Podcasts about Athens

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Capital of Greece

  • 5,604PODCASTS
  • 10,308EPISODES
  • 41mAVG DURATION
  • 4DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 26, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about Athens

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Latest podcast episodes about Athens

Southern Sports Today
CHUCK OLIVER SHOW 1-26 WEDNESDAY HOUR 1

Southern Sports Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 39:51


Chuck opens the show by saying there needs to be a reason for a program to say they are THE program for this position group. If you are a wide receiver looking for a new program, Dan Mathews thinks you should look at this program. We are joined every Wednesday by Chris Landry of LandryFootball.com.    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Life in the Peloton
Stuart O'Grady - The Pioneer of the New Generation E2.S7.

Life in the Peloton

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 72:18


Rapha presents Life in the Peloton  Stuart O'Grady is an absolute legend of the sport: He's a Roubaix winner, an Olympic Gold medallist, a trailblazer for Aussie pros in Europe, and now race director of Australia's top cycling event, the Tour Down Under. In this episode, we go in-depth on all of this and more. It's a fascinating insight into the career of one of the most accomplished people in cycling.   (Read detailed summary below) . . . It's January, I'm in Australia; it's Tour Down Under time.  As we all probably know, the World Tour peloton won't be at the TDU this year, and I'm enjoying my first January in a long time not having to think about racing. However, I thought who better to bring on the pod than the legend himself, Adelaide's Stuart O'Grady.   Stuey wasn't just a huge inspiration, but for the generations of Australian riders who followed in his wheel tracks, he was a real pioneer.  Stuey went to his first Olympics as an eighteen year-old before turning pro with the French Gan team in the mid-nineties. In just a few years he went from being a risky signing for an almost entirely French team to a Tour de France stage winner and a mainstay of the team.   I kicked off the pod by asking about these early days and how his career on the road began. I also wanted to know what it was like coming full circle and ending up finishing his career in Australia's own World Tour team, a project that would never have come to life without his successes in Europe.    We also go back to the track to get into his Gold medal ride in Athens, a crowning achievement for the six-time Olympian.  Of course, I couldn't not discuss his win Paris Roubaix. Stuey tells how the day unfolded, from puncturing in the Areneberg forest to winning alone in the Roubaix velodrome.  These days he has a new career as the race director at the the Tour Down Under, and I used the opportunity to find out what the job of race director really entails, as well as ask a few questions about what the future looks like for this much loved race.  There is so much to ask Stuey that it was honestly hard to cram it all into the hour, but it was great to be able to learn so much from someone who was a huge inspiration for myself, and go into detail about those unforgettable wins - I got the feeling that he enjoyed the chance to reminisce too!  So here it is, I hope you guys enjoy this as much as we did: Stuart O'Grady - The Pioneer of the New Generation.  Stay tuned for Talking Luft with Stuey next week! Cheers, Mitch   Show Notes 0:00 to 4:20 – Intro 4:20min to 10:05 – Stuey intro & TDF Stage win 1998 10:05 to 18:20 – Racing as an Aussie in a French team 18:20min to 27:42 – Athens Olympics Madison Gold 27:42min to 43:30 – Paris Roubaix Win 44:50min to 53:33 – Finishing his career at Greenedge 53:33min to 1:00:00 – Retirement and transitioning out of Pro life  1hr to 1:10:10 – Tour Down Under  1:10:10 to end – Outro . . . • Tour de France Stage 5 win 1998: Watch the final kilometres of Stuey's win at 37min in: https://youtu.be/cOnIphGlSPM?t=2255 • Watch Stuey's interview with Phil Liggett pre a wet Paris Roubaix in 2001 at 4min: https://youtu.be/cRQtz-yI59E?t=193 • Athens Olympics: Watch the final 20 laps of Stuey's Gold medal ride in the Madison with Graham Brown (in French): https://youtu.be/CueSvBqXIG4 . . . This episode is brought to you by Rapha, makers of the world's finest cycling clothing & accessories and the worlds largest cycling club, RCC. Find out more about Rapha: their kit, their club, their events and awesome clubhouses at rapha.cc. . . . Check out episode sponsor Restrap – Yorkshire based makers of top quality, handmade and sustainable bike packing accessories. I used their bags on my bike packing trip riding the length of Sweden and can tell you I was blown away by the quality and functionality, every detail has been thought out. Whichever way you prefer to carry things on your bike, they'll have a solution.  Use the discount code at checkout: PELOTON10 for 10% off your order. Shop now at restrap.com . . . Keep in touch Find all our episodes, LITP news and merch on our website www.lifeinthepeloton.com Listen to our short spin off series Talking Luft presented by Rapha – much like DVD Extras, every second week.   Follow us on socials: Instagram: @lifeinthepeloton Twitter: @lifeinthepelo . . . Merch LITP x ÇOIS Cycling: Find the last sizes of the Road Worlds Collection at coiscycling.com. Snapbacks have now been restocked. Shop now! LITP Cycling Caps: Jump over to our online shop to grab one. Shop LITP casual Merch anytime online at our store. From casual caps to mugs, embroidered tees, logo tees, sweaters and much more.. . . . Theme Music The theme music for Life in the Peloton was composed by Pete Shelley, who was lead singer of the punk band Buzzcocks. It was commissioned by the production company behind Channel 4's coverage of the Tour de France in the 1980s and was used as the theme music for the nightly highlights show. Pete died in December 2018. We were given permission by Pete's widow and his manager to continue using the music for the theme tune to Life in the Peloton. To hear more about the music, listen to the Andre Greipel episode of Life in the Peloton. . . . Subscribe  Sign up to Life in the Peloton email updates to get the latest episodes and merch news straight to your inbox.  

Southern Sports Today
CHUCK OLIVER SHOW 1-25 TUESDAY HOUR 1

Southern Sports Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 39:51


Chuck opens the show by talking about how Georgia won a national title without their best receiving option on the team. He then talks about the job Mario Cristobal has in front of him at Miami. Dan Mathews believes that Matt Rhule to this premiere program would be a huge hit. Dave Bartoo of College Football Matrix joins the show for his weekly visit.    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Southern Sports Today
CHUCK OLIVER SHOW 1-25 TUESDAY HOUR 2

Southern Sports Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 39:47


Chuck opens hour two with ‘CFB 365' and a look at the college football headlines. We talk Florida State with Ingram Smith of the Nolecast. Drew DeArmond of ESPN 97.7 The Zone in Huntsville joins us to talk Alabama Crimson Tide transfers. We close out the show with a special in-studio guest, Mike Morgan of SEC Network drops by!     See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Before The Hedges
How the 2022 class was built to offset vast turnover from the 2021 team | Before the Hedges

Before The Hedges

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 50:54


On the most recent episode of Before the Hedges, DawgNation recruiting insider Jeff Sentell broke down why the 2022 Georgia signing class was built to offset the many expected player departures from the 2021 roster. DBs? Check. Elite 5-star DBs? Big check? Playmaking high-IQ LBs? Check and doublecheck. 5-star pass rushers? Check. This class, absent of a 5-star WR, looks like the most complete class of the Kirby Smart era in Athens. Especially on the defensive side. "Hedges" also updates the remaining three targets for the 2022 class, really sets the table of the 2023 cycle and a few other things that those in the know might need to know. You can catch "Before the Hedges" live every Wednesday at 8 PM on the DawgNation Facebook and YouTube pages. "Hedges" also now streams live every Wednesday on the DawgNation.com home page, too.

Saint of the Day
Our Father among the Saints Gregory the Theologian, Archbishop of Constantinople (389)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 3:13


This light of the Church is one of only three holy Fathers whom the Church has honored with the name "the Theologian" (the others are St John the Evangelist and Theologian, and St Symeon the New Theologian).   He was born in 329 in Arianzus in Cappadocia to a pious and holy family: his father Gregory, mother Nonna, brother Caesarius and sister Gorgonia are all counted among the Saints of the Church. His father later became Bishop of Nazianzus. He studied in Palestine, then in Alexandria, then in Athens. On the way to Athens, his ship was almost sunk in a violent storm; Gregory, who had not yet been baptized, prayed to the Lord to preserve him, and promised that henceforth he would dedicate his entire life to God. Immediately the storm ceased.   In Athens, Gregory's fellow students included St Basil the Great and the future Emperor Julian the Apostate. The friendship between Gregory and Basil blossomed into a true spiritual friendship; they were loving brothers in Christ for the rest of their lives. After completing their studies, Sts Gregory and Basil lived together as monks in hermitage at Pontus. Much against St Gregory's will, his father ordained him a priest, and St Basil consecrated him Bishop of Sasima (in the Archdiocese of Caesarea, over which St Basil was Archbishop).   In 381 the Second Ecumenical Council condemned Macedonius, Archbishop of Constantinople, and appointed St Gregory in his place. When he arrived in the City, he found that the Arians controlled all the churches, and he was forced to "rule" from a small house chapel. From there he preached his five great sermons on the Trinity, the Triadika; these were so powerfully influential that when he left Constantinople two years later, every church in the City had been restored to the Orthodox.   St Gregory was always a theologian and a contemplative, not an administrator, and the duties of Archbishop were agonizing to him. In 382 he received permission from a council of his fellow-bishops and the Emperor to retire from the see of Constantinople. He returned to Nazianzus (for which reason he is sometimes called St Gregory of Nazianzus). There he reposed in peace in 391 at the age of sixty-two.   His writings show a theological depth and a sublimity of expression perhaps unsurpassed in the Church. His teaching on the Holy Trinity is a great bastion of Orthodox Faith; in almost every one of his published homilies he preaches the Trinity undivided and of one essence.

The Greek Current
The EU warns Russia as tensions simmer over Ukraine

The Greek Current

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 10:49


The EU called on Russia on Monday to defuse tensions over Ukraine and reaffirmed that Moscow would face "massive" consequences if it attacked its neighbor. The EU's foreign ministers, who met in Brussels, said the bloc "condemns Russia's continued aggressive actions and threats against Ukraine and calls on Russia to de-escalate." US Secretary of State Antony Blinken also joined the meeting via teleconference. In the meantime, NATO announced that European allies were deploying added ships and fighter jets to Eastern Europe and putting new forces on standby in response to Russia's continued military mobilization along Ukraine's border. Yannis Palaiologos, Kathimerini's Brussels correspondent, joins The Greek Current with the latest analysis. You can read the articles we discuss on our podcast here:Ukraine-Russia crisis: EU foreign ministers meet to coordinate strategy with USEU urges Russia to de-escalate, threatens 'massive' sanctionsNATO sends ships, fighter jets to eastern Europe as Russia tensions simmerSnow blankets Athens, Greek islands and Turkey's IstanbulRare heavy snow paralyses Greek capital and disrupts flightsTurkey: prominent journalist detained for insulting president ErdoğanSedef Kabas: Turkish journalist jailed for reciting proverb

Southern Sports Today
CHUCK OLIVER SHOW 1-24 MONDAY HOUR 1

Southern Sports Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 39:42


Nick Saban beat COVID and math all in recent times. Dan Mathews believes that Lincoln Riley is already well on his way to proving why he chose USC over LSU. Andrew Hutchinson of Hawg Beat joins the show to talk about the Arkansas Razorbacks.    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Southern Sports Today
CHUCK OLIVER SHOW 1-24 MONDAY HOUR 2

Southern Sports Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 39:50


Chuck opens hour two with a look at the college football headlines. Tim Hall of the Buckeye Show on 97.1 The Fan in Columbus joins the show to talk Ohio State Buckeyes. Then, Eddie Radosevich of Sooner Scoop joins up to talk Oklahoma.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

We Travel There with Lee Huffman
Athens, GA | Twilight Criterium, Children's Garden & Athens Beer Trail

We Travel There with Lee Huffman

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 37:19


We're in Athens, Georgia, with Jarryd Wallace, a Paralympic Track & Field Athlete. We talk about the Twilight Criterium, the interactive Children's Garden at the State Botanical Garden, and the Athens Beer Trail. The show notes are available at https://WeTravelThere.com/athens I love to travel, but I hate waiting. CLEAR uses biometrics to verify your identity to skip airport security lines. With this limited-time offer for listeners, you can try CLEAR free for 2 months, when you sign up at wetravelthere.com/clear.

The Podcast of the Lotus Eaters
PREVIEW: Epochs #38 | Solon

The Podcast of the Lotus Eaters

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2022 22:32


Beau and Carl chat about the life and career of Athens' lawgiver, Solon. With particular reference to the Roman account of his life left to us by Plutarch, they explore the sometimes strange but usually wise reforms of Solon.

51 Strokes
Bad Timing

51 Strokes

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2022 45:13


Caleb hops on to talk about the reason why his recent Sundae Conversation with Lil Yachty was taken down. It was another winner for Caleb as he went to Athens, Georgia to celebrate with Bulldogs fans as they won the CFB National Championship. Also, hear and update on how the golf game is going and an inside story on a dinner with Jimmy John on his yacht. All of this and more on today's show.

The Greek Current
Why Halkbank's US Supreme Court appeal is a win for Erdogan

The Greek Current

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 13:02


Late last week a US appeals court put the federal government's prosecution of Turkish state-owned lender Halkbank on hold while the bank appeals to the US Supreme Court. This decision means Halkbank can appeal without having to defend itself in a Manhattan federal court for its alleged role in helping Iran evade US sanctions. Halkank is accused of helping Iran secretly transfer $20 billion of restricted funds, including $1 billion laundered through the US financial system, and converting oil revenue into gold and then cash to benefit Iranian interests. Expert Aykan Erdemir joins The Greek Current to look into this latest development and explain why this decision is a win for Turkish President Erdogan in his continued attempts to delay a potentially embarrassing jury trial.Dr. Aykan Erdemir is the senior director of the Turkey program at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies and a former Turkish lawmaker.Read Aykan Erdemir's latest policy brief for FDD here: Halkbank's Supreme Court Appeal Will Delay Iran Sanctions-Evasion CaseYou can read the articles we discuss on our podcast here:Athens and Ankara seek positive agendaUS academics use radar to help seek missing in split Cyprus

The Midday Show
Hour 1 - Lane Kiffin reportedly recruiting in Athens

The Midday Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 34:52


Andy and Randy open the show talking about J.T. Daniels and Jermaine Burton apparently going into the transfer portal holding hands. Lane Kiffin was reportedly in Athens recruiting both of them. Plus the guys talk about the Hawks taking on the Heat tonight.

The Daily 10 with Matt Chernoff
The Daily 10 wMatt Chernoff Jan 21 2022

The Daily 10 with Matt Chernoff

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 12:30


Daily 10 notes - An SEC head coach was in Athens yesterday trying to take two from UGA out of the portal. -My Braves opening day OF would look like this. -This might be the only superstar option for Trae and and the Hawks. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Atlanta Braves
The Daily 10 wMatt Chernoff Jan 21 2022

Atlanta Braves

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 12:30


Daily 10 notes - An SEC head coach was in Athens yesterday trying to take two from UGA out of the portal. -My Braves opening day OF would look like this. -This might be the only superstar option for Trae and and the Hawks. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Monocle 24: The Globalist
Friday 21 January

Monocle 24: The Globalist

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 60:00


We reflect on Antony Blinken's address on the Russia-Ukraine tensions and ask whether the pandemic is nearing its endgame. Plus: Portugal's forthcoming election, Andrew Mueller on the week's stranger stories and Greece's attempts to bring the Parthenon marbles back to Athens.

The One Away Show
Episode 96.1 | Bryan's Take

The One Away Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 2:40


Hulet has been a light in my life. I met him in 2015, and I could tell right away that he had a free spirit in the sense that he would do what he wanted and nobody could stand in his way. At the same time, he cares so deeply about the people around him; his family, his wife, and his kids. He's a man really pushing the edge, especially for a town like Athens, GA where there aren't many people like Hulet around. Back then, we connected over coffee and stayed in touch because we mutually found each other very interesting. Hulet is a stand-out guy, and I can't say enough good things about him. I hope listeners can see what I see in him as well. Read the show notes here: https://bwmissions.com/one-away-podcast/

History Unplugged Podcast
Are Cities Humanity's Greatest Invention or an Incubator of Disease, Crime, and Horrific Exploitation?

History Unplugged Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 56:58


During the two hundred millennia of humanity's existence, nothing has shaped us more profoundly than the city. From their very beginnings, cities created such a flourishing of human endeavor—new professions, new forms of art, worship and trade—that they kick-started civilization. Guiding us through the centuries, is today's guest Ben Wilson, author of Metropolis: A history of the City, Humankind's Greatest Invention. We discuss the innovations nurtured by the energy of human beings together: civics in the agora of Athens, global trade in ninth-century Baghdad, finance in the coffeehouses of London, domestic comforts in the heart of Amsterdam, peacocking in Belle Époque Paris. In the modern age, the skyscrapers of New York City inspired utopian visions of community design, while the trees of twenty-first-century Seattle and Shanghai point to a sustainable future in the age of climate change.

Glory UGA

In this emergency edition of the Glory UGA Podcast we discuss the day's breaking news including Stetson Bennett's decision to return for his Super-Senior season and the decisions of J.T. Daniels and Jermaine Burton to enter the transfer portal. We also discuss our thoughts on the other players that have announced their decisions to enter the portal, declare for the NFL draft, or return to Athens. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Art of Manliness
The Rise and Fall of Athens

The Art of Manliness

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 58:49


In a period of only about 100 years, Athens went from relative obscurity, to becoming an influential empire, to collapsing into ruin.My guest today will guide us through the dramatic arc of this city-state and the larger-than-life characters that contributed to it. His name is David Stuttard, and he's a classicist and the author of Phoenix: A Father, a Son, and the Rise of Athens, and Nemesis: Alcibiades and the Fall of Athens.We begin our conversation with the rise of Athens and why its aristocratic families decided to institute a radically democratic form of government. David then walks us through how the Persian invasion catapulted Athens to power in Greece. Along the way, David explains how a father and son named Miltiades and Cimon led Athens to power. We then shift our attention to the fall of Athens and how it was precipitated by the Peloppensian War with their one-time ally, Sparta. David introduces us to the made-for-Hollywood character that would play a pivotal role in Athens' fall — the handsome and charismatic aristocrat and serial traitor, Alcibiades. We end our conversation with the lessons we moderns can take from the rise and fall of Athens.Resources Related to the PodcastAoM Podcast #461: The Spartan RegimeAoM Podcast #710: The Spartans at ThermopylaeMiltiadesBattle of MarathonCimonAlcibiadesConnect With David StuddardDavid's Website

Slate Daily Feed
Big Mood, Little Mood: Her Past. My Present.

Slate Daily Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 55:14


Danny Lavery welcomes Colette Arrand, a transsexual poet from Athens, Georgia. She is the author of the poetry collection Hold Me Gorilla Monsoon, and is the editor of FanFyte, the wrestling section of Fanbyte Media. Lavery and Arrand take on two letters. First, from someone who can't stop thinking about their partner's dating history. Another letter writer identifies as a lesbian, but is getting push-back from her friends. Plus, Lavery asks Arrand about her lifelong passion for poetry and wrestling. Slate Plus members get another episode of Big Mood, Little Mood every Friday: sign up now! Need advice? Send Danny a question here. Email: mood@slate.com Production by Phil Surkis Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Dear Prudence | Advice on relationships, sex, work, family, and life

Danny Lavery welcomes Colette Arrand, a transsexual poet from Athens, Georgia. She is the author of the poetry collection Hold Me Gorilla Monsoon, and is the editor of FanFyte, the wrestling section of Fanbyte Media. Lavery and Arrand take on two letters. First, from someone who can't stop thinking about their partner's dating history. Another letter writer identifies as a lesbian, but is getting push-back from her friends. Plus, Lavery asks Arrand about her lifelong passion for poetry and wrestling. Slate Plus members get another episode of Big Mood, Little Mood every Friday: sign up now! Need advice? Send Danny a question here. Email: mood@slate.com Production by Phil Surkis Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Midday Show
Hour 1 - Can Hawks get back on track after snapping losing streak?

The Midday Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 37:32


Andy and Randy open the show talking about the Hawks snapping their home losing streak with a 4th quarter rally and win over the Milwaukee Bucks on Monday night. Plus, they discuss Championship parade and celebration up in Athens before being joined by Georgia offensive lineman Justin Shaffer.

The Midday Show
Brandon Adams Interview - Georgia should have open QB competition

The Midday Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 12:52


Brandon Adams, who covers the Georgia Bulldogs for DawgNation.com, joined Andy and Randy to talk about the Championship parade and celebration in Athens over the weekend. He also talked about why he believes Georgia needs an open quarterback competition heading into next season.

ESV: M'Cheyne Reading Plan
January 18: Genesis 19; Matthew 18; Nehemiah 8; Acts 18

ESV: M'Cheyne Reading Plan

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 17:08


With family: Genesis 19; Matthew 18 Genesis 19 (Listen) God Rescues Lot 19 The two angels came to Sodom in the evening, and Lot was sitting in the gate of Sodom. When Lot saw them, he rose to meet them and bowed himself with his face to the earth 2 and said, “My lords, please turn aside to your servant's house and spend the night and wash your feet. Then you may rise up early and go on your way.” They said, “No; we will spend the night in the town square.” 3 But he pressed them strongly; so they turned aside to him and entered his house. And he made them a feast and baked unleavened bread, and they ate. 4 But before they lay down, the men of the city, the men of Sodom, both young and old, all the people to the last man, surrounded the house. 5 And they called to Lot, “Where are the men who came to you tonight? Bring them out to us, that we may know them.” 6 Lot went out to the men at the entrance, shut the door after him, 7 and said, “I beg you, my brothers, do not act so wickedly. 8 Behold, I have two daughters who have not known any man. Let me bring them out to you, and do to them as you please. Only do nothing to these men, for they have come under the shelter of my roof.” 9 But they said, “Stand back!” And they said, “This fellow came to sojourn, and he has become the judge! Now we will deal worse with you than with them.” Then they pressed hard against the man Lot, and drew near to break the door down. 10 But the men reached out their hands and brought Lot into the house with them and shut the door. 11 And they struck with blindness the men who were at the entrance of the house, both small and great, so that they wore themselves out groping for the door. 12 Then the men said to Lot, “Have you anyone else here? Sons-in-law, sons, daughters, or anyone you have in the city, bring them out of the place. 13 For we are about to destroy this place, because the outcry against its people has become great before the LORD, and the LORD has sent us to destroy it.” 14 So Lot went out and said to his sons-in-law, who were to marry his daughters, “Up! Get out of this place, for the LORD is about to destroy the city.” But he seemed to his sons-in-law to be jesting. 15 As morning dawned, the angels urged Lot, saying, “Up! Take your wife and your two daughters who are here, lest you be swept away in the punishment of the city.” 16 But he lingered. So the men seized him and his wife and his two daughters by the hand, the LORD being merciful to him, and they brought him out and set him outside the city. 17 And as they brought them out, one said, “Escape for your life. Do not look back or stop anywhere in the valley. Escape to the hills, lest you be swept away.” 18 And Lot said to them, “Oh, no, my lords. 19 Behold, your servant has found favor in your sight, and you have shown me great kindness in saving my life. But I cannot escape to the hills, lest the disaster overtake me and I die. 20 Behold, this city is near enough to flee to, and it is a little one. Let me escape there—is it not a little one?—and my life will be saved!” 21 He said to him, “Behold, I grant you this favor also, that I will not overthrow the city of which you have spoken. 22 Escape there quickly, for I can do nothing till you arrive there.” Therefore the name of the city was called Zoar.1 God Destroys Sodom 23 The sun had risen on the earth when Lot came to Zoar. 24 Then the LORD rained on Sodom and Gomorrah sulfur and fire from the LORD out of heaven. 25 And he overthrew those cities, and all the valley, and all the inhabitants of the cities, and what grew on the ground. 26 But Lot's wife, behind him, looked back, and she became a pillar of salt. 27 And Abraham went early in the morning to the place where he had stood before the LORD. 28 And he looked down toward Sodom and Gomorrah and toward all the land of the valley, and he looked and, behold, the smoke of the land went up like the smoke of a furnace. 29 So it was that, when God destroyed the cities of the valley, God remembered Abraham and sent Lot out of the midst of the overthrow when he overthrew the cities in which Lot had lived. Lot and His Daughters 30 Now Lot went up out of Zoar and lived in the hills with his two daughters, for he was afraid to live in Zoar. So he lived in a cave with his two daughters. 31 And the firstborn said to the younger, “Our father is old, and there is not a man on earth to come in to us after the manner of all the earth. 32 Come, let us make our father drink wine, and we will lie with him, that we may preserve offspring from our father.” 33 So they made their father drink wine that night. And the firstborn went in and lay with her father. He did not know when she lay down or when she arose. 34 The next day, the firstborn said to the younger, “Behold, I lay last night with my father. Let us make him drink wine tonight also. Then you go in and lie with him, that we may preserve offspring from our father.” 35 So they made their father drink wine that night also. And the younger arose and lay with him, and he did not know when she lay down or when she arose. 36 Thus both the daughters of Lot became pregnant by their father. 37 The firstborn bore a son and called his name Moab.2 He is the father of the Moabites to this day. 38 The younger also bore a son and called his name Ben-ammi.3 He is the father of the Ammonites to this day. Footnotes [1] 19:22 Zoar means little [2] 19:37 Moab sounds like the Hebrew for from father [3] 19:38 Ben-ammi means son of my people (ESV) Matthew 18 (Listen) Who Is the Greatest? 18 At that time the disciples came to Jesus, saying, “Who is the greatest in the kingdom of heaven?” 2 And calling to him a child, he put him in the midst of them 3 and said, “Truly, I say to you, unless you turn and become like children, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven. 4 Whoever humbles himself like this child is the greatest in the kingdom of heaven. 5 “Whoever receives one such child in my name receives me, 6 but whoever causes one of these little ones who believe in me to sin,1 it would be better for him to have a great millstone fastened around his neck and to be drowned in the depth of the sea. Temptations to Sin 7 “Woe to the world for temptations to sin!2 For it is necessary that temptations come, but woe to the one by whom the temptation comes! 8 And if your hand or your foot causes you to sin, cut it off and throw it away. It is better for you to enter life crippled or lame than with two hands or two feet to be thrown into the eternal fire. 9 And if your eye causes you to sin, tear it out and throw it away. It is better for you to enter life with one eye than with two eyes to be thrown into the hell3 of fire. The Parable of the Lost Sheep 10 “See that you do not despise one of these little ones. For I tell you that in heaven their angels always see the face of my Father who is in heaven.4 12 What do you think? If a man has a hundred sheep, and one of them has gone astray, does he not leave the ninety-nine on the mountains and go in search of the one that went astray? 13 And if he finds it, truly, I say to you, he rejoices over it more than over the ninety-nine that never went astray. 14 So it is not the will of my5 Father who is in heaven that one of these little ones should perish. If Your Brother Sins Against You 15 “If your brother sins against you, go and tell him his fault, between you and him alone. If he listens to you, you have gained your brother. 16 But if he does not listen, take one or two others along with you, that every charge may be established by the evidence of two or three witnesses. 17 If he refuses to listen to them, tell it to the church. And if he refuses to listen even to the church, let him be to you as a Gentile and a tax collector. 18 Truly, I say to you, whatever you bind on earth shall be bound in heaven, and whatever you loose on earth shall be loosed6 in heaven. 19 Again I say to you, if two of you agree on earth about anything they ask, it will be done for them by my Father in heaven. 20 For where two or three are gathered in my name, there am I among them.” The Parable of the Unforgiving Servant 21 Then Peter came up and said to him, “Lord, how often will my brother sin against me, and I forgive him? As many as seven times?” 22 Jesus said to him, “I do not say to you seven times, but seventy-seven times. 23 “Therefore the kingdom of heaven may be compared to a king who wished to settle accounts with his servants.7 24 When he began to settle, one was brought to him who owed him ten thousand talents.8 25 And since he could not pay, his master ordered him to be sold, with his wife and children and all that he had, and payment to be made. 26 So the servant9 fell on his knees, imploring him, ‘Have patience with me, and I will pay you everything.' 27 And out of pity for him, the master of that servant released him and forgave him the debt. 28 But when that same servant went out, he found one of his fellow servants who owed him a hundred denarii,10 and seizing him, he began to choke him, saying, ‘Pay what you owe.' 29 So his fellow servant fell down and pleaded with him, ‘Have patience with me, and I will pay you.' 30 He refused and went and put him in prison until he should pay the debt. 31 When his fellow servants saw what had taken place, they were greatly distressed, and they went and reported to their master all that had taken place. 32 Then his master summoned him and said to him, ‘You wicked servant! I forgave you all that debt because you pleaded with me. 33 And should not you have had mercy on your fellow servant, as I had mercy on you?' 34 And in anger his master delivered him to the jailers,11 until he should pay all his debt. 35 So also my heavenly Father will do to every one of you, if you do not forgive your brother from your heart.” Footnotes [1] 18:6 Greek causes . . . to stumble; also verses 8, 9 [2] 18:7 Greek stumbling blocks [3] 18:9 Greek Gehenna [4] 18:10 Some manuscripts add verse 11: For the Son of Man came to save the lost [5] 18:14 Some manuscripts your [6] 18:18 Or shall have been bound . . . shall have been loosed [7] 18:23 Or bondservants; also verses 28, 31 [8] 18:24 A talent was a monetary unit worth about twenty years' wages for a laborer [9] 18:26 Or bondservant; also verses 27, 28, 29, 32, 33 [10] 18:28 A denarius was a day's wage for a laborer [11] 18:34 Greek torturers (ESV) In private: Nehemiah 8; Acts 18 Nehemiah 8 (Listen) Ezra Reads the Law 8 And all the people gathered as one man into the square before the Water Gate. And they told Ezra the scribe to bring the Book of the Law of Moses that the LORD had commanded Israel. 2 So Ezra the priest brought the Law before the assembly, both men and women and all who could understand what they heard, on the first day of the seventh month. 3 And he read from it facing the square before the Water Gate from early morning until midday, in the presence of the men and the women and those who could understand. And the ears of all the people were attentive to the Book of the Law. 4 And Ezra the scribe stood on a wooden platform that they had made for the purpose. And beside him stood Mattithiah, Shema, Anaiah, Uriah, Hilkiah, and Maaseiah on his right hand, and Pedaiah, Mishael, Malchijah, Hashum, Hashbaddanah, Zechariah, and Meshullam on his left hand. 5 And Ezra opened the book in the sight of all the people, for he was above all the people, and as he opened it all the people stood. 6 And Ezra blessed the LORD, the great God, and all the people answered, “Amen, Amen,” lifting up their hands. And they bowed their heads and worshiped the LORD with their faces to the ground. 7 Also Jeshua, Bani, Sherebiah, Jamin, Akkub, Shabbethai, Hodiah, Maaseiah, Kelita, Azariah, Jozabad, Hanan, Pelaiah, the Levites,1 helped the people to understand the Law, while the people remained in their places. 8 They read from the book, from the Law of God, clearly,2 and they gave the sense, so that the people understood the reading. This Day Is Holy 9 And Nehemiah, who was the governor, and Ezra the priest and scribe, and the Levites who taught the people said to all the people, “This day is holy to the LORD your God; do not mourn or weep.” For all the people wept as they heard the words of the Law. 10 Then he said to them, “Go your way. Eat the fat and drink sweet wine and send portions to anyone who has nothing ready, for this day is holy to our Lord. And do not be grieved, for the joy of the LORD is your strength.” 11 So the Levites calmed all the people, saying, “Be quiet, for this day is holy; do not be grieved.” 12 And all the people went their way to eat and drink and to send portions and to make great rejoicing, because they had understood the words that were declared to them. Feast of Booths Celebrated 13 On the second day the heads of fathers' houses of all the people, with the priests and the Levites, came together to Ezra the scribe in order to study the words of the Law. 14 And they found it written in the Law that the LORD had commanded by Moses that the people of Israel should dwell in booths3 during the feast of the seventh month, 15 and that they should proclaim it and publish it in all their towns and in Jerusalem, “Go out to the hills and bring branches of olive, wild olive, myrtle, palm, and other leafy trees to make booths, as it is written.” 16 So the people went out and brought them and made booths for themselves, each on his roof, and in their courts and in the courts of the house of God, and in the square at the Water Gate and in the square at the Gate of Ephraim. 17 And all the assembly of those who had returned from the captivity made booths and lived in the booths, for from the days of Jeshua the son of Nun to that day the people of Israel had not done so. And there was very great rejoicing. 18 And day by day, from the first day to the last day, he read from the Book of the Law of God. They kept the feast seven days, and on the eighth day there was a solemn assembly, according to the rule. Footnotes [1] 8:7 Vulgate; Hebrew and the Levites [2] 8:8 Or with interpretation, or paragraph by paragraph [3] 8:14 Or temporary shelters (ESV) Acts 18 (Listen) Paul in Corinth 18 After this Paul1 left Athens and went to Corinth. 2 And he found a Jew named Aquila, a native of Pontus, recently come from Italy with his wife Priscilla, because Claudius had commanded all the Jews to leave Rome. And he went to see them, 3 and because he was of the same trade he stayed with them and worked, for they were tentmakers by trade. 4 And he reasoned in the synagogue every Sabbath, and tried to persuade Jews and Greeks. 5 When Silas and Timothy arrived from Macedonia, Paul was occupied with the word, testifying to the Jews that the Christ was Jesus. 6 And when they opposed and reviled him, he shook out his garments and said to them, “Your blood be on your own heads! I am innocent. From now on I will go to the Gentiles.” 7 And he left there and went to the house of a man named Titius Justus, a worshiper of God. His house was next door to the synagogue. 8 Crispus, the ruler of the synagogue, believed in the Lord, together with his entire household. And many of the Corinthians hearing Paul believed and were baptized. 9 And the Lord said to Paul one night in a vision, “Do not be afraid, but go on speaking and do not be silent, 10 for I am with you, and no one will attack you to harm you, for I have many in this city who are my people.” 11 And he stayed a year and six months, teaching the word of God among them. 12 But when Gallio was proconsul of Achaia, the Jews2 made a united attack on Paul and brought him before the tribunal, 13 saying, “This man is persuading people to worship God contrary to the law.” 14 But when Paul was about to open his mouth, Gallio said to the Jews, “If it were a matter of wrongdoing or vicious crime, O Jews, I would have reason to accept your complaint. 15 But since it is a matter of questions about words and names and your own law, see to it yourselves. I refuse to be a judge of these things.” 16 And he drove them from the tribunal. 17 And they all seized Sosthenes, the ruler of the synagogue, and beat him in front of the tribunal. But Gallio paid no attention to any of this. Paul Returns to Antioch 18 After this, Paul stayed many days longer and then took leave of the brothers3 and set sail for Syria, and with him Priscilla and Aquila. At Cenchreae he had cut his hair, for he was under a vow. 19 And they came to Ephesus, and he left them there, but he himself went into the synagogue and reasoned with the Jews. 20 When they asked him to stay for a longer period, he declined. 21 But on taking leave of them he said, “I will return to you if God wills,” and he set sail from Ephesus. 22 When he had landed at Caesarea, he went up and greeted the church, and then went down to Antioch. 23 After spending some time there, he departed and went from one place to the next through the region of Galatia and Phrygia, strengthening all the disciples. Apollos Speaks Boldly in Ephesus 24 Now a Jew named Apollos, a native of Alexandria, came to Ephesus. He was an eloquent man, competent in the Scriptures. 25 He had been instructed in the way of the Lord. And being fervent in spirit,4 he spoke and taught accurately the things concerning Jesus, though he knew only the baptism of John. 26 He began to speak boldly in the synagogue, but when Priscilla and Aquila heard him, they took him aside and explained to him the way of God more accurately. 27 And when he wished to cross to Achaia, the brothers encouraged him and wrote to the disciples to welcome him. When he arrived, he greatly helped those who through grace had believed, 28 for he powerfully refuted the Jews in public, showing by the Scriptures that the Christ was Jesus. Footnotes [1] 18:1 Greek he [2] 18:12 Greek Ioudaioi probably refers here to Jewish religious leaders, and others under their influence, in that time; also verses 14 (twice), 28 [3] 18:18 Or brothers and sisters; also verse 27 [4] 18:25 Or in the Spirit (ESV)

Art · The Creative Process
DIMITRIOS PANDERMALIS

Art · The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022


Dimitrios Pandermalis is Professor Emeritus of Classical Archeology at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, where he has served as President of the History and Archeology Department and Dean of the Philosophical School. He is the President of the Acropolis Museum, and Director of Aristotle University's archeological excavations at the ancient site of Dion on the foothills of Mount Olympus. There he has conducted innovative programs converting the excavated area into an archeological and environmental park. He has presented lectures and seminars on classical archeology at many institutions internationally and is the author of more than 60 publications on the subject. He is an ordinary member of the Archeological Society in Athens and of the German Archeological Institute in Berlin. · https://www.theacropolismuseum.gr/en· www.creativeprocess.info

On That Note
Lo Talker

On That Note

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 52:12


Todays guest is the frontman for the indie psychedelic rock group based out of Athens, GA, Lo Talker!Check out their newest single, 'Turnin' a Blind Eye" out now on all streaming platforms!Andrew Shepard discusses his recording process and the importance of surrounding yourself with people who are smarter and better than you!@lotalker@parkerwierling@onthatnote_podcastLike & Subscribe to spread the loooooooooove!

The Midday Show
A key piece returning to Athens for senior season, another on the move

The Midday Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 37:46


1-17 Hour 4 - After recapping the biggest headlines from the past weekend in the NFL, Chris Goforth reacts the news that Nolan Smith is returning to Athens for his senior season and J.T. Daniels entering the transfer portal. 

ESV: M'Cheyne Reading Plan
January 17: Genesis 18; Matthew 17; Nehemiah 7; Acts 17

ESV: M'Cheyne Reading Plan

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 19:54


With family: Genesis 18; Matthew 17 Genesis 18 (Listen) 18 And the LORD appeared to him by the oaks1 of Mamre, as he sat at the door of his tent in the heat of the day. 2 He lifted up his eyes and looked, and behold, three men were standing in front of him. When he saw them, he ran from the tent door to meet them and bowed himself to the earth 3 and said, “O Lord,2 if I have found favor in your sight, do not pass by your servant. 4 Let a little water be brought, and wash your feet, and rest yourselves under the tree, 5 while I bring a morsel of bread, that you may refresh yourselves, and after that you may pass on—since you have come to your servant.” So they said, “Do as you have said.” 6 And Abraham went quickly into the tent to Sarah and said, “Quick! Three seahs3 of fine flour! Knead it, and make cakes.” 7 And Abraham ran to the herd and took a calf, tender and good, and gave it to a young man, who prepared it quickly. 8 Then he took curds and milk and the calf that he had prepared, and set it before them. And he stood by them under the tree while they ate. 9 They said to him, “Where is Sarah your wife?” And he said, “She is in the tent.” 10 The LORD said, “I will surely return to you about this time next year, and Sarah your wife shall have a son.” And Sarah was listening at the tent door behind him. 11 Now Abraham and Sarah were old, advanced in years. The way of women had ceased to be with Sarah. 12 So Sarah laughed to herself, saying, “After I am worn out, and my lord is old, shall I have pleasure?” 13 The LORD said to Abraham, “Why did Sarah laugh and say, ‘Shall I indeed bear a child, now that I am old?' 14 Is anything too hard4 for the LORD? At the appointed time I will return to you, about this time next year, and Sarah shall have a son.” 15 But Sarah denied it,5 saying, “I did not laugh,” for she was afraid. He said, “No, but you did laugh.” 16 Then the men set out from there, and they looked down toward Sodom. And Abraham went with them to set them on their way. 17 The LORD said, “Shall I hide from Abraham what I am about to do, 18 seeing that Abraham shall surely become a great and mighty nation, and all the nations of the earth shall be blessed in him? 19 For I have chosen6 him, that he may command his children and his household after him to keep the way of the LORD by doing righteousness and justice, so that the LORD may bring to Abraham what he has promised him.” 20 Then the LORD said, “Because the outcry against Sodom and Gomorrah is great and their sin is very grave, 21 I will go down to see whether they have done altogether7 according to the outcry that has come to me. And if not, I will know.” Abraham Intercedes for Sodom 22 So the men turned from there and went toward Sodom, but Abraham still stood before the LORD. 23 Then Abraham drew near and said, “Will you indeed sweep away the righteous with the wicked? 24 Suppose there are fifty righteous within the city. Will you then sweep away the place and not spare it for the fifty righteous who are in it? 25 Far be it from you to do such a thing, to put the righteous to death with the wicked, so that the righteous fare as the wicked! Far be that from you! Shall not the Judge of all the earth do what is just?” 26 And the LORD said, “If I find at Sodom fifty righteous in the city, I will spare the whole place for their sake.” 27 Abraham answered and said, “Behold, I have undertaken to speak to the Lord, I who am but dust and ashes. 28 Suppose five of the fifty righteous are lacking. Will you destroy the whole city for lack of five?” And he said, “I will not destroy it if I find forty-five there.” 29 Again he spoke to him and said, “Suppose forty are found there.” He answered, “For the sake of forty I will not do it.” 30 Then he said, “Oh let not the Lord be angry, and I will speak. Suppose thirty are found there.” He answered, “I will not do it, if I find thirty there.” 31 He said, “Behold, I have undertaken to speak to the Lord. Suppose twenty are found there.” He answered, “For the sake of twenty I will not destroy it.” 32 Then he said, “Oh let not the Lord be angry, and I will speak again but this once. Suppose ten are found there.” He answered, “For the sake of ten I will not destroy it.” 33 And the LORD went his way, when he had finished speaking to Abraham, and Abraham returned to his place. Footnotes [1] 18:1 Or terebinths [2] 18:3 Or My lord [3] 18:6 A seah was about 7 quarts or 7.3 liters [4] 18:14 Or wonderful [5] 18:15 Or acted falsely [6] 18:19 Hebrew known [7] 18:21 Or they deserve destruction; Hebrew they have made a complete end (ESV) Matthew 17 (Listen) The Transfiguration 17 And after six days Jesus took with him Peter and James, and John his brother, and led them up a high mountain by themselves. 2 And he was transfigured before them, and his face shone like the sun, and his clothes became white as light. 3 And behold, there appeared to them Moses and Elijah, talking with him. 4 And Peter said to Jesus, “Lord, it is good that we are here. If you wish, I will make three tents here, one for you and one for Moses and one for Elijah.” 5 He was still speaking when, behold, a bright cloud overshadowed them, and a voice from the cloud said, “This is my beloved Son,1 with whom I am well pleased; listen to him.” 6 When the disciples heard this, they fell on their faces and were terrified. 7 But Jesus came and touched them, saying, “Rise, and have no fear.” 8 And when they lifted up their eyes, they saw no one but Jesus only. 9 And as they were coming down the mountain, Jesus commanded them, “Tell no one the vision, until the Son of Man is raised from the dead.” 10 And the disciples asked him, “Then why do the scribes say that first Elijah must come?” 11 He answered, “Elijah does come, and he will restore all things. 12 But I tell you that Elijah has already come, and they did not recognize him, but did to him whatever they pleased. So also the Son of Man will certainly suffer at their hands.” 13 Then the disciples understood that he was speaking to them of John the Baptist. Jesus Heals a Boy with a Demon 14 And when they came to the crowd, a man came up to him and, kneeling before him, 15 said, “Lord, have mercy on my son, for he has seizures and he suffers terribly. For often he falls into the fire, and often into the water. 16 And I brought him to your disciples, and they could not heal him.” 17 And Jesus answered, “O faithless and twisted generation, how long am I to be with you? How long am I to bear with you? Bring him here to me.” 18 And Jesus rebuked the demon,2 and it3 came out of him, and the boy was healed instantly.4 19 Then the disciples came to Jesus privately and said, “Why could we not cast it out?” 20 He said to them, “Because of your little faith. For truly, I say to you, if you have faith like a grain of mustard seed, you will say to this mountain, ‘Move from here to there,' and it will move, and nothing will be impossible for you.”5 Jesus Again Foretells Death, Resurrection 22 As they were gathering6 in Galilee, Jesus said to them, “The Son of Man is about to be delivered into the hands of men, 23 and they will kill him, and he will be raised on the third day.” And they were greatly distressed. The Temple Tax 24 When they came to Capernaum, the collectors of the two-drachma tax went up to Peter and said, “Does your teacher not pay the tax?” 25 He said, “Yes.” And when he came into the house, Jesus spoke to him first, saying, “What do you think, Simon? From whom do kings of the earth take toll or tax? From their sons or from others?” 26 And when he said, “From others,” Jesus said to him, “Then the sons are free. 27 However, not to give offense to them, go to the sea and cast a hook and take the first fish that comes up, and when you open its mouth you will find a shekel.7 Take that and give it to them for me and for yourself.” Footnotes [1] 17:5 Or my Son, my (or the) Beloved [2] 17:18 Greek it [3] 17:18 Greek the demon [4] 17:18 Greek from that hour [5] 17:20 Some manuscripts insert verse 21: But this kind never comes out except by prayer and fasting [6] 17:22 Some manuscripts remained [7] 17:27 Greek stater, a silver coin worth four drachmas or approximately one shekel (ESV) In private: Nehemiah 7; Acts 17 Nehemiah 7 (Listen) 7 Now when the wall had been built and I had set up the doors, and the gatekeepers, the singers, and the Levites had been appointed, 2 I gave my brother Hanani and Hananiah the governor of the castle charge over Jerusalem, for he was a more faithful and God-fearing man than many. 3 And I said to them, “Let not the gates of Jerusalem be opened until the sun is hot. And while they are still standing guard, let them shut and bar the doors. Appoint guards from among the inhabitants of Jerusalem, some at their guard posts and some in front of their own homes.” 4 The city was wide and large, but the people within it were few, and no houses had been rebuilt. Lists of Returned Exiles 5 Then my God put it into my heart to assemble the nobles and the officials and the people to be enrolled by genealogy. And I found the book of the genealogy of those who came up at the first, and I found written in it: 6 These were the people of the province who came up out of the captivity of those exiles whom Nebuchadnezzar the king of Babylon had carried into exile. They returned to Jerusalem and Judah, each to his town. 7 They came with Zerubbabel, Jeshua, Nehemiah, Azariah, Raamiah, Nahamani, Mordecai, Bilshan, Mispereth, Bigvai, Nehum, Baanah. The number of the men of the people of Israel: 8 the sons of Parosh, 2,172. 9 The sons of Shephatiah, 372. 10 The sons of Arah, 652. 11 The sons of Pahath-moab, namely the sons of Jeshua and Joab, 2,818. 12 The sons of Elam, 1,254. 13 The sons of Zattu, 845. 14 The sons of Zaccai, 760. 15 The sons of Binnui, 648. 16 The sons of Bebai, 628. 17 The sons of Azgad, 2,322. 18 The sons of Adonikam, 667. 19 The sons of Bigvai, 2,067. 20 The sons of Adin, 655. 21 The sons of Ater, namely of Hezekiah, 98. 22 The sons of Hashum, 328. 23 The sons of Bezai, 324. 24 The sons of Hariph, 112. 25 The sons of Gibeon, 95. 26 The men of Bethlehem and Netophah, 188. 27 The men of Anathoth, 128. 28 The men of Beth-azmaveth, 42. 29 The men of Kiriath-jearim, Chephirah, and Beeroth, 743. 30 The men of Ramah and Geba, 621. 31 The men of Michmas, 122. 32 The men of Bethel and Ai, 123. 33 The men of the other Nebo, 52. 34 The sons of the other Elam, 1,254. 35 The sons of Harim, 320. 36 The sons of Jericho, 345. 37 The sons of Lod, Hadid, and Ono, 721. 38 The sons of Senaah, 3,930. 39 The priests: the sons of Jedaiah, namely the house of Jeshua, 973. 40 The sons of Immer, 1,052. 41 The sons of Pashhur, 1,247. 42 The sons of Harim, 1,017. 43 The Levites: the sons of Jeshua, namely of Kadmiel of the sons of Hodevah, 74. 44 The singers: the sons of Asaph, 148. 45 The gatekeepers: the sons of Shallum, the sons of Ater, the sons of Talmon, the sons of Akkub, the sons of Hatita, the sons of Shobai, 138. 46 The temple servants: the sons of Ziha, the sons of Hasupha, the sons of Tabbaoth, 47 the sons of Keros, the sons of Sia, the sons of Padon, 48 the sons of Lebana, the sons of Hagaba, the sons of Shalmai, 49 the sons of Hanan, the sons of Giddel, the sons of Gahar, 50 the sons of Reaiah, the sons of Rezin, the sons of Nekoda, 51 the sons of Gazzam, the sons of Uzza, the sons of Paseah, 52 the sons of Besai, the sons of Meunim, the sons of Nephushesim, 53 the sons of Bakbuk, the sons of Hakupha, the sons of Harhur, 54 the sons of Bazlith, the sons of Mehida, the sons of Harsha, 55 the sons of Barkos, the sons of Sisera, the sons of Temah, 56 the sons of Neziah, the sons of Hatipha. 57 The sons of Solomon's servants: the sons of Sotai, the sons of Sophereth, the sons of Perida, 58 the sons of Jaala, the sons of Darkon, the sons of Giddel, 59 the sons of Shephatiah, the sons of Hattil, the sons of Pochereth-hazzebaim, the sons of Amon. 60 All the temple servants and the sons of Solomon's servants were 392. 61 The following were those who came up from Tel-melah, Tel-harsha, Cherub, Addon, and Immer, but they could not prove their fathers' houses nor their descent, whether they belonged to Israel: 62 the sons of Delaiah, the sons of Tobiah, the sons of Nekoda, 642. 63 Also, of the priests: the sons of Hobaiah, the sons of Hakkoz, the sons of Barzillai (who had taken a wife of the daughters of Barzillai the Gileadite and was called by their name). 64 These sought their registration among those enrolled in the genealogies, but it was not found there, so they were excluded from the priesthood as unclean. 65 The governor told them that they were not to partake of the most holy food until a priest with Urim and Thummim should arise. Totals of People and Gifts 66 The whole assembly together was 42,360, 67 besides their male and female servants, of whom there were 7,337. And they had 245 singers, male and female. 68 Their horses were 736, their mules 245,1 69 their camels 435, and their donkeys 6,720. 70 Now some of the heads of fathers' houses gave to the work. The governor gave to the treasury 1,000 darics2 of gold, 50 basins, 30 priests' garments and 500 minas3 of silver.4 71 And some of the heads of fathers' houses gave into the treasury of the work 20,000 darics of gold and 2,200 minas of silver. 72 And what the rest of the people gave was 20,000 darics of gold, 2,000 minas of silver, and 67 priests' garments. 73 So the priests, the Levites, the gatekeepers, the singers, some of the people, the temple servants, and all Israel, lived in their towns. And when the seventh month had come, the people of Israel were in their towns. Footnotes [1] 7:68 Compare Ezra 2:66 and the margins of some Hebrew manuscripts; Hebrew lacks Their horses . . . 245 [2] 7:70 A daric was a coin weighing about 1/4 ounce or 8.5 grams [3] 7:70 A mina was about 1 1/4 pounds or 0.6 kilogram [4] 7:70 Probable reading; Hebrew lacks minas of silver (ESV) Acts 17 (Listen) Paul and Silas in Thessalonica 17 Now when they had passed through Amphipolis and Apollonia, they came to Thessalonica, where there was a synagogue of the Jews. 2 And Paul went in, as was his custom, and on three Sabbath days he reasoned with them from the Scriptures, 3 explaining and proving that it was necessary for the Christ to suffer and to rise from the dead, and saying, “This Jesus, whom I proclaim to you, is the Christ.” 4 And some of them were persuaded and joined Paul and Silas, as did a great many of the devout Greeks and not a few of the leading women. 5 But the Jews1 were jealous, and taking some wicked men of the rabble, they formed a mob, set the city in an uproar, and attacked the house of Jason, seeking to bring them out to the crowd. 6 And when they could not find them, they dragged Jason and some of the brothers before the city authorities, shouting, “These men who have turned the world upside down have come here also, 7 and Jason has received them, and they are all acting against the decrees of Caesar, saying that there is another king, Jesus.” 8 And the people and the city authorities were disturbed when they heard these things. 9 And when they had taken money as security from Jason and the rest, they let them go. Paul and Silas in Berea 10 The brothers2 immediately sent Paul and Silas away by night to Berea, and when they arrived they went into the Jewish synagogue. 11 Now these Jews were more noble than those in Thessalonica; they received the word with all eagerness, examining the Scriptures daily to see if these things were so. 12 Many of them therefore believed, with not a few Greek women of high standing as well as men. 13 But when the Jews from Thessalonica learned that the word of God was proclaimed by Paul at Berea also, they came there too, agitating and stirring up the crowds. 14 Then the brothers immediately sent Paul off on his way to the sea, but Silas and Timothy remained there. 15 Those who conducted Paul brought him as far as Athens, and after receiving a command for Silas and Timothy to come to him as soon as possible, they departed. Paul in Athens 16 Now while Paul was waiting for them at Athens, his spirit was provoked within him as he saw that the city was full of idols. 17 So he reasoned in the synagogue with the Jews and the devout persons, and in the marketplace every day with those who happened to be there. 18 Some of the Epicurean and Stoic philosophers also conversed with him. And some said, “What does this babbler wish to say?” Others said, “He seems to be a preacher of foreign divinities”—because he was preaching Jesus and the resurrection. 19 And they took him and brought him to the Areopagus, saying, “May we know what this new teaching is that you are presenting? 20 For you bring some strange things to our ears. We wish to know therefore what these things mean.” 21 Now all the Athenians and the foreigners who lived there would spend their time in nothing except telling or hearing something new. Paul Addresses the Areopagus 22 So Paul, standing in the midst of the Areopagus, said: “Men of Athens, I perceive that in every way you are very religious. 23 For as I passed along and observed the objects of your worship, I found also an altar with this inscription: ‘To the unknown god.' What therefore you worship as unknown, this I proclaim to you. 24 The God who made the world and everything in it, being Lord of heaven and earth, does not live in temples made by man,3 25 nor is he served by human hands, as though he needed anything, since he himself gives to all mankind life and breath and everything. 26 And he made from one man every nation of mankind to live on all the face of the earth, having determined allotted periods and the boundaries of their dwelling place, 27 that they should seek God, and perhaps feel their way toward him and find him. Yet he is actually not far from each one of us, 28 for   “‘In him we live and move and have our being';4 as even some of your own poets have said,   “‘For we are indeed his offspring.'5 29 Being then God's offspring, we ought not to think that the divine being is like gold or silver or stone, an image formed by the art and imagination of man. 30 The times of ignorance God overlooked, but now he commands all people everywhere to repent, 31 because he has fixed a day on which he will judge the world in righteousness by a man whom he has appointed; and of this he has given assurance to all by raising him from the dead.” 32 Now when they heard of the resurrection of the dead, some mocked. But others said, “We will hear you again about this.” 33 So Paul went out from their midst. 34 But some men joined him and believed, among whom also were Dionysius the Areopagite and a woman named Damaris and others with them. Footnotes [1] 17:5 Greek Ioudaioi probably refers here to Jewish religious leaders, and others under their influence, in that time; also verse 13 [2] 17:10 Or brothers and sisters; also verse 14 [3] 17:24 Greek made by hands [4] 17:28 Probably from Epimenides of Crete [5] 17:28 From Aratus's poem “Phainomena” (ESV)

Grace Chapel Podcast | Leiper’s Fork, TN
ACTS // Story 25 (Paul in Athens)

Grace Chapel Podcast | Leiper’s Fork, TN

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 35:07


The post ACTS // Story 25 (Paul in Athens) appeared first on Grace Chapel.

The Greek Current
Alexandroupoli: A center for US-Greek cooperation

The Greek Current

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 16:04


Increased US-Greek cooperation at the port of Alexandroupoli has highlighted its geostrategic significance for the transatlantic alliance, becoming a key element in shaping the bilateral relationship. As the port sees increased activity, many locals believe that increasing operations at the port and railroad will eventually benefit the rest of Evros as well, bringing new businesses and well-paid jobs to the region and motivating locals to stay. Steven Tagle, who is currently based in Alexandroupoli, joins The Greek Current to talk about the significance of this port city for the US-Greece relationship, look into the plans currently underway to upgrade the port, and explore how local residents view these developments.Steven Tagle is a fellow from the Institute of Current World Affairs funded by the Stavros Niarchos Foundation. He previously served as speechwriter for the US Embassy in Athens and as a Fulbright Fellow in Greece. Read Steven Tagle's latest dispatch from Alexandroupoli here: US military operations reflect Greece's strategic significanceYou can read the articles we discuss on our podcast here:Greece to raise minimum wage for the second time in 2022Greece to raise minimum wage again this year, PM saysTurkey, Armenia hold 'constructive' first round of normalization talksTurkey, Armenia hold first talks on normalising ties in years 

Atlanta Braves
The Buck Belue Show (01.14.2022)

Atlanta Braves

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 41:47


Hear "The Buck Belue Show" every weekday morning from 10-11a on 680 The Fan and 93.7 FM, the 680 The Fan App available on Apple and Android, with your Smart Speaker by saying Alexa or wherever you get and listen to your favorite podcast! Get the latest with the Georgia Bulldogs, Atlanta Braves, Atlanta Falcons, Georgia Tech, the World of College Football, newsmakers and more! Buck's BIG Take Is Kirby going to lose one of his big coaches back to the NFL  Mike Bobo joined Buck on his Buck's Beats Podcast and talked about a variety of topics including his future which we hear him talk about. Hear the full conversation at The Podcast Park BuckBelue Show Headlines presented by Grease Monkey Auto Atlanta Hawks have made a trade Stetson Bennett's Big Decision Georgia are awaiting a decision from QB Stetson Bennett on if he will be returning to Athens for another year or not Buck's College Football Nugget presented by Ace Hardware not only will Kirby be celebrating the National Championship this weekend at Sanford Stadium but Coach Smart will also be working this angle over the weekend NFL Top 5 NFL Playoffs this weekend giving us some fun matchups and Buck and Jordan talk about the Top 5 storylines coming from them Georgia Bulldog Roundtable presented by Georgia's Own Credit Union, Georgia Pack and Load, Haug Law Group, AAA and Attorney Ken Nugent Is the strength of the 2021 team going to turn into weakness of the 2022 team? What's Poppin' hot topics from around the world of sports and entertainment  The Final Word one that will make all the non Georgia Football fans happy See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Late Kick with Josh Pate
Georgia's National Championship Impact | Late Kick Live Ep. 226

The Late Kick with Josh Pate

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 55:48


Late Kick Live Ep. 226 features Josh Pate reacting to the UGA National Championship win and the impact it could have not only on the Bulldog program but also the rest of College Football. Will the way Kirby Smart went about winning it all have any influence on how other coaches of major programs make decisions across the country? How sustainable is the model in Athens? We also discuss several programs that need to step up like Penn State, Miami, Texas, USC, Tennessee, Texas A&M, and more. Which team could be the next to join the main event conversation? The Transfer Portal continues to be the hottest topic around College Football with several big names on the move. On tonight's show we get the latest whispers and intel on who could be headed where. All that plus we revisit some of the biggest takeaways from the 2021 College Football season. Follow Josh on Twitter: @LateKickJosh Follow Josh on Instagram: @LateKickJosh Follow Josh on TikTok: @LateKickJosh Have a question for Josh? Email the show! Follow or Subscribe to The Late Kick with Josh Pate on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe to the 247Sports YouTube Channel! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

History of Persia
63: The Little Pharaoh That Could(n't)

History of Persia

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 34:20


After Artaxerxes I came to power in 465 BCE, a minor rebellion broke out in western Egypt led by the would-be Pharaoh Inaros II. Inaros quickly came to a stalemate with the local satrap, but in 460 BCE the Egyptian rebel reached out to Athens for aid. The Athenians came in force, broke the stalemate, killed the satrap (and Artaxerxes' uncle), and joined Inaros as he marched on Memphis. Swords, Sorcery, and Socialism Apple | Spotify | RSS | Twitter Patreon | Support Page Twitter | Facebook | Instagram --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/history-of-perisa/support

Atlanta Braves
The Buck Belue Show (01.13.2022)

Atlanta Braves

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 39:50


Hear "The Buck Belue Show" every weekday morning from 10-11a on 680 The Fan and 93.7 FM, the 680 The Fan App available on Apple and Android, with your Smart Speaker by saying Alexa or wherever you get and listen to your favorite podcast! Get the latest with the Georgia Bulldogs, Atlanta Braves, Atlanta Falcons, Georgia Tech, the World of College Football, newsmakers and more! Buck's BIG Take, Buck gives credit to some unsung heros for Georgia in the National Championship Game Bulldogs Exit? AJC's Mike Griffith joined Buck yesterday part of the discussion turned to who will be leaving and staying in Athens now the season has wrapped and where that will leave the Dawgs Buck Belue Show Headline presented by Grease Monkey Auto record setting ratings for the National Championship Game Atlanta Falcons need to know where they stand with this player as they start to prepare for the future that will also set a precedent for the leadership of this organization. NFL Top 5 a look around some of the top topic in the NFL with Buck and Derrick Buck's College Football Nugget presented by Ace Hardware some TE news coming out of Athens for the Dawgs and that room is full of talent and a shout out to the latest DGD going into the College Football Hall of Fame Georgia Bulldog Roundtable presented by Georgia's Own Credit Union, Georgia Pack and Load, Haug Law Group, AAA and Attorney Ken Nugent former Georgia Offensive Coordinator Mike Bobo joined Buck on his Buck's Beats Podcast and we hear some of that conversation What's Poppins' quick hit topics around the sports world with Buck and Derrick The Final Word Dawg Nation get ready to celebrate this Saturday in Athens See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Good Life Project
Agapi Stassinopoulos | How to Speak to Spirit

Good Life Project

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 60:28


When you think about the word “prayer,” does it repel you, trigger you, or draw you in? My guest today, Agapi Stassinopoulos, offers a way into this sometimes loaded word that is both inclusive and powerful, no matter your beliefs, your background, or relationship with any kind of organized religion. The type of prayer she invites us to invoke operates on a very different level. One that anyone can get behind, and find connection and solace from. And this idea, along with many specific examples, is the focus of her newest book, Speaking with Spirit: 52 Prayers to Guide, Inspire, and Uplift You.Agapi is what I like to call a walking hug. She embodies love, which in fact is the translation of her name. A best-selling author and speaker who inspires audiences around the world, after being raised in Athens, Agapi was trained in London at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art, but then shifted direction, focusing her wisdom, words and presence away from the theatrical stage, getting her master's in psychology and speaking more directly to the hearts and minds of people with intention of inspiring us all to live better lives. She's authored numerous books, spoken to organizations around the world, from L'Oreal, Accenture, and LinkedIn to Google, Nike, Starbucks, Museum of Modern Art, and hundreds of others. In today's conversation, we dive deep into what happens we muster the courage to speak aloud a hard truth, a deep need, open to vulnerability, and reconnect with something bigger than ourselves. If there was ever a time to embrace this idea, it's now.You can find Agapi at: Website | InstagramIf you LOVED this episode:You'll also love the conversations we had with Agapi in a prior episode that shares more of her personal story, and the experiences that have shaped her.My new book is available!Order Sparked: Discover Your Unique Imprint for Work that Makes You Come Alive today!Check out our offerings & partners: KiwiCo: KiwiCo delivers science and art projects for kids of all ages. Redefine learning with play and get 50% off your first month plus FREE shipping on any crate line with code GOODLIFE at kiwico.comSleep Number: Adjustable firmness, comfort and support on each side. Proven quality sleep is life-changing sleep, which starts with Sleep Number adjustability. It's time for Sleep Number's Lowest Prices of the Season. Save up to $1000 on Sleep Number 360® smart beds. Plus special financing, for a limited time. Only at Sleep Number® stores or sleepnumber.com/GOODLIFE.OUAI: Get healthy hair & soft skin with our nourishing formulas. Does your hair need a Detox? Leave last year's build-up behind and start the year feeling refreshed and ready with OUAI. Go to theouai.com and use code GOODLIFE to get 15% off your entire purchase. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Ad Navseam
They've Lost their Marbles!: Lord Elgin and the Parthenon Sculptures (Ad Navseam, Episode 70)

Ad Navseam

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 73:27


The fact that many of the marbles from the Parthenon reside in the British Museum (London) has been controversial since they first landed there in the early 19th century. In this complex tale Lord Elgin has often played the villain—he being the one who greedily had the sculptures removed from Athens to decorate his drafty Scottish mansion. But is the story that simple? In this episode Dave and Jeff tell the whole story front to back with an eye to several questions: does Elgin perhaps deserve a bit more sympathy than he usually gets? What are the arguments for keeping the artifacts in London, and for repatriation? Why should Lord Byron—noted defacer of Greek monuments—get a pass? My goodness, what on earth happened to Lord Elgin's nose? And, will the guys ever stop attempting Scottish accents?  

The Late Kick with Josh Pate
National Championship Recap | Late Kick Live Ep. 225

The Late Kick with Josh Pate

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 54:50


Late Kick Live Ep. 225 features Josh Pate reacting to UGA winning the National Championship Monday night beating Alabama in Indianapolis and erasing an over four-decades drought. With Kirby Smart winning his first title in Athens, what will this mean for the Bulldog program moving forward? How significant was this night for the fanbase and for College Football in general? What was the scene like in the stadium as well as back home? Josh also discusses what this season was like for Nick Saban and Alabama. Is this one of the best coaching jobs we've seen from Bama despite a loss on the big stage? What does the future hold for this group of players and how much can be taken away from what we witnessed Monday night? All that plus we begin a look back at what many have labeled as the greatest College Football season in a generation. What were some of your favorite moments looking back over 2021? Follow Josh on Twitter: @LateKickJosh Follow Josh on Instagram: @LateKickJosh Follow Josh on TikTok: @LateKickJosh Have a question for Josh? Email the show! Follow or Subscribe to The Late Kick with Josh Pate on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe to the 247Sports YouTube Channel! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Mark Arum
The Mark Arum Show 01-11-22

Mark Arum

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 58:22


Today on the show: we soak it all in. Steak Shapiro the importance of the #nationalchampionship. Sandra Parrish live in Athens. Plus, a #GoDawgs themed Would You Rather with Lil Sanjay! 4-7pm on 95.5 WSB. #preesh

The Drive with Lon Tay & Derek Piper
01/11/22 Hour 1: Georgia Wins the National Title; Anna Jefferson (Former Intern) from Athens

The Drive with Lon Tay & Derek Piper

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 52:44


Lon and Trevor discuss Georgia's first title win in 40 years over Alabama, and welcome in former 93.5 intern Anna Jefferson, who currently attends UGA and has a boots-on-the-ground report on the party scene in Athens.

The David Pakman Show
1/11/22: COVID Takedown Fails as Urine Therapy Promoted

The David Pakman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 60:30


--On the Show: --Yanis Varoufakis, former Finance Minister of Greece, Professor of Economics at the University of Athens, and author of several bestselling books including most recently "Another Now: Dispatches from an Alternative Present," joins David to discuss the future of the global economy, Europe and the European Union, and much more. Get the book: https://amzn.to/3GlYGR2 --Republican Senator Mike Rounds admits that Republicans lost the 2020 presidential election plain and simple, and it causes Donald Trump to absolutely lose it --The MAGA revolt continues as former Republican US Senate candidate Daniel McCarthy now calls Trump a fraud and tells Trumpists they were "frauded" --Fox News reporter Peter Doocy, freshly back from a COVID infection, once again tries to take down Joe Biden's White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki on the topic of COVID and vaccines, but fails miserably --In a completely incoherent rant on Fox News, former Republican Vice Presidential candidate Sarah Palin claims that liberals want to "pound pound pound" the idea of sex into the minds of Americans (???) --David is banned from Facebook's monetization program for 90 days over an apparent misunderstanding about a recent vaccine-related story --Anti-vaccine lunatic Christopher Keys is now recommending so-called "urine therapy" to treat COVID, a bogus "treatment" --Voicemail caller has an absolutely mindblowing, and possibly completely inaccurate, take on why David didn't get COVID when his girlfriend did --On the Bonus Show: US Russia talks end with "no progress," first-ever heart transplant from gene-edited pig succeeds, Senator Jon Ossoff will introduce bill banning members of Congress from trading individual stocks, much more...

The Midday Show
Georgia Bulldogs Championship Parade Details

The Midday Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 9:05


The Georgia Bulldogs are National Champions! Fans will have an opportunity to celebrate their Dawgs' on Saturday with a Championship parade in Athens. And 92.9 The Game will be broadcasting LIVE at Grindhouse Killer Burgers.

Junkyard Dawgcast
247Sports College Football Daily: Party like it's 1980! Georgia bucks the bully

Junkyard Dawgcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 13:50


Kirby Smart stuck to his QB guns and Stetson Bennett delivered — with a little help from his defense — a national championship to Athens for the first time since 1980. Host: Trey Scott   Guest: Lance Glinn Follow or Subscribe to The College Football Daily on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Find the 247Sports podcast for your favorite team here! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The College Football Daily
Party like it's 1980! Georgia bucks the bully

The College Football Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 13:50


Kirby Smart stuck to his QB guns and Stetson Bennett delivered — with a little help from his defense — a national championship to Athens for the first time since 1980. Host: Trey Scott   Guest: Lance Glinn Follow or Subscribe to The College Football Daily on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Find the 247Sports podcast for your favorite team here! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Data Skeptic
Water Demand Forecasting

Data Skeptic

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 26:00


Georgia Papacharalampous, Researcher at the National Technical University of Athens, joins us today to talk about her work “Probabilistic water demand forecasting using quantile regression algorithms.”

Spiritual Shit
Ep. 146 Do You Believe In The Power Of Prayer ? Ft. Agapi Stassinopoulos

Spiritual Shit

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 57:16


AGAPI STASSINOPOULOS is a best-selling author and speaker who inspires audiences around the world. With her new book, Speaking with Spirit, 52 Prayers to guide, inspire and uplift you A collection of 52 prayers and stories to inspire, unlock inner strength, and get your daily God fix. She believes Prayer is your ongoing conversation with something larger than yourself. And similar to mindfulness practice, a daily prayer practice has the power to change your life. Regardless of whether or not you practice organized religion, this gift is available to you as a way to unlock greater awareness and inner strength. With her signature joy and heartfelt wisdom, Agapi Stassinopoulos presents a non-denominational guide to harnessing this power of prayer in your life and using it to find connection, peace, and gratitude. In her previous book, Unbinding the Heart: A Dose of Greek Wisdom, Generosity, and Unconditional Love, she shares the wisdom from her life's adventures and experiences. In her new book, Wake Up to the Joy of You: 52 Meditations and Practices for a Calmer, Happier Life, she takes readers on a journey and inspires them to let go of what doesn't work and instead create the lives they really want. Agapi was trained in London at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art and then moved on to receive her master's degree in psychology from the University of Santa Monica. Her previous books on the Greek archetypes, Gods and Goddesses in Love and Conversations with the Goddesses, were turned into PBS specials. She is currently conducting workshops for Thrive Global, a company founded by her sister, Arianna Huffington, to help change the way we work and live. She divides her time between New York and Los Angeles and was born and raised in Athens, Greece. Find her HERE and buy her new book HERE -------------------------------------------- Work with me here: Thelovelyalea.com Become a Patreon Member to get behind the scenes, extra content, and workshops. Become a $10 member for our monthly workshops and a $25 member to be a part of our mystery school community! patreon.com/thelovelyalea Follow me on Instagram instagram.com/thelovelyalea ( Remember I will never DM you for readings - watch out for Scammers ! ) Buy my Manifest Courses at manifestthem.com and my workshops at Spiritualshitschool.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/alealovely/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/alealovely/support

Postcard Academy Travel Podcast

Now is the time to book your summer travel (or winter if you live somewhere like Australia).So where are you headed?My friend and travel buddy Michelle Warner Martin joins me today to talk about what travel has been like for us over the last two years during covid; what the travel scene is like now; and which trips we're excited about in 2022. Michelle is a fantastic photographer whom I traveled with to Athens, Greece right before the global pandemic shut things down. Can't wait to travel with her again!http://www.michellemartinphotography.com/Hello! I'm your host, Sarah Mikutel. But the real question is, who are you? Where are you now and where do you want to be? Can I help you get there?Visit sarahmikutel.com to learn how we can work together to help you achieve more peace, happiness, and positive transformation in your life.Book your Enneagram typing session by going to sarahmikutel.com/typingsessionIt's not super easy for U.S. citizens to get visas to live and work abroad (and the U.S. gov doesn't make it easy for people to come in either). But millions of Americans have figured out how to create a life overseas, and so can you.Here's my cheat sheet of the nine easiest countries to move to from the U.S.https://www.sarahmikutel.com/countryguide

How To Love Lit Podcast
Homer - The Odyssey - Episode 1 - Greek Gods, Greek Heroes And One of The Oldest Epic Poems Of All Time!

How To Love Lit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022 55:30


Homer - The Odyssey - Episode 1 - Greek Gods, Greek Heroes And One of The Oldest Epic Poems Of All Time!   Hi, I'm Christy Shriver and we're here to discuss books that have changed the world and have changed us.    And I'm Garry Shriver and this is the How to Love Lit Podcast.  This week we embark on a seafaring adventure across the seas and through time to the ancient world of the Greeks to meet  someone who some have said is the greatest poet to have ever lived- Homer- and his second epic- The Odyssey.      To be honest, I think I agree with that assessment.      That's high praise. How does one get to that level?    I know.  It really is.  I guess, one way of looking at it may be attrition- how many poets do we still read from 3000 years ago.  That's not a large club.   We certainly don't have anyone in the English language canon that is competitive, but it's more than Homer basically invented the coming of age novel with the Telemachaie; he invented the flawed hero, as I choose to understand Odysseus.  In many ways, his epics, although they are poems, are pre-runners to modern day novels.   They are pre-cursors to fantasy.  Heck, even the success of the Marvel movies to me suggest a thinly veiled nod to Homer.  What is Superman or Wonder Woman if not demi-gods?    Well, if I may weigh in, although I don't feel even remotely qualified to suggest someone is the greatest poet to have ever lived, but what impresses me the most is the level of psychological and archetypal insights into the nature of man that crosses through culture.  Of course, I've heard of a lot of the characters and several of the stories, but I was impressed by how relatable Odysseus is.  And although so many of his adventures at sea are fantastical- they feel like hyperbolic expressions of what I go through- For example, what is Scylla and Charybdis if not being caught between a rock and a hard place?  Another thing that fascinates me is the order he wrote them in- at least the order as we think them- the first one, The Iliad, and then some years later, as an older man, The Odyssey.  That's also psychologically interesting- The Iliad has its version of a hero- Achilles is idealistic, proud in large and obvious way, self-righteous, vindictive even.         It's young man's idea of heroism versus The Odyssey and its version of heroism- a much more nuanced.  He also gets revenge, but it's slow and not very reactionary- he plots, he lies, he bides his time- things we learn by life beating the hound out of us.      I think that is well said.  Studying Homer for me is also very intimidating historically.  There is so much history and culture- beyond just the language differences just between my world and Homer's- 2600 years- give or take.  The language is different.  The culture is different. The geography and the religion are literally worlds and worlds away, and I'm not very confident I can understand the context.  And if that weren't scary enough, when you realize that Homer may have been describing events that may have preceded him by perhaps another 400- 1000 years or so, depending on who you believe- I just get lost in the math.  I might as well be saying, “A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away…”.   It's foreign and mysterious.  Lizzy asked me today as I was sitting on my computer reading some research on the Mycenaens what book I was working on and I said, “Research for ‘Homer's The Odyssey'” – to which she replied, “Sounds boring.”  And Lizzy listens to our podcasts!!  But on the screen of my computer were broken pieces of pottery and archeological data, not super-man and wonderwoman.    Ha!  Well, if you can't guilt-trip your family members into listening to you, even if you are boring, what hope do you have?  But, I totally understand where she's coming from, over the years, I've taught a lot of history from US to Europe to World, and the Ancient World, and I love it.  I will admit, though, even though a lot can be fascinating with the ancients, there's no doubt the farther back in time you go, it can be very difficult to conceptualize.  It is also a lot more guesswork.  Ancient Greece feels far away because it IS far away, and often we don't know what we're looking at when we see it. I hate to keep coming back to the arrogance of the present, but we really have to guard against looking at ancient peoples as primitive thinkers just because their technologies were not advanced.  I mean, honestly, which of us could survive one week on an island?  I think Survivor has proven that that's not happening.    Ha!  Those people always lose so much weight! Survivor also proves that the most cunning and deceptive you are- Odysseus style, the more likely you are to survive, but getting back to the historical side of it.  Did the Trojan war really happen?  And if it did, what was it?      That's a great question.  For years and years, even centuries- the greatest minds said no.  If Troy existed, we would know it.  And just for context, in case you are unfamiliar with the story, the story goes that there was a woman, today we call her Helen of Troy, but she wasn't Trojan, she was Greek, and she ran away with a young lover- named Paris- to a city called Troy across the ocean.  Her sister's husband, King Agamemnon, launched 1000 ships and all the Greek kings and heroes to get her back for her husband Menelaus.   The war to get Helen back took ten years before the Greeks were finally able to penetrate the wall, theoretically using a gigantic horse and a gimmick devised by Odysseus.  The story goes that Odysseus and a few others hid inside this gigantic horse.  Everyone else hid and pretended to return to Greece.  They left the horse there claiming that it was a gift to the god, Poseidon.  The Trojans brought the horse inside the gate, Odesseus came out, unlocked the gate and the Greeks sacked the city.    For forever, no one thought this place even existed with any real certainty.  We couldn't find it.   Until an outrageous and bombastic but exceedingly wealthy amateur self-proclaimed archeologist by the name of Heinrich Schliemann set out to find it in the 1860s and actually did.      Outrageous and bombastic sounds kind of like code for a schmuck?    Well, he did have a few personal issues as well as professional ones.  For one thing, he wasn't trained in archeology, so he just went around blasting everything he saw – to the point that- Historian Kenneth Harl has said that Schliemann's excavations did to Troy what the Greeks couldn't do, destroy and level the city walls to the ground.    Oh no, that's terrible.       Well, it really is and he destroyed a lot of history.  He wanted so badly to get to the jewels belonging to Helen of Troy that he actually blasted through the actual walls of the city.  But, that being said, there is something to the fact, that he actually found the walls of the city and was something no one had done before him.  He found tons of gold and all kinds of very important things- he claimed his loot belonged to people like King Priam and Agamemnon including a very important solid gold.  One of the most famous is still called The Mask of Agamennon.  This, of course, has mostly been debunked by actual archeologists who know how to properly date archeological finds, but that being said, he found stuff that is real and validated many of the events referenced by Homer, albeit in myth form.   And if you ever  have the opportunity to visit Athens, you can see the mask of Agamennon in the National Archeological Museum.  Anyway, The best historical sources we have suggest that the Trojan war actually happened and took place around 1183 BC.  Not everyone is willing to say it lasted ten years or that was fought on the scale the Homer describes with thousands of ships, but we now believe it did happen.    Well, we are less likely to believe it was sparked by petty gods and goddesses and fought by demi-gods fathered by goddesses who dip their children in magical rivers that make them mostly immortal.  But I will say, I wish they would find a mask of Helen.  I would love to see what the uncontested most beautiful woman in human history, daughter of Zeus.      True, Christy, there is so much I don't know about all the myths of the gods and goddesses, and before I started researching for this podcast seris, honestly, I thought the story of the Illiad was the story of the Greeks sacking Troy.  I have to admit I got my information from the movie Brad Pitt made called Troy.  There are so many gods and goddesses and furies and nymphs and creatures and shapeshifters.  It's overwhelming.      True, the Illiad ends with the death and funeral of the Trojan hero, Hector,  and his father very sadly begging for his body and returning it home- not the sack of Troy.  In other words, the Greeks haven't won.  That's a story you get from other places.  The Odyssey references the Trojan horse when Telemachus goes to visit his father's old war buddies, but there is not a Homeric version of the Brad Pitt movie.  I was disappointed to find that out myself.     Speaking of things that have proven disappointing about Homer, One of those things is that we don't know him or even if there IS a him.    I know this is controversial and not universally accepted, but I will say from the get-go, that I am of the persuasion that Homer was an actual person who actually composed both pieces.  Although I'm sure there was a collection of traditional myths, like we saw with the Iroquois confederacy that were passed down orally from generation to generation, I believe that there was a man named Homer who drew from the myths kind of like Shakespeare did in our English tradition from popular stories he knew people recognized, and he composed his own pieces- one being the Iliad- where he doesn't retell the entire story of the war, but focuses on one hero and one aspect of it- and the other being the Odyssey- where he again focuses on one person.  Obviously I'm not an archeologist or a university professor with a degree in classical studies and I'm not prepared or qualified to argue with anyone who is.  But, I've read enough from those who are to convince me of that.    Do we know anything about Homer at all, assuming as you do, that he existed?    Not really- to be honest.  Most traditions claim that he was blind, although I can't find any real compelling reason for that belief except there's a blind poet named Demodacus in the Odyssey that sings at the court of the Phaeacian king- which I wouldn't think means anything at all, except that the ancients themselves took it for something- so if they believed it, maybe it was so.  Oh, This is interesting, there is one tradition that believes Homer was a woman- based in large part to the prominence Homer gives women in the text- that's my favorite theory, but a minority view for sure.  No ancient scholars were making that claim.  Tradition, and by tradition, we're talking about a couple thousand of years- so that's a long time for a tradition to develop- but traditional views consider him to have been  a male bard, or what today we call a professional singer/songwriter.  No one really knows where he's from.  Although, at least seven different places claim him; the most convincing arguments, at least for me, suggest he came from islands that are actually closer to Turkey then mainland Greece- more specifically the island Chios which is in the Aegean sea but close to Smyrna, modern day Izmir.  But maybe he came from Ios or Cyme.        If you are not all that well acquainted with the geography of the Mediterranean Sea or the Aegean ocean, I'll try to create a mini-map in your mind's eye.  Think of the big Mediterranean sea being a like a giant lake, and mainland Greece jets kind of halfway between Turkey and Italy with all of these scattered islands everywhere that go with it.  So, the part of the water that is between Greece and Turkey we call the Aegean Sea.  I don't want to oversimplify to people who know their maps, but, I've learned over the last couple of years, it's harder for those of us who use GPS  all the time to see the world in terms of maps, the way we old-schoolers used to have to do all the time- no disrespect. I definitely love my GPS over a paper map- but there's the trade-off.   I guess a good linked-in question might be, do we need maps anymore?      Anyway, Ancient Troy or modern day Hissarlik is on the north side of this inlet.  If you go down about 120 towards the Mediterranean you run into Chios and Smyrna.  Both of these places are about 158 miles across the ocean from Athens.  So, today, by modern standards they don't take long to get from one to the other, but obviously if you make the gods make, like Odysseus did, it can take up to 10 years.  But, Garry, beyond the geography of Greece being so different from other parts of the world because it's so based around a culture of the sea, I have trouble understanding the different periods- the Bronze Age, the Iron Age, all that stuff.  Can you give us a two minute crash course?    Sure, well we usually call what you're talking about this age of the early Greek glory years where they built the big palaces with the gigantic walls with the gods and heroes that were larger than life- the Mycenaean civilization- and the dates for that, generally speaking, are between 1650-1200 BC.  We really don't think of the Myceans as having a writing system like we think of today-  they likely had some ways of using script perhaps to mark things for business, but the culture and stories were passed down by an oral tradition.  The most important city-states, at least this is what we think today, were some of the ones we see in the Odyssey for example Mycenae was home to the legendary King Agamemnon and Pylos was the home of King Nestor.  All of these city states worshiped the same gods and spoke the same language, but politically, they had different kings.  Kings had to be strong.  Piracy was a way of life and not even considered immoral.  We think today that these people were highly aggressive and warlike amongst themselves as well as against outsiders.  They also made their armor out of Bronze- hence the Bronze Age.  So, back to the Iliad, Helen, the most beautiful woman in the world, was the queen of Sparta.  If we referring back to your little mental map- Sparta, Mycenae and Pylos are on the other side of mainland Greece- the side closer to Italy.  The ruins from those cities show big walls and lots of wealth. Sparta is about 300 or so miles across the sea, pass the mainland and into the Aegean Ocean.  This would have been the warpath to Troy but honestly, we really don't know what happened and that is not even just about this particular war.  We don't know for sure what happened to any of these towns.  What we do know is something devastasted all of these beautiful city states.  They were burned to the ground and whatever happened caused this area to fall into a period called the Dark Age- because we know nothing about it.  Almost the only thing we really know is that during the Dark Age, there was a transition from Bronze weapons to the much stronger Iron ones.    The big changes and the big cultural movement that shaped the world- at least the Western world- like we think of today comes out of the next period- the one following the Dark Age. We call this one the Archaic period which we consider to be from 800-500BC.  This era as well as the next are where we get things we're familiar with like the Olympics, the new sophisticated writing system- the Greek alphabet- democracy- like we associate with Athens.  And to make things even more confusing, the big Greek guys that we think of- like Plato and Aristotle and the “Golden Age” do not coincide with Homer- they come much later.  So, it's a lot of history- for us on the American continent who are mostly immigrants from other parts of the world- be it Europe, Africa or Asia, it's more than we can really even conceptualize- our entire nation as we understand it as a nation is less than 250 years old.  If we add what we know of the Indigenous people like the Iroquois confederacy into our timeline -we still fall short by thousands of years- Dekcadeakoah wasn't born til 1200 AD, at least that's our best guess.  So- there's your historical context in the two minute nutshell.  Does that work?    Well of course, so- to summarize even more Homer, a man who comes this Archaic period 8th century BC,  was writing about people who claimed lived during the Mycenaean civilization a full 400 before his life time- so if we want to give Odysseus, the man, an age- he's like 3000 plus years old-  Like I said before- for me it is basically “A long time ago in an galaxy far far away”...and yet…it's not… I want to start out by reading the first page of Fagle's translation- and then let's jump into the story itself- because for me-and I mean to disrespect to history- you know I love history- but I think you will agree with me- that it's not the history of this story that has kept it around for 3000 years.  It's not the religion; it's not the culture.  Homer writes the story of our lives- all of our lives- and we keep coming back to it generation after generation for that reason.      Read page 77    Okay- Christy- I think there's one more thing I think we need to clarify- there are so many translations.  Does it matter?    Well, I think the answer to that is the same if you ask that question about translations of the Bible- whichever you like personally-- which I may add- if you want to compare when Odysseus lived with Biblical characters, Moses arguably lived about 200 years before Odysseus-my best guess from my looking at the most respected timelines for each of these guys – but I stand to be corrected -if you have an article that parallels the two histories, I'd love to see it- email it over.  The more important point- and in some sense this is true for any text- but it is especially true for ancient texts- it's not the nuance of the language that matters really at all.  It's the essence of the ideas of the stories- the universal truths.  Most of the millions who read these stories every year can't read the original Greek. And although those that can really talk about the beauty of  all that- that part is lost on us.   It's not the translation that is going to make or break the story.  The Rouse translation, which, by the way, is the one we used when I taught this text to freshmen in Wynne Arkansas, was the first one I knew and the only one I knew for a really long time.  I really like it because I know it.  But, the knock on it is that it's prose and the Odyssey was not written in prose.  It's by far one of the lesser respected ones today. A lot of people today prefer Robert Fagle's translation because his book is really easy to read but he tries to make it sound like poetry.     Well, for the record, I am using Rouse's translation. I picked up Fagles, but I ended up preferring Rouse's because I wanted to read the story in prose instead of verse, for me that's easier.  But just so I know, Christy, assuming we were Greek and could understand this as it was originally composed what would it be like.    Good question- not that anyone knows for sure- but the general understanding is that it was written in meter- dactylic hexameter to be exact.  DAH -duh-duh- One accented syllable with two unaccented syllables in a row and then each line would have six of these.  Now, this is just me, but I really compare these ancient bards to modern day rap artists.  The Bards that would go around singing these stories- would improvise- but would use the beat to kind of keep them on course- obviously it didn't sound like rap, but it's the same skill that we see rap artists do when they improvise and you wonder- how can they think of all those rhymes?  Well, the trick is to already have little phrases in your mind that you know will make your lines work.  In the case of the Greek bards, they would have these epithets, or phrases they would use to describe the names of different gods- these lines that keep repeating throughout- would help them keep up with the demands of the meter.  So what does that mean- that means when you hear them say, as we will “Bright-eyed Athena”- he's adding syllables to make the meter work.  If that makes sense.      So, the descriptions don't necessarily mean that her eyes are the most important thing about her- it's just to make the music work?     That's it exactly.  The thinking is we aren't supposed to read too much into those kinds of things.  Also, the bards themselves used a very specialized vocabulary which was a mixture of different Greek dialects in order to make it all work.   This is a tangent, but it's kind of interesting, there was a classical linguist named Milman Parry who really wanted to figure out how in the world Homer could memorize so many lines.  You know the Odyssey has over 12,000 lines.  Well, Parry, by studying modern day illiterate singer/songwriters in Bosnia.  He came to believe that Homer didn't memorize anything- he had these patterns, these phrases and names of the gods that he knew rhymed well and fit the pattern and he would just tell the story and improvise the language for every different audience- he'd end the lines with the phrases and patterns that rhymed.  Maybe like professional comedians who do comedy improv in “Who's line is it anyway?”  So, in my mind, a Greek bard is something between a cross between a rap artist and modern day improv comedian.     HA!  Well, there's some creative analogies, but I get it.  Honestly, the idea of improvising makes it cooler than if Homer just wrote a piece of writing and then just read/chanted/sang the same thing over and over again.  As a musician, it reminds me of what Jazz musicians do or even bands in general.  You know, and this is really going to sound nerdy, but every once in a while, I have some buddies that I've known from years ago- we all went to the same church at one time- but many have moved out of Memphis- but we get together about once a year and do something like this. We'll go to a friend's house with our instruments, bring up some good ole' rock and roll music that we like and just improvise.  We all know the songs, but the specific variations, solos- that sort of thing- will be just be stuff that we make up.    Parry thought a Homer show was exactly that- every time he performed The Odyssey it was totally new.  But again, this is all total speculation- no one knows.  It's just too long ago.  So- having said that, back to the question you asked, for most of our purposes none of this stuff really matters- the translation doesn't matter, that Homer may or may not even have been a person, or a male or a person with vision who wrote with letters at all- or that the text itself may not even have been a fixed text or a story with improvised performances- all of those things- all though interesting- are really not the reason we love these stories and teach them in the ninth grade- at least around here.  It's this Homeric universe- this fantastical story- this hyperbolic creation  that has magnified the human experience.  Homer gave us a  new way to conceptualize our world- and a way to feel about the events- both controllable and uncontrollable that plague our lives.  Every once in a while, someone shows up in the world that can produce such a space.  In some ways we could say that Tolkien did this with Middle Earth, that JK Rowling did it, that CS Lewis did it, even George Lucas did it- each of those artists conceptualize entirely new and different universes- and when we spend time in their work- whatever medium we use- can inhabit that universe.  We can understand our world better through their world- it's fantasy.  So, Homer was the first that we know of to do this at the scale in which he did.  This is not to say that there are not legends and stories that predate him- there most certainly are- but they don't exist, that I know of, in this full length single unit form- not like what we have with Homer.  But yet, there is more to it than even that, although that is quite a feat.    Homer defined reality for a large number of people for centuries- maybe even still- and I'm not sure those other writers that I just listed out can say that.  The Greeks for hundreds of years, were able to ground their reality on the backs of the principles, morals, the world view that was laid out in his work- The Illiad and The Odyssey.  It helped people answer basic questions like- how do I conduct myself in the world.        Let's look at those first lines again and go through them-    “Sing to me of the man, Muse, the man of twists and turns driven time and again off course, once he had plundered the hallowed heights of Troy.”    Christy, is Homer telling us his entire story in the first lines.    Yes- of course he is- first of all, I do want to point out that Homer does not take credit for his story.  He is going to say it was given to him from a Muse.  That's interesting and really Jungian- so, I'll let you speak to that since that's your cup of tea-    Ha!  Well, he's basically saying, it's not that he made up the story- but he found the story or the story found him-the Muse is the originator- the idea being that the story existed before him in some larger context- that there is something here greater than he is.    And of course, all religious traditions speak to this reality, but since you referenced Jung, so does psychology.  There is something greater… and that is his starting point.    Exactly, and then he brings up why we love Odysseus- he was a man of twist and turns.  You know James Joyce who wrote that incredibly complicated masterpiece Ulysses was asked why he wrote his masterpiece about Odysseus- Ulysses is the Roman way to say Odysseus- and he famously responded that he was the only complete man in literature.  Odysseus, as we are going to see is a different kind of hero.  In the Iliad which is the book that came first, the Achilles is a demi-god. He's perfect.  He is totally beautiful, totally powerful, totally honest- that is something he took pride in. He never had to lie, he never had to back down- he was bigger and stronger and could overpower anyone.  That's not Odysseus- he was amazing- for sure.  But he wasn't the absolute biggest- he had to rely on lies- he sacked cities but he also got sacked himself- he had twist and turns- and for two reasons- on the one hand, the gods had agendas that had nothing to do with him that affected his world, but also he, himself,  made choices that steered him way off course.      Odysseus is a hero- for sure-   he definitely gets all the women- haha- if you want to look at it that way- but he's the kind of hero- we as mere mortals might aspire to be.  His life didn't turn out the way he wanted it, but he still wins at life- and actually he gets to make choices that allow him to live the kind of life he ultimately figures out he wants for himself.    Exactly- and Homer shows us how to make that happen.  In this Homeric universe that is safely far away- full of monsters and goddesses and magic- we can test drive some of the things we'd like to do if we could.  In this magical place we see consequences for things like running your mouth when maybe you shouldn't. But we can get some good ideas at how to get back when we're being exploited- ways that are smarter than just running our mouth.   Maybe by watching Odysseus we can get ideas about how to correct the course of our personal odyssey, we can figure out success that looks like for ourselves in our mundane realities. At least, that's the idea.    And yet, Christy, it is magical and otherworldly with characters we don't know.  I'll just be honest, as a person who doesn't know a lot about mythology, am I going to get confused the farther into this I read?  So far, so good, but I'll admit I haven't finished the whole thing yet.    Again, back to Homer's brilliance- the answer is NO.  Homer is going to build a pantheon of gods that is manageable and knowable.  And this is brilliant.  Just like other polytheistic faiths there are hundreds of gods in the Greek pantheon- but how do you wrap your brain around 600 or so? Homer is going to reduce it to a few- the Olympians.  He's going to create a hierarchy we can understand and he's going to personalize the gods so that we can know them.  As we read the story, we meet them little by little.  We learn who they are, what they value, how they operate- and of course- how we appease them and stay out of trouble. First and foremost- we meet Zeus- he's the chief, the god of the sky- protector and father of all the other gods and humans.      We're also going to learn an important principle, that will explain a lot about life- both to us and the ancients- there are things that are in the hands of the gods, but there are also things that are in our control.  We can control what we can control but then there are times we can strive hard and still meet disaster.  Sometimes, we have offended the gods; sometimes they just like us- sometimes we are just victims of happenstance.      Yes- exactly- and how do we account for that?  Let's keep reading…    Page 78    So, we met Zeus- he's the god of the sky- now we get to meet Poseidon- he's the god of the sea- he's Zeus' brother, but he is way more unpredictable and volatile- hence the behavior of the sea.  The big three are Zeus, Poseidon and Hades- God of the Sky, God of the Sea and God of the underworld.  We meet all three in the Odyssey- and in some sense, this brings order to a universe.      There are powers out there- things we can't see but that determine our fate- but are also arbiters of justice.  There is also a spiritual battlefield- spirits- invisible forces, however you want to understand the world- energy forces larger than our own humanity can see through our natural senses- there is a story that is larger than our story, but we play a part.   Sometimes we are just a speck in humanity, but other times we are not invisible, even to these larger forces.    Of course, as we think through this, although, not many of us adopt Greek mythology as our spiritual worldview, there is a lot there, that most of the world still accepts as truth- even if you're a monotheist.    Exactly- those are the major big boys- but there are a few others that we're going to meet.  We meet Hermes pretty quickly and we quickly understand his role in the role- he is a messenger.  He's Zeus' son, but not with his wife, Hera.  Zeus is always getting in trouble with his wife because he has fidelity issues.  But Hermes, as we will quickly learn is in charge of messages.        After we meet the men, we will slowly meet some of the important women of Olympus.  The first one here is probably my favorite goddess- Athena, she might be everyone's favorite goddess. She's a virgin, not controlled by a man, ha- but a goddess of both wisdom and war.  She's awesome.    I don't know that she's everybodies- Aphrodite has fans.      Yeah- you're right- but she's a trouble-maker.  Aphrodite makes you like fall madly in love with someone you know is no good for you- or be sexually compelled to do behave improperly.    Some would say that's low impulse control.      Yes- but those would not be the ancient Greeks.  They would say it's Aphrodite's fault- you are listening to her- that was Helen of Troy's problem.  But back to Athena    Athena seems she likes Odysseus.      She DOES!!  And that's how Odysseus wins.  Someone is watching over him and he is sensitive to her leading.  Athena is the goddess of wisdom, and Odysseus is attuned to this sense of wisdom in the universe.  She speaks to him, guides him, and most importantly, Athena enables Odysseus to always keep his cool. Odysseus, we will see, with a few exceptions, is led by wisdom- not by lust,  not by uncontrollable rage- by god-given wisdom.  Seeing people as being visited by outside forces that inspire them one way or the other is not a bad way of understanding why people are the way they are- even if you don't believe in gods and goddesses- which for the record, I don't personally, but this is my understanding of the ancient Greek worldview.  In the Homeric Universe, men and women are led by one god or goddess for the most part- not by a variety of different ones.  We mentioned that Helen of Troy is attune to Aphrodite, the goddess of sexual love- that's who's giving her direction.  But Odysseus is attuned and sensitive to Athena.  Athena takes credit not for Odysseus' strength, although he is strong, not for his ability with a bow and arrow, which we'll see he's pretty good at that too, but she takes credit for his wisdom.  The Odyssey is a story of this collaboration- there are things that we can't control, but there are things we can, and if we control the things we can, the universe, a goddess or someone outside of ourselves can and will intervene on our behalf with grace and kindness.  It's a way to organize our thinking about how the universe works- a very old way of thinking about how the universe works.     Let's quote Zeus here- again from the Fagles translation- as he explains the responsibility of humans- at this point in the story- Poseidon is out of town, so to speak- he's off in Ethiopia receiving offerings by the hundreds.  And with him away, Athena will make her play to save Odysseus' life, but we also see this philosophy of the Greeks explained here in the beginning of how and why things work out the way they do.    Page 78      But now let me read what Athena says back to her father= here she demonstrates the role the gods play in the destinies of man    page 79-       And so we have our narrative hook.  The gods will intervene in the destinies of men.  Calypso has been holding Odysseus hostage.  Hermes is being sent with a message from the gods forcing Calypso to release Odysseus.  At the same time this is happening,  Athena will visit Telemachus' Odysseus' son back in their hometown, Ithaca.  Telemachus was a newborn when Odysseus' left.  He is now 20 years old.  For ten years Odysseus fought in Troy.  Then after angering Poseidon, he spent the next ten years wandering lost at sea.  Telemachus has been left to be raised by his mother and a man named Mentor (guess where got that word).  Anyway, there is trouble in Ithaca which we'll find out about next episode, but more importantly than that, it is time for Telemachus to take his own journey and go out into the world on his own.        The Odyssey can easily be divided into three parts- the first four books are about Telemachus' journey to visit all of his father's war buddies.  The second part is Odysseus wandering around the magical seas, and the third is what he finds when he gets back to Ithaca, how he finds his beautiful and faithful wife and what he sees in his palace estate.  The first part, which we'll tackle. Next episode is about the coming of age from a boy to a man. After that we'll look at what all these seas trials are all about and then finally, we'll discuss some ideas about the famous finale in our finale.    Well, it sounds like we have a plan.  You know, the Iliad is a pretty straight forward narrative- a linear timeline and a kind of tragic ending.  The Odyssey is written in circles.  It's winding with endless setbacks but it has a happy ending.      I think that's exactly the right way to look at it.  They are both charming and enduring books but for different reasons, my book club recently just finished reading the latest take on the Iliad.  Madeline Miller wrote a novel called The Song of Achilles from the perspective of Patroclus that we read and really liked, but it was sad too.   If we ever analyze the Iliad, we'll get into the appeal of that book- it certainly is there- but if we just look at what's appealing the Odyssey – I think the ending is definitely a factor- many of us know what it's like to offend the gods, experience the wrath of Poseidon, maybe even the lures of Aphrodite or Circe – we've also likely been jilted by suitors or friend-enemies- as we call them nowadays- we can live vicariously through this steady under pressure goddess led hero- and maybe be inspired to face down our monsters- maybe we can even do a little listening for Athena and learn to bide our time and wreck havoc on our foes if we need to.  But mostly, we all want that heart-warming reunion after a long absence with our loved-ones and own home- we want to rest in the prophecy that old Greek prophet Tiresias gave Odysseus during his visit to the underworld- that when our time comes death will steal upon us a gentle painless death, far from the seas it comes to take you down, borne down with the years in ripe old age with all your people there in blessed peace around you.”                                      

The Chase Thomas Podcast
College Football National Championship Game Preview Georgia vs Alabama, Dillon Gabriel To Oklahoma and Jim Harbaugh NFL Rumors With Matt Green. Plus, CBB With Stats By Will and Tennessee Titans With Charlie Burris of A To Z Sports

The Chase Thomas Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 117:49


Outsider and Blue Wire's Chase Thomas is joined by fellow University of North Georgia alumni Matt Green to talk about the 2022 CFP National Championship game between UGA and Alabama, how Georgia can flip the script this time around, the possibility of limiting Bryce Young, matchups to watch out for, Gabriel spurning UCLA for Oklahoma, Calzada to Auburn, Jim Harbaugh and the Raiders possibilities, and much more (3:00). Then, Stats By Will returns to talk about this week in college basketball, Johnny Davis breaking out for Wisconsin, more Tom Crean sadness in Athens, Tennessee's offensive issues, Baylor and Gonzaga's continued dominance and much more (60:00). To wrap, A to Z Sports' Charlie Burris sits down with Chase to talk about the Tennessee Titans getting back Derrick Henry this week, how the team is No. 1 in the AFC, AJ Brown's importance, the dominant defense and if they can make the Super Bowl (90:00). Host: Chase Thomas Guests: Matt Green, Will Warren, Charlie Burris Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices