Podcasts about Great Depression

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worldwide economic depression starting in the United States, lasting from 1929 to the end of the 1930s

  • 2,676PODCASTS
  • 4,248EPISODES
  • 40mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Oct 15, 2021LATEST
Great Depression

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Best podcasts about Great Depression

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Latest podcast episodes about Great Depression

True Crime Astrology with Shawn Engel
Ep 63: Dirty, Hot, Great Depression Sex

True Crime Astrology with Shawn Engel

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 125:37


In this episode, Shawn is joined by professional astrologer Jasmine Wolfe, and they cover the charts of  Beverly Allitt! Sources from Wikipedia, charts from Astro Seek and Astrolabe. Follow on IG at @WitchyWisdoms@satin.saturn@TrueCrimeAstrologyand @theBMPNTake advantage of our sponsors!BetterHelp– Betterhelp.com/witchy  (one week free!)Chakrubs– code WitchyWisdom   (15% off!)Lets Get Checked– code Witchy   (20% off!)Tonic CBD– code Witchy  (20% off!)Support the show (http://witchywisdoms.com/the-bmpn)

Composers Datebook
An all-star Gershwin premiere

Composers Datebook

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 2:00


Synopsis Imagine the cocktail party bragging rights you'd have if you had attended the first night of “Girl Crazy,” a musical that opened in New York on today's date in 1930. That show marked the Broadway debut of Ethel Merman, and co-starred Ginger Rogers. But that's just for starters… The pit orchestra that night included Benny Goodman, Gene Krupa, Glenn Miller, Jimmy Dorsey, and Jack Teagarden – gentlemen who would all go on to become famous band leaders in their own right. Speaking of band leaders, for the opening night of “Girl Crazy,” the show's composer, George Gershwin himself, was there conducting that all-star ensemble. For his part, Gershwin recalled: “With the exception of some dead head friends of mine, especially the critics, I think the notices, especially of the music, were the best I have ever received.” Gershwin was right: “Girl Crazy” included two songs that quickly became classics: “I Got Rhythm” and “Embraceable You.” The show ran for 272 performances – an impressive statistic in the first year of the Great Depression, and Hollywood produced not one but TWO cinematic versions of the show in 1932 and 1943. Music Played in Today's Program George Gershwin (1898 - 1937) — Girl Crazy (Studio Cast Recording) Sony 60704

Mysteries of The Ohio Valley
S2E20 Killer On The Cuyahoga - Cleveland Torso Murderer

Mysteries of The Ohio Valley

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 25:45


The late 1930's were a time of transition and healing for most of the United States, and especially the state of Ohio. As people in the Valley began to go back to work after the Great Depression, life seemed to be bouncing back to new heights. But the neighborhood of Kingsbury Run in Cleveland, Ohio was about to drop to a horrible low. We'll dive into our last serial killer episode of season two today on Mysteries of The Ohio Valley.HUGE shoutout to our sources:ClevelandPoliceMuseum.orgMurderMurder.newsUnsolvedCasebook.comAll were terrific in helping us tell this story!

PA BOOKS on PCN
“Made Free and Thrown Open to the Public” with Bernadette Lear

PA BOOKS on PCN

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 57:43


"Made Free and Thrown Open to the Public" charts the history of public libraries and librarianship in Pennsylvania. Based on archival research at more than fifty libraries and historical societies, it describes a long progression from private, subscription-based associations to publicly funded institutions, highlighting the dramatic period during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries when libraries were “thrown open” to women, children, and the poor. The book explains how Pennsylvania's physical and cultural geography, legal codes, and other unique features influenced the spread and development of libraries across the state. It also highlights Pennsylvania libraries' many contributions to the social fabric, especially during World War I, the Great Depression, and World War II. Bernadette Lear is the behavioral sciences and education librarian at Pennsylvania State University's Harrisburg campus. With Eric C. Novotny, she is the founding coeditor of the scholarly journal "Libraries: Culture, History, and Society." Lear's research focuses on the history of libraries, which she studies as an intersection of cultural, labor, social, and women's history.

Ranking U.S. Presidents
Herbert Hoover

Ranking U.S. Presidents

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 47:31


He's the president who was at the helm for the first four years of the most devastating economic disaster in modern times: the Great Depression. Was he up to the task? And what other policies did he pursue when he wasn't handling the Depression? Find out here!

Macro Musings with David Beckworth
Scott Sumner on The Money Illusion

Macro Musings with David Beckworth

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 50:50


Scott Sumner is David's colleague and the Ralph G. Hawtrey Chair of Monetary Policy at the Mercatus Center. Scott is also a returning guest to the podcast and joins David on Macro Musings to discuss his new book, The Money Illusion: Market Monetarism, the Great Recession, and the Future of Monetary Policy. Specifically, David and Scott discuss common misconceptions about the 2008-09 Recession, why bubble narratives too often miss the mark when explaining rising asset prices, whether the Fed's adoption of average inflation targeting signals that it is moving toward a level target, and much more.   Transcript for the episode can be found here: https://www.mercatus.org/bridge/tags/macro-musings   Scott's Twitter: @ScottSumnerTMI Scott's blog: https://www.themoneyillusion.com/ Scott's Mercatus profile: https://www.mercatus.org/scholars/scott-sumner   Related Links:   *The Money Illusion: Market Monetarism, the Great Recession, and the Future of Monetary Policy* By Scott Sumner https://www.mercatus.org/publications/monetary-policy/money-illusion-market-monetarism-great-recession-and-future-monetary   *Eight Centuries of Global Real Interest Rates, R-G, and the ‘Suprasecular' Decline, 1311–2018* by Paul Schmelzing https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3485734   David's blog: macromarketmusings.blogspot.com David's Twitter: @DavidBeckworth

Hidden History
119: Art & Artifice Part I: The Long Leash

Hidden History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 16:57


Episode 119: Part 1 of 2. Throughout the 1950s, the CIA, through a number of secret fronts, provided funding and publicity for abstract modern art in the United States. Jackson Pollock and Mark Rothko became arrows in the Cold War quiver, as the Agency turned them, and scores of other modern artists into unwitting agents of American propaganda. How and why did the CIA accomplish this, and what does it mean for the relationship between modernism and politics?Twitter: Link Patreon: LinkShirts and more: LinkSources and Further ReadingHow MoMA and the CIA Conspired to Use Unwitting Artists to Promote American Propaganda During the Cold War: LinkArt For Art's Sake: LinkModern art was CIA 'weapon': LinkHow the CIA Secretly Used Jackson Pollock to Fight the Cold War: LinkThe New American Painting, 1959: LinkThe new American painting, as shown in eight European countries, 1958-1959: LinkAn Era-Defining 1930s Mural of American Excess and Industry Is Revived: LinkDickstein, Morris. Dancing in the dark: A cultural history of the Great Depression. WW Norton & Company, 2009.Alfred Barr, ‘Introduction', in The New American Painting, 1959: LinkThe CIA and the Cultural Cold War Revisited: Link

The Opperman Report
Paratrooper of Fortune: The Story of Ted B. Braden - Vietnam Commando, CIA Operative, Congo Mercenary, and just maybe D.B. Cooper

The Opperman Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 80:52


Ted B. Braden was “the perfect combination of high intelligence and criminality.” - Jo Ann, Ted Braden's sister-in-law November 24th, 2021 will mark the 50th Anniversary of the only unsolved skyjacking case in American history. The case, nicknamed “Norjack” by the FBI as it involved the hijacking of a Northwest Orient 727 Airliner, would create a folk hero, if not a legend, of a mysterious man who would be immortalized by the name D.B. Cooper. This fascinating case has garnered a myriad of colorful and interesting suspects. One of the “dark horse” suspects who emerged over the years was a member of the most elite Special Forces unit created by the United States Government to serve during the war in Vietnam: a secret and covert unit called the Military Assistance Command, Vietnam – Studies and Observations Group (MACV-SOG). This rather benign-sounding name served as a thin veil, masking what was known to a few as the “black ops” unit in Vietnam. Many of the soldiers who served in this elite unit consider one of their own to be the infamous D.B. Cooper who hijacked Northwest Orient Flight 305; demanded a ransom of $200,000 in cash; and jumped out of the lowered aft staircase of the plane into the stormy night, never to be seen again. It was even stated by some of the most highly-decorated members of MACV-SOG, legends such as Major John Plaster and Sergeant Billy Waugh, that one man in SOG had the parachuting expertise, the know-how, and, most of all, the “balls of steel” to pull off the D.B. Cooper skyjacking. This man was Ted B. Braden. Raised in the Mid-West during the Great Depression, young Ted could not have foreseen that the trajectory of his life would be set by events happening thousands of miles from his boyhood home. At age 16, Braden joined the army to fight in World War II, a decision that led to a twenty-year on-again/off-again military career marked by dangerous covert operations; C.I.A. intrigue; desertion, arrest, and incarceration (only for him to be freed without trial under mysterious circumstances); Cold War mercenarism; and ultimately, distrust in a government for whom he could have surrendered his life. The story of Ted B. Braden, master parachutist and soldier of fortune, trained by Uncle Sam in the art of war but not in the art of peace, is the quintessential American story, the story of the men of his generation and of a war that defined that generation. Ted Braden was an enigma as a person, driven by a brilliant, unorthodox mind that struggled to adapt to a society based on law and order and routine. He was a true super soldier who was suspected of having mental illness, most likely from post-traumatic stress disorder. He was a tortured soul with the burning frustration that he could never parlay his soldiering skills into big financial gains. He was fearless in his military endeavors to the point of risking lives but was endowed with natural instincts of survival that kept him and the men under his command alive. It is tragic that a man like this is no longer alive to share his story. It is tragic that a man like this never will be fully understood. He had an ability to be very kind and very cruel, an ability to be very forthright and very cunning, an ability to be very committed as a soldier and very adrift as a civilian. Was he the man who fearlessly leapt out of a Boeing 727 with $200,000 strapped around his body on a rainy Thanksgiving Eve in 1971? We may never know, but even if Ted Braden is not D.B. Cooper, he is one of the most fascinating people whose story you never knew - until now.

The Opperman Report'
Paratrooper of Fortune: The Story of Ted B. Braden - Vietnam Commando, CIA Operative, Congo Mercenary, and just maybe D.B. Cooper

The Opperman Report'

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 80:52


Ted B. Braden was “the perfect combination of high intelligence and criminality.” - Jo Ann, Ted Braden's sister-in-lawNovember 24th, 2021 will mark the 50th Anniversary of the only unsolved skyjacking case in American history. The case, nicknamed “Norjack” by the FBI as it involved the hijacking of a Northwest Orient 727 Airliner, would create a folk hero, if not a legend, of a mysterious man who would be immortalized by the name D.B. Cooper.This fascinating case has garnered a myriad of colorful and interesting suspects. One of the “dark horse” suspects who emerged over the years was a member of the most elite Special Forces unit created by the United States Government to serve during the war in Vietnam: a secret and covert unit called the Military Assistance Command, Vietnam – Studies and Observations Group (MACV-SOG). This rather benign-sounding name served as a thin veil, masking what was known to a few as the “black ops” unit in Vietnam.Many of the soldiers who served in this elite unit consider one of their own to be the infamous D.B. Cooper who hijacked Northwest Orient Flight 305; demanded a ransom of $200,000 in cash; and jumped out of the lowered aft staircase of the plane into the stormy night, never to be seen again. It was even stated by some of the most highly-decorated members of MACV-SOG, legends such as Major John Plaster and Sergeant Billy Waugh, that one man in SOG had the parachuting expertise, the know-how, and, most of all, the “balls of steel” to pull off the D.B. Cooper skyjacking.This man was Ted B. Braden.Raised in the Mid-West during the Great Depression, young Ted could not have foreseen that the trajectory of his life would be set by events happening thousands of miles from his boyhood home. At age 16, Braden joined the army to fight in World War II, a decision that led to a twenty-year on-again/off-again military career marked by dangerous covert operations; C.I.A. intrigue; desertion, arrest, and incarceration (only for him to be freed without trial under mysterious circumstances); Cold War mercenarism; and ultimately, distrust in a government for whom he could have surrendered his life.The story of Ted B. Braden, master parachutist and soldier of fortune, trained by Uncle Sam in the art of war but not in the art of peace, is the quintessential American story, the story of the men of his generation and of a war that defined that generation.Ted Braden was an enigma as a person, driven by a brilliant, unorthodox mind that struggled to adapt to a society based on law and order and routine. He was a true super soldier who was suspected of having mental illness, most likely from post-traumatic stress disorder. He was a tortured soul with the burning frustration that he could never parlay his soldiering skills into big financial gains. He was fearless in his military endeavors to the point of risking lives but was endowed with natural instincts of survival that kept him and the men under his command alive.It is tragic that a man like this is no longer alive to share his story. It is tragic that a man like this never will be fully understood. He had an ability to be very kind and very cruel, an ability to be very forthright and very cunning, an ability to be very committed as a soldier and very adrift as a civilian.Was he the man who fearlessly leapt out of a Boeing 727 with $200,000 strapped around his body on a rainy Thanksgiving Eve in 1971? We may never know, but even if Ted Braden is not D.B. Cooper, he is one of the most fascinating people whose story you never knew - until now.

Business Leaders Podcast
Great Depression VS Covid

Business Leaders Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 54:37


On the F5 podcast, we discuss business, relationships, and hot topics for your entertainment. In this episode, Frank Aziz and Sabastian Enges talk about various topics that may help you grow as a person. If you enjoyed this comment please like, share and leave a comment!

The Kicker
Balls and Strikes: How to cover the Supreme Court's “super-majority”

The Kicker

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 20:38


This week, the most conservative Supreme Court since the Great Depression convened. The 6-3 “super-majority” is poised to roll back decades of law. On our latest episode of the Kicker, Jay Willis, the editor in chief of Balls and Strikes, a site that launched last month promising “progressive, bullshit-free commentary” about the legal system, joins Kyle Pope, editor and publisher of CJR. They discuss vital rulings that missed the news cycle, and why conservative justices have been so critical of the media.

Daily News Brief
Daily News Brief for Thursday, October 7, 2021

Daily News Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 13:50


https://www.nationalreview.com/corner/can-employers-punish-employees-if-spouses-arent-vaccinated/ There It Is – Study Finds Predominance of Antibody-Resistant SARS-CoV-2 Variants in Vaccine Breakthrough Cases in San Francisco Bay Area Pfizer scientist break silence on natural immunity. Food Stamp Benefits to Receive Historic Increase in October https://www.breitbart.com/health/2021/10/01/food-stamp-benefits-to-receive-historic-increase-in-october/ People who receive food stamps, known as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), will notice a major and permanent increase starting in October. Beginning this month, the average benefits for food stamps will grow over 25 percent above pre-pandemic levels, and the additional assistance will be “available indefinitely to all 42 million SNAP beneficiaries,” “The increase coincides with the end of a 15% boost in SNAP benefits that was ordered as a COVID-19 pandemic protection measure, which expired on Sept. 30,” “In practical terms, the average monthly per-person benefits for qualified recipients will rise from $121 to $157 — or $36 per person, per month,” The increase is projected to cost an additional $20 billion per year but it doesn't have to be approved by Congress. A farm law passed in 2018 by the then-Republican led Congress and signed by former President Donald Trump already directed the department to reassess the Thrifty Food Plan by 2022 and every five years thereafter. Paper ball… Senate Republicans plan to block another debt ceiling vote as default risks rise https://www.washingtonpost.com/us-policy/2021/10/06/republicans-senate-debt-ceiling-default/?utm_campaign=wp_post_most&utm_medium=email&utm_source=newsletter&wpisrc=nl_most&carta-url=https%3A%2F%2Fs2.washingtonpost.com%2Fcar-ln-tr%2F34e4a0a%2F615dcde29d2fda9d41004e99%2F5fd17c37ade4e21670c1cfd7%2F10%2F70%2F615dcde29d2fda9d41004e99 Senate Republicans plan to block Democrats from raising the country's debt ceiling, daring President Biden and his party's top lawmakers to devise another path forward just 12 days before the U.S. government could run out of flexibility to pay its bills. For the third time in as many weeks, Senate Majority Leader Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) is set to hold a vote on a measure that would suspend the borrowing limit into next year, aiming to act before Congress blows past an Oct. 18 deadline that could catapult the country into an economic recession. But the proposal is likely to be as doomed as the two that preceded it. Democrats for the moment cannot advance in the debate over the debt ceiling unless 10 GOP lawmakers join them — and Republicans once again are refusing to supply the votes as part of their broader campaign to oppose Biden's economic agenda. “They basically want us to be aiders and abettors to their reckless spending and tax policies, and we just aren't going to do it,” said Sen. John Cornyn (R-Tex.). Absent congressional action, a default threatens to unleash widespread financial havoc: It could rattle markets, delay seniors' Social Security checks, prevent some families from receiving monthly child tax assistance and raise the cost of borrowing for millions of Americans by driving up interest rates. The Defense Department added Wednesday that it also would “seriously harm our service members and their families,” jeopardizing the government's ability to pay service members and civilians on time while providing benefits to veterans. Biden recently likened the doomsday scenario to a “meteor” crashing into the U.S. economy, only months after the coronavirus pandemic created the worst such devastation since the Great Depression. Paper ball… Democrats Wrangle Over How to Shrink $3.5 Trillion Proposal Lawmakers consider trims to package of healthcare, education and climate-change programs https://www.wsj.com/articles/democrats-wrangleover-how-to-shrink-3-5-trillion-proposal-11633466811?mod=itp_wsj&mod=djemITP_h President Biden acknowledged in a series of meetings with Democrats this week and on Friday that a package once pegged at $3.5 trillion would have to be smaller, given opposition from centrist Senate Democrats to a bill of that magnitude. Now, they are grappling with the tougher next step: deciding exactly how much narrower—and which of—their proposed child care, education or health programs would have to get trimmed or culled. “That's what the president wanted to hear from us: We know this isn't going to hit the $3.5 trillion—we all know that at this point—what are the most important needs of the American people?” said Rep. Cindy Axne (D., Iowa), who participated in a virtual meeting with Mr. Biden on Tuesday. Meeting with House Democrats on Friday, Mr. Biden had suggested that the package's overall spending level would likely be between $1.9 trillion and $2.3 trillion. Although Democratic leaders had initially agreed to roughly $3.5 trillion in spending, centrist Democratic Sens. Joe Manchin of West Virginia and Kyrsten Sinema of Arizona balked at that level. The two moderate Democrats have been negotiating for days with White House officials and Democratic leaders over the specifics of what they will be able to support. The two senators' approval is crucial because Democrats are planning to pass the package through a process linked to the budget, known as reconciliation, that allows it to clear the Senate with just a simple majority, rather than the 60 votes most bills require. With no GOP support expected, that means Democrats must still secure the support of every member of the Democratic caucus in the evenly split Senate and can afford no more than three defections in the House. Support Rowdy Christian media by joining our club at fightlaughfeast.com, downloading our App, and head to our annual Fight Laugh Feast Conference next fall. With your partnership, together we will fight outdated and compromised media, engage news and politics with the gospel, and replace lies and darkness with truth and light. Go to fightlaughfeast.com to take all these actions. Have a great day. Lord bless

Ranking U.S. Presidents
Calvin Coolidge

Ranking U.S. Presidents

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 42:20


This week we are discussing Silent Cal, America's 30th President. He's the sixth VP to take over after the President dies in office. But is he up to the task for tackling the roaring 20s? And what role does he play in the Great Depression that will hit during Hoover? Find out in this week's episode!

Money
20 Ways to Invest That Don't Involve the Stock Market

Money

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 34:11


When it comes to investing, this apple fell far from the family tree. I became a Wall Street investment adviser, otherwise known as a stockbroker, in 1981 and have been an avid stock investor ever since. My parents, on the other hand, didn't own a single share of stock until their late 50s, and only then because my mother inherited a utility stock from her aunt. You can't blame them. My parents were survivors of the Great Depression, a time in history when stocks fell nearly 90% and some bank depositors lost it all. So it's natural they'd be more Treasury bills than stock investors. To them, the stock market was more a casino than a place for your life savings. It also helped that in their day, they didn't really need Wall Street, since they could easily earn 8% or more in risk-free T-bills or CDs. These days, with savings rates hovering near zero, many of us have been practically forced into stocks. But even for true believers like myself, we can't put all our eggs into a volatile basket. So it's important to be aware of other potential investments. And there are a ton of them: by my count, more than 20. Not all great ideas, of course, but it pays to be aware of your options. And that's what this week's "Money!" podcast is about: investments that don't involve stocks. So if you're like me and are reaching the upper boundaries of what you'll comfortably keep in stocks, or you're like my parents and want nothing to do with them in the first place, this is your podcast. As usual, my co-host will be financial journalist Miranda Marquit. Listening in and sometimes contributing is producer and novice investor Aaron Freeman. Want more information? Check out these resources: How to Get Started Investing With $500 or Less 7 Ways to Slay Your Fear of the Stock Market 13 Dumb Investing Moves — and How to Avoid Them GoBankingRates: 13 Ways To Invest That Don't Involve the Stock Market Huffington Post: 10 Ways to Invest That Don't Involve the Stock Market Investopedia: 5 Alternative Investments for 2021 HowStuffWorks: 10 Reasonably Safe Alternative Investments Forbes: Think The Stock Market Is Expensive? Here Are 14 ‘Alternative' Investment Ideas The Balance: Best Investment Alternatives to Stocks Subscribe to the Money Talks News newsletter Take our course The Only Retirement Guide You'll Ever Need Take our course Money Made Simple Miranda Marquit's website Become a member: https://www.moneytalksnews.com/members/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Composers Datebook
The New York Philharmonic on the air

Composers Datebook

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 2:00


Synopsis If, on today's date in the year 1930, you happened to be flipping through the pages of the New York Times, you would have seen several ads for radios, including one that argued that purchasing a radio was a good investment. This was only one year after the infamous 1929 stock market crash, so New Yorkers might have been a little leery of investing in anything, and disposable income for most Americans was severely limited during the Great Depression that followed. Still, that same October 5th edition of the Times announced that the New York Philharmonic would commence live nation-wide broadcasts of its Sunday afternoon concerts that very day, with the visiting German conductor Erich Kleiber leading the orchestra. The rest of the Philharmonic's 1930-31 season, led by the orchestra's new music director, Arturo Toscanini, would also be broadcast live on subsequent Sunday afternoons. For music lovers, that radio purchase started to look like a pretty good investment after all. And over the following decades, in addition to Bach, Beethoven, and Brahms, the New York Philharmonic's radio audiences coast-to-coast were introduced as well to new works of American composers like Roy Harris, Aaron Copland, Samuel Barber, Leonard Bernstein, and Ellen Taaffe Zwilich. Music Played in Today's Program Wolfgang Mozart (1756 – 1791) — Symphony No. 39 (New York Philharmonic; Leonard Bernstein, cond.) Sony 60973 Roy Harris (1898 – 1979) — Symphony No. 3 (New York Philharmonic; Leonard Bernstein, cond.) Sony 60594

The John Batchelor Show
1736: Nicholas Wapshott #UNBOUND. Samuelson Friedman: The complete, forty-minute interview, July 24, 2016.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 41:00


Photo: Second dinner held by the Economic Club of New York at the Hotel Astor. CBS Eyes on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow Nicholas Wapshott #UNBOUND. Samuelson Friedman:The complete forty-minute interview, July 24, 2016. Samuelson Friedman: The Battle Over the Free Market, by Nicholas Wapshott  https://www.amazon.com/Samuelson-Friedman-Battle-Over-Market-ebook/dp/B08589Z7M9/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=Nicholas+Wapshott+%2B+samuelson&qid=1627690920&s=digital-text&sr=1-1 From the author of Keynes Hayek, the next great duel in the history of economics. In 1966 two columnists joined Newsweek magazine. Their assignment: debate the world of business and economics. Paul Samuelson was a towering figure in Keynesian economics, which supported the management of the economy along lines prescribed by John Maynard Keynes's General Theory. Milton Friedman, little known at that time outside of conservative academic circles, championed “monetarism” and insisted the Federal Reserve maintain tight control over the amount of money circulating in the economy. In Samuelson Friedman, the author and journalist Nicholas Wapshott brings narrative verve and puckish charm to the story of these two giants of modern economics, their braided lives and colossal intellectual battles. Samuelson, a forbidding technical genius, grew up a child of relative privilege and went on to revolutionize macroeconomics. He wrote the best-selling economics textbook of all time, famously remarking "I don't care who writes a nation's laws—or crafts its advanced treatises—if I can write its economics textbooks." His friend and adversary for decades, Milton Friedman, studied the Great Depression and with Anna Schwartz wrote the seminal books The Great Contraction and A Monetary History of the United States. Like Friedrich Hayek before him, Friedman found fortune writing a treatise, Capitalism and Freedom, that yoked free markets and libertarian politics in a potent argument that remains a lodestar for economic conservatives today. In Wapshott's nimble hands, Samuelson and Friedman's decades-long argument over how—or whether—to manage the economy becomes a window onto one of the longest periods of economic turmoil in the United States. As the soaring economy of the 1950s gave way to decades stalked by declining prosperity and "stagflation," it was a time when the theory and practice of economics became the preoccupation of politicians and the focus of national debate. It is an argument that continues today.

CHURCH. A HISTORY.
Canceling the Apocalypse pt. 2 (The Great Depression-the start of WW2/ The 1930's Socialist Impact on the Church in the United States)

CHURCH. A HISTORY.

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 55:31


Karl Barth's The Word of God and ManH. Richard Niebuhr's The Social Sources of Denominationalism Reinhold Niebuhr's Moral Man and Immoral Society  also The Nature and Destiny of ManPaul Tillich's Systematic Theology 

New Books in History
William Souder, "Mad at the World: A Life of John Steinbeck" (Norton, 2020)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 60:11


The first full-length biography of America's most celebrated novelist of the Great Depression to appear in a quarter century, Mad at the World illuminates what has made the work of John Steinbeck endure: his capacity for empathy. Pulitzer Prize finalist William Souder explores Steinbeck's long apprenticeship as a writer struggling through the depths of the Great Depression, and his rise to greatness with masterpieces such as The Red Pony, Of Mice and Men, and The Grapes of Wrath.  Angered by the plight of the Dust Bowl migrants who were starving even as they toiled to harvest California's limitless bounty, fascinated by the guileless decency of the downtrodden denizens of Cannery Row, and appalled by the country's refusal to recognize the humanity common to all of its citizens, Steinbeck took a stand against social injustice—paradoxically given his inherent misanthropy—setting him apart from the writers of the so-called "lost generation." A man by turns quick-tempered, compassionate, and ultimately brilliant, Steinbeck could be a difficult person to like. Obsessed with privacy, he was mistrustful of people. Next to writing, his favorite things were drinking and womanizing and getting married, which he did three times. And while he claimed indifference about success, his mid-career books and movie deals made him a lot of money—which passed through his hands as quickly as it came in. And yet Steinbeck also took aim at the corrosiveness of power, the perils of income inequality, and the urgency of ecological collapse, all of which drive public debate to this day. Steinbeck remains our great social realist novelist, the writer who gave the dispossessed and the disenfranchised a voice in American life and letters. Eloquent, nuanced, and deeply researched, Mad at the World: A Life of John Steinbeck (Norton, 2020) captures the full measure of the man and his work. Barbara Berglund Sokolov is a historian of the American West. She is also the convener of the Joy of History Book Club, an online history seminar open to anyone. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Biography
William Souder, "Mad at the World: A Life of John Steinbeck" (Norton, 2020)

New Books in Biography

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 60:11


The first full-length biography of America's most celebrated novelist of the Great Depression to appear in a quarter century, Mad at the World illuminates what has made the work of John Steinbeck endure: his capacity for empathy. Pulitzer Prize finalist William Souder explores Steinbeck's long apprenticeship as a writer struggling through the depths of the Great Depression, and his rise to greatness with masterpieces such as The Red Pony, Of Mice and Men, and The Grapes of Wrath.  Angered by the plight of the Dust Bowl migrants who were starving even as they toiled to harvest California's limitless bounty, fascinated by the guileless decency of the downtrodden denizens of Cannery Row, and appalled by the country's refusal to recognize the humanity common to all of its citizens, Steinbeck took a stand against social injustice—paradoxically given his inherent misanthropy—setting him apart from the writers of the so-called "lost generation." A man by turns quick-tempered, compassionate, and ultimately brilliant, Steinbeck could be a difficult person to like. Obsessed with privacy, he was mistrustful of people. Next to writing, his favorite things were drinking and womanizing and getting married, which he did three times. And while he claimed indifference about success, his mid-career books and movie deals made him a lot of money—which passed through his hands as quickly as it came in. And yet Steinbeck also took aim at the corrosiveness of power, the perils of income inequality, and the urgency of ecological collapse, all of which drive public debate to this day. Steinbeck remains our great social realist novelist, the writer who gave the dispossessed and the disenfranchised a voice in American life and letters. Eloquent, nuanced, and deeply researched, Mad at the World: A Life of John Steinbeck (Norton, 2020) captures the full measure of the man and his work. Barbara Berglund Sokolov is a historian of the American West. She is also the convener of the Joy of History Book Club, an online history seminar open to anyone. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/biography

New Books in American Studies
William Souder, "Mad at the World: A Life of John Steinbeck" (Norton, 2020)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 60:11


The first full-length biography of America's most celebrated novelist of the Great Depression to appear in a quarter century, Mad at the World illuminates what has made the work of John Steinbeck endure: his capacity for empathy. Pulitzer Prize finalist William Souder explores Steinbeck's long apprenticeship as a writer struggling through the depths of the Great Depression, and his rise to greatness with masterpieces such as The Red Pony, Of Mice and Men, and The Grapes of Wrath.  Angered by the plight of the Dust Bowl migrants who were starving even as they toiled to harvest California's limitless bounty, fascinated by the guileless decency of the downtrodden denizens of Cannery Row, and appalled by the country's refusal to recognize the humanity common to all of its citizens, Steinbeck took a stand against social injustice—paradoxically given his inherent misanthropy—setting him apart from the writers of the so-called "lost generation." A man by turns quick-tempered, compassionate, and ultimately brilliant, Steinbeck could be a difficult person to like. Obsessed with privacy, he was mistrustful of people. Next to writing, his favorite things were drinking and womanizing and getting married, which he did three times. And while he claimed indifference about success, his mid-career books and movie deals made him a lot of money—which passed through his hands as quickly as it came in. And yet Steinbeck also took aim at the corrosiveness of power, the perils of income inequality, and the urgency of ecological collapse, all of which drive public debate to this day. Steinbeck remains our great social realist novelist, the writer who gave the dispossessed and the disenfranchised a voice in American life and letters. Eloquent, nuanced, and deeply researched, Mad at the World: A Life of John Steinbeck (Norton, 2020) captures the full measure of the man and his work. Barbara Berglund Sokolov is a historian of the American West. She is also the convener of the Joy of History Book Club, an online history seminar open to anyone. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books in the American West
William Souder, "Mad at the World: A Life of John Steinbeck" (Norton, 2020)

New Books in the American West

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 60:11


The first full-length biography of America's most celebrated novelist of the Great Depression to appear in a quarter century, Mad at the World illuminates what has made the work of John Steinbeck endure: his capacity for empathy. Pulitzer Prize finalist William Souder explores Steinbeck's long apprenticeship as a writer struggling through the depths of the Great Depression, and his rise to greatness with masterpieces such as The Red Pony, Of Mice and Men, and The Grapes of Wrath.  Angered by the plight of the Dust Bowl migrants who were starving even as they toiled to harvest California's limitless bounty, fascinated by the guileless decency of the downtrodden denizens of Cannery Row, and appalled by the country's refusal to recognize the humanity common to all of its citizens, Steinbeck took a stand against social injustice—paradoxically given his inherent misanthropy—setting him apart from the writers of the so-called "lost generation." A man by turns quick-tempered, compassionate, and ultimately brilliant, Steinbeck could be a difficult person to like. Obsessed with privacy, he was mistrustful of people. Next to writing, his favorite things were drinking and womanizing and getting married, which he did three times. And while he claimed indifference about success, his mid-career books and movie deals made him a lot of money—which passed through his hands as quickly as it came in. And yet Steinbeck also took aim at the corrosiveness of power, the perils of income inequality, and the urgency of ecological collapse, all of which drive public debate to this day. Steinbeck remains our great social realist novelist, the writer who gave the dispossessed and the disenfranchised a voice in American life and letters. Eloquent, nuanced, and deeply researched, Mad at the World: A Life of John Steinbeck (Norton, 2020) captures the full measure of the man and his work. Barbara Berglund Sokolov is a historian of the American West. She is also the convener of the Joy of History Book Club, an online history seminar open to anyone. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-west

New Books in Literary Studies
William Souder, "Mad at the World: A Life of John Steinbeck" (Norton, 2020)

New Books in Literary Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 60:11


The first full-length biography of America's most celebrated novelist of the Great Depression to appear in a quarter century, Mad at the World illuminates what has made the work of John Steinbeck endure: his capacity for empathy. Pulitzer Prize finalist William Souder explores Steinbeck's long apprenticeship as a writer struggling through the depths of the Great Depression, and his rise to greatness with masterpieces such as The Red Pony, Of Mice and Men, and The Grapes of Wrath.  Angered by the plight of the Dust Bowl migrants who were starving even as they toiled to harvest California's limitless bounty, fascinated by the guileless decency of the downtrodden denizens of Cannery Row, and appalled by the country's refusal to recognize the humanity common to all of its citizens, Steinbeck took a stand against social injustice—paradoxically given his inherent misanthropy—setting him apart from the writers of the so-called "lost generation." A man by turns quick-tempered, compassionate, and ultimately brilliant, Steinbeck could be a difficult person to like. Obsessed with privacy, he was mistrustful of people. Next to writing, his favorite things were drinking and womanizing and getting married, which he did three times. And while he claimed indifference about success, his mid-career books and movie deals made him a lot of money—which passed through his hands as quickly as it came in. And yet Steinbeck also took aim at the corrosiveness of power, the perils of income inequality, and the urgency of ecological collapse, all of which drive public debate to this day. Steinbeck remains our great social realist novelist, the writer who gave the dispossessed and the disenfranchised a voice in American life and letters. Eloquent, nuanced, and deeply researched, Mad at the World: A Life of John Steinbeck (Norton, 2020) captures the full measure of the man and his work. Barbara Berglund Sokolov is a historian of the American West. She is also the convener of the Joy of History Book Club, an online history seminar open to anyone. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literary-studies

New Books Network
William Souder, "Mad at the World: A Life of John Steinbeck" (Norton, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 60:11


The first full-length biography of America's most celebrated novelist of the Great Depression to appear in a quarter century, Mad at the World illuminates what has made the work of John Steinbeck endure: his capacity for empathy. Pulitzer Prize finalist William Souder explores Steinbeck's long apprenticeship as a writer struggling through the depths of the Great Depression, and his rise to greatness with masterpieces such as The Red Pony, Of Mice and Men, and The Grapes of Wrath.  Angered by the plight of the Dust Bowl migrants who were starving even as they toiled to harvest California's limitless bounty, fascinated by the guileless decency of the downtrodden denizens of Cannery Row, and appalled by the country's refusal to recognize the humanity common to all of its citizens, Steinbeck took a stand against social injustice—paradoxically given his inherent misanthropy—setting him apart from the writers of the so-called "lost generation." A man by turns quick-tempered, compassionate, and ultimately brilliant, Steinbeck could be a difficult person to like. Obsessed with privacy, he was mistrustful of people. Next to writing, his favorite things were drinking and womanizing and getting married, which he did three times. And while he claimed indifference about success, his mid-career books and movie deals made him a lot of money—which passed through his hands as quickly as it came in. And yet Steinbeck also took aim at the corrosiveness of power, the perils of income inequality, and the urgency of ecological collapse, all of which drive public debate to this day. Steinbeck remains our great social realist novelist, the writer who gave the dispossessed and the disenfranchised a voice in American life and letters. Eloquent, nuanced, and deeply researched, Mad at the World: A Life of John Steinbeck (Norton, 2020) captures the full measure of the man and his work. Barbara Berglund Sokolov is a historian of the American West. She is also the convener of the Joy of History Book Club, an online history seminar open to anyone. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Felipes Garage
Episode 190- Great Depression Eatin'

Felipes Garage

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 95:33


The 3 OGs hold it down on this one, while the Young is out bein young... Cook gives up some limo tales, we go over a couple episodes of Disney Plus & Marvel's What If? Talk about goin out to THOPfest this weekend, and Cook gives us his theory on where the Griselda style came from...Let's see if y'all agree... Also, big stuff at the end that you don't wanna miss! PRESS PLAY!!! FOLLOW US! www.instagram.com/felipesgarage http://www.facebook.com/felipesgaragepodcast http://www.youtube.com/felipesgaragepodcast EMAIL US! FelipesGarage@gmail.com COP THAT MERCH! www.FelipesGarage.com CONTRIBUTE TO THE POD! PayPal.me/JasonPSoto   We love y'all, Mechanics!!!

Lowy Institute: Live Events
Aiding the Pacific's economic recovery

Lowy Institute: Live Events

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 61:10


The Covid-19 pandemic has delivered one of the most severe global economic shocks since the Great Depression. In the Pacific, as in the rest of the world, economic activity has collapsed as a result of lockdowns to contain the virus. Without a strong domestic and international response the Pacific faces the prospects of a lost decade of economic development. Alexandre Dayant, Research Fellow and Project Director of Development Economics in Asia and the Pacific, discusses these issues, the response to date, and the economic support still needed, with a panel of Lowy Institute and regional experts. This event will coincide with the release of the fourth edition of the Lowy Institute Pacific Aid Map and will showcase the map's new features and findings. Recorded on 29 September 2021

The Opperman Report'
W. Craig Reed :Spies of the Deep

The Opperman Report'

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 63:42


Twenty years after the most terrifying submarine disaster in naval history, the untold story about why the Russians buried the truth and how Vladimir Putin used the incident to ignite a new Cold War finally comes to light.A decade after the Cold War and just a few months after Vladimir Putin came to power, a violent explosion sent the Russian submarine Kursk to the bottom of the Barents Sea. The Russians claimed an outdated torpedo caused the incident and refused help from the West while twenty-three survivors died before they could be rescued. When Russian naval officers revealed evidence of a collision with a U.S. spy sub, Putin squelched the allegations and fired the officers. In Spies of the Deep, the New York Times bestselling author of Red November shatters the lies told by both Russian and U.S. officials and exposes several shocking truths. Included are never-before-revealed facts and firsthand accounts from deep sea rescue divers, U.S. submariners, government officials, Russian naval officers, and expert witnesses. Not to mention unveiled evidence of a secret deal between Putin and U.S. President Bill Clinton to avert a nuclear war. Discover how the Kursk propelled Putin to power and how he used its demise to muzzle oligarchs, wrest control of energy firms, rebuild Russia's military, and dominate Arctic resources and sea routes.Spies of the Deep explores how the Kursk incident will be remembered as a pivotal historical event that propelled the world's superpowers into another, far more dangerous Cold War, sparked conflicts in the Arctic, and fueled a resource war that could create an economic nightmare not seen since the Great Depression. Are U.S. and NATO navies already too far behind to deal with new threats from Russia, China, North Korea, and Iran, and if so, how might that impact each of us?

The Opperman Report
W. Craig Reed :Spies of the Deep

The Opperman Report

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 63:42


Twenty years after the most terrifying submarine disaster in naval history, the untold story about why the Russians buried the truth and how Vladimir Putin used the incident to ignite a new Cold War finally comes to light. A decade after the Cold War and just a few months after Vladimir Putin came to power, a violent explosion sent the Russian submarine Kursk to the bottom of the Barents Sea. The Russians claimed an outdated torpedo caused the incident and refused help from the West while twenty-three survivors died before they could be rescued. When Russian naval officers revealed evidence of a collision with a U.S. spy sub, Putin squelched the allegations and fired the officers. In Spies of the Deep, the New York Times bestselling author of Red November shatters the lies told by both Russian and U.S. officials and exposes several shocking truths. Included are never-before-revealed facts and firsthand accounts from deep sea rescue divers, U.S. submariners, government officials, Russian naval officers, and expert witnesses. Not to mention unveiled evidence of a secret deal between Putin and U.S. President Bill Clinton to avert a nuclear war. Discover how the Kursk propelled Putin to power and how he used its demise to muzzle oligarchs, wrest control of energy firms, rebuild Russia's military, and dominate Arctic resources and sea routes. Spies of the Deep explores how the Kursk incident will be remembered as a pivotal historical event that propelled the world's superpowers into another, far more dangerous Cold War, sparked conflicts in the Arctic, and fueled a resource war that could create an economic nightmare not seen since the Great Depression. Are U.S. and NATO navies already too far behind to deal with new threats from Russia, China, North Korea, and Iran, and if so, how might that impact each of us?

The Return to Order Moment
Calls to Action - Rising to the Challenges that All Americans Face

The Return to Order Moment

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 29:57


Currently, the Congress of the United States looks like a hive of bees that have lost the ability to make honey. They know something is wrong, but they lack the intellect and imagination to do anything about it. These sentiments are reflected in many everyday Americans. Ever since the Great Depression, the government has stepped in to solve – or appear to solve – our problems. We allowed them to quietly and gradually gain power. We were happy to let elected officials and bureaucrats do the heavy lifting. Inflation, Covid, rising crime rates and Afghanistan are all signs that government is failing. It is time to look for different solutions from different people. Those different people are ourselves. To read the original articles, please use the following links - https://www.returntoorder.org/2021/09/we-need-americans-with-grit-and-who-get-the-job-done/, https://www.returntoorder.org/2021/09/what-happens-when-a-just-in-time-world-breaks-down/, and https://www.returntoorder.org/2021/07/the-stressed-out-consumer-needs-wisdom-not-more-marketing/. Thank you for listening

Should Have Listened to My Mother Podcast
HOST JACKIE TANTILLO - Same Drive Different Generations with Dr. Susan Landers

Should Have Listened to My Mother Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 28:55


Dr. Landers' mother completed her master's degree in library science and  worked  full time as a school librarian in the 1950's and  60's long before that was the norm for  women/mothers. "My mother grew up on a farm, lived through the Great Depression and met my dad, a WWII veteran after the war," says Landers. "She was a natural born giver, always looking after the needs of others," say the doctor.One family tradition that Susan embraced while growing up, was the daily family dinners. She continued the tradition with her own family as she saw the true benefits of taking the time  to share each other's  day.The second oldest of four children, Susan  had a  sense of independence from  a young age.  She new she wanted to study and work hard and no one was going to talk her out of relocating for an opportunity to train for her medical career.Susan and  her mother didn't always see eye to eye and her father had a volatile personality.  Susan often wondered why her mother stayed with their dad and her response was "because I loved him."After many years of not truly understanding why Dr. Landers worked so hard, her mother volunteered in the NICU at a Florida hospital, helping and holding babies. She finally understood why her daughter was so passionate about her career.    Susan's mother died at the age of 97 but it took the death of Susan's younger sister for their relationship to be rekindled.    

More Than A Muse
The Political Power of Dance

More Than A Muse

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 62:17


This week we got to dive into a very underrepresented  area of the arts and its influence on political protest. Throughout history, dance has been used as a tool for political power and protest, even though it's also been laced with controversy and sometimes outlawed in countries and communities (even today). We talk about a myriad of cultures and societies that have been influenced by this political power of dance. From  Zimbabwe warriors, plantation slaves, 17th-century French Courtiers,  Soviet Communists,  LGBTQ+ activists,  to the counterculture scene of Sao Paulo, dance has been used as a way to express unity, power, and protest.  We also talk about the myriad of issues that have used dance as a catalyst for change including protests against the economy during The Great Depression, the refugee crisis, gender equality, human trafficking,  and most recently police brutality and the Black Lives Matter movement.  This episode will definitely make you rethink dance... and also the movie Footloose. Want to check out some of our favorite books? Check out our booklist Follow Us on Instagram @morethanamuse.podcast 

Buzz Killers: A True Crime Podcast
Ep. 50 The Sordid History of the Cecil Hotel

Buzz Killers: A True Crime Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 112:28


SEPTEMBER TOPIC: The Cecil Hotel Check out Buzz Killers every Sunday for new episodes!   In epsiode fifty we discuss the history of the Cecil Hotel and why it has such an unsavory reputation. First opened on December 20, 1924 as a traveller's hotel, the grandiose building was meant to service the many people coming to booming downtown LA. However, shortly after its construction, the Great Depression leveled the downtown community, sending the Cecil Hotel into a downward spiral of debauchery.   For this episode we drank Chronic Cellars Purple Paradise Red Blend! Check out Chronic Cellars to see their full selection.    Music made by M.Eighmey on Soundtrap   Sources: https://www.independent.co.uk/news/the-cecil-hotel-netflix-elisa-lam-los-angeles-b1800647.html https://bizarrela.com/2016/03/cecil-hotel-suicide/ https://www.countryliving.com/life/travel/a45235/creepy-history-cecil-hotel-los-angeles/ https://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-skid-row-suicide-20150613-story.html https://www.buzzfeed.com/ehisosifo1/cecil-hotel-scary-criminal-facts https://www.travelchannel.com/interests/haunted/articles/inside-the-infamous-cecil-hotel https://www.cosmopolitan.com/entertainment/tv/a35555848/cecil-hotel-timeline/ https://www.elle.com.au/culture/cecil-hotel-history-24660 https://thetab.com/uk/2021/02/12/history-timeline-death-murder-the-cecil-hotel-194916 https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/life/entertainment/a35458616/the-cecil-hotel-history-timeline-true-story/ https://www.denofgeek.com/culture/ghost-adventures-cecil-house-zak-bagans-interview/  https://abc7.com/archive/9409571/  https://la.curbed.com/2015/10/27/9907144/haunted-hotels-los-angeles  https://sfghosts.com/infamous-cecil-hotel/  https://www.intheknow.com/post/cecil-hotel-creepy-encounter-tiktok/  Ghost Adventures: Cecil Hotel Special on discovery+ Horror at The Cecil Investigation Discovery on discovery+ Crime Scene: The Vanishing at the Cecil Hotel on Netflix   **This episode is brought to you by BK Creations, LLC. **

GZero World with Ian Bremmer
The COVID-Damaged Economy Surprised Adam Tooze

GZero World with Ian Bremmer

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 31:06


The pandemic hit the global economy hard, and many economies are still hurting. But it could have been even worse. In May 2020 as a guest on the GZERO World podcast, economic historian Adam Tooze told Ian Bremmer that the world was facing a second Great Depression. In a new interview, Tooze is back to take stock and explains why the US economy rebounded so surprisingly fast, while much of the rest of the world lags behind.

Events from the Brookings Institution
Aftershocks: Pandemic politics and the end of the old international order

Events from the Brookings Institution

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 60:38


On September 24, the Foreign Policy program at Brookings hosted a panel discussion on how nationalism and great power rivalries stymied critical international cooperation on COVID-19 and led to the worst economic crash since the Great Depression. Subscribe to Brookings Events on iTunes, send feedback email to events@brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. To learn more about upcoming events, visit our website. Brookings Events is part of the Brookings Podcast Network.

The Smerconish Podcast
Is the US today as bad as it was in the Civil War, The Depression, and WWII?

The Smerconish Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 11:16


Michael's commentary on filmmaker Ken Burns saying the US is in an era comparable to the Civil War, the Great Depression, and WWII. Original air date 21 September 2021.

RED-C Roundup
229 Dr. Thaddeus Romansky: The American Catholic Odyssey, Pt. 2

RED-C Roundup

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 57:04


Part Two looks at how Catholics were a minority population viewed largely with suspicion and prejudice by their Protestant neighbors because of their ethnic, creedal, and worship differences. The challenging years of the World War I, the Great Depression, and World War II began to break that mould and put American Catholics on a path to greater participation in the nation's cultural and civic mainstream.  Part two then looks at how American Catholicism has weathered the chaotic years following the Second Vatican Council and the contemporaneous cultural crisis in the wider society.

The Majority Report with Sam Seder
2680 - American Capitalism and the Exploitation of Immigrants w/ Daniel Melo

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 64:26


Sam and Emma host public sector immigration lawyer Daniel Melo to discuss his recent book Borderlines: The Edges of U.S. Capitalism, Immigration, and Democracy, which contextualizes immigration policy within the history of the US, and exploring what we can do to push back against the unfair designation of the migrant position. Melo begins by stepping back to the early battles between colonies, then states and the federal government on who has say regarding who can come into the country, looking particularly at the fears of negative influences on the early capitalist economy, whether that be anarchists, poor Irish folks, or the spirit of the Haitian revolution. Next, he dives into the first laws in the early 1920s that worked to criminalize immigrants, and how the developing Great Depression and reassertion of white supremacy worked to bolster this rhetoric of scapegoating migrants. Emma, Sam, and Daniel then cover a little theory, addressing the role migrants play within a Marxist view of our economy, providing capitalists with a cheap labor sector to aid the exploitation of the working class, before moving on to the false narrative constructed around immigration, from the ability to simply “get in line” for acceptance into the country to the idea that migrants drive down wages for US citizens, and how the law gets used to reinforce this status quo. They wrap up the interview by discussing the current state of the US immigration system, the importance of unpacking the undemocratic nature of the citizen-migrant dichotomy, and what the role of labor organizing can play in bolstering a progressive immigration agenda. Sam and Emma conclude the free half by touching on the state of the infrastructure and reconciliation package, and CNN's apparent lack of awareness about what the Democratic platform has been in the fight for this over the last few months. And in the Fun Half: Emma and Sam dive back into CNN's miscalculations of the infrastructure package, not quite realizing that $6 trillion is indeed not $3.5 trillion, and its inability not to finger point at progressives who've made their stance clear for months. Rudy from Orlando calls in to chat about the importance of taking away the exclusionary regulations around the medical industry that attempt to ensure patient survival, and Stephen Crowder finally gets back into his groove after hospitalization, fully diving back into middle school racism. Lastly, the MR crew basks in the schadenfreude of Bill Gates finally being questioned about his relationship with Jeffrey Epstein, and Kowalski from Nebraska calls in with his farm report, plus, your calls and IMs! Become a member at JoinTheMajorityReport.com Subscribe to the AMQuickie newsletter here. Join the Majority Report Discord! http://majoritydiscord.com/ Get all your MR merch at our store https://shop.majorityreportradio.com/ (Merch issues and concerns can be addressed here: majorityreportstore@mirrorimage.com) You can now watch the livestream on Twitch Support the St. Vincent Nurses today as they continue to strike for a fair contract! https://action.massnurses.org/we-stand-with-st-vincents-nurses/ Subscribe to Discourse Blog, a newsletter and website for progressive essays and related fun partly run by AM Quickie writer Jack Crosbie. https://discourseblog.com/ Subscribe to AM Quickie writer Corey Pein's podcast News from Nowhere, at https://www.patreon.com/newsfromnowhere Check out Matt's show, Left Reckoning, on Youtube, and subscribe on Patreon! Subscribe to Matt's other show Literary Hangover on Patreon! Check out The Letterhack's upcoming Kickstarter project for his new graphic novel! https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/milagrocomic/milagro-heroe-de-las-calles Check out Matt Binder's YouTube channel! Subscribe to Brandon's show The Discourse on Patreon! Check out The Nomiki Show live at 3 pm ET on YouTube at patreon.com/thenomikishow Check out Jamie's podcast, The Antifada, at patreon.com/theantifada, on iTunes, or at twitch.tv/theantifada (streaming every Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday at 7pm ET!) Follow the Majority Report crew on Twitter: @SamSeder @EmmaVigeland @MattBinder @MattLech @BF1nn @BradKAlsop

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts
A Tribute to Great Minds. Thomas E. Woods Jr. & Keith Knight

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 55:45


https://youtu.be/LALiVLMtN2o ... while Ludwig von Mises was acknowledged as one of Europe's most eminent economists in the 1920s and 30s, the language barrier shut off any recognition of Mises in the Anglo-American world until the mid-1930s; then, just as his business cycle theory was beginning to achieve renown as an explanation for the Great Depression, Mises's overdue recognition was lost in the hoopla of the Keynesian Revolution. A refugee deprived of his academic or social base in Europe, Mises emigrated to the United States at the mercy of his new-found environment. But while, in the climate of the day, the leftist and socialist refugees from Europe were cultivated, feted, and given prestigious academic posts, a different fate was meted out to a man who embodied a methodological and political individualism that was anathema to American academia. Indeed, the fact that a man of Mises's eminence was not offered a single regular academic post and that he was never able to teach in a prestigious graduate department in this country is one of the most shameful blots on the none too illustrious history of American higher education. The fact that Mises himself was able to preserve his great energy, his remarkable productivity, and his unfailing gentleness and good humor in the face of this shabby treatment is simply one more tribute to the qualities of this remarkable man ... ... Ludwig von Mises's writings are the embodiment of a courageous and eminent man hewing to his discipline and to his vision, unheeding of shabby maltreatment. Murray N. Rothbard Economic Controversies, p. 232 Thomas E. Woods, Jr., is the 2019 winner of the Hayek Lifetime Achievement Award from the Austrian Economics Center in Vienna. He is a senior fellow of the Mises Institute and host of The Tom Woods Show, which releases a new episode every weekday. FREE must read e-book: https://aociswrong.com/ Odysee BitChute Spotify Flote Archive Minds

Marketplace All-in-One
The social safety net explained

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 30:05


Congressional Democrats are working on a $3.5 trillion bill that would vastly expand the social safety net. But what exactly is this thing we call the social safety net? “We’re talking about things like the earned income tax credit, child tax credits, a cash transfer program called TANF, or Temporary Assistance [for] Needy Families … but if you think about how long it might take you to get on your feet, it is a relatively meager and challenging system to subsist on,” said Tina Sacks, associate professor of social welfare at the University of California, Berkeley. The idea that the government should help catch Americans if they fall on hard times started during the Great Depression, for obvious reasons. But Sacks says today that net doesn’t work as well as it should. There are a lot of gaps in the system, and at the end of the day our programs are pretty meager compared to those in other developed nations. On the show today, Sacks walks us through the ins and outs of the social safety net. What it looks like in practice and whether the Democrats’ plan could make a real difference. Later, we’ll talk about the next legal fight over reproductive rights, hear from a listener who makes us smart about toaster ovens and a callout for all your Duo voice memos! When you're done listening, tell your Echo device to “make me smart” for our daily explainers. This week we'll explain so-called name, image and likeness compensation deals and how they’re changing the game for student athletes, along with the origin of potato chips. Also, don't forget to subscribe to our newsletter! You can find the latest issue here. Here’s everything we talked about today: “From Cradle to Grave, Democrats Move to Expand Social Safety Net” from The New York Times “Pandemic Aid Programs Spur a Record Drop in Poverty” from The New York Times The Uncertain Hour’s podcast on the history of welfare reform “The Time Tax” from The Atlantic “Texas doctor who defied state’s near-total abortion ban is sued” from The Los Angeles Times Professor Caitlin Myers’ tweet thread on economists’ amicus brief against a Mississippi abortion law “A ‘Righteous Strike'” from The New York Times’ The Daily podcast

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly
The social safety net explained

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 30:05


Congressional Democrats are working on a $3.5 trillion bill that would vastly expand the social safety net. But what exactly is this thing we call the social safety net? “We’re talking about things like the earned income tax credit, child tax credits, a cash transfer program called TANF, or Temporary Assistance [for] Needy Families … but if you think about how long it might take you to get on your feet, it is a relatively meager and challenging system to subsist on,” said Tina Sacks, associate professor of social welfare at the University of California, Berkeley. The idea that the government should help catch Americans if they fall on hard times started during the Great Depression, for obvious reasons. But Sacks says today that net doesn’t work as well as it should. There are a lot of gaps in the system, and at the end of the day our programs are pretty meager compared to those in other developed nations. On the show today, Sacks walks us through the ins and outs of the social safety net. What it looks like in practice and whether the Democrats’ plan could make a real difference. Later, we’ll talk about the next legal fight over reproductive rights, hear from a listener who makes us smart about toaster ovens and a callout for all your Duo voice memos! When you're done listening, tell your Echo device to “make me smart” for our daily explainers. This week we'll explain so-called name, image and likeness compensation deals and how they’re changing the game for student athletes, along with the origin of potato chips. Also, don't forget to subscribe to our newsletter! You can find the latest issue here. Here’s everything we talked about today: “From Cradle to Grave, Democrats Move to Expand Social Safety Net” from The New York Times “Pandemic Aid Programs Spur a Record Drop in Poverty” from The New York Times The Uncertain Hour’s podcast on the history of welfare reform “The Time Tax” from The Atlantic “Texas doctor who defied state’s near-total abortion ban is sued” from The Los Angeles Times Professor Caitlin Myers’ tweet thread on economists’ amicus brief against a Mississippi abortion law “A ‘Righteous Strike'” from The New York Times’ The Daily podcast

Let's Know Things
Buy Now Pay Later

Let's Know Things

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 26:28


This week we talk about layaway, debt, and BNPL. We also discuss K-Mart, the Great Depression, and credit. Support the show: patreon.com/letsknowthings & letsknowthings.com/support Show notes/transcript: letsknowthings.com Check out my other shows & publications: understandary.com

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast
Thomas Wright: Pandemic Politics and the End of the Old International Order

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 59:27


The COVID-19 pandemic has killed millions, infected hundreds of millions, and laid bare the deep vulnerabilities and inequalities of our interconnected world. The ensuing economic collapse was the worst since the Great Depression, undoing more than two decades of progress in reducing extreme poverty. Tensions between the United States and China boiled over, and the worldwide contest between democracy and authoritarianism deepened. At a time when this global crisis required a truly collective response, international cooperation had almost entirely broken down, with key world leaders hardly on speaking terms. In Thomas Wright and Colin Kahl's Aftershocks: Pandemic Politics and the End of the Old International Order, the two national security experts offer a definitive account of the global impact of COVID-19, the political shock waves it will have on the United States, and myriad ways in which the crisis exposed the limitations of the old world order. This comprehensive account of the year 2020 draws on interviews with officials around the world and extensive research to tell the story of how nationalism and major power rivalries constrained the response to the worst pandemic in a century. Co-author Thomas Wright is a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and a contributing writer at The Atlantic. He has written several extensively researched pieces analyzing Donald Trump's foreign policy. Join us as Thomas Wright delves into his latest analysis of one of the strangest and most consequential years on record. SPEAKERS Thomas Wright Senior Fellow, Brookings Institution; Co-author, Aftershocks: Pandemic Politics and the End of the Old International Order In Conversation with Edward Luce Associate Editor, Financial Times In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are currently hosting all of our live programming via YouTube live stream. This program was recorded via video conference on September 13th, 2021 by the Commonwealth Club of California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Road to Now
This Episode Kills Fascists: Woody Guthrie's Life & Legacy w/ Deana McCloud

The Road to Now

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 47:42


Most Americans know Woody Guthrie's “This Land is Your Land”, but the song, much like the man who wrote it, is far more complex than many of us realize. Guthrie, who was born in Oklahoma in 1912, moved west during the Dust Bowl of the mid-1930s and witnessed the tragedy of the Great Depression first-hand. A self-proclaimed “common-ist,” Woody dedicated his life to documenting the experiences of his generation and using his platform to advocate for the common worker. In this episode, Bob & Ben speak with Woody Guthrie Center Executive Director Deana McCloud to learn more about Woody Guthrie, his music, and his legacy. This episode was recorded at the Woody Guthrie Center in Tulsa, OK. If you're ever in the area, we highly recommend you take the time to visit. A video of Bob's visit is available on our episode page and on The Road to Now's YouTube channel. You can visit the Guthrie Center's website at woodyguthriecenter.org and follow on them at twitter at @WoodyGuthrieCtr. You can follow Deana McCloud on twitter at @DKMcCloud.

Legends of Philadelphia
Sicilian Witchcraft and the Philadelphia Poison Ring

Legends of Philadelphia

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 45:13


In the 1930's, during the Great Depression, a criminal syndicate dominated the underworld with a lethal combination of black magic, arsenic, and fraud. They say 100 corpses piled up before the law finally caught them. Join us today as we spill the tea on the Philadelphia Poison Ring.

The John Batchelor Show
1699: Nicholas Wapshott #UNBOUND. The complete, forty-minute interview, July 24, 2016.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 41:00


Photo:  The book cover. CBS Eyes on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow Nicholas Wapshott #UNBOUND. The complete forty-minute interview, July 24, 2016. Samuelson Friedman: The Battle Over the Free Market, by Nicholas Wapshott  https://www.amazon.com/Samuelson-Friedman-Battle-Over-Market-ebook/dp/B08589Z7M9/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=Nicholas+Wapshott+%2B+samuelson&qid=1627690920&s=digital-text&sr=1-1 From the author of Keynes Hayek, the next great duel in the history of economics. In 1966 two columnists joined Newsweek magazine. Their assignment: debate the world of business and economics. Paul Samuelson was a towering figure in Keynesian economics, which supported the management of the economy along lines prescribed by John Maynard Keynes's General Theory. Milton Friedman, little known at that time outside of conservative academic circles, championed “monetarism” and insisted the Federal Reserve maintain tight control over the amount of money circulating in the economy. In Samuelson Friedman, the author and journalist Nicholas Wapshott brings narrative verve and puckish charm to the story of these two giants of modern economics, their braided lives and colossal intellectual battles. Samuelson, a forbidding technical genius, grew up a child of relative privilege and went on to revolutionize macroeconomics. He wrote the best-selling economics textbook of all time, famously remarking "I don't care who writes a nation's laws—or crafts its advanced treatises—if I can write its economics textbooks." His friend and adversary for decades, Milton Friedman, studied the Great Depression and with Anna Schwartz wrote the seminal books The Great Contraction and A Monetary History of the United States. Like Friedrich Hayek before him, Friedman found fortune writing a treatise, Capitalism and Freedom, that yoked free markets and libertarian politics in a potent argument that remains a lodestar for economic conservatives today. In Wapshott's nimble hands, Samuelson and Friedman's decades-long argument over how—or whether—to manage the economy becomes a window onto one of the longest periods of economic turmoil in the United States. As the soaring economy of the 1950s gave way to decades stalked by declining prosperity and "stagflation," it was a time when the theory and practice of economics became the preoccupation of politicians and the focus of national debate. It is an argument that continues today.

Hold These Truths with Dan Crenshaw
Repeating the Mistakes of the Great Society | Amity Shlaes (Repost)

Hold These Truths with Dan Crenshaw

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 58:01


This episode originally premiered on August 25, 2020. Historian Amity Shlaes joins us for a new look at the origins and aftermath of LBJ's Great Society – the massive federal poverty-reduction programs of the 1960's. The debates in that era were the same debates today: socialism vs capitalism, public-sector vs private-sector, victimhood vs self-empowerment. And the cost of these programs led to devastating outcomes which are still unfolding to this day. Amity Shlaes' most recent book is Great Society: A New History. She is the author of four New York Times bestsellers: The Forgotten Man: A New History of the Great Depression, The Forgotten Man/Graphic, Coolidge, and The Greedy Hand: How Taxes Drive Americans Crazy. Miss Shlaes chairs the board of the Calvin Coolidge Presidential Foundation and the Manhattan Institute's Hayek Book Prize, and serves as a scholar at the King's College. A former member of the Wall Street Journal's editorial board, Miss Shlaes published a weekly syndicated column for more than a decade, appearing first in the Financial Times, then in Bloomberg. Follow her on Twitter at @AmityShlaes.

True Crime Creepers
The Mighty Michael Malloy

True Crime Creepers

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 55:07


It was July, 1932 in the Bronx, New York. Prohibition is alive and well, and we're a few years into the Great Depression. Francis Pasqua, Daniel Kriesberg, and Tony Marino were sitting together in Tony's speakeasy while Tony complains about how bad business is. That's when Francis has a completely brilliant plan - sign one of the regulars up for life insurance and then stage their murder to look like an accident. The group loved the plan, and they got right to work. Michael Malloy was the down-on-his-luck regular they chose. They figured it would be easy. Michael would come in every day and drink until he passed out. They figured the alcohol would kill him quick enough. Only... it didn't. The group tried everything they could think of, but Michael just wouldn't die. Sources:ArticlesTrue Crime Edition | The Murder Plot of "Iron"Mike MalloySmithsonian Magazine | The Man Who Wouldn't DieTrivia Library | New York Gangs Murder Trust and MichaelMalloy Part 5All Things Interesting | The Curious Case Of MichaelMalloy – “Rasputin Of The Bronx”PodcastCriminal | Episode 151: The Many Lives of Michael MalloySupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/truecrimecreepers)

Barron's Live
What We Can Learn from a 96-Year-Old

Barron's Live

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 33:55


Frances Ballantyne, a 96-year-old born into America on the brink of the Great Depression and moved to New York during World War II joins Quentin Fottrell, MarketWatch's personal finance editor to share her life experience, her mistakes and smart money moves, how she has weathered crises and has been able to live comfortably.

Ready For Takeoff - Turn Your Aviation Passion Into A Career

The term The Greatest Generation was popularized by the title of a 1998 book by American journalist Tom Brokaw. In the book, Brokaw profiled American members of this generation who came of age during the Great Depression and went on to fight in World War II, as well as those who contributed to the war effort on the home front. Brokaw wrote that these men and women fought not for fame or recognition, but because it was the "right thing to do." I have had the honor of interviewing numerous members of this generation, pilots who bravely served in World War Two. Many people are not aware that casualties in the war were higher among aircrews than among Marines. The people who served during World War II were from a different generation, at a time when patriotism was the order of the day and national service was expected and respected. Major movie stars put their careers on hold to serve their country. Athletes like Ted Williams continued to serve in Korea. Today, the environment is different. There is no longer a draft. Military service is totally voluntary. As a result, only 1 percent of Americans new serve in the military. I believe that the military members of today are truly the greatest generation. A perfect example of this is Pat Tilman, who gave up his four million dollar salary to serve his country. I recently worked with a retired Marine pilot who had served two years in Iraq and five years in Afghanistan.

Haymarket Books Live
Strong Communities Make Cops Obsolete w/ Geo Maher, Robin DG Kelley, & Alex Vitale

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 85:23


If police are the problem, what's the solution? Tens of millions of people poured onto the streets for Black Lives Matter, bringing with them a wholly new idea of public safety, common security, and the delivery of justice, communicating that vision in the fiery vernacular of riot, rebellion, and protest. Geo Maher's new book, A World Without Police transcribes these new ideas—written in slogans and chants, over occupied bridges and hastily assembled barricades—into a compelling, must-read manifesto for police abolition. Compellingly argued and lyrically charged, A World Without Police offers concrete strategies for confronting and breaking police power, as a first step toward building community alternatives that make the police obsolete. Geo will be joined by Robin D.G. Kelley and Alex Vitale to pick up on these urgent themes and to examine the alternatives to Police and policing. --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Order a Copy of A World Without Police: https://www.versobooks.com/books/3783-a-world-without-police --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Speakers: Geo Maher has previously taught at Vassar College, San Quentin State Prison, and the Venezuelan School of Planning in Caracas. He is the author of five books, including We Created Chavez, Decolonizing Dialectics, Building the Commune, Spirals of Revolt, and A World Without Police. Robin D.G. Kelley is Gary B. Nash Endowed Chair in U.S. History at UCLA and the author of many books, including Freedom Dreams: The Black Radical Imagination, Race Rebels: Culture, Politics, and the Black Working Class, and Hammer and Hoe: Alabama Communists During the Great Depression. Alex S. Vitale is Professor of Sociology and Coordinator of the Policing and Social Justice Project at Brooklyn College and a Visiting Professor at London Southbank University. He has spent the last 30 years writing about policing and consults both police departments and human rights organizations internationally. Prof. Vitale is the author of City of Disorder: How the Quality of Life Campaign Transformed New York Politics and The End of Policing. His academic writings on policing have appeared in Policing and Society, Police Practice and Research, Mobilization, and Contemporary Sociology. He is also a frequent essayist, whose writings have been published in New York Times, Washington Post, Guardian, The Nation, Vice News, Fortune, and USA Today. He has also appeared on CNN, MSNBC, CNBC, NPR, PBS, Democracy Now, and The Daily Show with Trevor Noah. This event is co-sponsored by Haymarket Books and Verso Books. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/Shj1A0_r5MQ Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 09.08.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 59:55


    20 Years of Government-Sponsored Tyranny: The Rise of the Security-Industrial Complex from 9/11 to COVID-19   By John W. Whitehead & Nisha Whitehead September 7, 2021 “I tell you, freedom and human rights in America are doomed. The U.S. government will lead the American people in — and the West in general — into an unbearable hell and a choking life.”—Osama bin Laden (October 2001), as reported by CNN What a strange and harrowing road we've walked since September 11, 2001, littered with the debris of our once-vaunted liberties. We have gone from a nation that took great pride in being a model of a representative democracy to being a model of how to persuade a freedom-loving people to march in lockstep with a police state.   Our losses are mounting with every passing day.   What began with the post-9/11 passage of the USA Patriot Act  has snowballed into the eradication of every vital safeguard against government overreach, corruption and abuse.   The citizenry's unquestioning acquiescence to anything the government wants to do in exchange for the phantom promise of safety and security has resulted in a society where the nation has been locked down into a militarized, mechanized, hypersensitive, legalistic, self-righteous, goose-stepping antithesis of every principle upon which this nation was founded.   Set against a backdrop of government surveillance, militarized police, SWAT team raids, asset forfeiture, eminent domain, overcriminalization, armed surveillance drones, whole body scanners, stop and frisk searches, police violence and the like—all of which have been sanctioned by Congress, the White House and the courts—our constitutional freedoms have been steadily chipped away at, undermined, eroded, whittled down, and generally discarded.   The rights embodied in the Constitution, if not already eviscerated, are on life support.   Free speech, the right to protest, the right to challenge government wrongdoing, due process, a presumption of innocence, the right to self-defense, accountability and transparency in government, privacy, press, sovereignty, assembly, bodily integrity, representative government: all of these and more have become casualties in the government's war on the American people, a war that has grown more pronounced since 9/11.   Indeed, since the towers fell on 9/11, the U.S. government has posed a greater threat to our freedoms than any terrorist, extremist or foreign entity ever could.     While nearly 3,000 people died in the 9/11 attacks, the U.S. government and its agents have easily killed at least ten times that number of civilians in the U.S. and abroad since 9/11 through its police shootings, SWAT team raids, drone strikes and profit-driven efforts to police the globe, sell weapons to foreign nations (which too often fall into the hands of terrorists), and foment civil unrest in order to keep the security industrial complex gainfully employed.   The American people have been treated like enemy combatants, to be spied on, tracked, scanned, frisked, searched, subjected to all manner of intrusions, intimidated, invaded, raided, manhandled, censored, silenced, shot at, locked up, denied due process, and killed.   In allowing ourselves to be distracted by terror drills, foreign wars, color-coded warnings, pandemic lockdowns and other carefully constructed exercises in propaganda, sleight of hand, and obfuscation, we failed to recognize that the U.S. government—the government that was supposed to be a “government of the people, by the people, for the people”—has become the enemy of the people.   Consider that the government's answer to every problem has been moregovernment—at taxpayer expense—and less individual liberty.   Every crisis—manufactured or otherwise—since the nation's early beginnings has become a make-work opportunity for the government to expand its reach and its power at taxpayer expense while limiting our freedoms at every turn: The Great Depression. The World Wars. The 9/11 terror attacks. The COVID-19 pandemic.   Viewed in this light, the history of the United States is a testament to the old adage that liberty decreases as government (and government bureaucracy) grows. Or, to put it another way, as government expands, liberty contracts.   This is how the emergency state operates, after all, and we should know: after all, we have spent the past 20 years in a state of emergency.   From 9/11 to COVID-19, “we the people” have acted the part of the helpless, gullible victims desperately in need of the government to save us from whatever danger threatens. In turn, the government has been all too accommodating and eager while also expanding its power and authority in the so-called name of national security.   This is a government that has grown so corrupt, greedy, power-hungry and tyrannical over the course of the past 240-plus years that our constitutional republic has since given way to idiocracy, and representative government has given way to a kleptocracy (a government ruled by thieves) and a kakistocracy (a government run by unprincipled career politicians, corporations and thieves that panders to the worst vices in our nature and has little regard for the rights of American citizens).   What this really amounts to is a war on the American people, fought on American soil, funded with taxpayer dollars, and waged with a single-minded determination to use national crises, manufactured or otherwise, in order to transform the American homeland into a battlefield.   Indeed, the government's (mis)management of various states of emergency in the past 20 years has spawned a massive security-industrial complex the likes of which have never been seen before. According to the National Priorities Project at the progressive Institute for Policy Studies, since 9/11, the United States has spent $21 trillion on “militarization, surveillance, and repression.”   Clearly, this is not a government that is a friend to freedom.   Rather, this is a government that, in conjunction with its corporate partners, views the citizenry as consumers and bits of data to be bought, sold and traded.   This is a government that spies on and treats its people as if they have no right to privacy, especially in their own homes while the freedom to be human is being erased.   This is a government that is laying the groundwork to weaponize the public's biomedical data as a convenient means by which to penalize certain “unacceptable” social behaviors. Incredibly, a new government agency HARPA (a healthcare counterpart to the Pentagon's research and development arm DARPA) will take the lead in identifying and targeting “signs” of mental illness or violent inclinations among the populace by using artificial intelligence to collect data from Apple Watches, Fitbits, Amazon Echo and Google Home.   This is a government that routinely engages in taxation without representation, whose elected officials lobby for our votes only to ignore us once elected.   This is a government comprised of petty bureaucrats, vigilantes masquerading as cops, and faceless technicians.   This is a government that railroads taxpayers into financing government programs whose only purpose is to increase the power and wealth of the corporate elite.   This is a government—a warring empire—that forces its taxpayers to pay for wars abroad that serve no other purpose except to expand the reach of the military industrial complex.   This is a government that subjects its people to scans, searches, pat downs and other indignities by the TSA and VIPR raids on so-called “soft” targets like shopping malls and bus depots by black-clad, Darth Vader look-alikes.   This is a government that uses fusion centers, which represent the combined surveillance efforts of federal, state and local law enforcement, to track the citizenry's movements, record their conversations, and catalogue their transactions.   This is a government whose wall-to-wall surveillance has given rise to a suspect society in which the burden of proof has been reversed such that Americans are now assumed guilty until or unless they can prove their innocence.   This is a government that treats its people like second-class citizens who have no rights, and is working overtime to stigmatize and dehumanize any and all who do not fit with the government's plans for this country.   This is a government that uses free speech zones, roving bubble zones and trespass laws to silence, censor and marginalize Americans and restrict their First Amendment right to speak truth to power.   This is a government that persists in renewing the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), which allows the president and the military to arrest and detain American citizens indefinitely based on the say-so of the government.   This is a government that saddled us with the Patriot Act, which opened the door to all manner of government abuses and intrusions on our privacy.   This is a government that, in direct opposition to the dire warnings of those who founded our country, has allowed the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to establish a standing army by way of programs that transfer surplus military hardware to local and state police.   This is a government that has militarized American's domestic police, equipping them with military weapons such as “tens of thousands of machine guns; nearly 200,000 ammunition magazines; a million hollow-point bullets; thousands of pieces of camouflage and night-vision equipment; and hundreds of silencers, armored cars and aircraft,” in addition to armored vehicles, sound cannons and the like.   This is a government that has provided cover to police when they shoot and kill unarmed individuals just for standing a certain way, or moving a certain way, or holding something—anything—that police could misinterpret to be a gun, or igniting some trigger-centric fear in a police officer's mind that has nothing to do with an actual threat to their safety.   This is a government that has created a Constitution-free zone within 100 miles inland of the border around the United States, paving the way for Border Patrol agents to search people's homes, intimately probe their bodies, and rifle through their belongings, all without a warrant. Nearly 66% of Americans (2/3 of the U.S. population, 197.4 million people) now live within that 100-mile-deep, Constitution-free zone.   This is a government that treats public school students as if they were prison inmates, enforcing zero tolerance policies that criminalize childish behavior, and indoctrinating them with teaching that emphasizes rote memorization and test-taking over learning, synthesizing and critical thinking.   This is a government that is operating in the negative on every front: it's spending far more than what it makes (and takes from the American taxpayers) and it is borrowing heavily (from foreign governments and Social Security) to keep the government operating and keep funding its endless wars abroad. Meanwhile, the nation's sorely neglected infrastructure—railroads, water pipelines, ports, dams, bridges, airports and roads—is rapidly deteriorating.   This is a government that has empowered police departments to make a profit at the expense of those they have sworn to protect through the use of asset forfeiture laws, speed traps, and red light cameras.   This is a government whose gun violence—inflicted on unarmed individuals by battlefield-trained SWAT teams, militarized police, and bureaucratic government agents trained to shoot first and ask questions later—poses a greater threat to the safety and security of the nation than any mass shooter. There are now reportedly more bureaucratic (non-military) government agents armed with high-tech, deadly weapons than U.S. Marines.   This is a government that has allowed the presidency to become a dictatorship operating above and beyond the law, regardless of which party is in power.   This is a government that treats dissidents, whistleblowers and freedom fighters as enemies of the state.   This is a government that has in recent decades unleashed untold horrors upon the world—including its own citizenry—in the name of global conquest, the acquisition of greater wealth, scientific experimentation, and technological advances, all packaged in the guise of the greater good.   This is a government that allows its agents to break laws with immunity while average Americans get the book thrown at them.   This is a government that speaks in a language of force. What is this language of force? Militarized police. Riot squads. Camouflage gear. Black uniforms. Armored vehicles. Mass arrests. Pepper spray. Tear gas. Batons. Strip searches. Surveillance cameras. Kevlar vests. Drones. Lethal weapons. Less-than-lethal weapons unleashed with deadly force. Rubber bullets. Water cannons. Stun grenades. Arrests of journalists. Crowd control tactics. Intimidation tactics. Brutality. Contempt of cop charges.   This is a government that justifies all manner of government tyranny and power grabs in the so-called name of national security, national crises and national emergencies.   This is a government that exports violence worldwide, with one of this country's most profitable exports being weapons. Indeed, the United States, the world's largest exporter of arms, has been selling violence to the world in order to prop up the military industrial complex and maintain its endless wars abroad.   This is a government that is consumed with squeezing every last penny out of the population and seemingly unconcerned if essential freedoms are trampled in the process.   This is a government that routinely undermines the Constitution and rides roughshod over the rights of the citizenry, eviscerating individual freedoms so that its own powers can be expanded.   This is a government that believes it has the authority to search, seize, strip, scan, spy on, probe, pat down, taser, and arrest any individual at any time and for the slightest provocation, the Constitution be damned.