Podcasts about Reform

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Share on LinkedIn
Copy link to clipboard
  • 5,497PODCASTS
  • 12,124EPISODES
  • 38mAVG DURATION
  • 5DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Aug 8, 2022LATEST

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022



    Best podcasts about Reform

    Show all podcasts related to reform

    Latest podcast episodes about Reform

    Wirtschaftspresseschau - Deutschlandfunk
    05. August 2022 - Die Wirtschaftspresseschau

    Wirtschaftspresseschau - Deutschlandfunk

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 2:30


    Die Wirtschaftskommentatoren beschäftigen sich unter anderem mit dem Vorstoß von Bundesfinanzminister Lindner für eine Reform des EU-Stabilitäts- und Wachstumspakts. Der FDP-Politiker will die europäischen Schuldenregeln im Kern erhalten, die mittelfristigen Haushaltsziele aber verbindlich durchsetzen, wie er sagt.www.deutschlandfunk.de, WirtschaftspresseschauDirekter Link zur Audiodatei

    The Jenna Ellis Show
    CONGRESS CONTEMPLATES ELECTORAL COUNT ACT REFORM

    The Jenna Ellis Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 28:43


    Mainstream media is basically ignoring the proposed reforms to the Electoral Count Act. Attorney Hans Von Spakovsky joins to discuss what is actually in the proposal and the impact on election integrity. Plus, a disturbing admission from the U.S. Census Bureau that affects election integrity!See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Secrets of Data Analytics Leaders
    Data Mesh Translated: Software Engineers Try to Reform Data - Audio Blog

    Secrets of Data Analytics Leaders

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 9:00


    The data mesh is an attempt by software engineers to remake the data industry in their image. There is a lot of goodness in the data mesh but will it work? The track record for other reform efforts is not good, although new technologies are putting wind into the methodology. Published at: https://www.eckerson.com/articles/data-mesh-translated-software-engineers-try-to-reform-data

    Presseschau - Deutschlandfunk
    05. August 2022 - Die Wirtschaftspresseschau

    Presseschau - Deutschlandfunk

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 2:30


    Die Wirtschaftskommentatoren beschäftigen sich unter anderem mit dem Vorstoß von Bundesfinanzminister Lindner für eine Reform des EU-Stabilitäts- und Wachstumspakts. Der FDP-Politiker will die europäischen Schuldenregeln im Kern erhalten, die mittelfristigen Haushaltsziele aber verbindlich durchsetzen, wie er sagt.www.deutschlandfunk.de, WirtschaftspresseschauDirekter Link zur Audiodatei

    What's Left?
    Pelosi's $90,000,000 Plane Ride

    What's Left?

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022


    In the midst of USA´s House Speaker Nancy Pelosi´s visit to Taiwan, US and Chinese tensions have risen. Is another show of power straight from the playbook of the Ukrainian provocation? What political theatre is at play here? We discuss what we think is really going on behind the political curtain. Check us out.Co-host Eduardo Abarca´s Refugee Support Donation link:https://www.paypal.com/pools/c/8M2rXd2VfqITunes and Spotify only display our last 100 episodes:To see all our episodes go to:What's Left? Website:Contact us @:  Subscribe to What's Left? on Telegram:Find out more about our anti-mandate group: Workers & Students for Choicehttps://www.askhealthyquestions.com/ws4choiceiTunes: Spotify: Bitchute: YouTube:  LBRY: Telegram :Odysee: stitcher: Googleplaymusic: Rumble

    Bonjour Chai
    Shattering Glass and Breaking Stereotypes

    Bonjour Chai

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022


    To celebrate their love, the Bonjour Chai team is dedicating this entire episode to the topic of interfaith marriage. We dive into both sides of the issue: those who support the expansion of Jewish life, and those who prefer to keep the boundaries of Judaism more strict. To dive deep into the debate, we're joined by two Reform rabbis whose personal beliefs fall on opposite sides of the issue: Rabbi Lily Kowalski of Temple Emanu-El-Beth Sholom in Montreal, and Rabbi Philip Bregman, rabbi emeritus at Temple Sholom in Vancouver. They tackle the big questions, including whether an interfaith wedding can be truly Jewish, how parents in interfaith relationships can instill Judaism in their children's lives, and whether interfaith marriages might well spell the end of Judaism—or actually save us. Credits Bonjour Chai is hosted by Avi Finegold, Ilana Zackon and David Sklar. Michael Fraiman is the producer. Andre Goulet is the technical producer. Our theme music is by Socalled. The show is a co-production from The Jewish Learning Lab and The CJN, and is distributed by The CJN Podcast Network. To learn how to support the show by subscribing to this podcast, please watch this video.

    Battleground Wisconsin
    Send Darrin Madison to Madison

    Battleground Wisconsin

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 50:40


    We welcome Darrin Madison, Citizen Action's endorsed candidate for State Assembly District 10, to discuss his important primary election on August 9th and his vision for structural change in Wisconsin. Our panel reviews Ron Johnson's odd week. He floated the idea of making Social Security and Medicare vulnerable to cuts or cancellation if not passed by Congress annually and flip-flopped twice on marriage equality. Is this good politics, or is Johnson now completely out of touch with Wisconsin voters? We update progress on President Biden's domestic agenda, major advances on climate, health care costs, and tax fairness. The bill, which is called the Inflation Reduction Act, faces one remaining conservative Democratic hurdle, now that Manchin is on board, Kyrsten Sinema demands protecting a particularly sleazy tax break for the rich in return for her support. Since our last show, Sarah Godlewski dropped out of the U.S. Senate primary election, clearing the path for Mandela Barnes' primary election victory. We also discuss what the overwhelming defeat of anti-Abortion forces in Kansas portend for the midterms?

    Lyndeurozone Euro Simplified
    #111 Unit 2 - Other Reform Movements

    Lyndeurozone Euro Simplified

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 23:59


    Martin Luther and Lutheranism wasn't the only protestant reformation movement. In this episode we look at other reformers such as John Calvin and see how they impacted European culture. Lyndeurozone.com  Patreon If you use this podcast regularly would you please consider supporting us on Patreon for as little as a dollar a month?  The Euro Simplified Podcast has no advertising revenue and is produced by a public school teacher.  We love and appreciate our supporters on Patreon as our supporters help us meet the costs associated with the production of this free resource for students. Episodes will be released on the following schedule: Unit 1 and Unit 2 - August/September Unit 3: October Unit 4: November Unit 5: November and December Unit 6: January Unit 7: Late January & February Unit 8 : March Unit 9: April If you have any questions you can contact Robert Lynde at Lyndeurozone.com.

    The Readout Loud
    220: The last-minute push for drug pricing reform, Alnylam's success, and Sarepta's gamble

    The Readout Loud

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 33:01


    Is drug pricing reform really happening this time? Are things finally turning around for biotech? And is it ever wise to tweet your food? Rachel Cohrs, STAT's Washington correspondent, joins us to explain how congressional Democrats are on the verge of a coup in drug pricing — and what could still stand in their way. We also discuss the latest news in the life sciences, including some hotly anticipated data from Alnylam Pharmaceuticals, a $4 billion buyout deal, and other surprisingly good news for biotech.

    60 minučių
    60 minučių. Mirtinas nusteistųjų konfliktas - pareigūnų trūkumas ar reformų rezultatas?

    60 minučių

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 53:13


    Kinijos kariuomenė pradėjo didelio masto kovinio šaudymo pratybas vandenyse netoli Taivano. Taivano kariškiai sako, kad salos pajėgos įdėmiai stebi Kinijos pratybas ir yra pasiruošusios potencialiam konfliktui, bet pačios jo nesiekia.Marijampolės pataisos namuose vienas nuteistasis iki gyvos galvos mirtinai sužalojo kitą nuteistąjį iki gyvos galvos.Į Lietuvą iš Moldovos persikelia dar viena ukrainiečių grupė. Mūsų šalis yra pasižadėjusi apgyvendinti 2000 Ukrainos pabėgėlių iš Moldovos.Paskui rusų kalbą ir kultūrą atvažiuoja tankai, taip sako Donecke kariaujantis režisierius Olehas Sencovas.Lietuvoje jau galima nemokamai pasitikrinti dėl dar tyliuoju žudiku vadinamo hepatito C. Medikų teigimu, nieko neįtariančių virusio nešiotojų gali būti bent 50 tūkstančių. Tad nemokama patikra ne tik padės kontroliuoti viruso plitimą, bet kartu tai itin svarbus žingsnis ir kovoje su vėžiu.Melnragės paplūdimio ruožas šalia šiaurinio molo pildomas smėliu. Tam naudojamas uosto laivybos kanalo gilinimo metu iškastas smėlis, iš kurio jūroje formuojamas pylimas, nuo kurio Baltijos jūros bangos smėlį išneš į krantą. Tačiau darbai sulaukė įvairių visuomenės reakcijų - žmonės klausia, ar į jūrą pilamas ir vėliau krante atsidursiantis smėlis - švarus?Ved. Agnė Skamarakaitė

    Australia Wide
    Gambling help advocates call for reform as pokies pre-commitment considered

    Australia Wide

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 30:00


    Gambling addict advocates want pre-commitment laws extended to all operators

    Kerry Today
    Further Reform of System for Making Personal Injury Claims – August 4th, 2022

    Kerry Today

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022


    Minister of State for Trade Promotion, Digital and Company Regulations, Robert Troy speaks to Jerry.

    Out of Beta
    From push to pull

    Out of Beta

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 50:42


    Thank you to this month's sponsor, Eduflow (build internal courses for your company)! Eduflow makes it really easy to build out courses and training material for your employees, customers, and other collaborators. It's a great way to onboard a new team member or train your sales team etc. Listeners of Out of Beta get 50% off Eduflow Pro for one year, by going to Eduflow.com/outofbeta.Interested in sponsoring? Get in touch.Matt is starting to find serious traction with Summit's new positioning as a low-code tool to build calculators for sales and marketing teams. Peter and Bjørn are having long phone calls brainstorming what's next for Reform.Links:Matt on TwitterPeter on TwitterOut of Beta on TwitterSummit - Matt's startupReform - Peter's startupAdam Wathan's tweet about being the bestDes Traynor on the 20VC podcast

    Podcast – redefinED
    podcastED: SUFS president Doug Tuthill interviews education entrepreneur Erika Donalds

    Podcast – redefinED

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022


    Editor's note: You can read more about Optima Classical Academy here. On this episode, Tuthill interviews former Collier County School Board member Donalds, who is president and CEO of the Optima Foundation, a network of charter schools serving more than 3,000 students. The organization is set to launch Optima Classical Academy[Read More...] The post podcastED: SUFS president Doug Tuthill interviews education entrepreneur Erika Donalds appeared first on reimaginED.

    Dairy Stream
    Milk pricing: Reform starts with farmer-processor relationship

    Dairy Stream

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 28:22


    With lingering memories of record-large milk check deductions, seemingly every group tied to dairy is now exploring options for milk pricing reform. Dairy Stream host Mike Austin talks with Mitch Davis of Davis Family Dairies, a member of Edge Dairy Farmer Cooperative's board of directors who served on a multi-state task force about milk pricing reform, and Dr. Marin Bozic, a nationally recognized dairy economist who serves as an adviser to the Edge board. They went in-depth on Edge Dairy Farmer Cooperative's priorities and contracting principles. Thank you to BMO Harris Bank for sponsoring this episode.  This podcast is co-produced by the Dairy Business Association and Edge Dairy Farmer Cooperative, sister organizations that fight for effective dairy policy in Wisconsin and Washington, D.C. 

    The Best of the Money Show
    JSE interim revenue is up 11% and looks to listing reform

    The Best of the Money Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 8:24


    Guest: Dr Leila Fourie | CEO at JSE| See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Kan English
    Public transit reform comes into effect

    Kan English

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 7:14


    A new public transit pricing framework aimed at encouraging Israelis to use public transportation came into effect this week. How does it work and will it achieve its aim? KAN reporter Naomi Segal asked Zohar Galil, manager of community relations and activism at the public transportation advocacy NGO 15 Minutes. (Photo: Olivier Fitoussi/Flash90)  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Not Another Baptist Podcast
    Episode 309: POTLUCK PODCAST 210: SWBTS News, ARITF Announcement, and Walking Banana Pudding

    Not Another Baptist Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 19:38


    Jared, Allen, and Matt get together to share the news about the departure of David Allen and the Southwestern Classic, an announcement from Bart Barber about the ARITF, and our thoughts on the walking banana pudding.Must-See Golf: https://twitter.com/mhenslee/status/1554219238394667008?s=20&t=DGYCu3ySxKVIgTlgvsC5cQARITF: https://www.baptistpress.com/resource-library/news/blalock-keahbone-to-head-abuse-response-implementation-task-forceMake sure you are following us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PotluckPodcastSBC

    Judging Freedom
    George Soros Reform Prosecutors

    Judging Freedom

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 6:41


    Why I Support Reform Prosecutors Justice or safety? It's a false choice. They reinforce each other. By George Soros https://www.wsj.com/articles/why-i-su... #crime #PoliceSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Take on Board
    Kate Waterford on how to reform a board to improve diversty and skills

    Take on Board

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 30:48


    Kate is the Chair of two organisations - AusCam Freedom Project (an anti-trafficking charity) and Australasian Birth Trauma Association. She's also a board member at Physiotherapy Board of Australia and Corryong Health and a Councillor, AICD ACT Divisional Council. She's also the Chair of Amnesty International Australia's Nominations Committee (and in the process of joining Governance Committee for Fred Hollows Foundation).She was formerly the Vice Chair of Amnesty International Australia.Kate is a non-executive director and chair specialising in the healthcare sector, and in various human rights causes, across a range of government and charity boards. Kate is also a partner of Canberra law firm Maliganis Edwards Johnson, where she leads a practice in health and medical law; and she edits a major legal encyclopedia on medical law. Kate is the eternal optimist when it comes to finding ways to work towards a better world.ResourcesSand Talk: How Indigenous Thinking Can Save the World' by Tyson Yunkaporta'Tiddas' by Anita HeissYou might want to:Join the Take on Board Book Club, 26th July at 7pm Eastern Australian Time. Discussing - Stewards of the Future, by Helle Bank Jorgensen after the recent interview with the author.Join the Take on Board Facebook communityJoin the Take on Board LinkedIn communityFollow along on TwitterWork with meJoin the Take on Board: Kickstarter group programJoin the Take on Board: Accelerator group programFind out more about meContact me See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Indisputable with Dr. Rashad Richey
    The Bullpen: US Education is Rooted In Racism, Needs Massive Reform

    Indisputable with Dr. Rashad Richey

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 18:36 Very Popular


    Texas Congressional candidate Dr. James Rodgers joins the Bullpen to discuss school choice.Debate: Dr. James Rodgers*** Indisputable, features Dr. Richey talking about the top news stories of the day, reading viewer comments, and engaging in debates and conversations with guests.Help support our mission and get perks. Membership protects TYT's independence from corporate ownership and allows us to provide free live shows that speak truth to power for people around the world. See Perks: ▶ https://www.youtube.com/TheYoungTurks/joinSUBSCRIBE on YOUTUBE: ☞ http://www.youtube.com/IndisputableTYTFACEBOOK: ☞ http://www.facebook.com/IndisputableTYTTWITTER: ☞ http://www.twitter.com/IndisputableTYTINSTAGRAM: ☞ http://www.instagram.com/IndisputableTYTTWITCH: ☞ http://www.twitch.com/tyt

    CSPI Podcast
    42: Policy Reform for Progress | Andrew Kenneson, Maxwell Tabarrok, Brent Skorup & Richard Hanania

    CSPI Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 92:52 Very Popular


    On this week’s CSPI Podcast, Richard interviews the top three winners of the CSPI Essay Contest: Policy Reform For Progress. The first interview is with contest winner Andrew Kenneson, a program navigator at a public housing authority in Kodiak, Alaska and former reporter. In “Gathering Steam: Unlocking Geothermal Potential in the United States,” Andrew explains why exempting geothermal exploration on federally owned lands from NEPA requirements could set off a cascade of energy innovation. The second interview (starting at 29:12) is with Maxwell Tabarrok, an Econ and Math student at the University of Virginia whose essay on science funding reform “Mo’ Money Mo’ Problems” won second prize. Maxwell proposes a system of research guided funding in which the ~$120 billion spent by the federal government on science each year is distributed equally to the ~250,000 full-time STEM faculty at high research activity universities.The third interview (starting at 57:03) is with Brent Skorup, a senior research fellow at George Mason University's Mercatus Center and a visiting faculty fellow at the Nebraska Governance and Technology Center at the Nebraska College of Law. Brent’s 3rd place essay, “Drone Airspace: A New Global Asset Class,” outlines how public auctions for drone airspace would be an improvement on the FAA’s current plan to ration airspace to a few lucky companies.Listen in podcast form or watch on YouTube. Winning Essays:“Gathering Steam: Unlocking Geothermal Potential in the United States” by Andrew Kenneson“Mo’ Money Mo’ Problems” by Maxwell Tabarrok“Drone Airspace: A New Global Asset Class” by Brent SkorupHonorable Mentions: “The University-Government Complex” by William L. Krayer“It’s Time to Review the Institutional Review Boards” by Willy Chertman Get full access to Center for the Study of Partisanship and Ideology at www.cspicenter.com/subscribe

    MID-WEST FARM REPORT - MADISON
    Federal Milk Order Reform Gains Momentum

    MID-WEST FARM REPORT - MADISON

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 50:00


    Ben Styer of Menomonie is the past state FFA president who's also going to be the state's national officer candidate this fall.  Bob Bosold talks to him about a recent trip he made to Europe as a member of a dairy judging team that pushed pause during the pandemic.The Wisconsin Infant Study Cohort is investigating what health benefits kids might receive by playing on the farm.  Through soil microbes and interaction with animals, are farm kids exposed to influences that enhance their immunity and respiratory virus resistance?  Katherine Barnes, WISC Researcher, explains.Mike Davis, dairy farmer from MN and board of directors member of Edge Dairy Cooperative talks to Pam Jahnke about potential changes to the Federal Milk Marketing Order.  Davis stresses how important consensus is to getting the process started.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Factor This!
    Breaking down FERC's interconnection reform plan

    Factor This!

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 49:31


    Up until a few days ago, Congress had been a frequent disappointment to clean energy advocates. Even the current optimism around budget reconciliation is... cautious.  But a few blocks north of Capitol Hill, seismic change has been underway. In June, FERC laid out a set of proposed rules to address what possibly is the biggest threat facing clean energy deployment goals in the US: interconnection delays. The notice of proposed rulemaking (NOPR) identified ways to tackle widespread challenges that have led to years-long interconnection request backlogs across the country. Jeff Dennis, managing director for the advocacy group Advanced Energy Economy, and a former FERC policy staffer, joined Episode 9 of Factor This! to break down what's in the FERC interconnection NOPR and what comes next.Show notes: -Register for the free RENEWABLE +Series on green hydrogen, featuring panelists from Generate Capital, EDP Renewables, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. -Subscribe to the free Renewable Energy World newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest news in solar, wind, energy storage, green hydrogen, and more. Factor This!  is produced by Renewable Energy World and Clarion Energy. Connect with John Engel, the host of Factor This!, on LinkedIn and Twitter.

    All Inclusive
    Eric Marcus - Founder and Host of Making Gay History

    All Inclusive

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 40:05


    In the late 1980s, Eric Marcus decided to leave his job at CBS and take a leap of faith to pursue a project that required creating an oral history of the gay and lesbian civil rights movement. The result would become first one, then two editions of the book Making Gay History. Today, Eric is a celebrated author, journalist, and podcast host. He is the founder and host of the Making Gay History and Those Who Were There podcasts. Revisiting his oral history archives, Eric's work is celebrated as a profound deep dive into all corners of LGBTQ history. Listen to the latest episode of All About Change as Eric discusses his favorite known and long-forgotten champions of the LGBTQ civil rights movement, and the importance of keeping LGBTQ history in the public discourse following recent Supreme Court rulings. Please find a transcription of this episode here. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Harvest Church - harvestinus.co (Audio)
    Life To Heal And Raise The Dead – Part 3 | 7/31/22

    Harvest Church - harvestinus.co (Audio)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022


    Congressional Dish
    CD256: Poisonous Pet Collars

    Congressional Dish

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 81:32 Very Popular


    Seresto Flea and Tick Collars for dogs and cats have been sold to Americans since 2013. During that time, the EPA has received approximately 100,000 reports of illnesses and 2,500 reports of deaths of animals that wore a Seresto Flea and Tick collar, by far the most reports received about any flea and tick treatment on the market. In this episode, hear testimony from scientists about the Environmental Protection Agency's disturbingly lax review processes for pesticides in pet products and learn why your vote in November is likely to determine if these popular but dangerous products will stay on American shelves. Please Support Congressional Dish – Quick Links Contribute monthly or a lump sum via PayPal Support Congressional Dish via Patreon (donations per episode) Send Zelle payments to: Donation@congressionaldish.com Send Venmo payments to: @Jennifer-Briney Send Cash App payments to: $CongressionalDish or Donation@congressionaldish.com Use your bank's online bill pay function to mail contributions to: 5753 Hwy 85 North, Number 4576, Crestview, FL 32536. Please make checks payable to Congressional Dish Thank you for supporting truly independent media! Listen to the latest episode of Jen's new podcast with Andrew Heaton and Justin Robert Young — We're Not Wrong Episode 12: About The Never Ending Ukraine War, Biden's COVID and Mike Pence (LIVE FROM BERLIN) To report an incident directly to the EPA via email Report.Pesticide.Incident@epa.gov View the shownotes on our website at https://congressionaldish.com/cd256-poisonous-pet-collars Executive Producer Recommended Sources CD200: How to End Legal Bribes Bruce Bueno de Mesquita and Alastair Smith. The Dictator's Handbook: Why Bad Behavior is Almost Always Good Politics. Public Affairs: 2011. Background Sources Recommended Congressional Dish Episodes CD254: Baby Formula Shortage CD234: AWOL Recall: The Rock and Play Sleeper Reports on Seresto and Pesticides “Oversight Subcommittee Report Reveals EPA Failed to Protect Pets, Owners From Dangerous Flea and Tick Collar.” Jun 15, 2022. House Committee on Oversight and Reform. House Committee on Oversight and Reform, Subcommittee on Economic and Consumer Policy. June 2022. “Staff Report: Seresto Flea and Tick Collars: Examining why a product linked to more than 2,500 pet deaths remains on the market.” Lauretta Joseph. May 19, 2022. “Notification of Evaluation: The EPA's Response to Reported Incidents of Unintended Effects from Pet Collar Pesticides, Project No. OSRE-FY22-0120” Johnathan Hettinger. Sept. 24, 2021. “Is your pet wearing a Seresto flea collar? Company reports thousands more adverse incidents.” USA Today. Jordan Liles. Mar 8, 2021. “Did Seresto Flea Collars Cause 1,698 Dog and Cat Deaths?” Snopes. Johnathan Hettinger. Mar 2, 2021. “Popular flea collar linked to almost 1,700 pet deaths. The EPA has issued no warning.” USA Today. Jen's highlighted copy Lawrence J. Dyckman et al. July 1995. “Pesticides: EPA's Efforts to Collect and Take Action on Exposure Incident Data, GAO/RCED-95-163.” U.S. Government Accountability Office. Lobbying “Lobbyist Profile: Ryan Canfield.” 2022. Open Secrets. “Employment History: Ryan Canfield.” Open Secrets. “Elanco Animal Health.” Open Secrets. The Hearing Seresto Flea and Tick Collars: Examining why a product linked to more than 2,500 pet deaths remains on the market June 15, 2022 Committee on Oversight and Reform, Subcommittee on Economic and Consumer Policy Witnesses: Faye Hemsley & Omarion Hemsley, Owners of Deceased Pet Thomas Maiorino, Owner of Deceased Pet Jeffrey Simmons, President and Chief Executive Officer, Elanco Animal Health Incorporated Nathan Donley, Ph.D, Environmental Health Science Director, Center for Biological Diversity Karen McCormack, Former Scientist, Policy Analyst, and Communications Officer (ret.), Office of Pesticide Programs, Environmental Protection Agency Carrie Sheffield (minority witness), Senior Policy Analyst, Independent Women's Voice Clips 1:20 Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi (D-IL): As early as 2015, just a few years after the collar entered the US market, an EPA investigation found that among similar products, the Seresto collar “ranked number one” by a wide margin in terms of total incidents, major incidents and deaths, even after factoring in companies' relative sales. Those findings weren't enough to drive the makers of Seresto collar or the EPA to act. 1:50 Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi (D-IL): In 2016, Canada's equivalent of the EPA known as the PMRA, concluded based on a review of the same American data available to the EPA that the collar posed too great a risk to pets and their owners to be ever sold in Canada. 2:10 Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi (D-IL): Even as the death count rose, the EPA allowed Seresto to remain on the market here without even so much as requiring additional warning labels that regulators mandated in places ranging from Australia to Colombia to the European Union. 2:30 Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi (D-IL): The companies that manufactured the Seresto collar first Bayer animal health and then later Elanco were also aware of the risks, the incidents and the deaths, but they too failed to act. Instead, they hired third party industry insiders to conduct so-called independent reviews of the incident data, which ended up protecting their $300 million a year market but ended up endangering pets. So the Seresto collar stayed the same and so did the consequences. 4:15 Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi (D-IL): This particular collar has caused 100,000 incidents reported to the EPA and over 2500 pet deaths reported to the EPA. 4:30 Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi (D-IL): The steps that we are asking for today are crucial, because it's important to protect our pets and our families, too. I now call upon my distinguished colleague, Mr. Cloud for his opening statement. Rep. Michael Cloud (R-TX): Thank you, Chairman. This is the first hearing of the Economic and Consumer Policy Subcommittee this year, and we've been in session for 52 days this year. And our first hearing is on pet collars. And I do realize that our pets are a huge part of our lives, they enrich our families, they provide companionship for my kids, they've helped foster responsibility and compassion and care, important ethics we need in our society. Just recently, our family mourned the loss of our guinea pig, biscuit. And so pets are a huge part of our family lives. But I have to admit that when I saw that this was going to be on the agenda for this week, I cannot help but be concerned, especially coming from South Texas about the 1000s 10s of 1000s of human lives that have passed away due to fentanyl and due to an open border and due to the policies of this administration to continue to aid and abet cartels. And I realized that this is the economic and Consumer Policy Subcommittee. And so I think about economic policy happening right now and where the minds of the American people are. Gas is now averaging $5 A gallon nationwide. For the first time in history. We have not had a hearing. Inflation is at a 40 year high. We have not had a hearing, the American people cannot find baby formula. We still haven't had a hearing. I've mentioned fentanyl is killing Americans, especially our teens at unprecedented rates. We have not had a hearing. Biden's systemic elimination of the safe and secure border he inherited has led to the worst humanitarian and national security crisis in this country's history. We have not had a hearing this term, we could talk about how inflation is affecting the cost of owning a pet, including the increased cost of food, toys, accessories, but we're not talking about that either. Instead, we're holding a hearing on the pet collar, which fights fleas and ticks. And as any pet owner knows fleas and tick management is an essential part of pet care. But I'm not sure it's an essential part of congressional oversight, especially when we take in mind where the American people are at. And frankly, I've talked to a number of people in my district and others who live in other parts of the country and they are really surprised that this has risen to one of the top priorities of commerce at this time in juncture. The subcommittee Republicans would rather explore efforts to help American consumers during these trying times, we would gladly have joined the chairman in holding a hearing on the shortage of baby formula. Moreover, we have welcomed the chance to explore TikTok's troubling practice of showing dangerous content to minors, an investigation you all started last year. In fact, it's now come to light that teenagers are using tick tock and other social media platforms to purchase illicit drugs including unknowingly in many cases, in most cases, fentanyl. Social media platforms are also using it to recruit young people into the gig economy of human trafficking. A hearing on that crisis could be incredibly important. And on the subject of our nation's youth, CDC bureaucrats have actively pursued an agenda to close schools during the pandemic instead of following the science damaging our children's financial, mental, physical, emotional, and also their learning for years to come. But we still have not had a hearing. Americans are facing incredible economic issues which require us as elected officials to listen and to respond. I do appreciate the fact that our pets play an important part of our lives. We should be kind to animals and we should teach our children to do the same. But I do care immensely more about the human lives that we were elected to serve. 10:20 Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi (D-IL): A recorded vote has been requested — we will pause while the we will get the clerk out. 12:00 Rep. Byron Donalds (R-FL): Mr. Chairman, it's already been about what? A minute and a half. Where's the clerk? Is the clerk on lunch and not here today? Rep. Krishnamoorthi (D-IL): I think the clerk is on the way Mr. Donalds, thank you. Rep. Donalds: Is the clerk sitting in the side office just hanging out? I mean, come on, Mr. Chairman. 21:20 Clerk: Mr. Cloud? Rep. Michael Cloud (R-TX): Yes Clerk: Mr. Cloud votes yes. Mr. Keller? Rep. Fred Keller (R-PA): Yes Clerk: Mr. Keller votes yes. Mr. Franklin? Rep. C. Scott Franklin (R-FL): Yes Clerk: Mr. Franklin votes yes. Mr. Clyde? Rep. Andrew Clyde (R-GA): Yes. Clerk: Mr. Clyde votes yes. Mr. Donalds? Rep. Byron Donalds (R-FL): Yes Clerk: Mr. Donalds votes yes. 26:31 Thomas Maiorino: My name is Thomas Maiorina. I reside in Mount Laurel, New Jersey with my wife Monica. I am the father of three boys. My youngest son, Robert turned 12 in 2011. After years of asking for a dog, he wore us down and we decided to rescue a dog from a southern shelter for my son's birthday. After researching online, we adopted a mixed breed mutt that Robbie and his two other brothers named Rooney. Rooney swiftly became a loved member of our family. A bit rambunctious, she was just what a 12 year old boy needed. She loved the run and chase anything the move in the yard. By all measures, we took great care to ensure Rooney had a healthy and happy life. We took her on daily walks, sometimes three a day, hikes on park trails. We monitor her diet and made sure she was seen by the veterinarian as needed, and she received all of her shots. Because she was a bit rambunctious and we lived in a wooded area where there's a lot of wildlife, we were constantly concerned about the problems of fleas and ticks. We consulted with a veterinarian after getting Rooney to determine the best way to protect her against this. We use a variety of prevention methods for the first few years and when we changed veterinarians in approximately 2013 or 14, the new veterinarian strongly recommended that we use the Seresto flea and tick collar, based on all of our options. We heeded that advice and purchased Seresto collars from our local PetSmart. The collars were intended to provide protection for up to eight months. We noticed that after fixing a collar to Rooney's neck, she began to itch and first had that treated and tested for allergies. We took her to the vet several times during 2018 seeking to find the cause for the ever increasing itching. After several visits and multielement medications, they were unable to determine the cause and we switched to a specialist in 2019 to seek further assistance, where they provided allergy shots and other medications to address the worsening itching and related symptoms. Rooney's behavior then became more erratic as the months wore on she began linking her paws so feverishly they would bleed. She also developed bleeding patches on her stomach. Ultimately, in October 2020, Rooney suffered horrendous grand mal seizure in the presence of myself and my wife. The damage done by the seizure was irreversible. She was a shell of her former self and ultimately, the family decided the most humane thing would be to put Rooney to sleep at the age of nine. In early March 2021, I read an article online about Seresto pet collars resulting in the deaths of 1700 Pets without any warnings from the EPA or the manufacturer. I sought out legal representation not because I wanted financial compensation, but because I took great pains to care for Rooney. The final 18 months of her life were agonizing to watch if I could help prevent another family from going through what my family went through. I wanted to act. I'm here today in furtherance of that effort. I appreciate the committee taking the time to investigate this matter. And thank you for your time. 33:30 Jeffrey Simmons: There are a few points I'd like to emphasize upfront. First, the EPA approved Seresto following more than 80 safety and toxicity studies, all of which show that Seresto and its ingredients have a strong safety profile. Second, more than 80 regulatory bodies around the world have approved Seresto. Seresto is widely used and more than 80 million collars worn over the past decade to protect dogs and cats from fleas and ticks around the world. 34:00 Jeffrey Simmons: Third, adverse event reports are not intended to be, and in fact are absolutely not, proof of causation. Reports require further investigation and analysis to determine cause. And after years of review, our pharmacovigilance team made up of veterinarians and other experts who study adverse event reports has not identified a single death caused by the active ingredients in the collar. 36:45 Jeffrey Simmons: No product is without risk. What matters is whether those risks are reasonable. And in light of the benefits and numerous studies and the incident report data for Seresto demonstrate the product does not pose an unreasonable risk and has a strong safety profile, which is why the American Veterinary Medical Association opposed canceling Seresto's EPA registration. 38:05 Nathan Donley: My name is Dr. Nathan Donley. I'm the science director for the Environmental Health Program at the Center for Biological Diversity. I have a PhD in Cell and Developmental Biology from Oregon Health and Sciences University. The last seven years of my professional life have been spent researching how pesticides impact people and the environment and the regulatory failures that can actually facilitate harm rather than prevent it. I published three peer reviewed scientific articles and five technical reports on this subject. I've authored over 100 technical scientific comments to the EPA on pesticide documents, including flumethrin and imidacloprid, the two active ingredients in the Seresto collar. I've read through 1000s of pages of FOIA documents I requested on matters related to the approval and continued use of Seresto. 39:40 Nathan Donley: While other agencies like the FDA have robust systems in place to surveil harms from products under their purview, EPA only requires minimal information be submitted four times a year and they delegate this responsibility to the pesticide industry itself. The limited information that is collected includes only the pesticide product name, where the incident occurred, and the severity of the incident. That's it. Oftentimes, the agency doesn't even know if the incident involves a dog or a cat. Even though the EPA determines what incident information it collects, it then turns around and laments that the incident data are insufficient to take regulatory action to protect public health, the environment and our pets. It's a system designed to achieve nothing other than maintaining the status quo. Worse yet, reported incidents significantly underestimate the true scope of harm. The EPA recently estimated that only one in 25 pesticide incidents involving another pesticide called Kamba was actually reported to the authorities. That's only a 4% reporting rate. Given that 100,000 people have reported their concerns about Seresto, this is very alarming because the true number of harmful incidents to pets could be potentially far higher. 41:05 Nathan Donley: The EPA's counterpart in Canada was so concerned about Seresto incidents and harms of pets and humans that it denied Seresto approval in 2016. Canada analyzed U incident data and determined that Seresto collars had an incident rate 50 times greater than the average flea collar and 36 times greater than Canada's trigger for review. 41:25 Nathan Donley: EPA has no trigger for review of any pesticide product, no matter how much harm is being reported. And because the agency has no mandated trigger for reviewing pesticides like Seresto, rather than choosing to use incident reporting data to inform a robust regulatory process and take dangerous products off the market, EPA routinely chooses to do nothing at all. And that's especially troubling when you consider that Seresto is just one of 18,000 pesticide products currently approved by the EPA. 42:40 Karen McCormack: My name is Karen McCormack. At the present time I am a retired government employee after working over 40 years at the Environmental Protection Agency. During my career at EPA, I first worked in an EPA laboratory as a research coordinator. And in that capacity, I conducted research on numerous pesticides. Later I transferred to EPA headquarters in Washington DC, and worked in various positions in the pesticide program as a scientist, policy analyst, and a communications officer. I also worked in a number of offices at EPA including the Office of the Assistant Administrator for Pesticides and Toxins. Although I'm retired from EPA, I'm still closely following a number of environmental topics and one of those topics of interest to me has been the impact of flea and tick pet products on cats and dogs. 43:30 Karen McCormack: The US Environmental Protection Agency is charged with regulating products that contain pesticides and in ensuring that all pesticide products are safe to use. Before 1996, EPA did not consistently require manufacturers to conduct animal safety studies for pet products containing pesticides. Because pet products with pesticides were available readily in commercial stores, consumers thought they must be safe. This is not necessarily the case. Flea and tick products are designed to kill insects, and they often contain poisonous chemicals. When combined with pesticides that are used outside the home and in the water and food that people drink and eat, the aggregate risks from all these sources of pesticides can be high, especially for children who are vulnerable to toxic chemicals -- much more vulnerable than adults. And it wasn't until the passage of the 1996 Food Quality Protection Act that EPA began to examine the risks from sources other than food, including risks from pet products containing pesticides. After the passage of FQPA, pesticide manufacturers were required to submit to EPA animal safety studies and incident reports showing harm to animals and humans exposed to pesticides and pet products. Between 2012 and the present time the EPA received an increasing number of incident reports related to the use of flea and tick pet collars for dogs and cats. The toxic effects that were described in these many incident reports from the use of certain pet collars ranged from mild effects, such as skin irritation to more severe effects such as intense tremors, seizures, paralysis, organ failure and death. The largest number of incident rate counts that EPA received during this period were from the use of pet collar called Seresto. 45:35 Karen McCormack: Between January 2012 and the present time, EPA has received over 100,000 incident reports, and these incident reports include human incidents as well as pet incidents. These reports also include at least 2300 reports of pet deaths. The number is most likely a very low estimate of the actual number of incidents that are occurring since many pet owners do not know that they can report incidents to EPA and they may not know how to correlate the adverse effects in their pets with a particular pet product. 46:30 Karen McCormack: There are no independent organizations that rank the safety of pet products. And the sales data which is needed to rank the safety of pet products is considered confidential business information by the manufacturers. EPA's risk assessments also do not tell the full story of what pet products are safe, as they rely heavily on industry generated studies that were conducted on mice and rats rather than dogs and cats. And EPA's risk assessments also are based mainly on studies that were conducted with only one pesticide in Seresto rather than the combined pesticides in this pet product. 47:10 Karen McCormack: Although the original manufacturers of Seresto, Bayer, did conduct a number of efficacy and safety studies in dogs and cats treated with Seresto, the company did not conduct two very critical studies that are important for determining the safety of a pet product. These tests include a pet transferable residue study, a petting study, to determine the exposure of humans to Seresto. And they did not conduct a study that measures the amount of pesticide that gets in the blood of treated dogs and cats. 48:45 Carrie Sheffield: My name is Carrie Sheffield and I'm a senior policy analyst at the Center for Economic Opportunity at Independent Women's Forum. We are a nonprofit organization committed to increasing the number of women who value free markets and personal liberty. 2:44:20 Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi (D-IL): Let me just show you some analysis that was conducted by Elanco, which we would just refer to as well as the EPA, as well as the Canadian equivalent of the EPA, which is called the PMRA. Essentially, we look at this chart here, and we see that at the top Elanco computed that 0.51% of pet deaths were “possibly or probably” caused by the Seresto collar. The PMRA in Canada, looking at a sample of pet deaths concluded that 33% of those pet deaths were possibly or probably caused by Seresto collars. And the EPA here, concluded that 45% were possibly or probably caused by pet by the Seresto collar. Now, sir, I think originally, you said that there is no scientific evidence, no evidence of a causal link, this is clearly evidence, it was so compelling that the Canadian equivalent of the EPA never allowed for Seresto collars to be sold in Canada, correct? Jeffrey Simmons: Yes, I'm aware of that decision. I would also add that 80 other countries have approved this product, we've had over 80 million collars actually used. I'm not familiar with this data comparison, but what I can say is following the EPA regulatory process around the oversight, that we have pharmacovigilance, close to 200 veterinarians and staff on our team, looking at the data through the way the EPA wants us to we have not seen a linkage from the active ingredients. Rep. Krishnamoorthi: I understand that sir, I understand you haven't seen the linkage, although other authorities have and their scientists who are not paid by you have done so. 2:46:25 Nathan Donley: This is what we commonly see, quite frankly, when the regulated industry is doing their own research. It commonly finds that their products are safer than when government agencies or academic scientists take on a similar analysis. 2:46:55 Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi (D-IL): We have FOIA documents from the EPA, and emails internal to the EPA talking about the Seresto collar. Here's just one of them. This is from an employee who basically voiced their opinion about recent coverage of the Seresto controversy, he said, “looks like the sh*t has hit the fan….will be interesting seeing where this goes. I hope there is a FOIA for all communications on this so that our emails are made public. We have been screaming about Seresto for many years.” I presume that you've heard some of these screams and concerns, correct, Ms. McCormack? Karen McCormack: That's correct. A number of EPA employees have contacted me and given me detailed descriptions about what's happening with Seresto and they were very upset that EPA refused to do anything about it. 2:48:25 Karen McCormack: A number of the scientists, and this is not unusual, feel that the decision makers are not considering the science and they're making decisions based on political reasons. I don't know if I have time to talk about this, but I did look at the science that the Canadian government did, the causality analysis. They looked at the consistency and toxicity of effects from exposure of pets to Seresto. And what they found was very disturbing. It was so disturbing that they decided the risks were too high to approve Seresto and they could not be mitigated by putting a label statement on the product or by issuing warning labels, so they refused to approve Seresto. 2:49:25 Rep. Michael Cloud (R-TX): Thank you, Ms. McCormack, for acknowledging that the EPA sometimes makes political decisions, so that's something we'll definitely be coming back to next term. 2:55:05 Rep. Katie Porter (D-CA): Are the active ingredients for Seresto in the United States different from the active ingredients for Seresto collars in other countries? Jeffrey Simmons: No, I do not believe they're any different than the other 80 countries. Rep. Porter: In other countries like in Colombia and Australia, the warning labels for Seresto collars classify the collar as highly toxic and as poison. 2:55:50 Rep. Katie Porter (D-CA): Does the label in the United States have language? Like highly toxic or poison? Yes or no? Jeffrey Simmons: It does not. Rep. Porter: Okay. So the warning label here in the United States, though does say that mild reactions may occur and mentions hair loss, scratching and redness. The most severe symptoms listed are eczema and lesions. This is the warning label: does it mention the potential for death? Jeffrey Simmons: It does not. Rep. Porter: So a pet owner looking at this label that we're looking at would have absolutely no reason, no way to know that Seresto may have caused roughly 100 pet deaths. That's what both the Canadian Pest Management Agency, the PMRA, and the EPA found. Will you change this label, so that it includes deaths as a possible side effect? Jeffrey Simmons: Congresswoman, we do not believe the scientific data warrants a label change. And again, that is not just the 80 studies were submitted. There's been 20 additional added studies since and all of the oversight data that's been done on the 33 million pets over the 10 years. So again, following an EPA regulated process, we're always open if a data warranted, some need for a change, we would do that. 2:57:30 Rep. Katie Porter (D-CA): The EPA encouraged both your predecessor, Bayer, and your company, Elanco, to update the warning label. Yet, you just said that you never have. So the federal government did in fact advise you to update the label and you failed to do so. Is that correct? Jeffrey Simmons: I do not believe that is correct. We are in regular engagement with EPA. We have not received any formal…there's no data that warrants that and there's been no formal engagement on that. 2:58:15 Rep. Katie Porter (D-CA): The EPA asked Bayer, the predecessor here, in 2019 to help the agency collect data on adverse incidents for cats and dogs using the Seresto collar. EPA asked Bayer to split the registration for cats and dogs, so the agency could better understand and evaluate the risks for each type of pet. They refused, saying that change might have, “an adverse impact on sales” and they also said, “it would be a substantial increase in work.” Mr. Simmons, are you willing to make that change and split the registration for cats and dogs as the EPA requested? Or do you believe it's too much work? Jeffrey Simmons: I am willing to engage with the EPA on anything that the scientific data and the engagement under the regulatory body of the EPA merits the right thing to do. We believe the 80 studies and all of the pharmacovigilance data that we've submitted to them stands that this is a safe product. 3:00:10 Rep. Andrew Clyde (R-GA): I feel obligated to begin by stating the obvious this afternoon. Today's hearing is a colossal waste of time and resources. 3:13:25 Rep. Henry Johnson (D-GA): And the only reason that the public knew about the harm caused by this pesticide is because the Center for Biological Diversity publicly petitioned the EPA to cancel registration for Seresto flea collars. If they had not bought this to light, do you think we would even know of the dangers presented by these collars? Nathan Donley: No, we wouldn't. You know, the investigation that came out in USA Today in 2021 really brought this to the public attention. And if there wasn't that amount of pressure from the public, this would just still be completely unknown. EPA, for the last 10 years, has not done anything to alert consumers to the harms associated with this product or any other pesticide products where there are a very high number of incidents. 3:15:10 Karen McCormack: I think some of the people at EPA are programmed to go along with whatever industry says. It makes life easier for you, you can go home earlier and you can also get promoted easier if you go along with what industry says. It's unfortunate a problem there. And I've seen it over the years and it's very hard to do something about it. 3:15:40 Karen McCormack: Canada's analysis was very scientific. It was not only based on incident data and sales data, it was based on the toxicity of the two pesticides in Seresto. And they looked at the consistency and what happened eventually with the pets that were exposed to Seresto. 3:19:20 Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi (D-IL): And so because of the tremendous number of pet incidents, the tremendous number of deaths, even when factoring in sales, I sadly have no choice but to recommend that the EPA commence a notice of intent to cancel proceedings and to fully investigate what's going on with the Seresto collar, and I respectfully request Elanco to voluntarily recall these collars at this time, pending this further investigation. Cover Art Design by Only Child Imaginations Music Presented in This Episode Intro & Exit: Tired of Being Lied To by David Ippolito (found on Music Alley by mevio)

    What's Left?
    Part 3. The Future of Sex: SexTech

    What's Left?

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022


     We have reached the end of our series on SEX, its industry and the future of it. Today we get to the disturbing five areas of sex and technology. We discuss everything from mental health, surveillance, privacy, and the possible end of human interaction as we know it. Check us out.LINKS:The Future of Sex | Bryony Cole at Brain Barhttps://youtu.be/FoDWCb3wAD4Future of Sex Image:https://www.tatlerasia.com/power-purpose/technology/sg-the-future-of-sextechITunes and Spotify only display our last 100 episodes:To see all our episodes go to:What's Left? Website:Contact us @:  Subscribe to What's Left? on Telegram:Find out more about our anti-mandate group: Workers & Students for Choicehttps://www.askhealthyquestions.com/ws4choiceiTunes: Spotify: Bitchute: YouTube:  LBRY: Telegram :Odysee: stitcher: Googleplaymusic: Rumble

    New Books in History
    Kimberly Anne Coles, "Bad Humor: Race and Religious Essentialism in Early Modern England" (U Pennsylvania Press, 2022)

    New Books in History

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 62:34


    Kimberly Anne Coles is Professor of English at the University of Maryland; her first book, Religion, Reform and Women's Writing in Early Modern England, was published with Cambridge University Press in 2008. Her work has been supported by the John W. Kluge Center, the Warburg Institute, and the Folger Shakespeare Library. Today, we are discussing Bad Humor: Race and Religious Essentialism in Early Modern England, which was published by the University of Pennsylvania Press in 2022. In Bad Humor, Professor Coles charts how concerns around lineage, religion and nation converged around a pseudoscientific system that confirmed the absolute difference between Protestants and Catholics, guaranteed the noble quality of English blood, and justified English colonial domination. Professor Coles delineates the process whereby religious error, first resident in the body, becomes marked on the skin. Early modern medical theory bound together psyche and soma in mutual influence. By the end of the sixteenth century, there is a general acceptance that the soul's condition, as a consequence of religious belief or its absence, could be manifest in the humoral disposition of the physical body. The history that this book unfolds describes developments in natural philosophy in the early part of the sixteenth century that force a subsequent reconsideration of the interactions of body and soul and that bring medical theory and theological discourse into close, even inextricable, contact. With particular consideration to how these ideas are reflected in texts by Elizabeth Cary, John Donne, Ben Jonson, William Shakespeare, Edmund Spenser, Mary Wroth, and others, Professor Coles reveals how science and religion meet nascent capitalism and colonial endeavor to create a taxonomy of Christians in Black and White. John Yargo recently received his PhD in English literature from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, specializing in the environmental humanities and early modern culture. His articles have been published or are forthcoming in the Journal for Early Modern Culture Studies, Early Theatre, Studies in Philology, and Shakespeare Studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

    Battleground Wisconsin
    Special Interview with Angelito Tenorio

    Battleground Wisconsin

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 49:47


    We welcome Citizen Action's endorsed candidate for State Treasurer, Angelito Tenorio, to talk about his grassroots campaign to win the primary election on August 9th. We discuss the huge news this week that Tom Nelson and Alex Lasry ended their campaigns for Senate and endorsed Mandela Barnes, leaving two viable candidates and a new dynamic to the race. In other huge news, is there really a Manchin deal on climate, health care, and corporate taxes which brings President Biden's domestic agenda back from the dead? The new Inflation Reduction Act of 2022 may pass as early as next week. But is the national media right it is a done deal or is the other obstructionist Sen. Kirsten Sinema waiting in the wings. Robert educates us on the significance of the Climate and Equity Resolution for the Milwaukee Public Schools.

    New Books in Literary Studies
    Kimberly Anne Coles, "Bad Humor: Race and Religious Essentialism in Early Modern England" (U Pennsylvania Press, 2022)

    New Books in Literary Studies

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 62:34


    Kimberly Anne Coles is Professor of English at the University of Maryland; her first book, Religion, Reform and Women's Writing in Early Modern England, was published with Cambridge University Press in 2008. Her work has been supported by the John W. Kluge Center, the Warburg Institute, and the Folger Shakespeare Library. Today, we are discussing Bad Humor: Race and Religious Essentialism in Early Modern England, which was published by the University of Pennsylvania Press in 2022. In Bad Humor, Professor Coles charts how concerns around lineage, religion and nation converged around a pseudoscientific system that confirmed the absolute difference between Protestants and Catholics, guaranteed the noble quality of English blood, and justified English colonial domination. Professor Coles delineates the process whereby religious error, first resident in the body, becomes marked on the skin. Early modern medical theory bound together psyche and soma in mutual influence. By the end of the sixteenth century, there is a general acceptance that the soul's condition, as a consequence of religious belief or its absence, could be manifest in the humoral disposition of the physical body. The history that this book unfolds describes developments in natural philosophy in the early part of the sixteenth century that force a subsequent reconsideration of the interactions of body and soul and that bring medical theory and theological discourse into close, even inextricable, contact. With particular consideration to how these ideas are reflected in texts by Elizabeth Cary, John Donne, Ben Jonson, William Shakespeare, Edmund Spenser, Mary Wroth, and others, Professor Coles reveals how science and religion meet nascent capitalism and colonial endeavor to create a taxonomy of Christians in Black and White. John Yargo recently received his PhD in English literature from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, specializing in the environmental humanities and early modern culture. His articles have been published or are forthcoming in the Journal for Early Modern Culture Studies, Early Theatre, Studies in Philology, and Shakespeare Studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literary-studies

    New Books Network
    Kimberly Anne Coles, "Bad Humor: Race and Religious Essentialism in Early Modern England" (U Pennsylvania Press, 2022)

    New Books Network

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 62:34


    Kimberly Anne Coles is Professor of English at the University of Maryland; her first book, Religion, Reform and Women's Writing in Early Modern England, was published with Cambridge University Press in 2008. Her work has been supported by the John W. Kluge Center, the Warburg Institute, and the Folger Shakespeare Library. Today, we are discussing Bad Humor: Race and Religious Essentialism in Early Modern England, which was published by the University of Pennsylvania Press in 2022. In Bad Humor, Professor Coles charts how concerns around lineage, religion and nation converged around a pseudoscientific system that confirmed the absolute difference between Protestants and Catholics, guaranteed the noble quality of English blood, and justified English colonial domination. Professor Coles delineates the process whereby religious error, first resident in the body, becomes marked on the skin. Early modern medical theory bound together psyche and soma in mutual influence. By the end of the sixteenth century, there is a general acceptance that the soul's condition, as a consequence of religious belief or its absence, could be manifest in the humoral disposition of the physical body. The history that this book unfolds describes developments in natural philosophy in the early part of the sixteenth century that force a subsequent reconsideration of the interactions of body and soul and that bring medical theory and theological discourse into close, even inextricable, contact. With particular consideration to how these ideas are reflected in texts by Elizabeth Cary, John Donne, Ben Jonson, William Shakespeare, Edmund Spenser, Mary Wroth, and others, Professor Coles reveals how science and religion meet nascent capitalism and colonial endeavor to create a taxonomy of Christians in Black and White. John Yargo recently received his PhD in English literature from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, specializing in the environmental humanities and early modern culture. His articles have been published or are forthcoming in the Journal for Early Modern Culture Studies, Early Theatre, Studies in Philology, and Shakespeare Studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

    Lage der Nation - der Politik-Podcast aus Berlin
    LdN300 Lage-Jubiläum, Moduswechsel im Ukraine-Krieg, Verbrauchertipps zum Gas sparen, Sanktionen gegen Russland, Gas-Umlage, Reform der Gebäudesanierung, Urteil zu Protestcamps

    Lage der Nation - der Politik-Podcast aus Berlin

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 65:38


    LdN300 Lage-Jubiläum, Moduswechsel im Ukraine-Krieg, Verbrauchertipps zum Gas sparen, Sanktionen gegen Russland, Gas-Umlage, Reform der Gebäudesanierung, Urteil zu Protestcamps

    On Point
    Unpacking bipartisan efforts to reform the Electoral Count Act

    On Point

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 47:22


    A new bill proposes critical updates to the Electoral Count Act of 1887, but is it enough to prevent another Jan. 6th? Matthew Seligman, Derek Muller and Jack Beatty join Meghna Chakrabarti.

    Morning Announcements
    Thursday, July 28th, 2022

    Morning Announcements

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 5:56


    Today's headlines: The DOJ has confirmed that it is investigating Trump himself in their January 6th criminal probe, while also investigating numerous arms of criminality, including the pressure campaign against Pence. The House Committee on Oversight and Reform committee found that gun manufacturers that sell assault style rifles have purposely employed ethically questionable tactics. Instagram head Adam Mosseri stated that the company does not intend to take predominant feedback from users into account. Senator Joe Manchin announced yesterday that he plans to support a deficit reduction package that will address climate change and prescription drug reform. Meanwhile, WNBA star Brittney Griner testified in Russian court yesterday, and Secretary of State Antony Blinken announced that the administration has made an offer to the Kremlin to exchange Griner and American Paul Whelan for convicted Russian arms trafficker Viktor Bout. Finally, Dr. Oz failed to report his ownership of a Garden State apartment, home to friends tied to groups involved in Armenian genocide denial. Resources/Articles mentioned this episode: NBC: Merrick Garland calls Justice Department's Jan. 6 probe the ‘most wide-ranging investigation in its history' Washington Post: Justice Dept. investigating Trump's actions in Jan. 6 criminal probe CNN: 'The gun industry has flooded our neighborhoods': House hearing highlights assault-style weapons Washington Post: Instagram knows you don't like its changes. It doesn't care. Axios: Manchin announces support for climate, tax, health care deal CNN: Brittney Griner testifies she signed documents without understanding what they said after being stopped at Moscow airport Daily Beast: Dr. Oz's Turkish Nationalist Pals Living in His Secret N.J. Condo