Podcasts about Sweden

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Country on the Scandinavian peninsula

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  • Oct 19, 2021LATEST
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Best podcasts about Sweden

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Latest podcast episodes about Sweden

Coronavirus 4 1 1  podcast
Coronavirus, COVID-19, coronavirus variants, and vaccine updates for 10-19-2021

Coronavirus 4 1 1 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 4:56


This is Coronavirus 411, the latest COVID-19 info and new hotspots for October 19th, 2021. 84-year-old Colin Powell, the retired four-star general who became the country's first Black secretary of state and chairman of the Joints Chiefs of Staff, died from complications of Covid-19. He was fully vaccinated. Powell had a cancer of a type of white blood cell. France's High Authority for Health decided to no longer allow the Moderna vaccine to be injected as a booster dose against Covid-19. Now only Pfizer is used for boosters in those that are eligible. Sweden and Finland had already suspended use of Moderna for those under 30 due to potential heart risks. And Denmark and Norway formally advised against it for people under 18. Iceland suspended it as a booster dose altogether. Japan is suddenly a big coronavirus success story. And if you ask them what they did, they'll tell you “we have no idea.” Daily cases have plummeted, bars are packed, trains are crowded, and Japan never came anywhere near a lockdown. Some speculate it's because of a late but fast vaccination campaign, bad weather in August that kept people home, or widespread masking, which was already embraced in that country even pre-pandemic. Thousands of California parents were expected to keep their kids home from school to protest a vaccine mandate. Some teachers were also planning on not showing up to classrooms. Nearly 40% of state employees remain unvaccinated. The question is, if we're going to get booster shots, why weren't the vaccine formulas revised to more closely target the Delta variant that's been the biggest problem? The answer: The FDA okayed Pfizer boosters of the original recipe last month because studies showed it works good enough against Delta and the doses could roll out immediately without manufacturing problems. In the United States cases were down 22%, deaths are down 19%, and hospitalizations are down 18% over 14 days. The 7-day average of new cases has been trending down since September 13. There are 9,675,650 active cases in the United States. With not all states reporting daily numbers, the five states with the greatest increase in hospitalizations per capita: Michigan 28%, Minnesota 22%. Montana 13%, Colorado 11%. And Pennsylvania and North Dakota 8%. The top 10 counties with the highest number of recent cases per capita according to The New York Times: Goshen, WY. Lake, MT. Stark, ND. Bethel Census Area, AK. Matanuska-Susitna Borough, AK. Kenai Peninsula Borough, AK. Nome Census Area, AK. Todd, MN. Hill, MT. And Hale, AL. There have been at least 724,502 deaths in the U.S. recorded as Covid-related. The top 3 vaccinating states by percentage of population that's been fully vaccinated: Vermont at 70.5%, and Connecticut and Rhode Island at 69.9%. The bottom 3 vaccinating states are West Virginia unchanged at 40.8%, Idaho at 42.9%, and Wyoming at 43%. The percentage of the U.S. that's been fully vaccinated is 57%. Only one country had a 24-hour increase in the number of fully vaccinated people: Oceana up 2%. Globally, cases were down 11% and deaths were down 15% over 14 days, with the 7-day average trending down since August 26. There are 17,863,141 active cases around the world. The five countries with the most new cases: The U.K. 45,140. Russia 34,303. Turkey 24,114. The United States 17,947. And India 14,289. There have been at least 4,901,756 deaths reported as Covid-related worldwide. For the latest updates, subscribe for free to Coronavirus 411 on your podcast app or ask your smart speaker to play the Coronavirus 411 podcast. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Radio Sweden på lätt svenska
Måndag 18 oktober 2021

Radio Sweden på lätt svenska

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 8:30


Sveriges utrikesminister, Ann Linde besöker Israel idag. Miljöpartiet vill göra mer för klimatet. SM-guld till Rosengård. Reportrar Jenny Pejler och Jenny Hallberg

Radio Sweden
Uppsala loses court battle with military, Estonia dive footage released, Rosengård wins women's football league

Radio Sweden

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 2:09


Radio Sweden brings you a round-up of the main news in Sweden on October 18th 2021. You can hear more reports on our homepage www.radiosweden.se, or in our app Sveriges Radio Play. Presenter: Frank Radosevich Producer: Kris Boswell

Classics For Kids
Edvard Grieg 3: Other Scandinavian Composers

Classics For Kids

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 6:00


Music by composers from the three official Scandinavian countries -- Norway, Denmark and Sweden -- and a couple of unofficial ones -- Finland and Iceland!

Film Reviews
Mixing It Up With the Master

Film Reviews

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 3:20


A filmmaking couple in Mia Hansen-Løve's wonderful "Bergman Island" spend a summer residency on the island off the coast of Sweden where Ingmar Bergman lived and made some of his most cherished films.

Get Fit with Jodelle
EMF, EHS, The Science behind Cell Phone Danger

Get Fit with Jodelle

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 72:30


PROF Olle Johansson is here with again for a third podcast, so thrilled Olle Johansson, who I have now coined my Swedish father, because my maiden name used to be the same as his, and I really look up to him for his research on something I am extremely passionate in, which we will be jumping into in just a moment but for those of you who don't know much about Prof Johansson, I highly recommend listening to the two previous podcasts we did which will blow you HAIR BACK, due to the knowledge he brings on the dangers of the internet of things, 5G, the coming 6G, 7G and more. Olle Johansson is a professor, and head of Experimental dermatology in the department of Neuroscience at the prestigious Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden. Olle is a world-leading authority in the field of EMF radiation and health effects. He has published more than 500 original articles, reviews, book chapters and conference reports within the field of basic and applied neuroscience and is more recently researching something I am so interested to talk with him today on which is electro hyper sensitivity (EHS) is an officially fully recognized functional impairment. We discuss: Smartphones and weight gain How EMF affects your gut bacteria!!!! New Research! Smartphones, EMF and sleep health Smartphones and cancer Smartphones and children's health Internet of things and health implications What's happened to the bees Dangers of too much time on social media And much more! PROF Olle Johansson is doing some incredible work and would greatly benefit from our help. Please consider donating to his fundamental work here: https://honeywire.org/research (Always remember that no gift is too small, and Dr. Johansson's work needs this economic support so he would be able to continue quality research work regarding the adverse health and biological effects of artificial electromagnetic fields from cell phones, satellites, smart meters, WiFi, baby alarms, powerlines, and many more installations.) Resources mentioned: Johansson O, "To bee, or not to bee, that is the five “G” question", Newsvoice.se 28/5, 2019 https://newsvoice.se/2019/05/5g-question-olle-johansson/ But perhaps you also can use some of these, with their web links? Johansson O, "Bacteria, mobile phones & WiFi - a deadly combination?", Nya Dagbladet 31/5, 2017 https://nyadagbladet.se/debatt/bacteria-mobile-phones-wifi-deadly-combination/ Johansson O, "Associate professor: Wireless radiation – the biggest full-scale biomedical experiment ever done on Earth", Newsvoice.se 5/8, 2018 https://newsvoice.se/2018/08/wireless-radiation-biomedical-experiment/ Johansson O, “Is the ‘electrosmog' finally clearing?”, Newsvoice.se 4/2, 2019 https://newsvoice.se/2019/02/electrosmog-clearing/ Johansson O, Ferm R, " “Yes, Prime Minister” Stefan Löfven, but no! This is not good enough!",Newsvoice.se 3/5, 2020 https://newsvoice.se/2020/05/stefan-lofven-5g-microwave-radiation/ Santini R, Johansson O, "If 5G is not deemed safe in the USA, and nowhere in the rest of the world, by the insurance industry … why is it by the Danish government?", Newsvoice.se 8/7, 2020 https://newsvoice.se/2020/07/5g-not-safe-usa/ Johansson O, Rebel TK, McGavin B, "Global 5G protest warns of health and ecological costs", Newsvoice.se 5/9, 2020 https://newsvoice.se/2020/09/global-5g-protest-warns-of-health-and-ecological-costs/ Johansson O, "Fuck your telephone?", Newsvoice.se 17/3, 2021a https://newsvoice.se/2021/03/olle-johansson-fuck-your-telephone/ Johansson O, "Cars, humans, laws, artificial electromagnetic fields … but what about the future?”, Newsvoice.se 9/8, 2021b https://newsvoice.se/2021/08/associate-professor-olle-johansson-artificial-electromagnetic-fields-future/ Thank you to our show sponsors: Swanwick Sleep Blue-light Blocking glasses: https://www.bn10strk.com/GETFIT/ and use code: FITFOR10 MOS Shielding Equipment https://mosequipment.com/?ref=cGFWJ1 COUPON CODE: JODELLE FOR 5% OFF Microbe Formulas - Mimosa Pudica is the best supplement I have found to help eliminate gut pathogens and enhance your EMF-resisting gut bacteria https://bit.ly/3lqn3oH

ESC Insight: The Eurovision Song Contest Podcast
Eurovision Insight Podcast: Our Village Is Calling

ESC Insight: The Eurovision Song Contest Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 20:54


Sweden has some tickets for you, Albania may not be our first National Final, Turin Council signs off on the budget, and more, in the latest Insight News podcast. The post Eurovision Insight Podcast: Our Village Is Calling appeared first on ESC Insight - Home of the Unofficial Eurovision Song Contest Podcast.

Radio Sweden på lätt svenska
Fredag 15 oktober 2021

Radio Sweden på lätt svenska

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 6:53


Nytt farligt godis med droger har hittats i Sverige. Många barn vårdas på sjukhus med RS-viruset. 350 ton skräp från havet har samlats in till återvinning. Reportrar Jenny Pejler och Jenny Hallberg.

Radio Sweden
Linde to visit Israel, woman dies from injuries in Gothenburg blast, 15 year old charged in school stabbing

Radio Sweden

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 2:13


Radio Sweden brings you a round-up of the main news in Sweden on October 15th 2021. You can hear more reports on our homepage www.radiosweden.se, or in our app Sveriges Radio Play. Presenter: Frank Radosevich Producer: Kris Boswell

Stories From Women Who Walk
60 Seconds for Story Prompt Friday: Knowing Yourself Speaking Truth to Authority.

Stories From Women Who Walk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 2:11


Hello to you listening in Goeteborg, Sweden!Coming to you from Whidbey Island, Washington this is 60 Seconds for Story Prompt Friday with questions carefully chosen to help you collect stories in the oral tradition or spark your own writing. Either way, you'll say, "Thanks for the memories."Perhaps like me you've been surprised about when and how your personal knowing shows up.I remember a 6th grade grammar school homework assignment: write a story for English class. I did. Here's my story: “Once upon a time long ago and far away they all lived happily every after. The end.”Problem was my teacher didn't see it that way. “Miss Wyzga, you didn't understand the assignment.” And from out of my very deep knowing came this reply: “Yes. I did. You didn't understand my answer.”Needless to say I ended up where all the back-talking girls find themselves more often than not: in the principal's office. But something had shifted. I realized that they didn't know everything and, more importantly, I did know something -  about me!Story Prompt: When has your bold, daring, unexpected Self surprised you?  Write that story!Practical Tip: The magic of stories is also in the sharing. If you wish share your story with someone or something.   All that matters is you have a story.This is the place to thrive together. Come for the stories - stay for the magic. Speaking of magic, I hope you'll subscribe, follow, share a nice shout out on your social media or podcast channel of choice, including Android, and join us next time! You're invited to stop by the website and subscribe to stay current with Diane, her journeys, her guests, as well as creativity, imagination, walking, stories, camaraderie, and so much more: Quarter Moon Story ArtsProduction Team: Quarter Moon Story ArtsMusic: Mer's Waltz from Crossing the Waters by Steve Schuch & Night Heron MusicAll content and image © 2019 - Present: for credit & attribution Quarter Moon Story Arts 

Revolutionary Left Radio
Riding the Wave: Sweden's Integration into the Imperialist World System

Revolutionary Left Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 76:45


Torkil Lauesen returns to the show, this time to discuss his newest book "Riding the Wave: Sweden's Integration into the Imperialist World Order". Pushing back against the narrative that Nordic countries like Sweden are socialist paradises who don't engage in colonialism and imperialism like other western countries, Torkil dives deep into history to deconstruct this rather naive perspective and offer a historical materialist account of Sweden's actual place in the history of colonialism, capitalism, and imperialism.  Henry Hakamaki from Guerrilla History joins Breht for the interview as well!  Check out the book here: https://www.leftwingbooks.net/book/content/riding-wave-sweden Read more of Torkil's work here: https://anti-imperialist.net/author/lauesen/ Outro Music: "I'm the Echo" by DARKSIDE ----- Support Rev Left Radio: https://www.patreon.com/RevLeftRadio or make a one time donation: PayPal.me/revleft LEARN MORE ABOUT REV LEFT RADIO: www.revolutionaryleftradio.com

Death in The Garden
#22 Death with Dignity - An Update from Jake and Maren

Death in The Garden

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 58:07


On this episode of “Death in The Garden”, Jake and Maren break their two month hiatus with an update about the events of the past months during production of the film. We talk more about being robbed in Ecuador, the Ancestral Health Symposium that we attended in Los Angeles, the protest against the proposed lithium mine in Thacker Pass, the Our Land, Our Nature counter-congress to the IUCN World Conservation Congress in France, our time at Fjällbete in Sweden, and deeply personal encounters with death and grief that have punctuated the last month, which have informed the rest of our lives. Specific topics discussed in the show: Ancestral Health Symposium Website Lectures Protect Thacker Pass/Peehee Mu'huh Website Twitter Instagram Our Land, Our Nature Part 1 video Part 2 video Survival International Twitter and Instagram. Please rate, review, and subscribe if you enjoy the show. Thank you all for your patience, and thank you for being here. For more information about the project, check out our Instagram and website. Editing: Jake Marquez Intro music: Daniel Osterstock Outro music: “Death with Dignity” by Sufjan Stevens

Occupied Thoughts
The Malmö Forum -- Fighting Antisemitism or Policing Discourse on Israel?

Occupied Thoughts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 41:20


In this episode of Occupied Thoughts, FMEP's Lara Friedman speaks with Swedish political scientist Dr. Anders Persson about this week's International Forum on Holocaust Remembrance and Combating Antisemitism, held in Malmö, Sweden. They discuss what happened in Malmö and what this event means in the context of ongoing efforts to achieve the worldwide adoption and enforcement of the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance (IHRA) definition of antisemitism -- a definition that explicitly conflates criticism of Israel/Zionism with antisemitism. Follow Dr. Persson's work: http://dranderspersson.com; on Twitter at @82AndersPersson. Original music by Jalal Yaquoub.

In the Envelope: An Awards Podcast

Rebecca Ferguson has combined backgrounds in music, dance, short films, and soap operas in her native Sweden to become one of today's most versatile and compelling screen stars. From life advice (“Lay your own path and have other people follow you!”) to technical secrets (she gets into character by creating a silhouette), her “In the Envelope” interview has endless value for artists at any level. “It's a really, really difficult job and it takes a lot of time,” she says of an acting career. “The more you get to know yourself, the more grounded you can be in this world of scrutiny.” After dabbling in various performing arts, Rebecca earned a Golden Globe nod for playing Elizabeth Woodville in the BBC's “The White Queen,” which launched her into a screen career on both sides of the Atlantic. Tom Cruise cast her in the “Mission Impossible” films as Ilsa Faust, and then came “Despite the Falling Snow,” “Florence Foster Jenkins,” “The Girl on the Train,” “Life,” “The Greatest Showman,” the award-winning “Doctor Sleep,” and this year's “Reminiscence.” She now stars in Denis Villeneuve's big-screen adaptation of sci-fi epic “Dune,” from Warner Bros., as the powerful Lady Jessica. Rebecca will next appear in “Mission: Impossible 7” and produce and star on the AppleTV+ series “Wool.” As Backstage gears up for Screen Actors Guild Awards season, brush up on the best and buzziest films to come: https://bit.ly/3FIzHrn --- Backstage has been the #1 resource for actors and talent-seekers for 60 years. In the Envelope, Backstage's podcast, features intimate, in-depth conversations with today's most noteworthy film, television, and theater actors and creators. This is your guide to every aspect of acting, from voiceover and commercial work to casting directors, agents, and more. Full of both know-how and inspiration, In the Envelope airs weekly to cover everything from practical advice on navigating the industry, to how your favorite projects are made, to personal stories of success and failure alike. Join host Jack Smart, Awards Editor at Backstage, for this guide on how to live the creative life from those who are doing it every day: https://bit.ly/2OMryWQ Follow Backstage and In the Envelope on social media: - https://www.facebook.com/backstage - https://www.twitter.com/backstage - https://www.twitter.com/intheenvelope - https://www.instagram.com/backstagecast Looking to get cast? Subscribe here: www.backstage.com/subscribe Browse Backstage casting listings: https://bit.ly/3mth68e Check out our community-driven virtual programming, The Slate: https://bit.ly/2WDNXf0 Backstage stands in solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement: https://bit.ly/3cuMBt5 Special thanks to... - Host: Jack Smart - Producer: Jamie Muffett - Social media: Katie Minard - Design: Mark Stinson, Caitlin Watkins - Additional support: Christine McKenna-Tirella, Kasey Howe, Samantha Sherlock, Benjamin Lindsay, Oriella St. Louis

West Coast Cookbook & Speakeasy
West Coast Cookbook and Speakeasy - Metro Shrimp and Grits Thursdays 14 Oct 21

West Coast Cookbook & Speakeasy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 63:06


West Coast Cookbook & Speakeasy is Now Open! 8am-9am PT/ 11am-Noon ET for our especially special Daily Specials, Metro Shrimp & Grits Thursdays!Starting off in the Bistro Cafe, in their strategy to gut and replace current voting laws, Republicans will manufacture voter fraud where they have not found any.Then, on the rest of the menu, new FDA guidelines spell out lower sodium goals for the food industry; a district judge ruled Maine can bar religious exemptions to its healthcare worker vaccine mandates; and, the same people who have no problem with offshore oil rigs darkening the horizon, will complain Biden's offshore wind farms are an unrelenting eyesore.After the break, we move to the Chef's Table where the UN has begun vaccinating people in the eastern Congo against Ebola; and, a Holocaust forum in Sweden is looking at social media's role in the current steep rise in antisemitism.All that and more, on West Coast Cookbook & Speakeasy with Chef de Cuisine Justice Putnam.Bon Appétit!~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~“Everyone in this good city enjoys the full right to pursue his own inclinations in all reasonable and, unreasonable ways.” -- The Daily Picayune, New Orleans, March 5, 1851~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Show Notes & Links: https://www.dailykos.com/stories/2021/10/14/2057963/-West-Coast-Cookbook-Speakeasy-Daily-Special-Metro-Shrimp-Grits-Thursdays

Radio Sweden på lätt svenska
Torsdag 14 oktober

Radio Sweden på lätt svenska

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 6:57


Fullvaccinerade personer behöver inte testa sig för Covid-19. Stockholm har fler utsatta områden. Skidbacken öppnar extra tidigt i år. Reporter Odessa Fardipour

Radio Sweden
"Vulnerable area" list updated, fully vaccinated with symptoms exempted from testing guideline, wolfpack spotted in Skåne

Radio Sweden

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 2:28


Radio Sweden brings you a round-up of the main news in Sweden on October 14th 2021. You can hear more reports on our homepage www.radiosweden.se, or in our app Sveriges Radio Play. Presenter: Frank Radosevich Producer: Kris Boswell

Radio Sweden
Radio Sweden Weekly: Holocaust Forum on combating anti-Semitism

Radio Sweden

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 24:40


Sweden hosts a global forum on fighting the rise in anti-Semitism. We hear how social media is fuelling hatred against Jews. We hear from the author of a report on anti-Semitism in Malmö schools. And we speak to one man who talks about what it is like to grow up Jewish in the Swedish city that once open its arms to holocaust survivors but in recent times has become less welcoming. Dave Russell/Producer and presenter david.russell@sverigesradio.se

LARB Radio Hour
Dodie Bellamy's "Bee Reaved;" and Mia Hansen-Love's on Bergman Island

LARB Radio Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 46:44


Writer Dodie Bellamy joins Kate Wolf to speak about her latest collection, Bee Reaved. The book gathers nearly 20 essays Bellamy has written over the last few years, with a focus on the state of bereavement, examining not only the loss of her husband Kevin Killian, but the loss of other artists, physical objects, her own past lives, and radical social movements. As with all of Bellamy's work, the pieces in Bee Reaved foreground the viscera of the body and other aspects of the physical world, while also engaging with ghosts, fairy tales, the internet, spirituality and a deep sense of community. Then, in this week's second interview, Kate is joined by fillmaker Mia Hansen-Love to discuss her latest, and first English-language movie, Bergman Island, which follows a filmmaking couple during their residency on Fårö, the island in Sweden where Ingmar Bergman lived and shot many of his films. As the couple, Chris and Tony, work on their screenplays and tour the sites that inspired the great filmmaker, the line between real life and fiction becomes ever more ambiguous. Bergman Island opens in theaters October 15th and available for digital rental October 22nd.

Across The Pond
ATP Episode 67 - Chris Abbott

Across The Pond

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 76:16


Rögle General Manager Chris Abbott joins David for an interview. We also recap the past weeks action and update you on some player movement throughout the league.

Indagare Global Conversations
Marcus Samuelsson, Top Chef, Restaurateur: The Greatest Showman

Indagare Global Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 41:17


In the aftermath of the pandemic and its devastating impact on the restaurant industry, Melissa Biggs Bradley sits down with top chef Marcus Samuelsson and discusses everything from his brand-new Bahamas restaurant to the foods of his Swedish childhood—and nothing's off the table: his Ethiopian roots, home cooking, DEI, how a restaurant is like a circus and how food can foster community—and belonging. Plus, his favorite destination and cuisine for eating and inspiration and much more!

Low Tide Boyz
Team Run For Tacos

Low Tide Boyz

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 65:23


Welcome to episode ninety-three of the Löw Tide Böyz - A Swimrun Podcast!This week we have Stirling Miles and Lolo Armstrong, A.K.A., Team Run For Tacos, on the show. They share their inspiring Swimrun journey of training, traveling, and racing their first Swimrun at Ödyssey Swimrun Orcas Island a few weeks back. We loved chatting with them and their story will make you feel all warm and fuzzy inside!But first... Training UpdateÖdyssey Swimrun Austin is four weeks away. We're starting to pump up the volume on our training and did a 2 hour-plus Swimrun on Saturday to start dialing things in again.ShoutoutsThis week we're shouting out Lindsey Ludwick from Virginia. Thanks for being a fan of the show and for wearing your Tie-dye hoodie with pride. Hope to meet you in person at a race soon!Feats of EnduranceThis week's award goes to Robb Damman and his buddy Yanni for their 8 hour, 30.33 mile point to point Swimrun adventure in Durham County, North Carolina this past Saturday. They called the route “SCRAMP the Falls” and while we don't know what that means, it's still an impressive feat!Check out and join our Strava Club and join Swimrunners from around the world as they train for Swimruns and stuff.This Week in SwimrunAll the news that we could find on the internet contained herein.It's race week for ÖTILLÖ Cannes. Best of luck to everyone racing and remember to ignore the paparazzi. We'll be putting out Cannes memes all week so make sure to follow us on IG to witness the ridiculousness. If that wasn't enough, we will have some bonus race coverage thanks to our friends G Flo and Tobias from Team Max Mockermann who will be our “LTBz Correspondents in the Field” taking over our IG stories to share all the sights and sounds of Cannes. And it THAT wasn't enough, we will also be releasing a Cannes Race Recap episode in the next few weeks so stay tuned for that!This past weekend, Swimrun Cyprus held their annual race on the island. We loved seeing all the photos on IG and the event looked fantastic.Gravity Race hosted the 6th edition of their Annecy Swimrun over the weekend. According to their website, they had 700 athletes participating in their three distance formats. Can't blame the athletes for wanting to race because the Lac D'annecy is a pretty majestic location for a Swimrun.If you're looking for something to do on October 24, we recommend that you check out Swimrun Cote D'azur. We learned about this part of France from our friends Laurene and Irina, A.K.A., The Swimrun Mermaids, and they convinced us that it's an amazing location for a Swimrun. (I foresee planning a double Swimrun vacation in the South of France with ÖTILLÖ Cannes one weekend and this race the following.)Finally, it's never too early to start planning for 2022 and Bauer Swimrun recently opened registration for their May 1st event in ​​Småland, Sweden.That's it for this week. Be sure to tip us off if there's any news that you would like for us to share on the show.UpdatesProgramming alert: If you're racing or thinking about racing Swimrun NC in November, make sure to check out our course preview episode that will drop next week.Speaking about course previews, if you're racing Ödyssey Swimrun Austin (it's on the same day as Swimrun NC) make sure to check out our course preview episode to get you super stoked...and ready for race day. Team Run For TacosChatting with Stirling and Lolo about their Swimrun journey was so great! They shared their origin story and how one video changed the course of the endurance lives of two long-time best friends and got them to the start line of Ödyssey Swimrun Orcas Island. Their story is what Swimrun is all about and we can't wait to see them again at another race.You can follow the adventures of Team Run For Tacos on Instagram.That's it for this week's show. If you are enjoying the Löw Tide Böyz, be sure to subscribe to the show on your favorite podcast player and leave us a five-star review. You can find us on Apple Podcast, Spotify, Google Podcast, and on YouTube. You can also follow our meme page on Instagram. Email us at lowtideboyz@gmail.com with any feedback and/or suggestions. Finally, you can support our efforts on Patreon…if you feel so inclined.Thanks for listening and see you out there!-  Chip and Chris

LA Review of Books
Dodie Bellamy's "Bee Reaved;" and Mia Hansen-Love's on Bergman Island

LA Review of Books

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 46:43


Writer Dodie Bellamy joins Kate Wolf to speak about her latest collection, Bee Reaved. The book gathers nearly 20 essays Bellamy has written over the last few years, with a focus on the state of bereavement, examining not only the loss of her husband Kevin Killian, but the loss of other artists, physical objects, her own past lives, and radical social movements. As with all of Bellamy's work, the pieces in Bee Reaved foreground the viscera of the body and other aspects of the physical world, while also engaging with ghosts, fairy tales, the internet, spirituality and a deep sense of community. Then, in this week's second interview, Kate is joined by fillmaker Mia Hansen-Love to discuss her latest, and first English-language movie, Bergman Island, which follows a filmmaking couple during their residency on Fårö, the island in Sweden where Ingmar Bergman lived and shot many of his films. As the couple, Chris and Tony, work on their screenplays and tour the sites that inspired the great filmmaker, the line between real life and fiction becomes ever more ambiguous. Bergman Island opens in theaters October 15th and available for digital rental October 22nd.

Motiv8 - The Motivation and Inspiration Podcast
Jordan Peterson: Maximizing Your Potential | motivation

Motiv8 - The Motivation and Inspiration Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 8:49


Today's motivation is for those of us focusing on baby steps. Audio Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vIeFt88Hm8s&t=1818s More about Jordan: Dr. Jordan B. Peterson is a professor of psychology at the University of Toronto, a clinical psychologist, and the author of the bestsellers Beyond Order: 12 More Rules for Life & 12 Rules for Life: An Antidote to Chaos, #1 for nonfiction in 2018 in the US, Canada, the UK, Australia, New Zealand, Sweden, the Netherlands, Brazil and Norway, and slated for translation into 50 languages. Quote of the Day: “If you fulfill your obligations every day you don't need to worry about the future.” - Jordan Peterson Review Us on Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/motiv8-the-motivation-and-inspiration-podcast/id1505213616 Join me on Discord: https://discord.gg/YwuaacY9 --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/motiv8/support

Women's Waves - A podcast by Vancouver Rape Relief
Pornography Harms Women - Part 1

Women's Waves - A podcast by Vancouver Rape Relief

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 37:00


Part 1 of our two part series called "Pornography Harms Women" Working on the frontlines has informed us on how women are impacted by pornography. Our collective member Sophia Hladik shares Vancouver Rape Relief's demands with regards to MindGeek, and revenge porn, before her interview with Megan Donavan from the Sweden based organization Talita, who supports women exiting the porn industry. Women's Waves is produced in Vancouver, Canada, by Vancouver Rape Relief and Women's Shelter.

William & Lonsdale: Lives in the Law

This week we return to our conversation with Peter Norden AO. Peter was the Chaplain at Pentridge Prison for over 10 years. He has studied and visited prison systems in the US, UK, Holland & Sweden and advocated for people within the justice system for many years, via many avenues. As you can imagine Peter has a unique perspective and has had a thoroughly fascinating Life in the Law. www.greenslist.com.au/podcast

Shoot the Defence
Gate 7 International Podcast: Sweden 2 Greece 0 | Postmatch | Project Qatar: Failed | World Cup Qualifier

Shoot the Defence

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 56:14


EPISODE 126: Ari, Costa & Kosta get together for postmatch following the defeat of the Ethniki to Sweden. What next for the Ethniki? Join the conversation. #greece #sweden #greswe #hellas #greekfootball #wcq #wcq2022 #wcqualifiers #worldcupqualifiers #sverige #olympiacos #olympiakos  FOR MORE FOLLOW US: @Gate7Intl on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, and Reddit HIT SUBSCRIBE!!! LIKE AND COMMENT!! CHECK OUT OUR WEBSITE: www.gate7intl.com WATCH THE SHOW / LISTEN TO THE PODCAST: linktr.ee/Gate7InternationalPodcast SHOW LESS

Radio Sweden på lätt svenska
Onsdag 13 oktober 2021

Radio Sweden på lätt svenska

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 8:08


Statsministern lovar att judar i Sverige ska få mer trygghet. Dyrare diesel kan göra att maten också blir dyrare. Svensk 20-seger mot Grekland i VM-kvalet. Reporter Jenny Pejler.

Radio Sweden
Conference for Holocaust rememberance held in Malmö, Swedish FA files racism complaint, Sweden Democrats energy tax proposal

Radio Sweden

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 2:28


Radio Sweden brings you a round-up of the main news in Sweden on October 13th 2021. You can hear more reports on our homepage www.radiosweden.se, or in our app Sveriges Radio Play. Presenter: Odessa Fardipour Producer: Kris Boswell

Mises Media
Without Lockdowns, Sweden Had Fewer Excess Deaths Than Most of Europe

Mises Media

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021


Although the experts assured us Sweden would experience a disaster and a bloodbath without covid lockdowns, the Nordic nation has fared better than Europe on excess deaths. Original Article: "Without Lockdowns, Sweden Had Fewer Excess Deaths Than Most of Europe" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by Michael Stack.

Audio Mises Wire
Without Lockdowns, Sweden Had Fewer Excess Deaths Than Most of Europe

Audio Mises Wire

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021


Although the experts assured us Sweden would experience a disaster and a bloodbath without covid lockdowns, the Nordic nation has fared better than Europe on excess deaths. Original Article: "Without Lockdowns, Sweden Had Fewer Excess Deaths Than Most of Europe" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by Michael Stack.

The Atlas Obscura Podcast
Disgusting Food Museum

The Atlas Obscura Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 13:46


In honor of the release of our new book, we bring you another Gastro Obscura Classic: Open your minds and steel your stomachs as we go to a food museum in Sweden that challenges what exactly makes something delicious… or disgusting. Gastro Obscura: A Food Adventurer's Guide is a whirlwind tour of the world's edible wonders. Order your copy today!  Read more in the Atlas:https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/disgusting-food-museum See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Gate 7 International Podcast
Episode 126: Project Qatar: Failed | Sweden 2-0 Greece Postgame

Gate 7 International Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 54:44


Ari, Costa & Kosta get together for postmatch following the defeat of the Ethniki to Sweden. What next for the Ethniki? Join the conversation. FOR MORE FOLLOW US: @Gate7Intl on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, and Reddit HIT SUBSCRIBE!!! LIKE AND COMMENT!! CHECK OUT OUR WEBSITE: www.gate7intl.com

Radio Sweden på lätt svenska
Tisdag 12 oktober

Radio Sweden på lätt svenska

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 7:22


Något färre är arbetslösa länge. Färre personer säger att de utsatts för brott under pandemin. Musikhjälpen samlar in pengar för att barn inte ska behöva arbeta. Reporter Odessa Fardipour

Radio Sweden
EU sets Baltic fishing quotas, Sweden Democrat advisor linked to racist group, appeals court upholds life sentence for Vetlanda attacker

Radio Sweden

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 2:01


Radio Sweden brings you a round-up of the main news in Sweden on October 12th 2021. You can hear more reports on our homepage www.radiosweden.se, or in our app Sveriges Radio Play. Reporter: Frank Radosevich Producer: Kris Boswell

Apollos Watered
Deep Conversation w/Philip Jenkins: Is Secularization Killing Faith?

Apollos Watered

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 76:27


Travis has a conversation with well-known social critic Philip Jenkins. Jenkins is an award-winning author and scholar. Travis & Philip discuss Dr. Jenkins's book, Fertility and Faith, and how secularization may be affecting the institutional practice of religion around the world. Dr. Philip Jenkins has a doctorate from Cambridge in history, taught at Penn State University and at Baylor University's Institute for Studies of Religion. He is a well-known commentator on religion, past and present, having written about 30 books including The Next Christendom, The New Faces of Christianity: Believing the Bible in the Global South and God's Continent: Christianity, Islam and Europe's Religious Crisis, The Lost History of Christianity, Jesus Wars, just to name a few. He has published articles and op-ed pieces in several media outlets across the U.S. and Europe, including the Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, Boston Globe, New Republic, Foreign Policy, First Things, and Christian Century. The Economist has called him “one of America's best scholars of religion.” He has been interviewed on a number of television and radio shows, including CNN documentaries and news specials covering a variety of topics, such as global Christianity, sexual abuse crisis in the Catholic Church, as well as serial murder and aspects of violent crime. Jenkins is much heard on talk radio, including multiple appearances on NPR's All Things Considered, and on various BBC and RTE programs. In North America, he has been a guest on widely syndicated radio programs such as NPR's Fresh Air, as well as the nationally broadcast Canadian shows Tapestry and Ideas. His influence goes beyond North America to newspapers and radio stations in the United Kingdom, Ireland, Canada, Australia, Denmark, Sweden, the Netherlands, and Brazil. Now, in the highlight of his life ;-), he is on Apollos Watered! Travis & Phil discuss tacos, sushi, the 80's movie Matewan, and the possible correlation between secularization, religious institutions, birth rates, and gender roles in society. It's not just a European thing, but a global thing. It's truly a deep and heady conversation that helps us wrestle with our world and our place in it. You can get Fertility and Faith https://www.amazon.com/Fertility-Faith-Demographic-Revolution-Transformation/dp/148131131X/ref=sr_1_7?dchild=1&keywords=Philip+Jenkins&qid=1634080618&sr=8-7 (here)

No Sharding - The Solana Podcast
Packy McCormick - Founder of Not Boring Ep #49

No Sharding - The Solana Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 44:03


Anatoly (00:09):Hey, folks. This is Anatoly and you're listening to The Solana Podcast, and today, I have with me, Packy McCormick, author of Not Boring. Hey, man. Good to have you.Packy McCormick (17:27):Good to be here. Thanks for having me on.Anatoly (00:21):So, You're an author and you're also an investor. How did you get into crypto?Packy McCormick (00:26):Yeah. So, I got into crypto back in 2013. I read Fred Wilson's blog post on investing in Coinbase, bought a bunch of Bitcoin, I think 38 Bitcoin, and then I went on a trip to Oktoberfest, and I felt bad about it, I had just quit my job, so I was like, "You know what, instead of spending money when I'm unemployed, let me just sell this stupid Bitcoin and I will pay for the trip."So, because of that, because of the pain of selling then, I avoided it until earlier this year, later last year, and really, really got back into it as I was talking to a couple companies that I was thinking about investing in and thinking about the intersection of crypto and the metaverse and how an open economy just fits so much better with that vision, since then, I've just gotten deeper, and deeper, and deeper down the rabbit hole.Anatoly (01:18):So, you held Bitcoin because you can sell it? That's just too big of a pain in the ass.Packy McCormick (01:24):I felt so bad about selling it and missing out. I think at the peak, it was like a two million dollar plus mistake, and so I was like, "You know what? I'm out of this for a little while."Anatoly (01:34):That's funny. What do you guys invest in?Packy McCormick (01:39):Yeah. So, I run a small 10 million dollar fund called Not Boring Capital, and we really invest across stages, across geographies, across verticals. For the first, I'd say, half of the fund, it was really traditional investments, I'd say for the second five million in the fund, it's been pushing up against the 20% non qualifying limit. I'm actually investing in my first Solana based project this week, which is yet to be announced, so can't talk about it, but something in the real estate space and something I'm super excited about. But doing as much crypto as I can in there, but I still think some use cases are perfectly well suited to crypto and some are really not. There's plenty of things in Web 2.0 that I'm super excited about as well, so really trying to balance investing across both.Anatoly (02:27):So, by traditional businesses, you mean like software internet based ones?Packy McCormick (02:32):Exactly.Anatoly (02:33):Cool. I mean, I've been in crypto for like the last... I can't remember... it feels like a decade, and I can't imagine what the world is like. So, what are people building?Packy McCormick (02:48):It's a good question. So, today, I talked to a company, for example, that is making it a lot easier for a restaurant to order the food that they need. So, right now, if you're a restaurant and you're ordering food, you're getting a bunch of PDFs from suppliers every week that aren't even searchable, and then you're going through the 6,000 items on there and picking something. So, there are still a bunch of these huge unsexy categories that are completely ripe.There's some security stuff that bridges into crypto, but there's one, again, stealth right now, but is also dealing with some Solana projects on the security side that I'm really, really excited in, but they're also securing Web 2.0 projects. There's some FinTech stuff I wrote about a company called Uni, yesterday. There's definitely a little bit of mental gymnastics that I have to do to be super bullish on FinTech and super bullish on crypto, but I really think adoption cycles are going to be super long and there are some really huge opportunities on that side too. I think everybody is trying to make the existing system that doesn't work, make it work better for people, and so I'm all for things, on either the Web 2.0 Side or in crypto, that make finance better for people.Anatoly (04:01):The mental gymnastics are curious about. I always thought that crypto is just part of this general story of software eating the world. Is that your take on it too?Packy McCormick (04:12):Totally. I mean, I wrote about Solana and I wrote this in the piece, but then I'm a maximalist-minimalist, and that's cross chain, but that's also I don't think crypto is going to eat everything yet or maybe ever. Just like on the internet, Web 3.0 is really about the dynamic interfaces where you could interact with each other. While there are companies like Facebook and Twitter and all of this social media companies that were more interactive, there were a ton of huge companies built during the Web 2.0 Era that weren't social media, that weren't real-time interactive at all, and I think the same thing will play out. I think you need to pick the best stack for whatever you're building at the time. And so I think we'll see a world where a lot of stuff moves to Web 3.0, And hopefully, even things that don't incorporate crypto become a little bit more liquid, a little bit more decentralized, a little bit better for people, but I don't think that crypto is the answer to every problem that the world has.Anatoly (05:05):So, when you look at a company that is building out the basic, "Let's convert PDFs to a searchable interface," that feels like something that should have happened 10 years ago, right, in your mind, at least?Packy McCormick (05:23):Totally. I mean, I think there have been attempts in that space actually, and some of them haven't worked. There have been different approaches. People have tried to do marketplaces and different things like that. I think what changed in that particular case is that over the past year, one, restaurants are super cognizant of cutting costs and getting profitability to the best possible spot, and so they're more willing to try new things. These people are taking an interesting approach without actually changing the interface that the restaurants interact with at all, they're just making everything behind it more powerful. So, things have been tried... there's people that are trying new approaches every day. I mean, I'd say 80%, because that is the literal max that I'm allowed to do is 20% crypto out of my fund, so 80% of my investments are non-crypto, and there's a bunch of stuff that's growing fast and is really exciting.I think the other interesting thing is that there are a bunch of companies that aren't going fully decentralized but are incorporating maybe a DAO in one aspect, where they have members who might be running something and want to vote on what that thing is coming up, or will incorporate NFTs in a particular part of the business where it makes sense. So, I think we'll see that blur a little bit more, but even within companies, they'll be doing some Web 2.0 Stuff and some Web 3.0 Stuff.Anatoly (06:32):So, I guess, in a way, you're bullish on non-crypto on the rest of the world as an investor?Packy McCormick (06:41):Yeah, my worldview is bullish tech and innovation, and I think if you're talking on the... I have a medical device company in the portfolio and a machine learning company that helps make sense of medical documents, and all that kind of stuff, I don't see a need yet for crypto, and maybe there's better decentralized storage of that information in the future, so it's not a centralized entity. And so over time, I think more, and more, and more of it will potentially become decentralized as the tools catch up, but for right now, that's just stuff that needs to improve.There's a company called NexHealth that I invested in that has really complex long term plan to first, sell SAAS into doctor's offices, use that to connect the EHRs, use that to build out APIs, use that to build out a platform, to ultimately try to make it easier for people to just hack on medical products, because right now it's such a pain in the ass to do anything in the medical space. I am super bullish on that kind of innovation because if you ask me what doctor I went to two years ago, I'd have no idea, if you asked me what my stats were, I'd have no idea. So, anybody fixing any of those kinds of things, I'm super bullish on.Anatoly (07:52):Man, I mean, the internet is basically 30 years old, right, at this point, and it's wild to think that we're still connecting just data...Packy McCormick (08:00):Totally.Anatoly (08:02):... data to format.Packy McCormick (08:03):It's why I'm going to be bullish on all of this. The internet is still early in terms of penetration, and then crypto is a tiny, tiny, tiny percentage of that, so there's just a lot of room for all of this to run.Anatoly (08:13):It feels then like everything is happening at the same time, we're still onboarding the world to the internet or now, part of the internet is being on boarded to crypto. Is that something that you first saw? What do you think about that?Packy McCormick (08:29):Yeah. I mean, I think most of the world... I think well over 50% nowadays is internet connected. I think it's just more and more things that were not internet connected are being tackled. I think a lot of the big obvious opportunities get taken and then people realize like, "Oh, shoot." I think I've seen, in the past week, a couple of companies that are making it easier for truckers to pay for gas and track those expenses. There's just all these big things that touch the physical world, where primitives needed to be built first, you needed banking as a service type things to make it really easy for companies to issue cards, to build it for specific use cases, so I think it's all just a matter of what primitives have been built and then what you can do on top of that. That's one of the reasons I'm so excited about crypto is because you and other folks in the space are building such interesting things for other people to build on top of.Anatoly (09:15):Since you have, I think, a more maybe practical or realistic view, since you're dealing with non-crypto projects that are trying to get revenue, right? That's generally the pitch to an investor.Packy McCormick (09:33):Yes. Over a long enough time horizon, some of them need to get revenue.Anatoly (09:36):What do you see in crypto itself as promising to use crypto in a way that actually increases revenue for that business? What are those things?Packy McCormick (09:48):Yeah. I don't know. One of the fun things about exploring both sides is that I really try, when I look at any crypto project, to understand what business physics laws it's enhancing. Businesses are businesses because people buy things the same way all over the place or people like to make money. People are the same, and I think all of this comes down to people, obviously. Solana comes down to how many developers build on top of it and how many people use that. And so obviously, I think one of the big important things is the ability to build network effects by giving people ownership. And I think the idea of using ownership in crypto to even have negative customer acquisition costs, to be able to essentially make the price of something negative to be able to get adoption, to use crypto tools for retention and network effects I think is one of the big things that excites me.I think it's also just moving way, way, way faster. I mean, look at Ethereum and Solana, right? Ethereum, strong network effects, people building on top of it, and then Solana comes in and looks like the same chart but faster. And so you can get these network effects, but then somebody else will come in with network effects that are even faster, and I think it's going to be interesting to see how those types of things play out.Anatoly (11:05):Negative acquisition cost is a really interesting topic because that's basically yield farming, right, like DeFi? The foundation of DeFi, how I get users is, a lot of these projects give away their coin. Do you think those patterns is something that you're going to start seeing in traditional businesses, like AMC popcorn, if you buy AMC stock is some form of liquidity mining, right?Packy McCormick (11:39):I think the challenging part, right, is that people want either money pretty immediately or they want ownership in something, and it's really hard for Web 2.0 Companies to give away ownership, there's a ton of paperwork involved. There are platforms that are trying to make that a little bit easier, but it's still really hard for them to give away ownership the way that, if you're a DeFi protocol, you can give away your token to attract users in the beginning.So, maybe there will be some things that Web 2.0 Companies steal and bring over from crypto, but I do think that's one of the uniquely beautiful things about it, is that it's this... I mean, we'll see. It's still so early, right? But that it's this beautiful thing where because you're early, you're able to earn more, and then because you were there, you actually support the network and make the network more secure and all that. So, there's actual justification for it, but it's just that shift in who gets the ownership of things, which I think is kind of beautiful.Anatoly (12:35):Do you think that the Web 2.0 properties, or like Facebook, Twitter, that those are at risk for being disintermediated by crypto?Packy McCormick (12:44):Yes. On a long enough time horizon, absolutely. I don't know what it looks like, and I think the early attempts to do it have been a bit skeuomorphic, and that's one of the things that interest me here is that BitClout was, I guess, interesting, but it was Twitter with coins, and I don't think that the next social network will look like Twitter with coins, I think it will look like something that is maybe wallet first, or maybe in the 3D world, or something that looks different but then achieves a very similar end. And so I think, yes, 100% they're at risk, but I don't think that they're at risk from something that looks like a clone but adds a token.Anatoly (13:23):Man, I love that word, skeuomorphic, because that's how I started thinking about it as I'm talking to a bunch of projects that are trying to shove crypto into what is a Web 2.0 thing, a Web 2.0 product. Do you as an investor see that as a red flag or like, "Okay, maybe this might work and you should try it, but clearly, you're going to have to iterate away from it"?Packy McCormick (13:46):I think it comes down to what you're trying to do. I talked to an investor who is way smarter than I am about this the other day, and she was like, "You know what, actually for me, because I invested in the series A and beyond, if one of my portfolio companies came to me and said that they're going to incorporate crypto at this point, that would be a red flag because that means that they don't have product-market fit and they're trying to figure out how to get product-market fit by doing something else shiny." There are other projects, like there was something that I was talking to her that was totally Web 2.0 Based but that asked people for feedback, they were having challenges with retention, they were asking users to submit information, they were thinking about how to reward them, and for something like that, particularly when it's so early, I do think that adding crypto into the project makes a ton of sense.If you're trying to incentivize contribution and improve retention, crypto is an amazing tool for that for the right type of community. So, I really think it depends on what type of product it is, and some things I think skeuomorphic might work in some cases where you're ripping out an internal reward point and replacing it with crypto, I think that can make sense, but when you're trying to just shove money into something to see if you can attract more users, that's when I feel like there's a bit of a problem.Anatoly (14:59):So, Reddit Coins, do you think that's going to work?Packy McCormick (15:02):I mean, they're at least early and I feel like they're such an interesting community of people, and the idea of karma has existed in Reddit for a while, so maybe making that a little bit more fungible and exchangeable is interesting. I mean, there's a bunch of behavioral economics on the idea that if you just pay people for stuff, you actually fuck up incentives in a bunch of different ways that are hard to predict, so it could be tough. When you actually assign a dollar value to something, you make people think about it in terms of the dollar value, and they're like, "Wait, I just spent a day moderating the subreddit for $1? Are you kidding me?" So, I think you need to get that part right, right? Where you can give them a million karma points and it doesn't matter, but then it becomes $1 then there's an issue? So, I think people need to be wary of that, but certainly where there are internal scoreboards, giving people a way to actually monetize that I think is interesting.Anatoly (15:56):Have you looked into play-to-earn stuff?Packy McCormick (16:00):Yeah.Anatoly (20:39):Okay.Packy McCormick (16 :02):I wrote a piece on Axie. I think it's so fascinating.Anatoly (16:05):I'm terrified of a world where everything we do is like, "You got to do this to get your 20 extra cents on your dollar." Right? It just sounds like a nightmare.Packy McCormick (16:15):I know. I mean, I am of the mind that dystopia is probably overstated because people have to opt in at every gate, and so I've had conversations with people where they're like, "Isn't it wild that we'd be spending time in the metaverse? Isn't that dystopian?" And then you think about how we spend a lot of our time right now, we're in a two dimensional screen. Wouldn't it be more fun if there was an immersive environment that we were interacting with here, and would we just continue to choose to do the 2D version until the 3D version got realistic and fun enough that we made the shift? And so there's going to be those gates at all times where people can opt in or not.A lot of the people playing Axie right now are in the Philippines, were unemployed, thanks in large part due to COVID, and so their options were, "Don't do this and figure out some other way to make money or start playing this game, that you might be playing anyway, and actually make money while doing it." So, that's an incredible option that people have, but you also don't see a ton of people in the West flocking to Axie to make a couple of bucks because the trade-off doesn't make sense for them. And so I think the trade-offs have to make sense for people but everybody has agency, to some extent, and will opt in to the things that make sense for them.Anatoly (17:29):When I played Ultima Online, I bought digital items in that game on eBay with a cashier's check. So, I get this idea that you can get really into a game.Packy McCormick (17:41):Totally. And then you stop playing Ultima Online and that money is just wasted, right? And so the idea that you could easily transfer that item to the next generation or person that wants to go all in on the game is nice, it means that you're accumulating something while you play. I think, over time, those experiences will fade more and more into the background and it will feel less like play-to-earn and will probably just be play-and-earn, but there's going to be a transition period where you have to just be bold about it and the play-to-earn piece has to be front and center, but I don't know.We can go to deep down the philosophical rabbit hole on all of this, but there is a point at which, at some point in the future... and I know this is debatable... but at some point in the future, we're not going to have to actually work to eat, to shelter ourselves, to have clothes, all of that, and so what do you do that provides meaning, right? I don't think we're going to evolve into a world where we feel comfortable not having to work for anything, and so people will find new ways to make meaning.Anatoly (18:47):We're going to be NPCs in each other's games.Packy McCormick (18:51):Seriously.Anatoly (18:53):How much do you pay attention to the regulatory side of it? Do you think World of Warcraft is going to have to file W-2s?Packy McCormick (19:06):Man, I do not envy the IRS or the SEC trying to keep up with... I do this all day, every day. I'm fascinated by it and I can't keep up with everything. There's going to, obviously, need to be a total paradigm shift in the way that this stuff is tracked and managed, even taxes. I am going to figure out, at the end of the year, whatever the best tax software that I should use to make sense of everything that I've done all across Web 3.0 This year, but if I didn't, the chances that somebody sitting in the IRS for my small potatoes amount of money is actually going to be able to go and figure out what I did is minuscule. So, I don't know how they're going to do it, but there needs to be a common sense way that doesn't end up in just this constant clash.Anatoly (19:54):Yeah. All my Degen Ape trades.Packy McCormick (24:36):Seriously. I mean, there's a thread that went viral on Twitter a couple weeks ago that was someone being like, "Hey, by the way, did you know essentially that when you buy an NFT, you're also selling your coins at a game and you're going to have to pay taxes on that?" There's going to be a lot of people who get hit pretty hard at the end of the year.Anatoly (20:15):Yeah. I'm curious how that's going to play out. That's wild. I mean, like one of the investments should be like, "Here's tax software for all your crypto shit." That seems obvious one.Packy McCormick (20:28):Yeah, there are a few people working on that. I mean, the other one that I really want to see... I had mentioned this 20% limit. So, if you're not an RAA, if you're not a registered investment advisor and you manage over X dollars, you can only buy 20% non qualifying, and crypto is included in that. I really want to see someone build RAA in a box, and RAA means that you need a chief compliance officer and you need all this stuff. And so somebody who makes that easier to do and easier to set up crypto funds I think is going to make a killing as well.Anatoly (20:58):I mean, that seems like something that the smart contracts should be doing, right? If you're investing purely... Most of that compliance is just transparency, right? It's like, "Am I doing the thing that I said I was going to do?"Packy McCormick (21:10):Totally. But some of it is, "Is there a person here looking over what I'm doing?" The rules are written for a world in which it makes sense for a person to look over something instead of computers talking to each other. So, there's going to be a transition period there, but over time, yes, it makes a lot more sense as a smart contract, and I'm interested to see.Are you familiar with Syndicate protocol?Anatoly (21:33):I'm not.Packy McCormick (21:34):So, Syndicate protocol is I think mostly on Ethereum at this point, but it makes it easy to set up investment clubs, SPVs, a bunch of other things, and so brings a lot of the group investing activities on chain. Is there anything similar on the Solana side?Anatoly (21:50):I don't know yet. The network exploded in terms of people building on it to the point that I can't track.Packy McCormick (21:57):That's awesome. That's a milestone.Anatoly (22:00):Yeah, that's a milestone. It's just like, "Pooh," so now I'm like, "Okay, go back into the weeds, back into optimizations."Packy McCormick (22:08):Yeah. Sorry to turn the mic on you, but I'm very curious. How do you balance your time right now?Anatoly (22:14):Poorly, I would say. I think there was an effort to get the word out to as many developers out there that this is how you build stuff and these are the reference implementations, and now that that's moving on its own, I almost feel like me putting energy there is going to have such a small amount of gain. So, I think of it in value against replacement terms, which is a very dumb engineer perspective, or maybe that's a pretty good one. I don't know.Packy McCormick (22:48):No. I mean, if you can view yourself from a remove like that. I mean, that's the goal of running a company or an organization or a protocol is, "How can I replace myself in as many different spots as possible?" But are you in the Discords? Are you getting Degen on some of these projects and stuff?Anatoly (23:07):I used to be more Discord just telling devs, "This is where the doc started, this is how you unblock that compiler error or whatever." I was in there, and now there's enough people doing that, I'm like, "Okay, I'm useless here." So, in the early days of Metaplex, helping out people set up their Heroku servers or whatever, I spent a little bit of time doing that, but then all of a sudden, our engineers took off with it.I'm curious how you think about DAOs? Are these truly amorphous blobs where nobody knows anyone else and there's some voting mechanism that you trust, or as normal people actually that do this stuff, it feels to me that they are humans that are all know each other and they're coordinating with software?Packy McCormick (23:54):Yeah. There's been a meme going around, I feel like this week, again, on Twitter, where people have been talking about like, "Oh, it's impossible to get fired by a DAO. Why not just get hired by a DAO and then don't do anything because who's going to fire you?" I love the idea, and I love the fact that crypto makes it possible to organize and incentivize huge groups of people across the world and get them to work in the same direction, I also think there's going to be a ton of challenges.People are very used, for the past at least couple 100 years since the dawn of the corporation, people are very used to working in hierarchical structures where there's somebody making a decision. And so I think there will be a balance that gets struck in a lot of cases, like delegation I think will get more, and more, and more popular. And ideally, there's some projects being worked on that I'm excited about where people's on-chain contribution and activity and resume is almost tracked, and maybe you give more power to the people who've contributed the most and proven expertise in a certain area, and all of that. So, I think a lot of things need to be worked out there.I think that we're in the stage now, frankly, where a lot of DAOs will not do as well as a centralized thing would have done, but then some DAOs will just do this crazy emergent stuff that never would have been possible in a normal structure that was a little bit more hierarchical. So, I think we're in the, let 1,000 flowers bloom, phase of DAOs right now where emergence will produce some really interesting stuff, and then emergence will also produce some total failures, and we'll see where it all shakes out.Anatoly (25:25):Corporations have politics, right? There's definitely politics in large corpse, and I feel like small DAOs have politics, and that's typically not true of a startup.Packy McCormick (25:39):Yeah, I think that's true. Although it can happen faster to startup, but the interesting thing that happens at a startup is, if the CEO allows it to be political, it can get political really quickly. And so it's interesting, in the DAO structure, when you don't have a "CEO," that either the community ethos will be away from politics and you'll get shunned and banned or whatever for politicking, or there's no one to say, "Don't do that," in which case, it can get out of hand really quickly. So, if you have a bad CEO, it's probably better to be a DAO, and if you have a really good CEO, there are advantages to having somebody making the decisions.I'm also fascinated to see... and I don't know if you've seen anything on this side yet... but can a DAO build products that are as good as something with a little bit more centralized control? Like products are traditionally made by a visionary, and then a team, who has a clear roadmap and all of those types of things, and is it possible to do that in a more decentralized way?I mean, even Solana itself, one of the things that attracts me about the project, and again, not a decentralization maxi by any stretch of the imagination, is that you were involved, right? And when there were code errors, you were getting in there, you were telling people how to fix them and all of that. And I've talked to a bunch of people, since I read that piece, who were building things on Solana, who site that as one of the reasons that they like building on Solana, is that the team is there to help when there are errors and help direct them towards best practices. So, I don't know. I think something like that model is probably going to succeed.Anatoly (27:18):I can only get blamed myself.Packy McCormick (27:21):Exactly.Anatoly (27:23):At the end of the day, yeah. Balaji had this quote that I've used it a bunch of times, that decentralization is not the absence of leadership but it's the abundance of leadership, and I love it. I also feel like that because of Bitcoin and it's like history. People started assuming that disorganization also was required for decentralization, which I think is bullshit too.Packy McCormick (27:52):Yeah. How do you view DAO versus social token, or I guess more just governance versus upside sharing?Anatoly (27:59):I think tokens are social networks, almost first, and then anything else later, because any community, it's all contracts. All this open source software is reusable. I can take Uniswap, fork it, and then stick some random token on it, and it's as good as Uniswap. You cannot tell me that it's worse in any way, right? It's the same thing, right?Packy McCormick (28:27):Someone should do that.Anatoly (28:29):Yeah. And then that community takes it in a different product direction, right, for whatever reason. I think that really fast fail is probably the most important part of decentralization. Anybody can fork you and then just take it in a different direction and form a community around it.Packy McCormick (28:50):I agree. Which project was it that Justin Sun tried to take over and then everybody just stopped using it?Anatoly (28:50):Steem.Packy McCormick (28:55):Yeah.Anatoly (28:57):And that is, I think, part of the beauty of the space, right, is you can only be a benevolent dictator. As soon as you lose the benevolent part, they're like, "Well, everything's open. F off."Packy McCormick (29:12):It's amazing.Anatoly (29:13):Yeah. Did you follow the SUSHI saga?Packy McCormick (29:19):I didn't follow in real-time. I went back and looked at it after the fact, but I would not consider myself a SUSHI expert.Anatoly (29:26):Do you think that we're going to see these communities stick around for the long haul, like Uniswap, etc?Packy McCormick (29:33):I think that is the billion dollar, trillion dollar, whatever number you want to put on it, question. I mean, I was alluding to it before with these network effects being replaced by things that pick up network effects even faster and faster. I think that's the blessing and the curse that I was talking about. You could remove every single person working on Facebook except for the person who made sure that the servers were up, and people would keep using it for a long, long time. If the people disappeared from Sushiswap or Uniswap or wherever, it just fades away and they move on to the next thing, and that takes off. So, I think virality in crypto has been proven. You can get viral really, really quick. Defensibility over a very long time horizon I think is still TBD.Anatoly (30:19):Where does defensibility come from in Facebook, in your mind?Packy McCormick (30:24):In Facebook, Facebook has a clear network effects, one where I guess if the people on the network decided to stop using it, it would go away, but there's not a clear place that you would all go when you have... Maybe there's switching costs too because you have your whole network mapped, and they won't actually let it be portable. To your point, you can fork anything... you should be able to fork the relationship graph and all of that over time as people build new mechanics to make that happen, and when you can just bring your whole relationship graph with you across Web3, then maybe you just all go to the next place, or maybe there's not even a place, and it is just that your wallet, at some point, keeps track of all the connections that you have, so maybe the wallet is the central point where a lot of the value accrues and the thing that makes everything portable, but I'm not exactly sure. What do you think?Anatoly (31:22):When I first saw Facebook, I thought, "This is a shitty news group. I can run my own mail server and ask my friends." And then you realize that normal people don't want to run their own mail servers or news groups, but you centralize around convenience. Where things centralize around convenience in crypto has, for me, been really tough to pin down. NFTs especially are a really good example of people jumping from one set to another but still maintaining both, right? They're able to be in multiple places at the same time.Anatoly (36:44):I can be a Degen Ape and like a Monkey MBS member at the same time.Packy McCormick (32:12):Where do you think that ends up? Where do you think people end up centralizing, or do they not?Anatoly (32:18):I'm not sure. This is like, again, a trillion dollar question. I feel like if we get to, three, 400 million people self custody with wallets that are doing stuff, we'll start seeing those patterns of like, "Okay, this is like the Facebook, it's a social graph or the... I don't know... the super connected now," something.Packy McCormick (32:42):Yeah. I wrote about this a couple weeks ago, I wrote a piece called the Interface Phase, and it was a little bit like a high kid post where I was like, "What are the interfaces going to be?" But just the fact that the first internet needed Netscape and needed a graphical interface, Web 2.0 needed things like Digg and Facebook that were interactive for that kind of capability, the read-write interface to really be there, and I don't think Web3 has gotten there yet. I do think that either a wallet based thing, and I don't know what that looks like, and I'm not smart enough to figure out what that looks like, or the kind of metaverse. And I think it's such an interesting mistake of history or just a coincidence of history that the tech for the metaverse and Web 3.0 Are peaking at the same time, but a world in which...One of the things I think crypto does well is give physical-ish characteristics to digital things, and so I think a interface that makes that clear will have a lot of value in just making a lot of the stuff that feels a little more ethereal feel more real and tangible, and actually, there will be physical places that people meet up and all that.Anatoly (38:28):So, I think what's interesting about crypto is that it's more like Ultima Online. When I was playing the game, I got a mental model of the map and the ownership of those items because it was persistent. I would go to the thing and I would change something and then come back and it was still there, and your brain, I think, just rapidly just plugs it into the rest of the stuff that it interacts with. If you got a lot of humans all doing this together, I think they'll start forgetting that it's nothing more than a bunch of computers.Packy McCormick (34:23):Totally. I mean it's interesting. I forget the name of the book, but there's a book about the memory competitions and the world memory championships, and the way that they memorize things is by putting different objects throughout a house and then walking through that house, So, we are, I think, a lot better at memorizing things and grokking things spatially than we are... and maybe this is just me talking as a non technical person, but just picturing computer networks without some physical reference point.Anatoly (34:54):I don't have as good of a mental model of space crypto Twitter or like social networks. It's not a map to me in my mind. But with something like experiments like DeFi land and stuff, I think that actually might bridge that because of this ownership thing. And I don't still think it's the fact that I can modify stuff and come back and see it and feel that I'm doing it.Packy McCormick (35:20):Totally. Yeah, people like building, and showing progress, and all of that. I'm going to turn the mic again. How do you view Solana at this point in terms of DeFi versus the cultural side of things or the metaverse side of things?Anatoly (35:37):We don't. I think, to us, DeFi was always I thought was an important part because you look at any kind of markets, NASDAQ, those are the obvious ones, "Oh, yeah, that's probably going to be on some blockchain," but advertisement, right? It's like Google Search shows you a page, they take your data, sell it on an Ad Exchange, and that to market, that's centralized right now, how do you disintermediate it? Oh, you can do that with cryptography, right? And a replicated censorship resistant database. That's it.You can break those things down into marketplaces and remove the middleman. And that, I think, is how we think about it, is like, where does that make sense? And culture NFTs are I feel like that non skeuomorphic social networks. It's not somebody that stuck Twitter with coins, these organically sprung up, right? It's like lodges in the whatever, 1700s, like I'm part of this Masonic Lodge or this club or whatever, right? Now, I'm Degen Ape or whatever.Packy McCormick (36:57):Totally. And right now, I guess, that often manifests itself in Discord where people are hanging out. I've had this conversation with people before in this debate. Do you think there needs to be a decentralized Discord where this lives or where do you think all of this ends up living?Anatoly (37:12):I don't think so. Like a year ago, I thought somebody needs to build a decentralized Twitter, a decentralized Instant Messaging, and the working mechanics of it, being decentralized or on chain, don't change the social impact of it. You're still talking to people. Why does it matter where you talk to them, right? Who cares?Packy McCormick (37:34):Totally.Anatoly (37:37):It's like, I think, stuff where you can start making connected modifications of the same state, that mental model of like, "Hey, we're all doing this thing over here." That becomes a place and that's where people actually do things, but here's where they talk about it.Packy McCormick (37:56):Yeah. And I don't think you can find a more minimally extractive corporation than Discord, and they make less dollars per user than anybody.Anatoly (38:06):Yeah, they're pretty awesome. Also, yeah, the high fidelity audio and stuff like that I think is pretty cool. I think they built it for gamers.Packy McCormick (38:19):Yeah. It's so interesting, and I'm probably going to write about Discord at some point here too, but I've written something called The Great Online Game before, which is essentially we're all just playing this big video game across the internet. And so it's really funny that Discord, which was built for gamers, is where all of this activity is... If you're playing a big video game and the chat app designed for video games, it makes sense as the place that people go.Anatoly (38:43):Yeah. Crypto and the internet is... at least the internet part of crypto is very much a big video game.Packy McCormick (38:49):Exactly.Anatoly (38:50):Are you investing mostly in the US, US companies or all over the place?Packy McCormick (38:54):I'm investing mostly in the US but have done a few in India, I've done Sweden, I've done Canada, very open to doing anywhere on the world.Anatoly (39:06):Do you feel like there's been a shift towards everything becoming Silicon Valley, that it doesn't really matter anymore at this point?Packy McCormick (39:13):The internet is Silicon Valley. A more amorphous idea is Silicon Valley at this point, but I'm in New York, I'm probably 30 minutes away. I'm in Park Slope and the crypto hub has become Williamsburg, and I talk to all those people all the time, and I never take the 30 minute trip over to Williamsburg because I have Twitter, and I have Discord, and I'm pretty much right there with them. So, I don't think physical place matters nearly as much. Gathering in physical places is awesome. I think the idea of conferences, and quarterly team meetups, and all of that kind of stuff is absolutely going to explode. There's a really fun thing about only knowing somebody on the internet and then meeting them in person and feeling like you've known each other for a long time, but I don't think the physical place where you all live all the time matters that much.Anatoly (40:03):Yeah. I think what's weird is like I have a sneaking suspicion that the remote work worlds, everybody's working remote is actually going to mean more people travel and get together.Packy McCormick (40:17):And it's not just going to be like FaceTime and waiting around the office and sitting. When you're together, you're together, and then when you're working, you're heads down working, and I kind of like that.Anatoly (40:26):Do you think people are more efficient that way or is that the natural state?Packy McCormick (40:30):It depends how many Discords. Before this call, I was supposed to be writing and I've gotten obsessed with the Wanderers NFT projects, so I just bought another Wanderer and then was trying to figure out how to display it in my cyber gallery. So, I think there's not somebody looking over my shoulder, so in that sense, maybe it allows you to get a little bit more distracted. But I also think a lot of things coming together at the same time, more and more people are responsible for themselves, and so if I don't work now, then I'm working all weekend, and I have to get the same stuff done anyway. And so I do think that's, hopefully, the natural state of things, is that people are allowed to get their shit done when they want to.Anatoly (41:12):Are NFTs what you're looking at mostly in crypto? Is that the most exciting part?Packy McCormick (41:16):NFTs are, I think, very exciting to me. My first internship was on an energy trading desk. I should want to get into DeFi and I feel like I'm going to get wrecked unless I can spend all of my time getting into DeFi, so I've largely steered clear. I do think that NFTs are super interesting for the reasons that you suggested, and I think that they are a little bit like a social network. I think it's going to be really fascinating to see how these things evolve and the worlds that get built around them. And they're the most tangible crypto thing out there, right? You have an item. I like these Wanderers because there's audio, and they're these eight second clips, and so the richer that you can make them, I think the better, and over time, more, and more, and more things will just be ownable digitally, and I think that's very cool.Anatoly (42:09):I love the trend of like 2DR first, like really low res, because it's like a forcing function in creativity, right? It's actually hard to make something look good with that low fidelity.Packy McCormick (42:22):Totally.Anatoly (42:25):So, I'm a fan of watching the space self, almost evolve, right? This is definitely going to get better, right? You're going to have full scale renders with 3D models and high production stuff in a few years, but it's exciting to see what it is now, right?Packy McCormick (42:42):Totally. I have another portfolio company called Arco that's doing... essentially, it's trying to replace the design software that companies use. So, Autodesk has Revit to do 3D modeling, they're doing the Figma version of that, but then could you just take this physical building that somebody's designed for the real world, turn it into an NFT and let somebody bring it into the digital world? I would love to own the Chrysler Building and then bring it into my world.Anatoly (43:10):Skeuomorphism.Packy McCormick (43:14):I thought about that too when I was trying to write about the interfaces, I was like, "Why are we even thinking about buildings and worlds at all? If you don't have to follow the rules of physics, then why do you?" But I do think, through our conversation earlier about maps, reference points are also important, so you need to, one step at a time, go away from things that people are familiar with.Anatoly (43:34):Yeah. Cool, man. So, this is a really awesome conversation. Thank you so much for being on the show and really getting into it.Packy McCormick (43:43):100%. This was fun. Thank you.

Well-Adjusted Mama
Jess Quarello and Taryn Lagonigro: Extra Lucky Moms | WAM144

Well-Adjusted Mama

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 41:45


Jess Quarello was born in Sweden but raised in North Carolina. She started singing at the age of 5 years old and pursued a career in music, modeling and performance. She received her BFA in Music Theatre from Elon University and after graduation moved to NYC to continue her career. She had some great successes which included national commercials, a beauty campaign printed in Vogue Magazine, a recording contract and even working with Timbaland and Snoop Dog. She met her husband Matt on a rooftop bar in Manhattan and they were engaged 9 months later. She decided to switch gears in her career and pivoted to the other side of the modeling industry, fashion! Jess worked as a lead stylist for a style-subscription company, moved into marketing for an international branding agency and most recently worked for a non-profit consultancy, on the sales and marketing business side. In 2020 she gave birth to Adeline, who at birth was diagnosed with Down Syndrome. What started as a traumatic and scary diagnosis has propelled her into a life of advocacy and passion for her daughter and the Down Syndrome Community. She currently resides in Hoboken, NJ with her 3.5 year old daughter Charlee, Adeline (14 months) and husband Matt. She hopes to inspire others facing a Down Syndrome diagnosis to not fear the future but to embrace a new beautiful perspective. Taryn Lagonigro is a mom of four girls, a business consultant and co-owner of Extra Lucky Moms and Iris Yoga in North Jersey. Her youngest daughter was born with Down syndrome and a heart defect in March 2020 which threw Taryn into the world of advocacy for children in the special needs community. Taryn dedicates time to several charities including the Down Syndrome Diagnosis Network and 321 Sunshine Nonprofit. Please click the like button above and leave a review if your favorite podcast app has that ability. Thank you! Visit http://drlaurabrayton.com/podcasts/ for show notes and available downloads. © 2021 Dr. Laura Brayton

Shoot the Defence
Gate 7 International Podcast: Sweden vs. Greece Preview with Par Zetterberg | World Cup Qualifiers

Shoot the Defence

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 52:54


EPISODE 125: Ari gets together with former Olympiacos Legend and G7I guest Pär Zetterberg to discuss what is shaping up to be a do or die cup final between Sweden and Greece. #greece #sweden #greswe #hellas #greekfootball #wcq #wcq2022 #wcqualifiers #worldcupqualifiers #sverige #olympiacos #olympiakos  FOR MORE FOLLOW US: @Gate7Intl on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, and Reddit HIT SUBSCRIBE!!! LIKE AND COMMENT!! CHECK OUT OUR WEBSITE: www.gate7intl.com WATCH THE SHOW / LISTEN TO THE PODCAST: linktr.ee/Gate7InternationalPodcast

Hydraulic Valve Dialogue
Parker MSDE: Lingonberries and Load Sense

Hydraulic Valve Dialogue

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 68:46


We all know IKEA, Volvo, Swedish Meatballs, Spotify, and the musical genius of ABBA - but did you know that Sweden is known for their fluid power prowess as well? In this episode, we sit down with Tommy Graham and Denis Felicijan to learn about MSDE. We get a glimpse into the differences between the US and Sweden, and dive into the product known for top tier performance and durability. We cover valves, futuristic applications, steer by wire, configurators, marvel movies, and the ritual of slowing down and taking time to enjoy your friends & colleagues around you- this episode truly has it all!

Baffled: Amazing Facts That Are Complete Nonsense
Whales, Uprisings and Sweden's Left Party

Baffled: Amazing Facts That Are Complete Nonsense

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 33:51


We bring you another 9 amazing facts, from Penguins to Dolly Parton. And Conor treating us with his beautiful singing voice!If you want to get involved, then follow us on TikTok andInstagram @BaffledPodOr email us info@baffledpod.com---A Create Podcast See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Weird AF News
Rent a fat person in Japan. Sweden offers a hotel for your sourdough starter.

Weird AF News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 21:44


You can rent fat people in Japan. Sweden offers sourdough starter hotels. Queens man stayed in a tree for days avoiding police. // Weird AF News is the only daily weird news podcast hosted by a comedian because I believe your daily dose of weird af stories deserves a comedic spin. Show your SUPPORT by joining the Weird AF News Patreon where you'll get bonus episodes and other weird af news stuff http://patreon.com/weirdafnews  - WATCH Weird AF News on Youtube - https://www.youtube.com/weirdafnews - check out the official website https://WeirdAFnews.com and FOLLOW host Jonesy at http://instagram.com/funnyjones or http://twitter.com/funnyjones or http://facebook.com/comedianjonesy or http://Jonesy.com --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Sweden Rolls
Forbidden Lands s04e14 "Many Meetings"

Sweden Rolls

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 60:13


The Band of Force moves on towards Sandy Hill, where unexpected things happen...The adventure in Ravenland continues. This time Vahni joins and the mishaps keep on comin'...We're an award winning actual play podcast where professional actors in Sweden play the best of Swedish RPGs! Led by one of Swedens most experienced and appreciated podcast Game Masters we play Forbidden Lands, by Fria Ligan (Free League publishing).Starring: Ingela Lundh, Anneli Heed, Dominic Kelly and Mattias Redbo.Game master: Andreas LundströmCheck out our filmed oneshot for Medeltidsveckan (medieval week) at medeltidsveckan.se

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast
S4 E50: Australia: Lockdowns and Location Apps | John Anderson

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 82:01


This episode was recorded on September 9th. Dr. Jordan Peterson and John Anderson exchange ideas about the freedom of conscience, policies, and mandatory vaccines. Dr. Jordan shares his experience with policies while Anderson shares tips on conducting proper debates while commenting on the governmental debates. See how Australia connects to their discussion and how social media came into play. John Anderson is a sixth-generation farmer and grazier from New South Wales, who spent 19 years in the Australian Parliament. After serving in politics, Anderson launched a web-based interview program, Conversations with John Anderson, featuring interviews with public intellectuals. He continues to serve the interests of Australia's rural and regional communities. Find more John Anderson on his website https://johnanderson.net.au/ Check out his YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnAndersonConversations Check out his Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/johnandersonao Follow him on Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnAndersonAO/ ———————————— Shownotes ———————————— ● [00:00] Dr. Peterson introduces this week's guest, John Anderson. ● [03:32] "The problem with fighting fire with fire is that you end up burning." Dr. Peterson ● [03:54] What's happening in Australia and the west? ● [04:26] John's tips for proper debates. ● [06:17] How Anderson views Australia's regime. ● [06:40] China's imposed threat on Australia. ● [09:09] John quoting Henry Kissinger on freedom. ● [09:47] The legality of mandatory vaccines in western culture and the blitz story during WWII in Britain. ● [11:48] Anderson's analogy of democracy. ● [14:31] Dr. Peterson's advice on policies. ● [16:05] The lockdowns in Australia. ● [22:07] Dr. Peterson's perspective towards proper political force on vaccinations. ● [21:26] The cost of safety. ● [25:29] John's opinion on debates. ● [26:56] Breaking down trust in the government. ● [31:53] How governmental debates should be conducted. ● [37:21] Freedom of Conscious. ● [43:10] The best rationale for mandatory vaccines. ● [53:01] Lockdowns and the dangers of mandating medical procedures. ● [59:46] The power of social media and John's thoughts on moving forward. ● [01:02:19] Social media and John's podcast. ● [01:06:47] Anderson's thoughts on freedom and governments. ● [01:10:15] Australian politicians' understanding of social media. __________ Visit www.jordanbpeterson.com to view more information about Jordan, his books, lectures, social media, blog posts, and more. Jordan B. Peterson is a professor of psychology at the University of Toronto, a clinical psychologist, and the author of the multi-million copy bestseller 12 Rules for Life: An Antidote to Chaos, #1 for nonfiction in 2018 in the US, Canada, the UK, Australia, New Zealand, Sweden, the Netherlands, Brazil and Norway, and slated for translation into 50 languages. Dr. Peterson has appeared on many popular podcasts and shows, including the Joe Rogan Experience, The Rubin Report, H3H3, and many more. Dr. Peterson's own podcast has focused mainly on his lecture series, covering a great deal of psychology and historical content. Jordan is expanding his current podcast from lectures to interviews with influential people around the world. We hope you enjoy this episode and more to come from Dr. Peterson in the future. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Radio Sweden på lätt svenska
Måndag 11 oktober 2021

Radio Sweden på lätt svenska

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 6:42


Ekonomipris till forskning om arbete och pengar. Ebba Busch får köpa huset och rättegången ställs in. Rekordmånga i publiken vid damfotbollsmatch i Stockholm. Programledare Jenny Pejler.

Coronavirus 4 1 1  podcast
Coronavirus, COVID-19, coronavirus variants, and vaccine updates for 10-11-2021

Coronavirus 4 1 1 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 5:18


This is Coronavirus 411, the latest COVID-19 info and new hotspots for October 11th, 2021. You might want to send Italy a congratulations. That country announced it's reached its goal of 80% of the population over 12 being fully vaccinated. That amounts to 43 million people out of 60 million. However, a lot of people hit the streets not to celebrate, but to protest vaccine passports. Many of these gatherings turned into violent riots. A comprehensive CBS News poll shows that most Americans are still worried about the pandemic with winter on the way, and a bit pessimistic in saying things are going to get worse in the coming months, not better. As for parents of young children, it's split down the middle in terms of will they get their children vaccinated. Masking for kids in school does seem to have majority support. About half feel the information they hear from America's health leaders has been confusing. The deadline is right around the corner and at the moment, hundreds of thousands of U.S. service members are still unvaccinated. Most of those deadlines are in November and December. Different branches are delivering different levels of compliance. For instance 90% of the active-duty Navy is fully immunized while only 72% of active-duty Marines are. The news is usually bad enough without getting it completely wrong. The New York Times issued a correction after their health and science reporter said 900,000 children have been hospitalized in the US with Covid-19. Not even a little bit close. The actual figure is a 63,000. The piece also got actions taken by regulators in Sweden and Denmark wrong. Wait, we're not done. She also got the timing of an FDA meeting on authorizing the Pfizer vaccine for kids wrong. Typically cautious and often a full-on buzzkill about holidays, Dr. Anthony Fauci says don't worry about trick or treating outdoors this Halloween. While he says we shouldn't declare premature victory and he still wants more people vaccinated who are eligible, Fauci did note that cases are dropping. Right now, there are about 95,000 new cases a day. Fauci said when it drops to less than 10,000 a day, we can start dropping restrictions like masking indoors...which will make it much easier to bob for apples. In the United States cases were down 20%, deaths are down 14%, and hospitalizations are down 21% over 14 days. The 7-day average of new cases has been trending down since September 13. There are 9,820,727 active cases in the United States. With not all states reporting daily numbers, the five states with the greatest increase in hospitalizations per capita: Michigan 20%, North Dakota 18%, Pennsylvania 15%. Minnesota 13%. And Montana 8%. The top 10 counties with the highest number of recent cases per capita according to The New York Times: Bethel Census Area, AK. Stark, ND. Lewis, KY. Kodiak Island Borough, AK. Whitley, KY. Knox, IN. Clay, TX. Custer, MT. McCreary, MT. And Big Horn, WY. There have been at least 712,993 deaths in the U.S. recorded as Covid-related. The top 3 vaccinating states by percentage of population that's been fully vaccinated: Vermont unchanged at 69.8%, Connecticut unchanged at 69.2%, and Rhode Island unchanged at 69%. The bottom 3 vaccinating states are West Virginia unchanged at 40.6%, and Wyoming and Idaho at 42.2%. The percentage of the U.S. that's been fully vaccinated is 56.2%. The five countries with biggest 24-hour increases in the number of fully vaccinated people: St. Lucia and Kosovo up 2%. And Australia, Sri Lanka, and Finland 1%. Globally, cases were down 14% and deaths were down 16% over 14 days, with the 7-day average trending up since October 5. The number of active cases around the world has now dropped below 18 million, at 17,987,905. The five countries with the... See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Incident Report
Delta's End, Kids & COVID, Natural Infection vs. Vaccine, & More LIVE

Incident Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 50:13


We're talking delta's end game dynamics, kids and COVID, natural vs. vaccine immunity, Moderna in Sweden and more, LIVE

The Box of Oddities
BOX370: Hat Guy Has a Thing For Toes

The Box of Oddities

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 36:25


Want to listen to The Box Of Oddities ad-free and early? Become a patron by joining The Order of Freaks!JG tells us of the girl born covered in hair who was a king by the age of five. Kat takes us to a centuries-old haunted inn in New England. Christina, King of Sweden of the ghosts of the Red Lion Inn in BOX370 - it's the breakfast of champions.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.