story but it definitely would be a mistake to Discount all this growth and say oh it's just. And that's my scoop that's your 36 slide deck that you're all welcome to grab and use my thanks to all the the data providers that contributed to all of it so I have a, a bibliography at the end so if you're interested in starting to track any of this data on your own I tried to make that easy for you. Scot: [59:41] Yeah when we do when we post the show will also try to get on our socials because I've had some people say they can't find the show notes and so we'll make sure that we disseminate this wide and so everyone has it. Jason: [59:55] Well Scott not surprisingly we were able to perfectly fill up an hour with this one topic. So hopefully you found value in this is Scott mentioned the top of the show if you did we sure would appreciate that five-star review, but thanks everyone for kind of following Along on this like pretty dry difficult data dump episode I hope I hope it was useful please, give us feedback if you liked it or if it was not the right format. Scot: [1:00:23] People of data in retailgeek delivers and until next time. Jason: [1:00:28] Happy commercing!

Radio Giga
Nach Activision-Deal: Schnappt sich Microsoft jetzt McDonald's?

Radio Giga

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022


Nachdem Microsoft mit der Übernahme von Triple-A-Publisher Activision Blizzard begonnen hat, zittern andere große Unternehmen. Auf Twitter befürchtet nun die Fast-Food-Kette McDonald's, dass sie das nächste Opfer werden könnte. Natürlich ist das nur ein Scherz, aber die kurze Konversation ist schon drollig.

SoFi Daily Podcast
SoFi Daily Podcast - 1/21/2022

SoFi Daily Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 5:06


US stocks fell Thursday. Plus Mercedes-Benz inks a deal with Luminar, McDonald's expands Beyond Meat partnership, and Instagram is testing a subscription service.

Whatever Happened to Pizza at McDonald's

Episode 238 of Whatever Happened to Pizza at McDonald's?.

Lauer Road Radio
Episode 82 - Quite a Bit Better Than Episode 81

Lauer Road Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 53:16


This week Dan and Jason talk about slipping on ice, writing in cursive, words with two z's, pop up books, gray skies, sike, The Mt. Rushmore of Potatoes, iPhones in group chats, McDonald's Drive Thru, The Mt. Rushmore of western actors, and telling people to go home.  Enjoy and share!   Netflix Suggestion of the Week: Jason: 1883 Dan:  The Book of Boba Fett   Video Podcast Link YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCFCEtzOS_7KEGkIwa-TY5iA Audio Podcast Links Apple: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/lauer-road-radio/id1080548373 Podbean: https://lauerroadradio.podbean.com/ Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/5LmfrAiGoe2Db6VUR8nF0t?si=RrmDIYrPSY-ioWXwBQjBJA iHeart: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/256-lauer-road-radio-31121154/ Player.FM: https://player.fm/series/lauer-road-radio-2360388 Castbox: https://castbox.fm/channel/Lauer-Road-Radio-id1334980?country=us Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/show/lauer-road-radio   Social Media Links Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lauerroadradio/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/lauerroadradio Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/lauerroadradio/ Contact Us Directly Email: lauerroadradio@gmail.com Support Lauer Road Radio CashApp: $LauerRoadRadio https://cash.app/$LauerRoadRadio

Food for Thought: The Joys and Benefits of Living Vegan Podcast
Plant-Based Options at Fast Food Restaurants: Not Suitable for Vegans?

Food for Thought: The Joys and Benefits of Living Vegan Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 64:23


Plant-based options are exploding in such fast food restaurants as Burger King, KFC, Carl's Jr., and White Castle as well as fast casual  restaurants like Chipotle, Pizza Hut, and Panda Express. And the research shows it's leading to a reduction in the amount of purchases of animal-based meat. Some see this as a win for animals and people, but some see it differently. Listen to this episode of Food for Thought for my take on this growing trend, and why I blame McDonald's for not graduating high school with my senior class.  Support Food for Thought Podcast at Patreon.com/ColleenPatrickGoudreau.  

Motley Fool Money
The Art of Pricing Power

Motley Fool Money

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 27:26


Both Amazon and Costco are expected to increase their membership fees this year. Will they surprise customers (and investors) by increasing their fees by more than they have in the past? Maria Gallagher analyzes what's expected and why pricing power is harder for entertainment businesses like Spotify, Netflix, and Disney+. She also discusses the expansion of McDonald's partnership with Beyond Meat, the anticipated IPO of Impossible Foods, and why she's not as bullish as others on the plant-based protein industry. Plus, Jason Moser and Matt Frankel dig into Shift4 Payments and share why it's more than simply a payments processing business. To get a free copy of our Investing Starter Kit go to www.fool.com/StarterKit.   Stocks: AMZN, COST, WMT, NFLX, DIS, SPOT, MCD, BYND, UL, FOUR, TOST, SQ Host: Chris Hill Guests: Maria Gallagher, Jason Moser, Matt Frankel Producer: Ricky Mulvey Engineers: Dan Boyd

The Friend Zone
And Just Like That

The Friend Zone

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 87:35


The Friend Zone is back! We ease into 2022 with a funny shoot the shit episode. THE FRIEND ZONE IS ON PATREON! Sign up now to catch our 4 spin-off shows (with audio AND video) plus our NEW Livestream Tour launching 1/26/22: www.patreon.com/TheFriendZonePodcast Thank you to our Sponsors: This episode of The Friend Zone is brought to you by the McDonald's “2 for six dollars deal.” 
 Away - Start your 100-day trial and shop the entire Away lineup of travel essentials, including their best-selling suitcases at https://www.awaytravel.com/FRIENDZONE ZocDoc - Go to https://www.zocdoc.com/FRIENDZONE and download the Zocdoc app to sign-up for FREE and book a top-rated doctor. 
 Door Dash - For a limited time, our listeners can get 25% off and zero delivery fees on their first order of $15 or more when you download the DoorDash app and enter code FRIENDZONE. Follow us online:
 Twitter - www.twitter.com/friendzonepod
 Facebook - www.facebook.com/thefriendzonepodcast
 Patreon - www.patreon.com/thefriendzonepodcast
 Discord - discord.gg/Jee2cwfAdz Have a GREAT day!

Working Capital The Real Estate Podcast
Self Storage Investing for Beginners with Paul Moore | EP88

Working Capital The Real Estate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 36:51


Paul Moore is an amazing contributor to BiggerPockets. Paul has launched multiple investments and developed companies appearing on HGTV and completed over 100 commercial & residential investments & exits in Real Estate. He has contributed in Fox business and Real Estate Guys™ Radio and is a regular contributor to BiggerPockets Producing live video and blog content. Paul also co-hosted wealth building podcast called “How to lose money” and  he has been featured on a number, over 200 at this point. Paul is a 3 time Real estate author. His new book is “Storing Up Profits: Capitalize on America's Obsession with STUFF by Investing in Self-Storage Paperback” In this episode we talked about: Paul's Bio & Background Entering Commercial & Multifamily Space Going Vertical in Self-Storage Rent Control Breaking into Self-Storage Self-Storage Performance and Risks within the recent 2 years Dislocation Aspect Underwriting of the Deals Thoughts on 2022 Outlook Why it is important to find your BIG WHY Mentorship, Resources and Lessons Learned Useful links: https://www.wellingscapital.com/resources https://podcasts.apple.com/nl/podcast/the-biggest-opportunities-in-real-estate/id1505750263?i=1000534008754&l=en Transcriptions:  So that's, that's what got me into real estate in the beginning. And then commercial, I ended up building a multifamily and operating it in the buckin oil rush of North Dakota. It was a multifamily quasi hotel. We did that for years. It was a lot of fun.   Jesse (4m 34s): That's great. So you, like, I'm not dissimilar from, from some stories and multifamily is you started with these properties, realize that you can make a dollar to two going that way. And then at what point did you end up going into the commercial space or the multi red space?   Paul (4m 50s): Yeah, so that was 20. So in 2010 we threw a bunch of friends and I threw over a million dollars to the bottom of a hole in the ground expecting about 50 times as much oil to come back out and nothing came out. And so I don't think we, I can almost certainly say we didn't think it through as well as it might sound now, but we thought, well, who made money in the gold rush? Well, those who sold the picks and shovels. So we noticed that there was a massive, massive housing shortage in North Dakota. I mean, like 10 or 20,000 people in a town of 3000, you know, sleeping in their trucks.   So we created this multifamily, which, which we ran as a, you know, sort of an extended stay hotel in 2011. And that was our entree in. And I ended up writing a book on multifamily about five years later and I was off to the races.   Jesse (5m 42s): Yeah, fair enough. I'm sure the, the Western Canadians can, can appreciate the throwing money in a hole in terms of the, so that moved from initially in Detroit, working with Ford motor company, was there an inflection point in your career where you, you said, okay, I'm going to go with the real estate way and, and left, left the job, or was it something that you kind of did on the side and kind of transitioned to?   Paul (6m 6s): Yeah. So when we launched our company, when I left Ford in 92, 93, it was actually, we started a staffing firm and I had only done a couple real estate deals on the side during those years. And honestly I hated real estate on the side, but when I had a chance to go into it full time in 2000 after we sold our company, that was, I I've honestly loved it ever since. Fair enough.   Jesse (6m 35s): Okay. So moving on to, you know, you write this book on multifamily, we're talking today about storing up profits, the, the book I mentioned at the outset, what can you tell us for the, for the average investor that say, you know, I'll give you an example is, is invested in some real estate, maybe it's on the commercial end. Maybe you, you know, whether it's single family or whatever, pick your vertical and keeps hearing about self storage. You know, we hear it, we hear it up here, you know, in the Canadian context, our friends to the south, we hear it constantly being brought up.   I think I mentioned before we had Brandon Moore or Brandon Turner on talking about self storage, but for the average investor, how would you describe the self storage vertical?   Paul (7m 17s): Yeah, so we, you know, we'd beat our head up against the wall for years looking for multifamily. And as I, you probably didn't know I'm old or, and, but seriously, those watching her going, he's really old anyway, but seriously, we, we were w w we're more conservative every year, you know, that I get, and, you know, I wanted to focus on investing and not speculating after making some mistakes in that arena. Hence the podcast name, how to lose money, but we, you know, really felt like it was like we were at the risk of overpaying for multifamily.   And unlike you, we didn't have a great acquisitions team finding those under the radar deals. And we found out that there were 53,000 self storage facilities in the us. That's the same as subway McDonald's and Starbucks combined, but three out of four are run by independent operators. And half, two thirds of those are actually run by single facility owners, which is also known as mom and pop owners.   And these mom and pops typically. I mean, first of all, the cap rates have compressed so much in the last eight or 10 years that they've doubled the value of their facility. And many of them did that by doing nothing except maybe staying the way they were, which is sometimes not always, but sometimes kind of mediocre. And so the opportunity for a medium sized company to go in and buy these facilities with this incredible intrinsic value, which I'll get into in a few minutes is enormous.   And we hadn't seen anything like that in multifamily in a long time. So we transitioned from multifamily to self storage, and then eventually also adding mobile home parks in 2018. And it's just been great. I mean, here's a couple quick stats. I mean, a couple quick issues to consider one would be that, I mean, if I'm renting a thousand dollar a month apartment from you and you raise my rent 6%, I might leave rather than commit to another 60 bucks a month or $720 a year.   But if you are renting me a self storage facility or unit, I should say, and you raise my rent 6%, well, you know, if it's a hundred dollars a month going to 106, I'm probably not going to spend a weekend rent a U-Haul get my buddies together to move my junk. I mean, excuse me, my treasures down the street, just to save six bucks a month. And that's one of the reasons that prices are so inelastic. And what I mean by that is, you know, I mean, they typically users don't leave because you raise the price, especially since most of the tenants think, Hey, I'm only going to be here a few more months anyway, and it's a month to month lease.   Well, that month to month lease has another benefit. And that is, it allows us to capture inflation. Think about it. Imagine my, my friend who has an Amazon sorting facility and has a 20 year lease on it, what's going to happen. If inflation goes way up, well, he's already locked in, or the guy with the warehouse, you know, that rents it for 10 or 20 years or a medical building. But this allows you to capture inflation increases, you know, potentially as much as every month. So we love that. There's also a ton of value adds.   Now, Jesse, the first time I heard value add self storage, I literally laughed. I thought, what are we talking about here? Four pieces of sheet metal, some rivets, a floor and a door. How are we going to do value at where where's the pain? Where's the fake hardwood flooring, where's the bark park. You know, none of that was available. And I had no idea. There were a significant number of value adds in self storage. For example, adding you hall now, adding you hall can, you can put a U haul out in front of your facility and with no cap ex nothing out of pocket, you can generate between one and $5,000 a month in commission, let's say it's $3,000 a month.   That's $36,000 a year using the commercial value at, I mean the commercial value formula, you know, 36,000 a year divided by, let's say a 6% cap rate. That's a $600,000 increase in value just by setting up a U haul operation at your facility. You can also sell locks, boxes, tape scissors, other retail items. You can add late fees. You can throw out bad tenants.   A lot of these mom and pops have a lot of delinquency. We invested in one self storage facility in grand junction, Colorado that had 80% delinquency, 80% of the tenants weren't paying or were paying late. And so there's just a lot of stuff you can do. You can add boat and RV storage, which is really popular. These days, you can add temporary storage like those, you know, storage, those boxes, and you can, there's so much, you can do two. And when you, you know, when you add the value formula and then add a little bit of safe leverage, it can really, really juice investor returns.   Okay.   Jesse (12m 42s): So I have a couple questions to start with, but just, just so I understand that correctly on the value add thing. Cause I, I never heard that concept before, either in terms of, so for example, the U haul, you basically just like you would see some industrial sites with multiple tenants that UCLU haul truck onsite, basically. That would be you, you basically getting the income for having that URL there and having individuals that are, that are tenants of yours renting that, is that correct?   Paul (13m 11s): Yeah. It wouldn't have to be tenants. Basically. You've got to, hopefully you've got a great location with high visibility on a main road you better. And these you halls will be sitting out front. People would book them from your location. And then the one catch is you have to have an employee there to check them out, you know, to sign the paperwork. And then when they come back in to sweep it out. So if you already have an employee think about self storage, how up and down somebody's hours are. I mean, I can imagine them sitting there for hours watching the security screens and Netflix.   Well, you know, it's not really a huge increase in cost to do that, but you get commission from you hall for doing this.   Jesse (13m 50s): It also be fair to say let's loop in Canada. Let's just say Canada is a big state and where you would be similar to New Jersey, New York, California. And I think Maryland in terms of rent control, the ability to remove tenants because of delinquency like you're describing here, is it, does it fall under the landlord tenant regulation in states or is it easier to, to remove them?   Paul (14m 16s): Yeah, that's another benefit of self storage is there's no eviction moratorium from COVID or from anything else, even in the height of COVID we were able to evict tenants. So that is another benefit for sure.   Jesse (14m 31s): I think the reason I bring up those states is those are all states with some form of rent, stabilization or control. And it's, it's a big factor up here, and I know it's a big factor in those states. So another appealing aspect, it seems of self storage, Paul, in terms of, so you talked, you opened the book with these, you know, different reasons that that self storage is an appealing asset class. And then you move into the ability to actually break into self storage. Cause you know, some people, if they're looking at these larger commercial deals and I think you're bringing up seven different paths about how you could get into the self storage space.   Could you talk a little bit about that?   Paul (15m 6s): Yeah. I, I wanted to write a book for bigger pockets on seven unique paths to get into commercial real estate. But instead I actually devoted the last one third of this book to that topic. And so this would apply to most, any commercial real estate. I think it's really hard for a lot of people, including myself for years to try to figure out how do I get into commercial real estate? And so the seven different paths real quick are one, some people call it stacking based on Brandon's a nomenclature there basically it would be buying a small facility, fixing it up, leasing it up, possibly refinancing, but more likely selling it and then going on to a bigger facility and then just rinse and repeat over and over.   I know that works. It's a long and winding road to the top, but it definitely will work. A second path would be being a capital raiser. Now here in the states, you've gotta be really careful with the securities and exchange commission if you're raising capital for other people's deals, but if you're a partner in the deal, or if you can work your way into a partnership with somebody for a raise and you raise the capital, that could be your specialty. And a lot of people do that are really good with people. They might have social media skills or podcasts, and they can raise a lot of money for other people's deals.   Some people have started their whole company by raising money. First Whitney Sule from the real estate syndication show. That's how he started. And he is just a master. Now at multifamily, he's raised a whole lot of money for his own deals, but he started as a capital raiser. Third would be a deal finder deal finder would be somebody who sort of serves hopefully legally in the role, similar to a commercial real estate broker and somebody who basically goes out and finds deals.   And then instead of getting a commission, they'd say, Hey, look, I like to get a piece of ownership in this deal. I'd like to stay involved and I'd like to do this over and over. And eventually hopefully, you know, you get to be a partner in that company or maybe another one. So deal finder is third. Fourth would be go big where you just start out at a high level. Let's say you won the lottery or, you know, retired from the NFL or you just have access to inherit it or your own money. You sold Bitcoin or something. And you can just start out at a high level and people do that.   It's, there's some challenges with that. Of course, path five would be, get a job. Now, most of your listeners probably thinking, I'm wait, I'm listening to Jesse to get out of my job. I don't want to get a job. Well, there are some benefits, especially if you're young to getting a job in property management or as a commercial broker or a commercial mortgage broker, possibly an asset manager, there's different things you can do to learn the lingo, learn the business, meet the people, get the connections and work your way into a career.   Six path would be taking the passive path. And that would be, you know, just becoming a professional or even a non-professional passive investor. Let's say you've got the money, but you don't have the time. You just need to do a great job. Vetting a great syndicator, check out several of them, use Bryan Burke's book, the hands-off investor, and go out. And that an organization that you can invest with and get, you know, essentially sometimes even higher returns than you'd get by yourself.   But somebody else is doing the heavy lifting. The seventh path is finding a mentor or a paid coach. And that would be, you know, finding somebody who will be willing to bring you into their training program or even somebody usually locally who will let you, you know, you trade your services for them, you know, the opportunity to hang around their office, get to know the product, get to know the company and the business as a mentee to that mentor. So those are the seven paths I talk about in the book.   Jesse (19m 5s): Yeah. What a great recap. I don't think I've, I've heard that in one, in one fell swoop, but that's pretty much covers everything. I didn't know that about Whitney. So for those interested, the syndication show, I believe it's called a fantastic podcast with Whitney and Brian Burke. We've had them on a number of times. I can't recommend that book enough. One thing I love about the book that he has is so many books are not from the limited partner's perspective, they're there from the, you know, the capital raiser or the, the GP. So it's nice, even as a GP, you really want to understand both sides of the coin.   So I'd recommend that to anybody that is interested. So Paul, from, from that outset, you know, you have these benefits of, of self storage. We go through this crazy time in the last two years, you know, the world has, hasn't probably one of the biggest health concerns of my generation. At least if not the last century and then various asset classes perform some not so well, some very well, how did self storage perform over the last two years? And maybe it's just in addition to that, what are the risks?   If, if any, with self storage?   Paul (20m 13s): Yeah, let me start with the risks. Cause I don't want to forget that it's really important. The biggest risk in self storage is really during the lease up. That's the time of the risk, at least. So in other words, we invested in a non unstabilized asset in Bradenton, Florida on a main road in a very, very booming area that had 29,000 new residential units being built in that area. Well, it was great until we tried to fill it up and that two new competitors, large national competitors had also built new facilities right down the road and the due diligence people miss this in that process, it just happened to fall right before they were really evident at any rate.   So it was harder to fill up that facility. It took two years longer than planned. And I think that is the biggest risk is large national competitors nearby by the way that eventually sold for an 80% profit to the investor. So it was great, but at any rate it was a hard road. So that's the number one risk would be competition, especially when you're unstabilized and leasing up. Other risks would include, of course, this is true for anything, a bad operator, you know, a great operator can take a mediocre deal and make it good or even great.   A terrible operator can destroy the best deal on the planet. And so bad property management, bad operator, those would be other risks with self storage, overestimating. Your ability to raise rents would be another one. You know, your, Hey it's 20% below market. Yeah. Well, there may be a reason for that. So really just, you know, things like that would be the major risks. I think if we drive around a lot of us, see just self storage in the, in the states everywhere.   And we're wondering why this has gotta be overbuilt. Well, I can take you to Nashville and show you, drive you around Nashville and show you why it is overbuilt. There's too many self storage facilities in too many locations around the city, but then I can drive you 20 minutes south to a suburb, a nice suburb Bellevue or Belmont they're neighboring suburbs. And they're completely underbuilt in fact, there's huge under supply there. And so this is why it's really important to invest with a great syndicator who uses tools like radius plus to check out, you know, the number of square feet of self storage versus, you know, the market, you know, the demographics, the number of people there.   So that's some of the risks as far as how it's done since COVID, it feels like you threw me a softball there, but I don't think you did the wall street journal, New York times, business wire and others have recently written articles basically saying that co that self storage is the big star in commercial real estate. Since COVID during COVID, we had students moving out of their dorms and their apartments, not knowing. I mean, the first weeks of COVID in March of 2020, what's going to happen.   We got to put our stuff in storage. Will we come back in two weeks when they flatten the curve or will it be two years we don't have. And so that, that was a nice little initial bump. Then there was the eviction moratorium that didn't happen, self storage. And then we have these unfortunate situations. I'm not making light of this, but a self storage thrives during the four days that's downsizing, dislocation, divorce, and death. And we had some of all of that going on during, and since COVID, let's look at dislocation, I mean, people have been moving in droves from places like Chicago, New York, San Francisco, and LA to smaller towns or different places like Utah and Texas and Florida and Charlotte and well, a lot of them need self storage along the way.   And so let's take dislocation as an example, Jesse, I mean, look in the last year at the massive number of people who have moved from places like New York city and Chicago, LA San Francisco to places like Utah and Texas and Scottsdale and Charlotte, a lot of these people need self storage along the way other people, you know, are moving for different reasons. There's been a lot of stress. There's been, unfortunately, a lot of divorce, there's been some death.   And so there's a lot of, you know, reasons that self storage is actually, you know, doing better right now. And another factor most people don't talk about is the price of steel and other building materials. Plus just the labor is in massively short supply. And so it's held up some self storage projects from coming to fruition. So the competition is actually lower, at least in these last, you know, let's say six to 12 months or more. And so really nobody would have dreamed, we thought self storage and we said self storage would do well in recessions.   Nobody had any idea how well self storage would do during this pandemic.   Jesse (25m 37s): Yeah, it makes sense. And just kind of from an anecdotal point of view, I can't, I can't remember a time where I've kind of put something in storage and I haven't used that storage for an extended period of time. I feel like, like you said, I believe you use the, the word inelastic. My, my very technical economic term would be sticky. It's just that aspect where once people store something in an area, like you said, you know, if you go from a hundred to a hundred, $6, is that going to make me move it probably not. You know, if you go up some crazy amount, then you might move the needle.   One thing I'm curious about I've, I've always been curious about the underwriting when it comes to self storage, because we always talk about self storage in the real estate context. I'm curious if that translates to the underwriting of the deal. And for example, you know, I somewhat of a rule of thumb when it comes to looking at multi-racial properties is an expense ratio of 40 to 50% know it'd be a good rule of thumb to do a back of a napkin calculation. Is that are the metrics with self storage?   What would they be most similar to in the real estate space?   Paul (26m 44s): I mean, that would be very similar to multifamily, but the operating expenses would be, I think about, I believe they would average something like 32% on average for most facilities, as some of the automated facilities have a lower expense ratio, but at the same time they can't have you all, they can't have showroom items like, you know, the retail items we discussed. And so their revenues might be a little lower as well. But yeah, other than that, you know, the, the revenues and certainly the value formula is quite similar.   Jesse (27m 20s): Fair enough. I just want to be a little bit mindful of the time. We do have four questions. We ask every guest when we wrap up here, but before we even get there, I'd like to get your thoughts on 2022 and maybe beyond in the relatively short term. And maybe we could talk about that a little bit in the context of self storage. And then, you know, if you want to opine on the broader real estate market, I'd love to get your thoughts.   Paul (27m 45s): Yeah. I used to make predictions when I knew nothing. And now that I know a little more, I don't, I mean, I've noticed that Charlie Munger, Warren buffet, Howard marks, those guys won't make any predictions of the cycle. Howard marks of course reminds us to, even though we can't know when the cycle is going to change, we should act appropriately for where we are in the cycle. So one thing we have here is this is a 10 real $10 trillion bills from Zimbabwe. And it just reminds me as I'm sitting here, you know, that we are in a real inflationary time and it might not be transitory.   And so I think that is something that, you know, self storage has going for it. Like I mentioned, it allows you to capture that inflation real time. And if it, you know, if deflation hits, it would allow, you know, you, that happened as well. I guess   Jesse (28m 40s): I would just say, I heard one of the best definitions from Howard marks when he said, if you want to define the, the cycle and in this could go for real estate as well. He said, stage one couple forward thinking. People realize that they think the market's going to get better stage two, a broader economy, and people realize it is getting better. Stage three people think it's going to get better forever. And he's like, I don't know why you need a better definition of that. And it it's people, you know, listening to this, they know I'm a big Howard marks fan, but I mean, it's a great, it's a great point.   And one thing I've, I've said a number of times is when my mentor, he said, you know, real estate is one of those few industries where you can actually charge your customers are downloaded inflation to your customers. I E tenants. And it sounds like self storage is a continuation of, of that. If not in more real time, given the fact that sounds like you could, you can do it on a monthly basis.   Paul (29m 35s): Yeah. Right. That's exactly right.   Jesse (29m 37s): All right, Paul, we, before we get to the final four questions here, I thought I would ask you why it is important for investors or entrepreneurs to find their, why.   Paul (29m 47s): You know, I woke up at 33 years old on October 7th, 1997. And I had a couple million dollars in the bank, which was completely unprecedented for a, you know, for me and I wasn't any happier. I wasn't any more, you know, like I didn't, I felt a little more successful than I did the week before, but not a whole lot. I think it's really important for people to find their big, why, you know, studies show that if you make over $95,000, I mean, let's say you make 950,000 or 95 million a year.   You're not any happier than you were at 95,000. So we really need to have something else to live for. I think we were created for more. And so I really would recommend people find a big why for me, it's a it's it's regarding human trafficking. You know, if you took the record profits, not the average, the record annual profits of apple, general motors, Nike and Starbucks, and you added those together, double that number. That's the approximate profits projected from human trafficking every year.   And I'd like to believe if I was alive in the 18 hundreds, I would have been an abolitionist fighting against slavery. And if I was alive or if I was an adult in the 1960s, I would have been fighting for civil rights. Well, this is a civil right. And it is slavery and it's happening right under our noses. So my company Wellings capital is dedicating ourselves to try to free 5,000 slaves in the next five years from human trafficking. And I'm just recommending, you know, on a broader point that everybody finds something you're passionate about.   That's bigger than yourself or your business,   Jesse (31m 28s): Dear. And I think it's important as you know, we do or individuals get successful individually or with their companies in our case, in real estate that you CA you figure out what those things are and you know, that human element of, of being, being successful or prosperous. Okay, we are going to switch it up to a four questions. We ask every guest, if you're ready to go, I'll fire them out. Yeah.   Paul (31m 51s): You bet. What's   Jesse (31m 52s): A one thing Paul, that you know, now that you wish you knew when you started investing in real estate.   Paul (31m 58s): I wish I hadn't known the difference between investing and speculating and investing is when your principles generally safe. And you've got a chance to make a return. Speculating is when your principal is not at all safe and you've got a chance to make a return. You know, they say low risk, low return, high risk leads to not high return. It's actually the possibility of losing all your money or making a high return. I wish I'd have known the difference when I started and lost a bunch of money early on.   Jesse (32m 27s): Yeah. I mean, it goes back to Howard marks where, you know, you have that curve where he's like, well, if high, if high risk means high return by definition, that is not that's impossible. It's it's, that would mean that it's certain it's, it's obviously the higher, the risk, the higher expected important expected piece there a return. Right. Okay. Number two, your view on somebody that's entering our industry, a younger person, what would you say to them in terms of mentorship and, and getting started?   Paul (32m 59s): Yeah, I would actually. So bill gates became the wealthiest guy in the world through three simple steps you can take right now. Number one, I'm sorry. I had to do that. Number one, he decided at a very young age, what he wanted to do, and he's stuck in that lane. He did not very, he said no to 10,000 distractions to stay focused. Number two step, he, all he partnered with, or he actually found a company that would partner with him who was the biggest wealthiest, most influential company in that business, the tech world.   And that was IBM. Then third, here's the surprise. He did everything in his power to make them successful. When he did that, he quickly became the wealthiest guy in the world at a pretty young age. And so I would say following bill gates steps, you know, try to figure out what you want to do. Say no to distractions, find a big organization. Who's willing to partner with you and do everything you can to make them successful. That's great. Okay.   Jesse (34m 3s): Number three, what is one book you just are constantly recommending to people?   Paul (34m 9s): Well, I was going to recommend Howard marks mastering the market cycle, but since your listeners are already familiar with that, I would go back to my second one by Jay Papasan and Gary Keller. The one thing, yeah,   Jesse (34m 21s): That's a great book. And you know what, it's funny with mastering the market cycle. That is one book that's fairly hard to find on. I think it's on audible. If you want to listen to the audio version, but maybe, maybe I'm not looking hard enough, but I books, I, it was more challenging to find. All right, Paul, I think we're going to get an interesting answer on this one. My favorite Bloomberg question, first car, make and model   Paul (34m 46s): 1969, black Ford Mustang with the hood scoop   Jesse (34m 52s): 1 64, a oh 69, sorry, 69. I was going to not quite as cool. I was going to say the, would that be similar to the a, was it the 1970 was Mach one with the, with the kind of riveted Fastback.   Paul (35m 8s): Yeah. Well, interestingly, my hood was an aftermarket hood and somehow or another, I ended up with a Fastback hood with the turn signals out on the hood, you know, with my 1969 car. So   Jesse (35m 23s): Yeah, and I think that car was a, it was an Evie electric. Now I'm just joking. I feel like, I feel like this question is slowly, slowly going to get phased out as more and more people that come on just never had a first car, which is just the paradigm. Awesome. Well, for listeners that want to either, we'll put a show notes for the book for links to reach you, but where would the best be the best place be to, to connect with you? Paul   Paul (35m 51s): Jessie, I'm sure you can relate to this. When I, all those years, I wanted to transition from residential to commercial. I didn't know what to do. And so I've written a guide for people, free guide for people who want to learn, how to make that transition. And it's at Wellings capital.com/resources. That's w E L L I N G S capital.com/resources.   Jesse (36m 14s): My guest today has been Paul Moore, Paul, thanks for being part of working capital.   Paul (36m 20s): Thanks, Jesse. It's prey to be here.   Jesse (36m 29s): Thank you so much for listening to working capital the real estate podcast. I'm your host, Jesse for galley. If you liked the episode, head on to iTunes and leave us a five-star review and share on social media, it really helps us out. If you have any questions, feel free to reach out to me on Instagram, Jesse for galley, F R a G a L E, have a good one take care.

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast
1851: ClickUp Founder Shares the Story Behind its $4B Valuation

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 23:40


A recent Gartner survey revealed that nearly 80% of workers are using collaboration tools for work in 2021, up from just over half of workers in 2019. While many organizations relied on productivity platforms before the pandemic, the emergence of remote and hybrid work models has proven just how vital an all-in-one solution is to maintain workplace collaboration and efficiency. ClickUp, the world's first productivity platform, recently announced they raised $400 million in Series C funding -- the largest funding round to date in the workplace productivity market. This funding puts ClickUp at a $4 billion valuation, which will be used to support the creation of 600 European jobs, a regional European HQ, and a new development center. ClickUp's unique offering in the market has fueled their success as one of the fastest-growing SaaS startups in the world -- ClickUp is the only solution that replaces all individual workplace productivity tools within a single, unified platform. In less than 18 months, the company has raised $535 million in funding ($35M Series A in June 2020; $135M Series B in December 2020.) In the last year, the company has tripled its revenue and grown its user base from 200,000 to 800,000 teams worldwide and has more than 85,000 paying customers, including teams at McDonald's, Booking.com, and Netflix to name a few. Zeb Evans, ClickUp founder, shares how he has taken ClickUp from a 50-person Series A startup to a $4 billion-dollar company.

Funemployment Radio
2733: STATEN NIBLHOLE FERRY

Funemployment Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 40:47


Today: Greg is now obsessed with a new game online and he's not very good at it, giant frying pan on the road and McDonald's bathing suits, buying a boat and what to do with it, and have a wonderful afternoon dear friends! :)

Gettin' Grown
Not Enough Sense To Be Ashamed feat. Michell C Clark

Gettin' Grown

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 135:05


Happy New Year!!! Jade and Keia are back at the kitchen table for the first time in 2022. Excited to welcome brilliant writer and content creator Michell Clark to discuss adulting, authenticity, and affirmations. Let's catch up! Shoutout: 100 Daily Affirmations- For Millennials Who Are Tired of Being Called Millennials www.michellcclark.com https://www.instagram.com/michellcclark/ Support the Show: Stop by McDonald's today and enjoy two of your faves, like the Big Mac, Quarter Pounder with Cheese, Filet-O-Fish or 10 piece Chicken McNuggets for only $6. Kick off 2022 with a better checking account. Chime, an award-winning app and debit card, has no overdraft fees, foreign transaction fees, monthly fees, or service fees. Make your first good decision of the new year, and join over 10 million people using Chime.Sign up takes only two minutes and doesn't affect your credit score. Get started at chime.com/gg. That's chime.com/gg. https://gettingrown.co/ https://www.patreon.com/gettingrown Email: GettinGrownPodcast@gmail.com Twitter: @GettinGrownPod IG: @GettinGrownPod Facebook: www.Facebook.com/GettinGrownPodcast

Line for Line with Devon Booker
The Anthony Perrine Interview: new location, future plans and McDonald's deal.

Line for Line with Devon Booker

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 29:23


One of Kenosha's most visited gas stations. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

The Business Side of Music
#198 - From Broadway, to Broadway, and Television Too

The Business Side of Music

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 45:41


What happens when you mix together a Jazz musician, Bluegrass performer, and songwriter / performer for a major television show? While you're at it, throw in spending time on the boards of Broadway (NYC), Lower Broadway (Nashville), along with being on the road with one of the Rock N' Roll industry's legends, and you get singer, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist Tim McDonald. On this episode of The Business Side of Music, we talk to Tim, discussing his career, how he broke in to getting a gig on the hit ABC television show “Nashville”, wound up on the road with Rick Derringer, and has created 11 albums in his short career, many of different genres including Bluegrass and Jazz. Tim is a former United States Army Veteran as a Staff SGt graduating with honors from the Armed Forces School of Music, and performed in two New York Broadway musicals: “Aida”, and “The Producers”.  Tim moved to Nashville, TN as a session artist, and commenced a focused effort as a singer songwriter and pianist. Tim is currently touring the world with his Country and Jazz bands. When he's not doing that, he tours with legendary rock guitarist Rick Derringer.   Tim has also toured with Blake Shelton, Hank Williams Jr, Olivia Newton-John, Pam Tillis, Mark Chesnutt, Josh Gracin, Buddy Jewell and Steve Holy.  Additionally Tim has also had the honor to perform with guitar studio legend and artist Larry Carlton  Tim can also be seen on the big screen in 4 seasons of the ABC series "Nashville" as keyboardist for Luke Wheeler, Every Other Holiday as a choir pianist, and Patsy and Loretta Forever as Pianist for Loretta Lynn.  Tim's original songs are also included in Jerry Seinfeld's "Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee" and several movies including "A Perfect Fit".  Tim has 11 albums including 5 Country albums, 4 Jazz albums, including his latest releases on his 10th record suitably called "10" and his pandemic bluegrass record titled "Highland County".  McDonald was also recently nominated for the Kentucky Musicians Hall of Fame. Music heard on this episode: Song: “Spankin' Bottom Red” From the Album: 10 Songwriter(s): Tim McDonald   Song: “Hot Chicken” From the Album: 10 Songwriter(s): Tim McDonald / Michael Tebrinke   Song: “Tyburn Tree” From the Album: Highland County Songwriter(s): Tim McDonald   Song: “John Henry Butler” From the Album: Highland County Songwriter(s): Tim McDonald www.timmcdonaldband.com The Business Side of Music ™ © 2022 Lotta Dogs Productions LLC Showrunner and Executive Producer Emeritus: Tom Sabella Produced and Host (by the guy who has a face for podcasting): Bob Bender Director of Video and Continuity (the brains of the entire operation): Deborah Halle Audio/Video Editor (the man behind the curtain): Mark Sabella  Marketing and Social Media: Sarah Fleshner for 362 Entertainment All Around Problem Solver: Connie Ribas Recorded inside an old beat up Airstream Trailer located somewhere on what's left of Music Row in Nashville TN (except during the Covid 19 pandemic, then it's pretty much been accomplished VIA Skype or over the phone, with the exception for those fearless enough to come to Bob Bender's living room… and there have been a few). Mixed and Mastered at Music Dog Studios in Nashville, TN Edited and Posted at Midnight Express Studio located in Olian, NY Production Sound Design: Keith Stark Voice Over and Promo: Lisa Fuson Special Thanks to the creator and founder of the podcast, Tom Sabella, along with Traci Snow for producing and hosting over 100 episodes of the original "Business Side of Music" podcast and trusting us to carry on their legacy. Website: If you would like to be a guest on the show, please submit a request to: musicpodcast@mail.com If you're interested in becoming a sponsor for the show, let us know and we'll send you a media / sponsorship kit to you. Contact us at musicpodcast@mail.com

Your Brain on Facts
Voice Over The Moon, pt 2 (ep 179

Your Brain on Facts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 31:34


How'd it go for the first BBC announcer with an accent?  How much work can you get if you "make it" in voiceover?  How much did the woman behind Siri make?  And what's a pencil got to do with any of this?  All this and more in part 2! Like what you hear?  Become a patron of the arts for as little as $2 a month!   Or buy the book or some merch.  Hang out with your fellow Brainiacs.  Reach out and touch Moxie on Facebook, Twitter,  or Instagram. 00:25 RP and Wilfred Pickles (voiced by Simon Jackson) 04:26 The cast of Futurama work a lot! 08:17 Voiceover is easy! (right?) 11:30 #moxiemillion 12:30 Trying to find a job 13:55 Props and accessories 15:55 AI (even worse than the movie) 18:24 Bev Standing vs TikTok 20:50 sponsors: Sly Fox Trivia, Sambucol 23:06 Susan Bennett, the voice of Siri 27:53 It's in the game Music: Kevin MacLeod, Track Tribe . Links to all the research resources are on the website.   Back when the BBC was first launched in 1922, the first General Manager of the corporation, Sir John Reith, insisted the BBC be as formal and quintessentially British as possible, and he created a number of rules towards this end.  One thing he stressed in particular was that the newscasters spoke the “King's English.“  He felt it was “a style or quality of English that would not be laughed at in any part of the country”.  He also assumed RP would be easier for people across the empire to understand versus a regional accent, of which the tiny land mass of the UK has dozens.  Reish wanted things to be ‘just so,' even ordering that any newscaster reading the news after 8PM had to wear a dinner jacket while on air, on the radio, where no one could see them.    The BBC didn't create Received Pronunciation, though.  We can trace the origins of RP back to the secondary schools and universities of nineteenth-century Britain, making it the accent of a certain social class, the one with money.  Their speech patterns - based loosely on the local accent of the south-east Midlands, roughly London, Oxford and Cambridge, soon came to be associated with ‘The Establishment.'   although one of Reith's goals in using RP was to appeal to the widest audience possible, many listeners still felt alienated by the broadcasts being beamed into their homes because of this “upper class” accent being used. Despite this, newscasters were required to use Received Pronunciation right up until World War 2.   Why change it during the war?  Didn't they have bigger things to worry about?  Well, the Ministry of Information was worried about the Nazis hijacking the radio waves.  During World War 2, Nazi Germany invested a lot of time and money to train spies and propagandists to speak using perfect Received Pronunciation so that they could pass as British.  If they pulled it off, the Nazis could potentially issue orders over the radio in a thoroughly convincing and official-sounding newscaster voice.  Therefor, the BBC hired several newscasters possessed of broad regional accents that would be more difficult for Nazis to perfectly copy, and as a bonus might also appeal to the “common man”.   The first person to read the news on the BBC with a regional accent was one Wilfred Pickles in 1941.  [sfx clip]  The public trusted that he was in fact British, but they didn't trust, or couldn't ignore his accent to pay attention to, a word he said.  Far from being popular, his mild Yorkshire accent offended many listeners so much that they wrote letters to the BBC, blasting them for having the audacity to sully the news that way.  Nonetheless, after the end of World War 2, the BBC continued to loosen its guidelines and began to hire more people who spoke with the respective accent of the region they were being broadcast.  That said, the BBC does continue to select newscasters with the most mild accents for international broadcasts.   You can't please everyone, but if you can get in good in the voicework industry, you can do a staggering number of roles.  How many?  Here are some examples, pulling only from the cast of one of my favorite shows, Futurama.  You might say my husband and I are fans; we had a Hypnotoad wedding cake.  Billy West, the voice of Fry, Prof. Farnsworth, and Zoidberg, as well as both Ren and Stimpy, has 266 acting credits on his IMDB page.  Maurice LaMarche, who did Calculon, Morbo and Kiff and is the go-to guy for Orson Welles impressions like Brain from Animaniacs, has 390 roles listed.  Tress MacNeille, who did basically every female who wasn't Amy or Leela, as well as Dot on Animaniacs and Agnes Skinner on The Simpsons has 398 roles to her name.  Bender's voice actor, John DiMaggio, without whom the Gears of War video games wouldn't be the same, has worked on some 424 projects.  The man who made Hermes Conrad Jamaican, and gave us Samurai Jack, Phil LaMarr, is the most prolific voice actor on that cast, with a whopping 495 credits to his name.  Still, he falls short of the resume of Rob Paulsen, who did the voices of Yakko and Pinky on Animaniacs, and other examples too numerous to list here, because his IMDB pages lists 541 voice acting credits.  And did I mention they're bringing Animaniacs back? [cheer]  Paulsen is trailing behind Tara Strong, though.  The actress who voiced Bubbles on Powerpuff Girls, Raven on Teen Titans, and Timmy on Fairly Oddparents has 609 roles in her 35 year career, or an average of 17 a year.  That may not sound impressive, but have you've ever tried getting *one acting job?  Strong can't hold a candle to a man whose voice I can identify from two rooms away, a man who will always be Spike Spiegel from Cowboy Bebop no matter who he's playing, Steve Blum, who has racked up 798 voice roles.  And those are just a sampling of voice actors I can name off the top of my head.  So when career day rolls around, maybe skip doctor and firefighter and suggest your kid become a voice actor.  Not everyone who does voice work has a face for radio, so I put pictures of all the actors up on the Vodacast app so you can se what Fry, Yakko, and Raven really look like ..   “Sure,” you say, “that sounds like a sweet gig.  Walk in, say a few things, and cash the check.”  Oh my sweet summer child.  If it was that easy, everyone would do it.  For starters, there is no “got it in one take” in voice acting.  Be prepared to do your lines over and over again, with different emphasis, different inflection, different pacing, or sometimes simply saying it over and over again until, even though each take sounds the same to you, the director gets the subtle difference they're looking for.  Bonus fact: the feeling you get when you say a word or phrase so many times that it stops sounding like a word and becomes a meaningless noise is called semantic satiation.   You may be standing in a little booth all day, but that doesn't mean it won't be physically taxing.  Actors dubbing anime in particular are required to do a lot of screaming.  Chris Sabat, who voices Vegeta in the Dragonball series, says that even with his background in opera and the vocal control that taught him, “I will literally be sick the next day. I will have flu-like symptoms. Because you have to use so much energy, and use up so much of your voice to put power into those scenes, that it will make you sick. That's not an exaggeration; I will be bedridden sometimes after screaming for too long.”   That is, if you can get a gig.  Remember how I rattled off actors who've had hundreds of roles each?  That's because, in rough figures, 5% of the actors get 95% of the work. So unless you're a Tara Strong or Phil LaMarr, noteworthy roles will be hard to come by.  One plus side is you get paid by the word, as well as by the tag.  A tag is part of a recording that can be swapped out, like recording a commercial, and recording the phrases “coming soon,” “opening this Monday,” and “open now.”  The clients gets three distinct commercials from one recording sessions, so you get more money.  Assuming the client actually orders the session.  You may find yourself on stand-by or “avail,” as it's called in the industry.  You may be asked to set aside a few hours or even consecutive days for a recording session.  The problem is, the client isn't actually obligated to use you during that time and no one else can book you during that time until they release you from it.    But it's a job you can do in your pj's, and I often do, and that's always a plus.  Even though no one can see the actors, voice work still uses props and accessories.  While computers can be used to speed up or slow down dialogue (which is more of a concern in dubbing Japanese animation, where the visuals are already done), certain vocal changes can easily be achieved using random items in the studio. “If the character is in a hollowed-out tree, I might stick my head in a wastebasket,” veteran voice actor Corey Burton told Mental Floss. “If it doesn't sound quite right, I can throw some wadded-up Kleenex in there for better acoustics.”  Burton, like Mel Blanc, prefers to eat real food when the moment calls for it. “They want you to sometimes just go, ‘Nom, nom, nom.' No! I want a carrot, a cookie. I don't want to make a dry slurping noise when I could be sipping a drink.”   Pencils also play an important role, not for making notes on the script or creating any sort of convincing sound effect.  The plague of these performers is plosives.  You've probably heard them on podcasts; they've definitely been on mine.  A plosive is the noise you get when a consonant that is produced by stopping the airflow using the lips, teeth, or palate, followed by a sudden release of air.  It's also called popping your p's, since that's the worst culprit.  A round mesh screen in front of the mic helps, but the old-school trick to stop plosives actually uses a pencil.  If they're getting p-pops on the recording, voice actors will hold a pencil or similar linear object upright against the lips.  This disrupts the air enough to avoid the giant, sharp spike in the soundwave.  Now if only there were some cheap and easy trick to get rid of mouth noises and lip smacks.  You may hear a few on this podcast, but for everyone you hear, I cut twenty out.   The most sure-fire way to avoid mouth noises and breathing when ordering a recording is to use a computer-generated or AI voice.  Now this is a sticky wicket in the VO community, a real burr under a lot of saddles.  Whenever it comes up in message groups, a third of people turn into South Park characters [sfx they took our jobs].  I won't get too Insider Baseball here, but here's the scoop.  AI voices are cheap, fast, and they're getting really good.  Have you ever gotten a robodialer call where it took you a moment to realize it was not a live person?  There are companies offering entire audiobooks in AI voices.  There is even an AI voice that can cry!  So why am I not bothered?  The way I see it, the people who will buy the cheapest possible option, in this case an AI voice, weren't going to pay even my Fiverr rate, and invariably, the cheaper a client is, the more working with them makes you regret ever starting this business in the first place.  It's an irony a lot of freelancers and business owners are familiar with -- the $5k client pays you the day you submit the invoice; the $50 client makes you hound them for six weeks and then they say they want you to do it over or come down on the price.  So I'm fine with letting those gigs go.  The other reason is that while AI applications and devices such as smart speakers and digital assistants like Siri are powered by computer-generated voices, those voices actually originate from real actors!  In fact, I just wrapped an AI-generation job this week.    In most cases, even computerized voices need a human voice as a foundation for the development of the vocal database. Nevertheless, AI is creating new work for a wide range of voice actors. Are these actors putting themselves out of a job in future?  Maybe. Maybe not.  It's definitely something I had to wrestle with before accepting the job.  But I figured, AI is coming whether we like it or not, so it's best to be involved to help steer the ship rather than be capsized by its wake.   When I took the AI-generation job, there were two questions I had for the client: what control do I have over how my voice is used, and what happens if you sell the company?  I asked these two questions for two good reasons, Bev Standing and Susan Bennett.  Bev Standing, a VO and coach from Canada, was surprised to hear her own voice being used on peoples' videos when friends and colleagues told her to log onto Tiktok.  For one, people could use her voice to say whatever they liked, no matter how vile, and she'd never worked with, been paid by, or given permission for use of her voice to TikTok.   According to Standing, who I've taken classes with and is a really nice lady, the audio in question was recorded as a job for the Chinese Institute of Acoustics four years ago, ostensibly for translations.  “The only people I've worked with are the people I was hired by, which was for translations... My agreement is not what it's being used for, and it's not with the company that's using my voice,” Standing said in an interview.   Standing files a lawsuit against TikTok's parent company ByteDance on the grounds of intellectual property theft.  She hasn't consented to her performance being used by TikTok, and had very real concerns that the content created using her audio would hurt her ability to get work in the future.  Imagine if Jan 6 insurrectionists and other such hateful wackaloons used your voice on their videos.  Good luck getting hired after that.  TikTok and ByteDance stayed pretty mum, both publicly and to Standing and her lawyer, also a VO, but they did change the AI voice, which certainly looks like they done wrong.  The lawsuit was settled a few months ago, but it's all sealed up in NDAs, so I can't tell you the details, but I'm calling it a win.   The other name I dropped was Susan Bennett, but that's not the name you'd recognize her as.  Though she was training to be a teacher, it soon became clear to Susan Bennet that her voice was destined for more than saying “eyes on your own paper.”  She acted in the theater, was a member of a jazz band, an a cappella group, and she was a backup singer for Burt Bacharac and Roy Orbison.  That background helped her land gigs doing VO and singing jingles for the likes of Coca-Cola, McDonald's, Macy's, Goodyear, Papa John's, IBM, and more.  In 1974, she became the voice of First National Bank of Atlanta's Tillie the All-Time Teller, one of the first bank ATMs.  Her voice made the new technology more user-friendly for a computer-unfamiliar public.     Bonus fact: one of the earliest ATMs in NYC printed the security picture of the user on their receipts.  According to the man who sold them to the bank, “The only people using the machines were prostitutes and gamblers who didn't want to deal with tellers face to face.”  Or it could be the hours they keep.  I can neither confirm nor deny this, but I like to think that sex workers are the underappreciated early-adopters that helped the rest of us to be able to hit the cash machine on the way out of town (or the Mac machine, as my mom called it well into the 90's).  Bennet also became the voice of Delta Airlines announcements, GPS's, and phone systems.   But even with all that, that's not where you know her voice from.  “Hey, Siri, how big is the Serengeti?” [sfx if Google was]  Susan Bennet was the original voice of Siri on the iphone, but she never actually worked for Apple.  In 2005, she recorded a wealth of words and wordy-sounding non-words for a company called ScanSoft or Nuance, I've been seeing either listed.   For four hours a day, every day, in July 2005, Bennett holed up in her home recording booth, saying thousands of phrases and sentences of mostly-to-completely nonsense, which the “ubergeeks” as she called them, could use for generating AI speech.  According to Bennet, “I was reading sentences like 'cow hoist in the tub hut today.' 'Militia oy hallucinate buckra okra ooze.' Then I would read these really tedious things that were the same word, but changing out the vowel. 'Say the shrayding again, say the shreeding again, say the shriding again, say the shredding again, say the shrudding again.' “  These snippets were then synthesized in a process called concatenation that builds words, sentences, paragraphs. And that is how voices like hers find their way into GPS and telephone systems.   The job was done, the check cleared, and life went on, then 2011 rolled around and Siri was unveiled as an integrated feature of the Apple iPhone 4S.  The actors who'd worked for Nuance had no idea until well after it happened.  Bennett found out that her voice is actually Siri after a friend emailed: ”Hey, we've been playing around with this new Apple phone. Isn't this you?'  Apple had bought SoftScan/Nuance and all of its assets.  “Apple bought our voices from Nuance without our knowing it.”  As a voiceactor, this turn of events was problematic for a few reasons.  Typecasting and stereotyping, for one.  The downside of being successful in a role can be that that's all people want you for after that, like Sean Bean and a character who dies.  So Bennett kept her identity close to her vest until 2013, when Apple switched voices.  “My voice was just the original voice on the 4s and the 5. But now it no longer sounds like Apple because [Siri] sounds like everyone else. The original Siri voice had a lot of character; she had a lot of attitude.   Bennet has never said how much she made from Nuance, but we know how much she's made from Apple.  In round figures, give or take for inflation, [sfx calculator] she made $0.  Her voice was on something like 17 million phones.  Even a penny per phone would have been a handsome payday, but no, no penny for you.  “We were paid for the amount of time we spent recording but not at all for usage. The only way I've been able to get any payment for it, really, is through my speaking events, but I'm very grateful to have been the voice of Siri. She's very iconic; it's led to a whole new career for me.”   Another widespread voice that didn't get commensurate royalties is known for a single phrase, barely a full sentence. [sfx clip]  From FIFA and Madden to UFC and NBA, Andrew Anthony's voice has opened EA Sports video games for 30 years now and let us all have a collective shiver of mortality at that fact.  Anthony had a friend who ran a small ad sales company, who had taken on the not-yet-industry-cornerstone Electronic Arts as a client.  "My friend then called me up in Toronto and said 'Hey will you do this thing... for free?' I said 'yeah, of course, I will! I don't even know what this is but I get a free trip down to see you, so for sure'.  So Anthony went to visit his friend, read the line, which was originally “If it's in the game, it's in the game,” and assumed he would never, ever hear anything about it again.  Call that an underestimation.  EA is valued at $37B, with the Sports being a big chunk of that.  And Anthony has seen exactly none of that money, and he's pretty okay with that.  Over the years, Anthony has met plenty of other gaming fans and happily agreed to do his EA Sports voice impression on camera.    Not every screen actor's able to do voice work successfully; we've all heard flat, lackluster performances from big name stars in animated features.  Looking at you, Sarah Michelle Gellar from the recent HeMan cartoon.  Not so with the person who arguably kicked off the trends of booking big names stars for voice work, Robin Williams in his role as Genie.  Williams recorded 30 hours of dialogue, most of it improvised, for the 90 minute movie.  He took the role for *9% of the fee he normally commanded with the condition that the recordings not be used to merchandise products.  He wanted to “leave something wonderful behind for this kids.”  Thanks for spending part of your day with me.   And that's where we run out of ideas, at least for today.  So a wife overheard her boss saying he wanted a voice to notify people when they received email and volunteered her husband. “I recorded it on a cassette deck in my living room,” Edwards told the New York Post on November 7.  “Most people think I'm retired and own an island.”  Instead, he works at WKYC-TV from 3:30 a.m. to noon, and drives an Uber from noon to 6 p.m.  In 2014, Edwards told CNBC that he pranks people by standing behind their computers and booming, “You've got mail!”  Explained the voice-over actor, “I have fun with it!”  He's not bothered by not getting royalties, so I guess we shouldn't be either. 

Leadership With Heart
204: Leaders with Heart Connect People

Leadership With Heart

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 30:03


In this episode, Heather sits down with Jane Grote Abell, the Chairwoman of the Board of Donatos Pizza. Over the last four decades, Jane has held a variety of positions at both Donatos Pizza and Jane's Dough Foods, including Chief Executive Officer. Her father, ​​Jim Grote, and their family built Donatos into a successful pizza chain, then sold it to McDonald's.   After seeing it struggle under McDonald's, Jane convinced her family to buy the family business back. Since then, Jane and her family have dedicated both time and money to the chain restaurant's home city of Columbus, Ohio.   Jane has been named various titles, such as the YWCA Columbus Academy of Women of Achievement, CEO of the Year by Columbus CEO Magazine, and a Top 24 Women in Franchising by Franchise Update Magazine. Take a listen.

Dream Chasers Radio
Interview with

Dream Chasers Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 8:00


#blackwomenpodcasters #wonderyears #celebrityinterview Ernest Owens is a multi-sport athlete who played quarterback for Oklahoma Baptist University. He is from Arlington, Virginia. After majoring in sociology and theatre in college, chose to play professional basketball in Germany for the Westfalen Mustangs. He's also a TV actor who's starred on BET's hit tv show “Boomerang” and is also known for starring on VH1 Love and hip hop Atlanta episode 4 of season 9. Ernest Owens is a free agent in the National Football League, and when he's not on the field, he does well out of his sponsored deals. His endorsement portfolio includes McDonald's, Old Spice, Aeropostale, Marc Jacobs, Papa Johns Pizza, Moes Southwest Grill, What-A-Burger, Bed Bath & Beyond, and more companies. Ernest quoted “ I'm excited to be endorsing fast food. If you look at the majority of the top brands in the world, they all have one thing in common, an athlete. “Athlete Endorsements, when used effectively, will boost a company's overall brand, identity and increase their public image. Other athletes who endorsed McDonald's were Charles Barkley, Kobe Bryant, Michael Jordan, and many more. Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ernez540/

LAUSCHANGRIFF - Endlich was mit Sport!
Folge 105 - die Schweiz

LAUSCHANGRIFF - Endlich was mit Sport!

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 76:57


Buschi hat für alle und alles Verständnis. Fast. Schmiso nicht. Für Djokovic und seine Eltern. Für legend-in-the making- Josh Allen. Für Spaß mit Flaggen. Für den Irren und den Alten. Und für McDonald. Das maue Gefühl bei den Handballern. Und Haaland statt Lewandowski. Du möchtest mehr über unsere Werbepartner erfahren? Hier findest du alle Infos & Rabatte: https://linktr.ee/Lauschangriff_Podcast

Teacher Hustle Podcast
Special New Year's Q&A with Alissa McDonald

Teacher Hustle Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 35:18


Today, I'm sharing a special New Year's Q&A episode where we'll talk about imposter syndrome, course creation, wanting to quit, combating burnout, favorite fries, and so much more! I thought for January, it might be nice to just take a pause and reflect on some of the questions I got over the past year to make sure that you have all the answers you're looking for and also to have a little fun. I asked in my Instagram stories and in the Facebook group of Teacher Hustle University if anyone had any questions they would like me to answer and I have a whole bunch of good ones ranging from marketing strategy to favorite fries to overcoming obstacles in business, and more. I hope you enjoy this self-conducted interview and listener Q&A!Thinking about launching a course, or have an idea but don't know where to start? Listen to a SECRET PODCAST episode about developing and launching your course idea at www.alissamcdonald.com/coursecreator. Available for a LIMITED TIME.Podcast episode with Amber Williams about Brand MessagingPodcast episode with Megan Hale about Money MindsetPodcast episode with Laura Beam about Wellness and Self-CareGrab this month's companion Teacher Hustle Magazine about investing and finding support depending on your stage of business.

What the Riff?!?
1986 - September: Bon Jovi “Slippery When Wet”

What the Riff?!?

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 45:15


This is the album that turned heavy metal into pop, or started the hair metal genre of the 80's.  Slippery When Wet was the third studio album by Bon Jovi, and would be their best selling album to date.The band was David Bryan on keyboards, Tico Torres on percussion, Alec John Such on bass, Richie Sambora on guitar, and Jon Bon Jovi on lead vocals and rhythm guitar.Bon Jovi deliberately targeted a mainstream audience with this album.  They wrote 30 songs and auditioned them to teenagers in New York and New Jersey.  The album's songs were then ordered based on the opinions of this teenaged focus group.The band collaborated with Desmond Child, a hall of fame songwriter who wrote songs like "I Was Made for Loving You" by Kiss and Joan Jett's "I Hate Myself for Loving You."  Slippery When Wet would be the top selling album of 1987, and would go 12x platinum.  It would also make Bon Jovi the first glam rock band to have two number 1 songs on the Billboard Hot 100 with "You Give Love a Bad Name" and "Livin' on a Prayer."Bon Jovi - the band, and Jon Bon Jovi as a soloist - would never leave the rock pantheon A-list after this album.   Raise Your HandsJon Bon Jovi and Richie Sambora wrote this one.  It was the B-side to "You Give Love a Bad Name," and was not released as a single.  If it sounds familiar you might be remembering it from a scene in the Mel Brooks film "Spaceballs."You Give Love a Bad NameThis is the first single from the album and would hit number one on the Billboard Hot 100 in November 1986.  Child, Bon Jovi, and Sambora re-wrote the song which started as a song for Bonnie Tyler called "If You Were a Woman (And I was a Man)"  The video was directed by Wayne Isham, who was also directing videos for Motley Crue at the same time.  Motley Crue felt betrayed that Wayne would direct a Bon Jovi video, since they were competing with each other at the time.I'd Die for YouThis song is a deeper cut with keyboard work reminiscent of the song "Runaway" from their first album.  Wanted Dead of AliveThis track hit number 7 on the Billboard Hot 100, and uses old west imagery to describe the lonely life of a rock star.  Bon Jovi and Sambora would perform an acoustic version of this tune on the 1989 MTV Video Music Awards, and would inspire the network to create their "MTV Unplugged" series.   ENTERTAINMENT TRACK:Glory of Love by Peter Cetera (from the motion picture The Karate Kid part II)This solo song from Chicago front man Peter Cetera was on the charts after being featured in the 1986 summer sequel starring Ralph Macchio and Pat Morita. STAFF PICKS:Wild, Wild Life by Talking HeadsWayne leads off the staff picks with a critically acclaimed song from the Talking Heads album, "True Stories."  The song was featured in the film "True Stories," a satirical comedy directed by David Byrne, front man for the Talking Heads.  This was the third and last top 40 hit the band would create.Higher Love by Steve WinwoodBrian's staff pick is Winwood's first number 1 hit in the United States.  Will Jennings wrote the lyrics, inspired by his experience with church in the deep South.  Chaka Khan provides the backing vocals, enhancing the gospel feel of the song - a modern day hymn.Sweet Freedom by Michael McDonaldRob's staff pick was featured in the buddy cop movie "Running Scared," starring Billy Crystal and Gregory Hines.  This was the last top 10 hit to date for McDonald.  In addition to his solo work, McDonald has worked with many musicians including Steely Dan, Kenny Loggins, Christopher Cross, and most famously as lead vocalist for the Doobie Brothers, with which he is touring today.Venus by BananaramaBruce finishes the staff picks with a number 7 hit from an English pop group formed by the trio of Sara Dallin, Siobhan Fahey, and Keren Woodward.  The original was released in 1969 by Netherlands group Shocking Blue.  Bananarama began covering this song when they first formed in 1980, but didn't release the single until they had recorded original songs so they would be taken seriously as musicians. COMEDY TRACK:Big Fat Blonde by The RainmakersThe Rainmakers released their debut album in 1986.  One of their fans was horror novelist Stephen King, who quoted the band's lyrics in some of his novels.

Dark Poutine - True Crime and Dark History
The Sydney River McDonalds Shooting

Dark Poutine - True Crime and Dark History

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 85:14


Episode 203: On May 7, 1992, after the McDonald's restaurant on Kings Road near Keltic Drive in Sydney River, Nova Scotia, closed for the night and the overnight crew was coming in and the evening crew was leaving. Three young men, armed with a shovel handle, knives and a .22 calibre pistol robbed the establishment. They beat, stabbed and shot 4 of the restaurant workers, killing three, Jimmy Fagan, 27, Donna Warren, 22, and Neil Burroughs Jr., 29, and critically wounding 20-year-old, Arlene MacNeil, who was permanently disabled both physically and mentally, requiring round the clock care until her death in 2018. The crime's brutality brought unwelcome international media attention to the small town, especially when the truth came out. To almost everyone's surprise, days after the murders, it quickly became evident that the brutal crime had been committed by three, fairly well-liked young men from the area. They'd robbed the place for its cash, making off with a tiny fraction of what they had assumed would be in the restaurant's safe. Sources: Sydney River McDonald's murders - Wikipedia R. v. Muise, 1992 CanLII 4046 (NS SC), < https://canlii.ca/t/1qlf2 > R. v. MacNeil, 1993 CanLII 4442 (NS SC), < https://canlii.ca/t/1pqsc > R. v. MacNeil, 1993 CanLII 4449 (NS SC), < https://canlii.ca/t/1pqsl > R. v. Wood, 1993 CanLII 4535 (NS SC), < https://canlii.ca/t/1ql92 > R. v. Muise (No. 1), 1993 CanLII 4555 (NS SC), < https://canlii.ca/t/1ql9r > R. v. Muise, 1994 NSCA 198 (CanLII), < https://canlii.ca/t/1mqpp > R. v. Wood, 1994 NSCA 239 (CanLII), < https://canlii.ca/t/1mqcn > R. v. MacNeil, 1995 NSCA 10 (CanLII), < https://canlii.ca/t/1mqdv > Twenty years of heartache | The Chronicle Herald N.S. McDonald's killer granted full parole | CBC News McDonald's killer Darren Muise ‘financially secure' and ‘living a good life' on parole: documents - Halifax | Globalnews.ca McDonald's murderer ‘financially secure' and ‘living a good life': parole documents | CTV News Derek Wood, convicted in McDonald's murders, denied day parole | CBC News Wood v Warden (Atlantic Institution), 2017 CanLII 67340 (NB CA), < https://canlii.ca/t/h6mgr > Derek Anthony Wood and the Sydney River McDonald's Murders - Christopher di Armani.com Sydney River McDonald's killer loses appeal | SaltWire One of three men convicted in McDonald's murders awarded unescorted absences   - Halifax | Globalnews.ca 24 Sep 2000, 28 - The Winnipeg Sun at Newspapers.com Murder at McDonald's: The Killers Next Door eBook : Jessome, Phonse: Amazon.ca: Kindle Store Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/darkpoutine See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

beep beep lettuce
TEASER Bonus # 146 - McDonald's Universal Healthcare

beep beep lettuce

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 5:58


A huge nerd has a plan to make Manhattan slightly bigger to solve climate change. the DPRK is on their sigma male juche grindset. Martin Shkreli owes $64 million. Cops get caught using forged DNA evidence to coerce confessions. And in praxis of the week, a guy in jail pretended to be a different guy who was getting released that day so he could escape.                 to hear the full episode and many more, check out our patreon at patreon.com/beepbeeplettuce

Ze Shows – Anime Pulse
Episode 734: Frame of the Goddess’ Girl

Ze Shows – Anime Pulse

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 84:07


This week on Anime Pulse we got no large McDonald's french fries, a dormitory for shota lovers, and New Years anime. Up first is the IRL news as Joseph talks about his time thus far with Pokemon Shield, and Andrew would like to know if any community members out there know of any good new years anime. Then in the industry news we get a Andrew sandwich, with topics like the possibility of a Netflix produced Scott Pilgrim anime and the downfall of Pachinko. Lastly are the reviews as Joseph is taken in by some very wholesome, buxom, not at all Shotacons and Andrew builds some anatomically correct GunPla.

Speaking of Crime
Shay Shares What She Knows About Kylen And Crystal's Last Days

Speaking of Crime

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 26:41


Kylen and Crystal had many friends in Moab. One of those friends worked with Crystal at McDonald's and her name is Shay. She is devastated. And five months later, she is still struggling to deal with the loss of her friends who she says she was so blessed to have known, even for the short period of time she was able to spend with them before their lives were brutally cut short.  Music in this episode provided by Artlist: SHe's a Gift by Borrtex Birthplace by Ardie Son Missing You by James Paul Mitchell Short Love Story by Claudio Laucci My Blues(Inst.) By Moody Bear Episode written by Jia Wertz Episode produced by Studio G   Your Hosts Jia Wertz and John Gully

PWTorch Dailycast
PWTorch Dailycast - PWTorch ‘90s Pastcast - Moynahan & McDonald discuss issue #155 of the PWTorch (1-9-92) including Bill Eadie Torch Talk

PWTorch Dailycast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 137:47


Patrick and Alex kick off the second episode of the "PWTorch ‘90s Pastcast" Dailycast by reading fan reviews of Starrcade ‘91, then pivoting to Lex Luger's run in WCW and his upcoming departure. They then turn their attention to discussing the bombshell quote by Superstar Billy Graham claiming he personally injected Hulk Hogan with steroids. They continue by covering the recent wave of media interest in the steroids in wrestling topic, including Wade Keller's Torch Talk with Bill Eadie and Wade's own editorial covering the steroid issue. Finally, the two wrap up by sharing a few interesting notes on the upcoming Royal Rumble and SNME events.

The Big Foodies
Best Fast Food Burger

The Big Foodies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 17:45


The Big Foodies are presented by Berky Orthodontics and after 70+ episodes, the Big Foodies finally do something that they are surprised they haver never done before. Burgers! This is the first time, the guys have talked about burgers. Biggie, Matt and BB Shea decided to sit down and try the signature single burger from several different fast food restaurants. Burgers on display are from Burger King, McDonald's, Sonic Drive-In, Hardee's, Cook Out and Wendy's!

Whatever Happened to Pizza at McDonald's

Episode 237 of Whatever Happened to Pizza at McDonald's?.

Bertcast's podcast
# 500 - Jim Gaffigan & ME

Bertcast's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 126:27


It's episode 500! Today, I sit down with comedian Jim Gaffigan. We talk about going to Disney Land with 5 kids, getting covid, favorite McDonald's order, FSU, finding your roots, his new special, and much more!  Watch Jim's new special “Comedy Monster” streaming now on Netflix!  Follow Jim Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jimgaffigan  Twitter: https://twitter.com/JimGaffigan    This episode is brought to you by Liquid IV. Get 25% off when you go to http://www.liquidiv.com and use the code “Bert” at checkout.   This episode is also brought to you by Better Help. Get 10% off your first month with the discount code “BERT”. Get started today at http://www.betterhelp.com/bert     This episode is brought to you by Ladder. Go to http://www.ladderlife.com/bert to find out if you're approved today!    This episode is also brought to you by Nutrafol. Go to http://www.nutrafol.com and use the code “BERTCAST” for $15 off plus free shipping on your first month's subscription.   For all TOUR DATE & MERCH click HERE: http://www.bertbertbert.com  Twitter: http://www.Twitter.com/bertkreischer  Facebook: http://www.Facebook.com/BertKreischer  Instagram: http://www.Instagram.com/bertkreischer  Youtube: http://www.Youtube.com/user/Akreischer 

Prayer 2021
Study in Prayer - January 13 - Pray for Results

Prayer 2021

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 6:40


Scripture of the Day:   Matthew 21:22“If you believe, you will receive whatever you ask for in prayer…” Pray for ResultsHave you ever heard someone finish a prayer and say something like, “for Jesus sake, amen.?” That is so foolish. We are praying for our sake – not Jesus sake. AMEN? We are to pray to the Father – IN THE NAME OF JESUS! We are to pray for RESULTS. Jesus said if we believe whatever it is we are asking God for, that God WILL answer our prayers…if we believe that – THEN we will receive our prayers as answered. DO NOT DOUBT. Amen! How can you believe in something you do not know? In order to receive your prayers as answered, you must believe they will be answered. To believe they will be answered, you must base them on the Word of God. How can you base them on the Word of God if you do not know the Word of God? Quick answer – You can't! So, first, you must READ what God's Word has to say about your situation. Whatever it is!  If you need healing, go to the Word and look up – AND READ – every single scripture that deals with healing and Jesus healing the sick. “Well, brother bob, that would take a lot of time…” I didn't say you had to do it one sitting. But you should spend at least 30 minutes scriptures. And, in my opinion, if you truly are in need of healing, do it three or four times per day! “Three or four times per day?”  I don't have that much time…!  Really? What are you doing at 5am every morning?  “Well, brother bob, I'm sleeping…I work all day…” Look at where I am right now. It is 5am and I'm doing this every single day. WHY? Because I need a deep dive in prayer. And I'm in the Word every single day. But I needed to FOCUS on prayer. And the Lord impressed upon me to share this study with you. That is what I'm doing. But I have been getting up between 5 and 515 am for years, just to spend the first few minutes of each and every day with the Lord. In His word and in prayer. Some people want to do that at the end of the day. That's ok too. But you need to make it part of your daily schedule. Not something you do when you remember. It has to be part of your routine. Amen. And, if you need an answer to something in particular, like healing – then you need to spend 30 minutes reading healing scriptures. Over and over and over. If you need an answer to financial pressures, read about finances. What to do, sowing and reaping, giving and receiving, etc. Tithing…hello! The point is – when I said three times per day, if you were truly sick and the doctor told you to take these pills and go for a half mile walk three times per day for the next six months and you will be healed – would you do it? Most people would say yes! Even if you had a job. You would wake up 30 minutes early and go for your walk before work. At lunch time you would go for a walk instead of McDonald's or whatever. Then after work you go for your third walk. You would find a way to fit it into your schedule because your doctor said if you would do it – you would be healed… So why won't you believe the one who gave the doctor's their wisdom? Why won't you believe the One who created all things, including your body. Why won't you believe the One who created all the silver, all the gold and all the cattle on a thousand hills? Do you think He who did all that is incapable of helping you? Then start believing and asking for specific prayer, like we already talked about – and, as we are talking about today – PRAY FOR RESULTS and then, as our scripture says today – BELIEVE YOU RECEIVE those prayers as answered. Amen! I want to pray for you right now, that you would take this seriously. So seriously that you will repent for not doing so before…so seriously that you will start to spend at least 30 minutes each day in God's Word. So seriously that, if necessary, you will get up 30 minutes earlier to start your day with God in His Word.  IF you will do that, THEN you will see...

If This Mic Could Talk
Episode 203 | "Hotbox Condoms"

If This Mic Could Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 125:55


***ALL THE VIDEOS, SONGS, IMAGES, AND GRAPHICS USED IN THE VIDEO BELONG TO THEIR RESPECTIVE OWNERS AND I NOR THIS CHANNEL CLAIMS ANY RIGHT OVER THEM.******THIS SHOW IS INTENDED FOR ADULTS AND MATURE AUDIENCES!!!***LORD WE THANK YOU FOR OUR GIFTS!!!Mic Talkers this was an energetic episode! Special guests Shannon and Queen K! Topics include: Is someone being celibate a red flag? Are we not giving enough credit to fathers and too much to mothers? Drizzy getting sued for what? Could a person being totally against the names you desire for future children be a dealbreaker? McDonald's food vs blender. First date dress code; should there be one? If a man wants to go to a bar but his favorite bar is one that his ex also likes to go to, is he wrong for taking a date there? If we aren't cool anymore should all pics be removed from your social media? Get rid of one: greens, fried chicken, cornbread, Mac n cheese. Segments: "Things That Make You Go Hmmm", "The Man's Den", "Hot Seat", "Would You Rather", "LB Moment", "Black Excellence", "OK Brotha", "Damn Girl", "Each One, Teach One", and MORE!!!MIC TALKERS, THIS IS FOR YOU!!!

The Secret World of Slimming Clubs
129: Slim-Inga World

The Secret World of Slimming Clubs

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 30:08


This is a fun episode for everyone to listen to, except Inga from Made in Chelsea! Has Jo learnt to live with Lindt balls yet? Did Victoria stick to plan for a full week? How many McDonald's can Katy eat and still lose weight? Go to our Etsy shop to get your Secret World of Slimming Clubs merchandise: https://www.etsy.com/shop/secretrecordings  If you'd like Extra Portions of this podcast (and join us for our monthly Zoom parties) you can: go to https://www.patreon.com/secretslimpod or find us on the Patreon app. go to https://anchor.fm/secretslimpod or search The Secret World of Slimming Clubs Extra Portions on Spotify.

ToddCast Podcast
California Shuts Down Christian Preschool Over Mask Issues

ToddCast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 115:45


A California preschool was shut down because teachers refused to make two-year-olds wear masks. An elderly woman was denied service at a McDonald's because she did not have her papers- Cruelty! Todd Starnes is joined by Rep. Jody Hice, Adm. Pastor Kevin Miller (Foothills Christian Church), YAF spokesperson Kara Zupkus, and Senate candidate (R-OH) Mike Gibbons! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
Food stamp benefits could soon be used to purchase restaurant meals, prepared foods

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 20:25


Numerous states are looking into extending food stamp use to restaurants and prepared meals to keep up with what academics are calling the lack of time, skills, resources, and physical abilities of some SNAP users. Award-winning food writer Corby Kummer joined Boston Public Radio on Wednesday to share why more states are looking into joining the SNAP Restaurant Meals Program, and where food policy needs to change. “When it comes down to it, realistically, the people who need and rely on nutrition assistance often work two jobs, they're supporting families, and they have no time at all to cook and prepare the wholesome food that SNAP was originally designed to restrict them to buying,” Kummer said. When Restaurant Meals started in 2003, 19 states participated in the program. That number shrank to just four states by 2018. Now, six states — Arizona, California, Maryland, Michigan, Rhode Island, and Virginia — let some people who receive SNAP benefits use food stamps at restaurants. Illinois and New York are both in the process of applying to the Restaurant Meals Program. Kummer told Boston Public Radio that states have to prove that there are enough high need residents — such as “adults over 60, people with disabilities, and those who are homeless and their spouses” — to get exemptions in the Restaurant Meals Program and SNAP. While the Restaurant Meals Program has been applauded by food equity advocates and anti-hunger organizations, small restaurants have been slow to participate in the program due to lengthy bureaucratic processes. Instead, large chains like McDonald's and Subway are often state-certified for the program. “It's a lot of paperwork on the part of the restaurant, and so this in the beginning seemed like it was going to be a boon for for smaller restaurants, especially with [something like a] high volume, local sandwich shop that opens,” Kummer noted. “But [the paperwork] turned out to be so cumbersome that it discouraged all but the largest chains.” Kummer is the executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.

Rooster Teeth Podcast
Eric Learns what UwU is - #683

Rooster Teeth Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 88:16


Join Eric Baudour, Gavin Free, Jessica Vasami, and Cole Gallian as they talk about Matrix 4, the McDonald's bridge, where things are in the ocean, what is a franchise, and more on this week's RT Podcast. Tickets on sale now for RTP LIVE on April 1 and RTX Tickets on sale Jan 24 (FIRST) & Jan 26 (Public): https://www.rtxevent.com/ Sponsored by MeUndies (http://Meundies.com/roosterteeth), Chime (http://Chime.com/rooster), and BetterHelp (http://Betterhelp.com/rooster).

Talkin' Isles
Colin McDonald

Talkin' Isles

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 40:57


Colin McDonald joins the podcast for episode 17. Cory and Greg talk to McDonald about: playing college hockey at Providence College (3:40), becoming the captain of the Bridgeport Sound Tigers (12:30), making the jump to the Islanders in 2012-13 (14:00), the 2013 playoff series against the Penguins (18:10), the Islanders Stadium Series game vs the Rangers at Yankee Stadium (21:35), memories of Evgeni Nabokov (25:30) and Lubomir Visnovsky (29:40), his glove getting stolen (31:05), post-playing career (37:00) and more.

Up and At ’Em: Minnesota’s Morning Podcast

Ben tries to topple the McDonald's breakfast sandwich monopoly.

History of the 90s
Introducing.... Twenty Thousand Hertz

History of the 90s

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 27:01


Twenty Thousand Hertz, a podcast that reveals the stories behind the world's most recognizable and interesting sounds, today's episode looks at the show about nothing... Seinfeld. If you like what you've heard check out their other episodes where they've also explored music sampling in hip hop, whether dinosaurs really sounded the way they do in Jurassic Park, and the surprisingly controversial story behind the McDonald's "I'm Lovin' It" jingle.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Indicator from Planet Money
Why Are McDonald's Ice Cream Machines Always Broken?

The Indicator from Planet Money

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 9:41


McDonald's is notorious for frequent malfunctions of its ice cream machine. What's behind those malfunctions and why is the government getting involved?

Financial Survival Network
Get Ready for the Great Resignation with Carl Gould #5378

Financial Survival Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 21:52


Summary: With 'The Great Resignation' continuing and labor shortages in many industries this may be the year you ask for a raise. Employers in businesses big and small are desperate to attract, and more importantly, retain employees. Highlights: -“While this is the time to ask for a raise, in many ways the same rules apply with regard to how to go about doing it," says Business Management Expert and owner of Business Management Firm '7 Stage Advisors' in Butler, NJ Carl Gould (see short bio below).  -Major chains like Chipotle and McDonald's have been fast to provide higher pay and better perks while larger companies like Bank of America have raised analyst pay by 10-thousand dollars and the salaries of associates and vice presidents by 20-thousand dollars.  -Tips to ask for a raise include eliminating any fear you might have about asking, making a list of your accomplishments on the job, making an appointment with the 'decision maker' and not the person who cannot make it happen, and preparing answers to any objections in advance. Questions addressed: • Why is this the year to ask for a raise? • How can you prepare for the meeting? • Why do you have the upper hand? • What could you ask for in lieu of more money? Useful Links: Financial Survival Network 7 Stage Advisors Start Your Xmas Shopping ASAP with Carl Gould Life in Post-Pandemic America with Carl Gould

No Blackout Dates
S2, Ep. 16: Running With The Buffalo In Bali

No Blackout Dates

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 43:56


Marko Randelovic is a documentary filmmaker and photojournalist from the UK whose work focuses heavily on Southeast Asia. Marko joins No Blackout Dates to discuss his new film, Makepung, which debuts on Matador Network on January 12. Makepung tells the story of Bali's long-running tradition of buffalo racing. That's right – there's a dedicated cohort of Balinese who aren't afraid to hop on a water buffalo and chase speed, glory, and honor. Lest you be worried about animal rights, these water buffalo are among the most cared-for animals on the Indonesian island. Also on today's docket is the lifestyle of an international filmmaker. What kept him going throughout a global pandemic that severely restricted his – and everyone else's – ability to vagabond? He also notes why it's so important to connect with the communities you visit rather than just experience a place through its travel or expat lens. Marko discusses the differences between visiting Canggu and Ubud, and how even the island's famed beach club scene has a spiritual side.In Hot Takes, Tim and Eben discuss the merits of Don't Look Up and debate whether or not Yelp reviews are bullsh*t. Tim wonders what the heck “smart casual” dress means, and Eben admits that he actually does enjoy the outdoors (as long as he's far from home).Relevant links: Marko Randelovic Don't Look Up The best places to go in Bali for every type of traveler Dress codes and what they mean Pizzeria UNO Marko's Instagram Tim's Instagram Eben's Instagram News of the Day: Why you should liquefy your corpse when you die It's true – McDonald's is putting stationary bikes in its restaurants BONUS: Help the Joshua Tree gain protection under the Endangered Species Act

Holiness Preaching Online
Rev. Shad Mcdonald- "Church! you can live it, to tell it!"

Holiness Preaching Online

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 30:00


Calvary Holiness Campmeeting 2021. Audio recording courtesy of Calvary Holiness church in Broxton, GA.

Holiness Preaching Online
Rev. Shad Mcdonald- "I sure didn't see that coming"

Holiness Preaching Online

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 37:33


Calvary Holiness Campmeeting 2021. Audio recording courtesy of Calvary Holiness Church in Broxton, GA

Murder In America
52: EP. 52 - CALIFORNA - The 1984 McDonald's Massacre: 77 Minutes of Hell

Murder In America

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 55:55


In 1984, a McDonald's franchise in San Ysidro, California was visited by evil in the form of a man named James Huberty. James brought three guns to that restaurant that day, and in the span of 77 minutes, 21 people were dead, countless more were injured and America was changed forever. This is one shocking and disturbing story, and listener discretion is HEAVILY advised. - Get access to professional therapy RIGHT NOW with BETTERHELP. And use our custom promo code to get 10% off of your first month! https://betterhelp.com/MIA - Ease YOUR back pain AND your life using the Chirp Wheel! Just enter code "MIA" at checkout to get 10% off your entire purchase! https://gochirp.com - Up YOUR cooking game (and improve your health) by signing up for DAILY HARVEST! And use our custom URL for up to $40 off your order! https://dailyharvest.com/state

TED Talks Business
Encore: Turn critics into allies | Bob Langert

TED Talks Business

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 26:39


When an organization is battered by critics, how does it usually respond? “Deny and push back, put out some sort of lame statement,” says Bob Langert, “and no progress is made at all.” But based on 25 years leading sustainability and corporate responsibility at McDonald's, Bob proposes another way: To work with critics. In this talk, he shares stories that take us from the Amazon to slaughterhouses, from tree huggers to corporate suits, all in the search for common ground with his greatest detractors. While we're taking a break, we hope you enjoy this favorite from the TED Business archive.

Double Threat with Julie Klausner & Tom Scharpling
I Gotta Get Me One of these Cyanide Tablets

Double Threat with Julie Klausner & Tom Scharpling

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 106:19


Double Threat returns for the Double Deuce with a rundown of 2022 New Year's Resolutions for the podcast as mandated by their network. Including - More Trending Topics! Make a 900 Number! Record a One Hit Wonder! Plus an update on the latest TeePublic email, the giant topiary chicken, and Brett's Lemon Delights. Also James Corden vehicular manslaughter, planning Cindy Adams' birthday party, RIP Betty White, RIP Joan Didion, Tom and Julie imitate each other, Carey Grant tries to buy a ticket for Urinetown, cyanide tablets, apartment birds, burlesque, McDonald's dinner party, packing a lip, what Charles Manson thinks of Ted Bundy, Rumpelstiltskin, Tom and Julie's sloopband, Goofus and Gallant and Gary, The Creep and the Cage, Hot Stuff, fencing, Julie's 3rd Grade performance of Oh! Calcutta!, David Crosby's turkey basters, red equals green, new britches, and attractive horrible people. CLIPS FROM THIS EPISODE: *What Charles Manson Thinks of Ted Bundy https://www.tiktok.com/t/TTPdMQmakk *900 Numbers https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dt3Aj9p5KUs *John Stossel Interviews Wrestler https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zrX9Ca7LSyQ *The Cherry Pie Guy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=odKt0EEwv6Q *Elizabeth from Knoxville Remix https://www.tiktok.com/t/TTPdMQqKVR LISTEN TO DOUBLE THREAT AD-FREE ON FOREVER DOG PLUS: http://foreverdogpodcasts.com/plus DOUBLE THREAT MERCH: https://www.teepublic.com/stores/double-threat SEND SUBMISSIONS TO: DoubleThreatPod@gmail.com FOLLOW DOUBLE THREAT: https://twitter.com/doublethreatpod https://www.instagram.com/doublethreatpod DOUBLE THREAT IS A FOREVER DOG PODCAST: https://foreverdogpodcasts.com/podcasts/double-threat Theme song by Mike Krol Artwork by Michael Kupperman

The Comedy Button
The Comedy Button: Episode 523

The Comedy Button

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 71:12


We celebrate the happy-so-far new year with some scheduling changes, learn about the time Scott's wife almost killed him, try to imagine what the worst giant animal would be, and discover way too much about nightmare McDonald's playground equipment. Starring Brian Altano, Scott Bromley, Ryan Scott, and Kristin Van De Yar.

Mind Pump: Raw Fitness Truth
1721: How to Know If You Are Gaining Muscle Instead of Fat, Ways to Improve Vascularity, Deep Squats Vs. 90 Degree Squats & More

Mind Pump: Raw Fitness Truth

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 84:28


In this episode of Quah (Q & A), Sal, Adam & Justin answer Pump Head questions about whether it is always best to do ass to grass squats or mix it up, social media tips for personal trainers wanting to demonstrate their process, ways to make your veins pop, and good metrics to know if your gaining muscle and not excessive fat. Mind Pump Fit Tip: STOP trying to burn more calories to lose weight; it's a losing strategy. (4:32) McDonald's new weight loss idea. (8:10) What is Tesla not doing?! (11:11) Is sneezing a male privilege? (17:02) The guys recap their holiday break and Adam's problem with running out of gas. (21:49) Glutathione, the master antioxidant. (33:40) If there are hoof prints in the sand, think horse not zebra. (43:08) Organifi's Pure is getting rave reviews from the guy's friends and family! (49:45) Why Sal's metabolism has been roaring as of late. (51:10) #Quah question #1 - Is it best to do ass to grass squats or mix it up? (57:29) #Quah question #2 – What are some social media tips for personal trainers wanting to demonstrate their process to their followers as Adam did? (1:03:45) #Quah question #3 – Is there anything you can do or take to make your veins pop like Sal? (1:13:38) #Quah question #4 – What's a good metric to know if I'm gaining muscle and not excess fat? (1:17:31) Related Links/Products Mentioned January Promotion (#1): NEW YEAR'S RESOLUTIONS SPECIAL BUNDLE OFFERS January Promotion (#2): MAPS Anabolic 50% off **Code “JANUARY50” at checkout** We Burn as Many Calories as Hunter-Gatherers, So What Makes Us Fat? The exercise bikes in McDonald's China are real — but they are not for working out Fact check: Stationary bikes at McDonald's locations in China are part of green-friendly initiative Tesla Can End Up Being The 'iPhone' Of The EV Industry And It's 'Show Me Year' For Ford, Rivian, Lucid: Gene Munster Visconti's Ristorante - Folsom Italian Restaurant Visit LivON Labs for an exclusive offer for Mind Pump listeners! Endogenous Deficiency of Glutathione as the Most Likely Cause of Serious Manifestations and Death in COVID-19 Patients Quercetin: New Hype for COVID-19? Jury finds Ghislaine Maxwell guilty on charges tied to Jeffrey Epstein's sex trafficking ring Visit Organifi for the exclusive offer for Mind Pump listeners! **Promo code “MINDPUMP” at checkout** MP Hormones Mind Pump Hormones Facebook Private Forum Visit NED for an exclusive offer for Mind Pump listeners! Mind Pump #1535: Should You Squat Below Parallel? Why Social Media is so Important for Personal Trainers – Mind Pump Blog Mind Pump #1675: Eight Ways To Get The BEST Muscle Pump Visit Drink LMNT for an exclusive offer for Mind Pump listeners! Mind Pump Podcast – YouTube Mind Pump Free Resources People Mentioned Ben Pakulski (@bpakfitness)  Instagram Mark Bell (@marksmellybell)  Instagram

I AM RAPAPORT: STEREO PODCAST
EP 885 - THE JEWISH LASER TOUR & MUPPET MARJORIE BANNED FROM TWITTER/ANTONIO BROWN BOUNCED FROM BUCS/INSURRECTIONISTS DAY

I AM RAPAPORT: STEREO PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 47:58


Have no fear and Happy New Year! This is The Zone of Disruption! This is the I AM RAPAPORT: STEREO PODCAST! His name is Michael Rapaport aka The Gringo Mandingo aka aptain Colitis aka The Disruptive Warrior aka Mr. NY aka The Inflamed Ashkenazi aka The Sultan of Sniff is here to discuss: Being in parts unknown of Los Angeles, having a chill New Year, having some sleep gummies, Up In Smoke Days done, Quarantine days cut down, cancelling cancel culture 2022, Young Shooter in a McDonald's commercial, The Jewish Space Laser Tour, Moronic Marjorie kicked off of Twitter, Antonio Brown being bounced from The Buccaneers, Insurrectionists Day, DTRUMP Jr. engaged, Re-Viewing Buffalo 66, enjoying watching Juliette Lewis, Kooky Kyrie Irving returning this week, LeBron James being an animal, Klay Thompson's return & a whole lotta mo'! This episode is not to be missed! Stand Up Comedy Tickets on sale at: MichaelRapaportComedy.com For all things sports wagering use MyBookie.AG with Promo Code: RAPAPORT If you are interested in MLB, NBA, NFL & UFC Picks/Parlays Follow @TheCaptainPicks on Instagram & subscribe to packages at www.CaptainPicks.com www.dbpodcasts.com   Produced by DBPodcasts.com Follow @dbpodcasts, @iamrapaport, @michaelrapaport on TikTok, Twitter & Instagram Music by Jansport J (Follow @JansportJ) www.JansportJMusic.com