Podcasts about Connects

  • 1,724PODCASTS
  • 2,547EPISODES
  • 32mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Dec 5, 2022LATEST

POPULARITY

20152016201720182019202020212022

Categories



Best podcasts about Connects

Show all podcasts related to connects

Latest podcast episodes about Connects

Be Great With Nate
How your muscular pain might be coming from another area of your body and how it connects to your emotions/Life Stories with Bob Fanelli

Be Great With Nate

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 71:28


How your muscular pain might be coming from another area of your body and how it connects to your emotions/Life Stories with Bob Fanelli I'm excited to share my mentor and guest on today's podcast episode! Bob and I talk about how deeply connected the body is. From trauma, storytelling, beliefs, organ inflammation, and the kinetic chain, there are many reasons why someone will have muscular pain and injury. Bob has been trained in Kinesiology, Exercise Physiology, Psychiatry, Energy Medicine, and Applied Functional Science, and his life's passion is to remind people that they are always 'whole'. Wholeness is never lost. It is only forgotten. You are always whole. You are always complete. You just may not be fully realized yet. I am also excited to announce that Bob and I created a course together called "Move to Freedom, Helping you get out of Pain Today." This course will be available on The BeGreatWithNate Acadamy. We hope you enjoy this podcast episode! More on info on Bob Fanelli: Website: https://www.bobfanelli.com/ Email: bbd@bbdinfo.com Podcast Details:

Daily Detroit
Soapbox Detroit connects people to where decisions are made

Daily Detroit

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 27:42


One of the most impactful ways to make change in your community is through local advocacy. But with tons of departments, boards and meetings, how do you know where to make your voice heard? That's where SoapBox Detroit comes in. It's a newsletter service that surfaces the public information you need to know have your say in the city of Detroit's decisions. He's got big plans for the service that could change how people connect with their government not just in the Motor City, but across the country. Daniel Arking, the creator, joins me on the podcast today. More: https://soapboxdetroit.com/ Thanks to our sponsor today, your Metro Detroit Edward Jones Financial Advisors.  Feedback: https://forms.gle/MnwUf8uJEtpyG9m2A or dailydetroit -at- gmail -dot- com

Hey Spirit! With Theresa Caputo
Wendi Connects and Continues to Honor The Loss of Her Departed Son

Hey Spirit! With Theresa Caputo

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 51:17


Wendi, a mother who lost one of her three triplets just eight years ago, had been searching for a connection to her son, Lawson. Theresa was able to see him on the other side and helped Wendi lift the numbing feeling of losing through signs, symbols, and validations. The ways in which she carries her son's memory with her through life and especially through the holidays can truly be an inspiration for some of us who may be grieving. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Passionistas Project Podcast
Danay Escanaverino Celebrates, Elevates and Connects People in the Latin Community

The Passionistas Project Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 43:04


We presented Danay Escanaverino with the 2022 Passionista Persist Vanguard Award for her great work celebrating, elevating and connecting people in the Latin community. She is an award-winning Latina serial entrepreneur, a speaker and a community builder. As CEO of Boutique Digital Agency, Luna Sol Media, she connects brands to Latino consumers, delivering millions of leads and sales to her clients. A Cuban immigrant and the daughter of a political prisoner, she's fiercely passionate about elevating the Latino community. As founder of Latina Meetup, she has introduced thousands of Latina brands to millions of consumers, and as the founder of Amigos, she has facilitated hundreds of job recruitments, grants, scholarships and other resources for Latino professionals.   Read more about Danay Learn more about The Passionistas Project   FULL TRANSCRIPT: Passionistas: Hi, we're sisters Amy and Nancy Harrington. We founded The Passionistas Project to tell the stories of women who are following their passions and fighting for equality for all. The more we spoke with women for our podcast, subscription box, and the annual Power of Passionistas Summit, the more we saw a common trait in all of them — they are unstoppable. Whether they choose to use their voices to start a women-owned brand, or fight for the rights of the marginalized, we found that all Passionistas are resilient, compassionate, and persistent. Each year we honor women who embody these qualities by presenting the Passionistas Persist Awards. This episode of the podcast is an interview with one of the 2022 recipients. Our next award is the Passionistas Persist Vanguard Award, which honors a woman who's leading the way in the development of ideas and building communities. The award will be presented by Julie DeLucca-Collins and Dāli Rivera, who nominated this year's honoree. Julie is the founder and CEO of Go Confidently Services and the host of the popular Casa de Confidence Podcast. Dāli is the creator of the Diversity and Anti-bullying Academy. Julie: Hello everybody and welcome. My name is Julie DeLucca-Collins and I am here with my friend and Dāli Rivera to honor our friend and colleague Danay Escanaverino. She is being honored with the 2022 Passionistas Persist Vanguard Award for her great work celebrating, elevating and connecting people in the Latin community. Danay Escanaverino is an award-winning Latina serial entrepreneur. She's a speaker and a community builder. As CEO of boutique digital agency LunaSol Media, she connects brands to Latino consumers, delivering millions of leads and sales to her clients. A Cuban immigrant and the daughter of a political prisoner, Danay is fiercely passionate about elevating the Latino community. As founder of Latina meetup, she has introduced thousands of Latina brands to millions of consumers. And as a founder of Amigos, she has facilitated hundreds of job recruitments, grants, scholarships and other resources for Latino professionals. Danay is a board member of Latinas in Business and is a mentor for several accelerators and Latino youth programs. She's pretty amazing. Julie: Danay congratulations and thank you again, for all of the work that you do on behalf of Latinas and women overall, you embody this award. So thank you for being here. Danay: Thank you, Julie. And thank you Valley for this gorgeous award. And thank you to The Passionistas Project. I have to tell you that, when you do stuff that you're so passionate about, and you get recognized, it's just that much more amazing because it means that people get it, people get the impact of what you're so passionate about. And so I really I'm absolutely humbled, especially being presented by two women that I am so, so much a fan of. So yeah, I'm super thrilled. Thank you so much for this award. I'm absolutely humbled and very happy to receive it. Julie: Thank you, you embody the award. And the one thing that you mentioned that I definitely want to ask you about is what are you passionate about? Danay: I am passionate about Latinos, the Latino community and specifically about us being unified in supporting each other. And that's my thing. I'm an immigrant. I came from Cuba when I was a little girl. My dad was a political prisoner. And even though, since the 2016 election, where the conversation about Latinos turned really sour and it was all about how we were a drain on the economy and a drain on the immigration system, and that's not what I grew up with. I grew up in Miami, in thriving neighborhoods and businesses. We make the economy go. We've brought the economy back from the last two recessions. We lead in job creation, we lead in business creation, we lead and entrepreneurialism. I just want to continue to change how we talk about Latinos and how we support each other as a community. And so I'm super, super passionate about that. And that's kind of why I do the things I do. That's why I'm really big into community and making sure that we foster opportunities for Latinos to lead and Latinos to help each other out. Julie: I totally understand and admire that sentiment because it's very much aligned with mine. I also grew up in Miami and I know from the Miami community and also the New York community that I have been so closely tied to, that Latinos definitely are always there to contribute always there to lend a helping hand. And we are going to raise every boat with our tide. We feel very strongly that what we have to offer is not just for us but for everyone. And I love that you're passionate about that. And you're really shedding a light into that. I loved every work that you have done in Clubhouse since I've met you. And since knowing you I knew that I needed to connect you to Nancy and Amy and the Passionistas community. Nancy and Amy are phenomenal individuals who are putting together a group of powerful women and through the summer, the Power of Passionistas really embodies the spirit of women who are making a large impact like you are in communities around you using gifts and talents. What does the power of Passionistas mean to you? Danay: The power is in the name, right? So when you're passionate, and you're led by that passion, I think that just translates into power and it's up to you how you want to use that power. So really, it's all in the name for me. And then, I'm a big old geek, I'm a dork. Anybody who knows me knows that I love learning. I adore the fact that there's going to be an event where we all get to learn from the community from each other from the leaders in the community. I think that's huge because there's so much power in the wealth of knowledge that's being shared. I'm excited to be part of this community. And I can't thank you enough for introducing me to it. Julie: You really embody a Passionista. You are so passionate about your community, you are passionate about lifting everyone up. And I think that this is a great opportunity for people to know that something that they feel passionate about their roots, especially in in our current world. We are we're living in a society now that tends to want to minimize the voices of women. And I so appreciate the fact that not only are you allowing to be platforms for women and minority women to be able to speak up but be awarded with grants, opportunities, and also highlighted for the amazing work that they're doing. So this is so much in alignment with being a Passionista, and I so love everything that you're doing. And I cannot be more tickled pink, because I'm a girly girl, that you are here is one of the Passionistas as well. Dāli: And Danay, I must say before I ask my questions that you have been such an inspiring individual in my life, and as well as in many other people's lives. Every time I tell people about you, I say check her out. And they're like, oh my gosh, she's amazing. Because you do what you say you're going to do. And you always have that lens of where can I help others? What can we do together and you are a great, great mentor. And it's so nice to see Latinas like you doing that for our community. And you have also educated us so much on the power that we hold, because until I met you, I wasn't aware that we had so much economic power that we pulled out of the recession. We weren't the reason why. And I was like holy smokes. Why don't more Latinos know about this? I think that if more Latinos knew if more Latinos came to the night and heard this from her, there would definitely make a difference in how they use their purchasing power. I just wanted to add, that'd be for a question. But do you have a time where you felt that you really had to persist? Danay: I mean, I think we all do, right? I have my struggles. I've had my struggles. I came over here as an immigrant. We were poor. My dad was an alcoholic — very, very toxic childhood. I was the only woman in many spaces. In my in the in the early parts of my career, I would go to trade shows with like, 10,000 people and I was like one of maybe a few women and definitely the only Latina in meetings. My gosh, I remember, the first time I went into a board meeting as a director of marketing for a company, a startup that had been acquired, and the CEO, I guess he didn't like my confidence and he actually tried to belittle me and asked me to order coffee for everybody, when really I was there to make a presentation about all of the things that we were working on. So, and stuff like that has happened consistently in my life. But I have something that I feel like it's a superpower and that is my perspective. My perspective is, I am so lucky, I literally won the frickin' like life lottery just for the fact that I get to live in the United States and I get to chase my dreams and my goals. And it's all on me. I get to bring people with me along for the ride, when they want to come with me, and if they're ready, and that's why I'm always trying to educate our community that we're super powerful. Change your perspective, a lot is wrong in society, a lot is wrong in the world, a lot is wrong in this country —— but a lot is right. And mostly the opportunity is right. I have 60 something cousins and aunts and uncles still living in Cuba, who have absolutely zero future, zero opportunity. They can barely make ends meet. There are no answers. To me, there's nothing there. So that's my perspective, every time I feel like something is difficult or I have something to overcome, that perspective reminds me, okay, but you're in a position of real, real privilege because you have opportunity, and it's on you. Dāli: I love something that you said in there that there's so much positivity, so much goodness that we can focus on. And I think that's what draws so many people to you. You make us see all of that stuff and especially when we feel like we're stuck, or that there's no options, you use that that positivity to emphasize that and remind us about that. Why is it important for women to lifted each other up? Danay: Because if we don't do it, who's going to do it? And nothing against men, I have some amazing men in my life, that I have a lot of respect for. Heck, my best mentor was my big brother. But they navigate through life with a totally different lens. Everybody has a different lens based on so many different variables. And so you don't know what you don't know. It's like my kids. My kids don't know what it's like to be poor. My kids don't know what you know what it's like not to be able to pay for your light bill. And so I can tell them as much as I want until I'm blue in the face about what it was like growing up without anything, but they'll never know. So that's kind of the same thing with men. Men just don't know, the challenges that women face. They can be great allies, but you don't know what you don't know. And so, because we are women, we have that in common, we understand those challenges that we face. Whether it's misogyny, whether it's, pay inequality, all of the different wonderful challenges that women face. So it's up to us to help each other out. It's up to us to elevate each other and really walk that walk with each other, because nobody else is going to do it. So it's our responsibility and we need to take that responsibility and really help each other out. And, be sisters and do our thing for each other help each other out. Dāli: And I think that the more that we have that conversation, and see leaders like yourself, taking that on and actually taking action, a lot more people are going to follow. And that's going to just change our future. I know it won't happen overnight but I already have seen so much positivity in like women's mindset of let's help each other out. We're not competition, we're just gonna rise together. Julie: I totally agree with what Dāli is saying and I haven't known you as long as dally has. Since the inception of Clubhouse, when I came in, you were immediately a person that I felt like, oh, I found my people. You are definitely providing opportunities for people to be educated, inspired. You have tangible ways in which, as community members we can connect and really lift each other up. And this is something that you're leading the way. Because a lot of people like we've talked about before, can consider a strong passionate woman competition. But I believe that we are stronger together we can go farther together. And this is what you're providing overall for the people that come in contact with you and it's amazing. I so appreciate that and you do embody this award. Nancy and Amy are definitely so correct to be able to honor you for the work that you're doing. Danay: I thank you for that. Again, it's very humbling. I really don't know how to take it other than people are noticing the work and that's what's really important to me. And so I accept it with tremendous humility and tremendous love. Julie: I wanted to mention something that you said, because I think that many women have been in those shoes in which they walk into the boardroom for the first time and they are immediately wanted to be pushed around. And you didn't do that. And I think that we have to create environments in which women hear the story in which maybe there is a male presence that wants to belittle your efforts or your presence, and we have to teach people how to treat us. And I think you are doing that for yourself, but you're forging the way for those that are coming behind us to also know that listen, just because we come from as immigrants or we come from a diverse backgrounds doesn't make us less than. And you are teaching people to define you by the people that you support, you influence and you help. So thank you for that example, as well. Danay: That is one of many stories that framed my life. And I'm sure so many people can relate to those types of situations. I really think that it's been the status quo for a really long time where women were the secretary, or they were supporting staff. And so I think it's just one of those things that men are not used to, especially in the boardroom, especially in the C suite or anywhere where decisions are made. And so they're just going to have to get used to it. And they're going to have to figure out how to navigate in a world where we make decisions, and we're, we're in the C suite and we're making those power plays. It's more than about time. So I love being able to share that story, even though it's embarrassing, because nobody wants to say, hey, even though I was at a certain level that I earned, my boss decided to try to embarrass me. But I think sharing stories like that really reminds everybody that nobody's alone in this. We all deal with it. So there are definitely ways to work with it and persist with it. Julie: Well Danay, I have five nieces and the youngest is nine, and you are showing them that they belong. You are showing them that we have representation. You are creating for them a vision of what is possible for them. So I thank you for that. Danay: Thank you. Dāli: Now looking back at all of that you've accomplished where you are today. Did you at the age of 15 ever imagine the life that you have right now? Danay: Yes and no. So, when I was 15, I was actually really angry. First of all teenagers, hello. And then secondly, growing up with an alcoholic father being embarrassed about that, being Latina, being an immigrant, a lot of those things made me feel like I wasn't good enough — the imposter syndrome thing and all of that stuff. On the one hand, no, I couldn't visualize it. But on the other hand, I always had something inside me, that said, prove everybody wrong. You're not going to be the statistic no matter where you came from or what you came from. I refused to be the person that people assumed I would turn into, because of my circumstances. And so yes, that part, the angry part of me that was like, no, I'm not gonna let anybody define me. There's more to this. And I couldn't visualize it, right? Because if you don't grow up around like wealth, and you don't grow up around entrepreneurs, and you don't grow up around people doing well that looked like you, you really don't know. For me growing up in the projects, I thought that someone who had a two-bedroom, one-bath house in a working-class neighborhood was rich. That was my understanding. So that's why I say I couldn't visualize it. But I could, in a sense that I knew I was going to do something — something of substance. I just didn't know what at that time. Dāli: I can relate to a lot of what you said, because I think of people who are on a larger stage like say Tony Robbins and he shares the same exact I'm sure that you have shared that your conditions were not perfect, they're not ideal and you refuse to become that statistic or that negative, whatever people expected of you. And there are so many kids who choose to be what they're in, and then others who do totally the opposite thing. And it's really beautiful to see that because it just shows the power of your mindset at a young age to start making those moves gradually — not really knowing exactly where it's gonna lead to but it's not that negative experience you're in. And I always tell my kids, my 14- and 15-year-old about you are Julie, all the women that I find so inspiring that have come from conditions that are less than desirable. And I remind them, look, you have no excuse, there are ways to achieve what you want to even if you don't really understand exactly what you want, just start exploring. And like Julie said earlier, she's got nine nieces, I actually have 11 So there are so many little girls that now have you to see. And hopefully one day we'll get to see you on a huge stage nationwide because we need more Latina representation. I used to take it for granted saying that representation mattersbut there really is a lot of truth to that. It's so important. And a lot of people just laugh at that. But then you hear people talk about their success and they mentioned something like, oh, when I was this old, I saw so and so and I'd never seen somebody like me. It's crazy that you don't know what kids are watching or listening to whatever that person might be seeing could be the person that just helps them turn their life around or routes their life to this great success. Passionistas: We're Amy and Nancy Harrington, and you're listening to The Passionistas Project Podcast. Are you looking for the perfect holiday gift for the women in your life? Visit ThePassionistasProject.com to order our subscription box filled with products made by women-owned businesses and female artisans to inspire women to follow their passions. Get a free mystery box with a one-year subscription using the code WINTERMYSTERY. Now here's more of our Passionistas Persist Awards ceremony. Julie: Danay, we've talked a little bit about how you elevate people in the community. But for the people who are new to the work that you do, could you talk a little bit about the actual work that you do day in and day out to elevate the voices to elevate the community, and to really push forward initiatives that help to support the Latino community? Danay: First, let me tell you a little bit about what I do for a living. I own a digital agency. I've been in digital marketing for over 25 years. I joke that I'm a digital dinosaur but really I am. And so I have the privilege of working with brands to connect them to multicultural consumers, mostly Latino consumers in the US and in Latin America, also in Spain, and Portugal. And so I have this point of view, that's very different. Because being that I have to deal with the data, I see just how important we are as a demographic. We represent over two trillion in GDP. Two trillion in GDP. That's a country. That's like right behind Italy, or France, I can't remember which one it is. We're like number seven, or eight or nine. But my point is, we create the GDP of a country. Not even a developing nation, like a full-on country. When I see those numbers and I see what we represent — and I do a lot of work with market research and because we want to make sure that our clients know how important it is to work with us — I see that and it absolutely fuels me because I know most Latinos do not know this information. Again, that narrative has always been pretty damn negative. And it's just gotten worse since that election. So I really, really wanted to make sure that number one we were educated about how important we are. And then number two, that I could find resources leveraging the clients that I work with, to really help out. And what I mean by that is when I launched Meetup, for example, in 2018, I made everything free. Everything was free. We had this multi-city tour of events where we had Latina professionals come in. I had sponsors that wanted to reach this demographic fund these events. And what did we do, we gave free headshot photography to every single woman that showed up that wanted to have a new professional headshot. We introduced Latina brands at all of these events so that they didn't have to pay to be marketed to their demographic. All of that was free. And a lot of professional development opportunities, again, all of a free because I really believe that the brands could fund that and we could have all of these resources for people that really needed them. We did a bunch of like scholarship opportunities. We give away a lot of free marketing to the community. So when the pandemic hit in 2020, we couldn't have any in-person events anymore. So I translated that into we started having Zoom events. But it really didn't feel the same. And then Clubhouse happened. And I got onto Clubhouse in December of 2020. I can't remember anymore. So, I just got on there, and I didn't see any Latinos, but my brain was already — the synapses were sparking. And I was like, there's something here, there's something here, there's an opportunity. So I just started having these networking events every single morning. And every single morning, we get more people joining and more people joining. And the community ended up, being like 38,000 strong. And we started having events where we featured Latinos you should know which really has been a great integral part of tha. We've interviewed Latinos that are doing great things in our community, whether they're an author or a speaker. I mean, we had the president of the Girl Scouts. We had so many amazing people. I just wanted to make sure we connected them with our community so that we could support Latino initiatives. We've done recruitment events to get people jobs. We've done educational stuff. All of it framed around supporting our community and giving opportunities and connecting people with opportunities — like we did with the Comcast grant initiative. There are so many things that I want to talk about but we don't have all day. Those are some of the things that we've been able to do with these communities, always keeping everything 100% free, because I really believe that the brands will support it. Julie: As a business and life strategy coach the opportunity to present small BIPOC community with grant opportunity. And you've connected them with a major brand, which is Comcast. And you're bringing these spaces where people can come and find out, hey, how can I get money from my business? How can I grow? How can I expand what I am doing? And I think that that is so terrific. And I appreciate all of the efforts. I also love, I'm a big proponent of social media audio like Clubhouse is a great place to be able to connect with individuals. You've made some great introductions and bringing guests that are relevant. We do have these conversations where people that are Hispanic descent and LatinX are really showing the world that we matter, that we also can speak with our dollars and can bring an influence to what is happening around in our communities. Dāli: As you were creating Latina Meetup and Amigos on Clubhouse. One of the things that I know for sure, that has made people feel accepted is that you invite them to be participants by hosting their own rooms and promoting themselves. And that is huge because so many people will only allow you to do that if you pay. And this is very powerful because the people who have started — like I remember I found you through Facebook on Latina Meetup — and then you invited me to this thing on Clubhouse's Amigos Club. I was like, oh, I had no idea what it was. And you asked, would you like to be a moderator? And I was like, sure, why not? I had no idea that this little thing was going to become something so huge. I'm forever grateful because growing up Nicaraguan in California, I never found a place or a community of Latinos where I felt included because I was always too different. Then I found Amigos and Latina Meetup and it's like, oh my gosh, I am home. And as we've had so many rooms, I always hear that from people. They always say, oh, my gosh, I found my tribe. I found my people. And we've had people from all over the world. We have had some Syrian-Mexican people, we've had Canadian Mexicans, we've had Colombian, Puerto Ricans. And it's like, whoa, mind-blowing, because we're also learning about our own diversity within our community. And that is really beautiful. The other thing that you always emphasize is the power of networking and collaboration. And people come into our networking rooms, and they say, hey, I just want to let you know that I got so many clients from this networking session, or we did this collaboration, and it was very successful. And I think when people hear that, and see the consistency of you always creating those opportunities in that space, people just keep coming, because they know that there's true value there. And what's really exciting now is that now that LinkedIn is doing their audio app to now we're moving over to that platform. And I think it's just going to be even bigger and greater because you have formed that essence that we are professionals trying to move up, trying to help communities and just trying to prosper, Dāli: Danay, said something that I want to go ahead and counter she said that she is a dinosaur in the digital space, but really she is an early adopter. She speaks my language. I am the first one who's going to try to adopt new technology. I'm not sure how it works at first but I know that this is one of her strengths. The fact that she explores and is not afraid. She is not a but kind of person. She is a yes and. And that adoption of technology of resources and being inclusive and creating the inclusive spaces for everyone. And again, one of the things that I've heard her say about the community, but also about what we do, is that yes, we are the Amigos Club of the Latina Meetup, but it's not exclusive to we are open to everyone and anyone who wants to be a part of the community and help to kind of link arms and go forward and move ahead and support one another in a way that we can continue to grow. That is rarely seen in many communities. A lot of communities like or I only do this and I have that. But this really speaks to me and how you embody this award of persisting no matter what the challenges are, and looking at the bright side of anything that you are doing. And making sure that you forge a way for others to have a seat at the table and be engaged in definitely benefit from all the different opportunities that come from being present. Danay: I will say that, when you said, having a seat at the table, I feel like we're creating our own table. We really are creating our own table. And we're creating our thought leaders and it's not a lot of work. Basically, when somebody has the passion to become a thought leader, for example, Dāli amazing work in the anti-bullying, parenting space. And I'm like, why isn't she on 20 million stages, talking about this because that's her passion. And she does amazing work with it. I mean, you just have to listen to one of her podcasts to see how great she is. She deserves to be highlighted. She deserves to be a leader. She deserves for people to look at her. And the same thing with you with the coaching and the confidence and the Tiny Habit stuff, which I absolutely adore listening to you're talking about it. You should be leading you should be people that other people are looking at for information, for knowledge exchange, for learning, for mentorship. And it's about time that we have our spaces where our community does that where our community can grow into leaders and show people their strengths because it's about time and you're there. Nobody's creating you. You guys are the creation. You guys are the thought leaders. So we need to have spaces where we can really, really feature you and focus on you. So yeah, I love that you said that about the table. I think we have our own table. It's an amazing, beautiful table to be sitting at where it's so multicultural and so diverse and yet unify all at the same time. Julie: When I look at the world is with the lens of my heritage, of my Hispanic heritage, I think yes, this whole table analogy is so important. Because in our countries, right, no matter how little you have, there's always a seat at the table for people you meet in the street, and come on over. I don't have a lot, but whatever rice and beans I have are yours. I love that mentality that we are inclusive and open and want to give a voice to the people who for so long, haven't had a voice. We want to rewrite the narrative of what many people believe or the view that people have when it comes to the Latino community. This is a community with buying power. This is a community highly educated, as well, with very strong roots. It's more than just the narrative that sometimes we might be presented to in our current media or current events. It's so important that people like you, Danay, especially through your work and many years, but really creating the space as we continue to move forward. It's super important. I so appreciate. I think that this is persistence that you have done this for so many years. Danay: I just wanted to say one thing that because we're talking about that table analogy. I'm sure we can talk like we can riff on this forever. I know you guys have heard this, I'll say it in Spanish. And then I'll translate it which is — donde comen cuatro, comen cinco. And it's if there's a space where four can eat, five can eat. And that's a huge, huge theme across all Latino culture. So yeah, I love that you said that. Julie: I've been the recipient of many tables that it's not a lot, but it's enough. And with a smile and a little music and a little dance, you can make a party happen. It's just the attitude, and the openness that again, you embody. One question for you. We talked a little bit about this but one of the things that you are the Founder of is the Mira.Click Program. Tell us a little bit about how you can enable bloggers and YouTubers that are Latino to monetize their traffic. Bcause I think that this is, again, another place where you are creating space for people to benefit from things that are out there already. Danay: This is an affiliate network and an influencer network. It's called Mira.Click. And basically, if you have any type of audience, and I'm talking about the five people who read your blog, or the 10 people who listen to your podcast, or the 100 people that follow you on Instagram, wherever your audience lives, there is a way to monetize that audience. The narrative has always been, oh, you need millions of followers to really make some money. You do not. You just need the right match for your audience. And so the network, the Mira.Click Network, brings in offers from brands. And then if you are someone with an audience, which we call an affiliate or an influencer or now the new term is creator, if you have an audience, you can jump onto the network, find brands and find programs and products and services that match your audience, promote them and make a commission. It's not always about generating a sale. A lot of the times it's about a click. We pay for clicks, sometimes. Sometimes we'll pay for a lead. Sometimes we'll pay for a phone call. Each offer is different. Each campaign that we have is different. We have hundreds of campaigns and different types of payout models. But the most important part about it is that there is a way for you to monetize your audience as a creator, affiliate influencer, however you want to call it. But yeah, there's an opportunity to monetize. Julie: That's terrific. And again, creating spaces and allowing people to leverage their buying power and allowing people to leverage what they're already doing to be able to move to the next level and improve. Danay, what's in the future for you. Danay: Oh, total world domination. Julie: The power being a Passionista for sure. Danay: The future is my goal right now is to continue to build our community and continue to teach people how to be influencers, some people already are, they just need a little bit of help with the branding or whatever. Again, always being free. So my view is, in the next two or three years, we're going to have an army of Latino influencers that are going to be doing great, whether they want to be paid as a creator or whether they want to be a speaker. But hopefully getting them to also continue to share the message that we are important, we are powerful and we need to stick together and be unified. So that's, in a nutshell. You know, a little bit of world domination. Dāli: Thank you so much for all the work that you do, and also for allowing us to be part of that journey. It's really special and I really feel blessed and privileged to be within your circle because. you've actually helped me grow personally and professionally. And, and I look forward to seeing the journey continue. Julie: Danay, I also echo with Dāli said. But I also want to follow up because one is one word that you want to leave with the listeners. They're not meant necessarily a Latino or part of the community but how can they participate and be a part of the community and part of our table and also make an impact? Danay: There is a word in Spanish that I use a lot. It's dalay, which means let's go. So for me, it's if you are passionate, if you're looking for a community, if you're looking to grow, to be mentor to mentor comm come hang out with Amigos and dalay! Lets go! Passionistas: Thanks for listening to the Passionistas Persist Awards presentation with Danay Escanaverino. And thanks to Julie DeLucca-Collins and Dāli Rivera for the amazing interview. To learn more about Julie visit goconfidentlycoaching.com. To learn more about Dāli, visit Dālitalks.com. To learn more about Danay, visit lunasolmedia.com. And if you're looking for the perfect holiday gift for the women in your life, visit thepassionistasproject.com to order our subscription box filled with products made by women-owned businesses and female artisans to inspire women to follow their passions. Get a free mystery box with a one-year subscription using the code WINTERMYSTERY. And be sure to subscribe to The Passionistas Project Podcast so you don't miss any of our upcoming inspiring guests. Until next time, stay well and stay passionate

Shout it out with Rosanna Palmer
Hope Connects You to Your Future

Shout it out with Rosanna Palmer

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 7:51


Hope Connects You to Your FutureSupport the show

Rabbi David Lapin's Matmonim Daf Yomi Series
Nedarim 36b How Empathy Connects Us - כוון דזכות הוא לו

Rabbi David Lapin's Matmonim Daf Yomi Series

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 17:31


When can we do things on behalf of others even without their knowledge?  Sources

Everyday Wine with Kris Levy
Ep. 59: How Wine Connects with Fitness with Margaux Alvarez

Everyday Wine with Kris Levy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 42:05


In today's episode, let me introduce you to Margaux Alvarez,Owner and Founder of Celeste by MA Fitness App & the G.O.A.T. wine. She is a small Business Owner, Winemaker, Competitive Athlete (7xCF Games, American Ninja Warrior, Titan Games, Tactical Games) and Fitness Coach.   Let's dive into his wine story!   [00:01 – 13:38] Margaux Alvarez on How Wine and Fitness Connect Margaux talks about her journey into wine and how it connects with fitness Margaux talks about the process of starting a business and licensing requirements for doing business in Utah Margaux shares her story of falling in love with wine and the agricultural process behind it   [13:39 – 26:40] Wine and Fitness: Balance is Key for CrossFit Games Competitor She has a personal philosophy of balance and how it is important to enjoy life's experiences, both in fitness and wine She has learned through her finished journey that if it's all or nothing mentality, it won't serve you the best She advocates for balance in her life by drinking wine every once in a while or every day, depending on her mood [23:50 – 32:48] Five Unique Wine Labels That Tell Stories The five wines featured on the label are all unique and special in their own way, with different stories and messages that resonate with people The goal of the brand is to promote wine as a lifestyle choice, not just a drink for special occasions, and to connect with people on a personal level by telling their stories and sharing wine tastings   [32:49 – 42:05] Closing Segment Learn everything you need to grow your wine, business, or brand with Wine Business Bootcamp where I help other wine producers master the fundamentals of digital marketing, nail their customer experience, and conver t more wine tasters into their wine clubs and other offers. Just send me a dm or email at kris@krislevy.com with the subject: Wine Business Bootcamp Favorite Wine: The Diablo Paso Favorite go-to pairings 11 Yuran Wine with chicken saute Cheer Sun with spicy tacos Wine Resource The Court of Masterson book Talking with Friends Connect with Margaux  Website: www.margauxalvarez.com    Let's continue the Everyday Wine Conversations and connect with me through Instagram, Facebook, LinkedIn, or feel free to shoot me an email at kris@krislevy.co. You can also check out my website at ​www.​klevywineco.com. TELL US WHAT YOU THINK! LEAVE A REVIEW + help us get the word out there! Share this podcast to someone who wants to join the wine conversations. Go ahead and take a screenshot, share this to your stories, and tag me on Instagram!  JOIN THE CLUB through this link and handpick wines every month, from up and coming wineries, winemaker owned brands and wineries with unique stories while supporting those wineries directly. You can also join our Facebook Group to connect with other wine lovers, get special tips and tricks, and take your wine knowledge to a whole new level.   Tweetable Quotes: “It's aligning myself with someone who has a good, strong record in terms of what she's been doing as a winemaker as well.” - Margaux Alvarez “We're gonna go to different periods in life. Just like with agriculture, you know, you gotta chill the ground. We're gonna introduce the nutrients back into the soil. We as individuals and humans also change and also have some sort of pivot in our life, and it's important to at least understand and take a step back to reflect on that.” - Margaux Alvarez

Alternative Talk- 1150AM KKNW
Stacy Connects 11 - 29 - 22 Sorry Charlie!

Alternative Talk- 1150AM KKNW

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 55:52


Stacy chats about her Thanksgiving back east; her nephew's delicious braised turkey, her chatty in-laws and the overall vibe of the east coast versus west. She also raves about the mockumentary, “Marcel the Shell with Shoes On,” a total must-see! Her wise-beyond-his-year-son, Charlie joins the show for a frank conversation about how gaming, the internet and consuming digital content in general have influenced and impacted the health of his mind, body and spirit. Eye-opening and a little heartbreaking; a classic example of hindsight being 20/20 and hopefully models the importance of open communication between parents and children of all ages. Special thanks to Charlie!

Dreams with Deadlines
Tomorrow Is Today: A Look at Corporate Inroads Into Sustainability and Accountability | Guenter Rottenfusser, Social Impact, Sustainability & Entrepreneur

Dreams with Deadlines

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 44:37


Key Things Discussed: Where ESG and CSR overlap in their mandates to develop better corporate citizens. The UN's 17 Goals for Sustainable Development and how that's going. The challenges associated with creating reliable, long-term metrics by which to track individual company efforts to reach carbon neutrality. The difference between – and examples of – carbon offsetting and insetting. Innovative technologies Guenter is involved with and what's on his horizon. The episode wraps with some lively Quick Fire Questions that will leave you inspired to join Guenter in driving hard towards creating the environmental solutions we need! Show Notes [02:20] Guenter brings us up to speed on his career trajectory, from academia (where he acquired advanced mathematical and analytical skills) to the Boston Consulting Group, where he was introduced to a steep learning curve across industry sectors. [03:25] Defining the E, S and G of ESG, a framework for supporting Environmental, Social and Governance measures for corporate responsibility: Provides a common language to discuss non-financial indicators and parameters. Connects corporate impacts in a global context. [06:50] While there is overlap, ESG and CSR (Corporate Social Responsibility) are not completely interchangeable. CSR has traditionally been a somewhat vague, even random, corporate commitment to philanthropy, community engagement, stockholder expectations and compliance/risk mitigation. ESG is the framework or vehicle through which to measure and quantify social impacts beyond financial metrics, the boardroom or day-to-day business. [10:28] Guenter places ESG within the context of 17 Sustainable Development Goals defined by the UN, including challenges such as hunger, poverty, health, economic development. [13:00] Does ESG impact the bottom line? Guenter argues yes and that evidence suggests that environmental and social elements in particular pay off in terms of both overall corporate and global health. [16:26] Challenges and Concerns: What metrics can be put in place based on hard indicators such as CO2 emissions developed based on sector-relevant resources and practices. Large accounting firms and regulatory control will also have a role to play. [18:42] Affordability, especially for small- and medium-sized businesses, will be determined in large part by scaling of technology and automation in the coming years.  [19:44] Impact measures and the fuzziness around defining them because of a lack of longitudinal tracking measures and the murkiness of long-term timelines.  [22:17] Guenter's thoughts about developing corporate solutions and plans for capturing impact measures in terms of political and scientific indicators: Using a flexible framework for collecting data. Implementing pro bono efforts to help environmental nonprofits. [26:25] Guenter explains the difference between carbon offset and inset: Buy your way out versus build your way out? It's nuanced! [30:07] Guenter gets granular with specific examples of offsetting methods, relative levels of impact available through programs in place today as well as innovative new technologies under development to scale efforts to stabilize and sequester carbon. [33:04] Guenter shares projects he's excited about with Sinkco Labs, which is developing a carbon-neutral alternative protein source, as well as a new app in beta testing that will offer consumers a simple way to get an ongoing read of their carbon footprint based on travel, dining out and other lifestyle patterns. [38:54] Quick Fire Questions for Guenter: What Is Your Dream With A Deadline?  Helping all sectors – but most especially the corporate world – realize their pledges to be profitable as well as socially and environmentally responsible. What do you appreciate about the teams you work with? The passion for common goals, excellence and pursuing a mission to make a difference. What challenge have you overcome and how did you do it? By pivoting in the right way at the right point in time. It's about stepping back to reassess, even if it means shifting your direction or strategy. Advice for effective team-wide and company-wide goalsetting? Focus on creating a shared vision that excites and enfranchises all stakeholders, which will lead to high levels of buy-in, satisfaction and success across the enterprise. What's top of mind for you these days? Moving forward with projects in progress in order to grow, grow, grow, scale, scale, scale and meet our global challenge Relevant links: The UN's 17 Sustainable Development Goals. Sinkco Labs About Our Guest:Guenter Rottenfusser is a strategist, global social impact and sustainability expert currently working with Sinkco Labs. He has been named an EWOR fellow and previously consulted for the Boston Consulting Group.Follow Our Guest:Website | LinkedInFollow Dreams With Deadlines:Host | Company Website | Blog | Instagram | Twitter

City Life Org
The Brooklyn Museum Joins Bloomberg Connects App with New Digital Guide to Enrich Both On- and Off-Site Visits

City Life Org

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 3:08


This episode is also available as a blog post: https://thecitylife.org/2022/11/28/the-brooklyn-museum-joins-bloomberg-connects-app-with-new-digital-guide-to-enrich-both-on-and-off-site-visits/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/citylifeorg/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/citylifeorg/support

Hack24 - The Podcast - Hacking and Hacked Content
@TagbitsXYZ as special guest and we will talk about his service that connects #Tezos artists and collectors using the power of tags!

Hack24 - The Podcast - Hacking and Hacked Content

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 136:21


Tonight we will have @TagbitsXYZ as special guest and we will talk about his service that connects #Tezos artists and collectors using the power of tags! If you are a collector or artist, you will WANT to be there! @BotTezos @objktcom https://objkt.com/profile/albertohill/created --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/darkwebtoday/message

Ready Layer One
PlayEmber is a web3 advertising and experience platform connects brands, creators and games studios with a highly engaged web3 consumer audience within mobile games.

Ready Layer One

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 55:45


What is PlayEmber? The platform is taking and sharing value from advertising and centralized (walled gardens) in web2 and bringing it into the token economy. Our token economy and platform drive player retention through a rewards-based ecosystem of our token EMBER, whilst bringing not just players but also game studios into the governance of the project via the DAO. Our platform connects players, creators ( game studios), and advertisers/brands via $EMBR all via a single mobile SDK that will be connected to billions of mobile gamers Website https://playember.com/ Linktree https://linktr.ee/playember Twitter https://twitter.com/play_ember Hugo https://twitter.com/hugofurn Jon https://twitter.com/JonHook We get into the details of web3 gaming and some of the use cases. And some philosophical conversations around web3. Ready Layer One Podcast https://readylayeronepodcast.com/ twitter.com/ready_layer_one Joe https://twitter.com/joespano_ Jared https://twitter.com/jarednotjerry1 NEAR near.org/ Aurora https://aurora.dev/ NO FINANCIAL ADVICE– The Podcast, is provided for educational, informational, and entertainment purposes only, without any express or implied warranty of any kind, including warranties of accuracy, completeness, or fitness for any particular purpose. The information contained in or provided from or through this podcast and podcast is not intended to be and does not constitute financial advice, investment advice, trading advice, or any other advice. You should not make any decision, financial, investment, trading, or otherwise, based on any of the information presented on this website without undertaking independent due diligence and consultation with a professional broker or financial advisor. You understand that you are using any and all Information available on or through this podcast at your own risk. RISK STATEMENT– The trading of Bitcoins, and alternative cryptocurrencies has potential risks involved. Trading may not be suitable for all people. Anyone wishing to invest should seek his or her own independent financial or professional advice.

Think Out Loud
Portland author Alicia Jo Rabins connects Torah stories to everyday parenting struggles

Think Out Loud

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 31:09


Alicia Jo Rabins is a writer, a performer, a filmmaker, a Torah scholar and a teacher. She's also a mother. Rabins says that after she had children, she noticed that the way she interacted the sacred texts of the Torah shifted. She saw them with new eyes and uncovered different lessons than she had before she became a parent. Her new book, “Even God had Bad Parenting Days,” connects the ancient stories with contemporary life. In this collection of essays, Rabins reveals some of her own deeply personal struggles and what she's learned and practiced to get her through difficult times and embrace joy as often as possible. We talk with her about these stories and their intersections with the ancient wisdom in texts written thousands of years ago.

Power Your Parenting: Moms With Teens
#193 How Fun Connects Parents and Teens

Power Your Parenting: Moms With Teens

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 42:40


As we approach January we are starting to think about healthy habits for the new year. Our guest today has a habit that I want to master in the new year. Dr. Mike Rucker is the author of the upcoming book, The Fun Habit: How the Pursuit of Joy and Wonder Can Change Your Life available January 23. I think this is a perfect podcast to be released in the holiday season. How about starting this fun habit during the holidays. Dr. Mike Rucker is an organizational psychologist, behavioral scientist, and charter member of the International Positive Psychology Association. He has been academically published in publications like the International Journal of Workplace Health Management. His ideas about fun and health have been featured in The Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, Fast Company, Psychology Today, Forbes, Vox, Thrive Global, Mindful, mindbodygreen, and more. He currently serves as a senior leader at Active Wellness. There are so many gems in this episode. Why develop a fun habit? "It increases vitality and makes life worth living." Connect with Mike at https://michaelrucker.com Follow on Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/thewonderoffun Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Packet Pushers - Fat Pipe
Heavy Networking 657: New VMware Client Connects Users To SASE, SD-WAN (Sponsored)

Packet Pushers - Fat Pipe

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 50:03


Today on Heavy Networking, a discussion with sponsor VMware about SD-WAN and SASE. We're diving into announcements from VMware Explore Barcelona 2022 covering a new SD-WAN client and more. With this client, you'll be able to connect your users to the SASE cloud with software--no hardware edge box required. We dive into how it works, the network architecture, use cases, and more. The post Heavy Networking 657: New VMware Client Connects Users To SASE, SD-WAN (Sponsored) appeared first on Packet Pushers.

Vermont Edition
Encore: Vt. journalist, author Garrett Graff connects Nixon and Watergate to Trump and Jan. 6

Vermont Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 19:59


We'll listen back to an interview with Vermont journalist and author Garret Graff about his book, released earlier this year, offering a fresh perspective on the Watergate scandal that led to the resignation of President Richard Nixon.

Packet Pushers - Full Podcast Feed
Heavy Networking 657: New VMware Client Connects Users To SASE, SD-WAN (Sponsored)

Packet Pushers - Full Podcast Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 50:03


Today on Heavy Networking, a discussion with sponsor VMware about SD-WAN and SASE. We're diving into announcements from VMware Explore Barcelona 2022 covering a new SD-WAN client and more. With this client, you'll be able to connect your users to the SASE cloud with software--no hardware edge box required. We dive into how it works, the network architecture, use cases, and more. The post Heavy Networking 657: New VMware Client Connects Users To SASE, SD-WAN (Sponsored) appeared first on Packet Pushers.

Packet Pushers - Heavy Networking
Heavy Networking 657: New VMware Client Connects Users To SASE, SD-WAN (Sponsored)

Packet Pushers - Heavy Networking

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 50:03


Today on Heavy Networking, a discussion with sponsor VMware about SD-WAN and SASE. We're diving into announcements from VMware Explore Barcelona 2022 covering a new SD-WAN client and more. With this client, you'll be able to connect your users to the SASE cloud with software--no hardware edge box required. We dive into how it works, the network architecture, use cases, and more. The post Heavy Networking 657: New VMware Client Connects Users To SASE, SD-WAN (Sponsored) appeared first on Packet Pushers.

Farm and Ranch Report
Artisan Grain Collaborative connects buyers with growers

Farm and Ranch Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022


Food companies that are looking for unusual ingredients often have to source these products outside of the country.

Dark Side of Wikipedia | True Crime & Dark History
Man Connects His iPhone To Car He Stole, Arrest Ensues | Daily Brief

Dark Side of Wikipedia | True Crime & Dark History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 2:14


A man stole a car, connected his own iPhone to car, then ditches the car. It wasn't hard to find out who "done" it. If you like TRUE CRIME TODAY - Be sure to search and subscribe wherever you download podcasts! Apple Podcasts https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/true-crime-today-a-true-crime-podcast/id1504280230?uo=4 Spotify https://open.spotify.com/show/0GYshi6nJCf3O0aKEBTOPs Stitcher http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/real-ghost-stories-online-2/dark-side-of-wikipedia-true-crime-disturbing-stories iHeart https://www.iheart.com/podcast/270-Dark-Side-of-Wikipedia-Tru-60800715 Amazon https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/565dc51b-d214-4fab-b38b-ae7c723cb79a/Dark-Side-of-Wikipedia-True-Crime-Dark-History Google Podcasts https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9hdWRpb2Jvb20uY29tL2NoYW5uZWxzLzUwMDEyNjAucnNz Or Search "True Crime Today" for the best in True Crime ANYWHERE you get podcasts! Support the show at http://www.patreon.com/truecrimetoday

Diversity Connects Us
Diversity Connects Us (Trailer)

Diversity Connects Us

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 0:56


--- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/rachelle-carrie0/support

UBC News World
The Office Smart Sign You Saw On Shark Tank Now Connects To Online Calendars

UBC News World

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 2:57


The BusyBox smart signs you saw on Shark Tank just keep getting better. They now offer a host of new features, with more updates just around the corner. Go to https://shop.busyboxsign.com for more information.

Spunky Spirit
Cari Connects - Nov 21st

Spunky Spirit

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 7:35


Love Lighthouse
98: Ways Spirit Connects with us

Love Lighthouse

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 23:19


You are surrounded by your spiritual encourage at all times. You may feel alone sometimes in your life but you never really are. You have a crew of loving beings who were assigned to you before you were even born. They love and adore you. They are called your spirit guides. They will be with you your entire life. Learn to connect with them and let them guide and support you! 

Stance for Health
10 Reasons Why You Should Chill

Stance for Health

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 37:50


In this podcast Dr. Rodney and Karen talk about the health and longevity benefits of cold exposure.  This practice definitely gets most of us out of our comfort zone. Here are a few of the reasons to give it a try:1. Raises your metabolic rateThis has to be one of the most compelling because cold exposure increases your BAT - Brown Adipose Tissue which in turn increases your metabolic rate. That means you can eat more without gaining weight and have more energy. 2. Improves fat burningCold exposure ramps up fat burning as the body makes the attempt to keep your body warm. Some have even called it a "weapon" to combat obesity. Are you ready to turn the thermostat down a few degrees?3. Boosts glycemic control and insulin sensitivityWhen you activate BAT it can increase blood glucose so that it is burned as fuel or stored as glycogen (for use later) rather than fat.  When insulin sensitivity goes up it improves metabolic health  and has an anti-diabetic effect. 4.  Diminishes inflammation and painCold exposure is often used to alleviate musculoskeletal pain and inflammation in conditions like arthritis and fibromyalgia.  In one study, participants with inflammatory arthritis who took a two-minute cold shower each day for a week experienced significant reductions in pain.  Cold exposure leads to vasoconstriction and reduces blood flow, which in turn reduces inflammation in tissues within and around injured sites. 5. Boosts moodResearchers believe these beneficial effects may be tied to cold exposure initiating an endocrine response and increasing hormones like cortisone, epinephrine, norepinephrine, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH),  pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC),and endorphins. On top of that, cold exposure may activate the body's own pain control system.6. Promotes better sleep qualityCooler temperatures (between 60 and 67°F) help lower core temperature, which facilitates sleep. Also, body temperature is a strong driver of circadian rhythms. In fact, similar to light, temperature is one of the environmental cues that's able to reset the body's circadian clocks. Turn down the thermostat or take a cold shower.7. Raises alertness & sharpens focusA cold shower can wake you and your body up, promoting a higher state of alertness. The cold also stimulates deeper breathing, helping increase oxygenation of the body's tissues.8. Builds resilienceAs you get acclimated to the cold your stress response (fight or flight) is blunted after repeated exposure. This is what hormetic stress is all about—exposure to small, transient stress leads to adaptation. This improved stress tolerance applies then to other areas of life through greater willpower and remaining cool-headed.9. Enhances cognitive functionConsidering the benefits on hormones (both stress & feel-good chemicals) and the enhancement in resiliency, it should not surprise you that cold exposure can also be good for the brain leading to better brain function. Repeated cold exposure is likely to be beneficial and neuroprotective because it regulates the release of inflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide.10. Connects to your true selfCold exposure therapy builds mental toughness and provides a place where your worries disappear. As you learn to control your breathing your mind clears and focus ensues. You just might also find yourself.Get started with cold exposure:Turn down the thermostatCold and contrast showersCold-water immersion (e.g., cold pools, ice baths, etc.)Go outside in cold temperaturesFollow us on Instagram and Facebook.

OAWRS Show Highlights
Seacrest Connects With Ana From Children's Hospital Vanderbilt Seacrest Studios

OAWRS Show Highlights

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 5:41


AMPstigator
Ep. 41: How giving connects us (w/ Pat Shea)

AMPstigator

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 53:30


Prepare to gain a new perspective on giving from a powerhouse business woman who's co-founded a tech startup, run a non-profit, served on beaucoup boards and helped name the AMPstigator video podcast. Pat Shea has provided background support for AMPstigator's efforts for the last 15 months, but now she makes her podcast debut with the lesson "How Giving Connects Us." In this episode, Pat teaches you how to create a movement and shares why asking someone for money is actually doing them A FAVOR.

I Am The One With Bishop Stephen A. Davis
The Kingdom Connects You With Heaven

I Am The One With Bishop Stephen A. Davis

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 43:33


Message: The Kingdom Is Better (Part 5) - The Kingdom Connects You With Heaven Scriptures: Matthew 16:17-19 (NKJV) Speaker: Bishop Stephen A. Davis Date: Sunday, November 13, 2022 - STAY CONNECTED - https://StephenADavis.org Bishop Stephen A. Davis Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bishopstephendavis/ Bishop Stephen A. Davis Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/bishopstephenadavis/ Refresh Family Church Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/RefreshFamilyChurch/ Refresh Family Church Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/refreshfamilychurch Visit Our Website: https://refreshfamily.church/

Lagrange Point
Episode 509 - What connects spicy food, proteins and your gut

Lagrange Point

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 17:53


How is your gut connected to the rest of your body? How does your nervous system connect to your gut? How can you sense pain inside of your gut? The bacteria that live inside your gut can call for help when under pressure. With the wrong balance of bacteria or signalling proteins our guts can be more prone for inflammation and damage. How can bad bacteria escape from the gut and evade detection? What enables some bacteria to sneak out of the intestine and wreck havoc. Wen Zhang, Mengze Lyu, Nicholas J. Bessman, Zili Xie, Mohammad Arifuzzaman, Hiroshi Yano, Christopher N. Parkhurst, Coco Chu, Lei Zhou, Gregory G. Putzel, Ting-Ting Li, Wen-Bing Jin, Jordan Zhou, Hongzhen Hu, Amy M. Tsou, Chun-Jun Guo, David Artis. Gut-innervating nociceptors regulate the intestinal microbiota to promote tissue protection. Cell, 2022; DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2022.09.008 Yusibeska Ramos, Stephanie Sansone, Sung-Min Hwang, Tito A. Sandoval, Mengmeng Zhu, Guoan Zhang, Juan R. Cubillos-Ruiz, Diana K. Morales. Remodeling of the Enterococcal Cell Envelope during Surface Penetration Promotes Intrinsic Resistance to Stress. mBio, 2022; DOI: 10.1128/mbio.02294-22

King of Kings Lutheran Church Podcast
Grieve for Christ's Sake Week 2: Grief Connects To Grace

King of Kings Lutheran Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 25:18


Honest Youth Pastor
How To Preach A Sermon That Connects With Culture - A Jeremy McGarity Sermon Review

Honest Youth Pastor

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2022 93:24


The sermon in this review was preached by Jeremy McGarity at Skyline Church and uploaded to their YouTube channel on November 6th, 2022. All rights belong to Jeremy McGarity and Skyline Church. This video is for teaching and review purposes only and is protected under fair use. Fair use is a doctrine in the United States copyright law that allows limited use of copyrighted material without requiring permission from the rights holders, such as commentary, criticism, news reporting, research, teaching, or scholarship. LINKS: 1) Original Sermon: https://youtu.be/GZtCEoucSaM 2) My Quick Run-through Of The Sermon Text: https://youtu.be/RIjS_62pwCs 3) Youth Pastor Conversation 4) FREE PDF Sermon Review Guide: https://thehonestyouthpastor.com/products/sermon-review-form

Death in The Garden
#46 Derrick Weston - How Food Connects Us to Creation and Liberation

Death in The Garden

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 90:40


On this episode of “Death in The Garden,” we're sharing our interview with our friend, fellow podcast host, up-and-coming author, educator, and farmer/gardener, Derrick Weston. Derrick is the co-host of the Food and Faith Podcast alongside Anna Woofenden, and the pair's book The Just Kitchen: Invitations to Sustainability, Cooking, Connection, and Celebration will be available soon! We had the pleasure of doing this interview at Rockrose City Farm, a beautiful community garden space in Baltimore, where Derrick stewards plots with volunteers and other community members, cultivating food that is donated to food pantries. In this conversation, we discuss food accessibility, and the long history of food apartheid in this country, and how food is related to all of the social justice issues we face as a species. We discuss Christianity and how his faith and understanding of Jesus' teachings informs how he understands his place in the world as a steward. We discuss the long shadow of slavery, and how racism, dispossession from land, and the systemic narrativizing which separates people from culture is not a thing of the past. We talk about how reconnecting with the land through food is an avenue of of liberation from these deeply engrained systems of oppression. We also discuss the importance of regenerative agriculture being more than a “program”— it needs to have an incredibly strong ethic at it's foundation which honors the indigenous wisdom traditions it comes from in order to not be subsumed by the same capitalistic structures that created the problem in the first place. Above all, we talk about how the problems we face today, whether it's consumerism, disconnection, or dislocation, all stem from severed relationships: between each other, and all of Creation. Our crisis of meaning is a crisis of belonging. Circumambulating that idea, we name the relationships that need to be repaired, and discuss visions for the future. You can find Derrick on Instagram and Twitter, and if you'd like to listen to us on his podcast (among many other brilliant conversations), check out the Food and Faith Podcast! Editing: Jake Marquez and Maren Morgan Music: “Holocene” by Bon Iver

The Answer is Yes
#220 - Faisal Hoque teaching us about "Lift" and how "Everything Connects" two books he has written

The Answer is Yes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 30:40


Faisal Hoque is the founder of SHADOKA, NextChapter, and other companies that focus on enabling sustainable and transformational changes. Throughout his career, he has developed over 20 commercial business and technology platforms and worked with public and private sector giants such as the US Department of Defense, GE, MasterCard, American Express, Northrop Grumman, CACI, PepsiCo, IBM, Home Depot, Gartner, and JPMorgan Chase. He is a 3 times winning Founder and CEO of Deloitte Technology Fast 50 and Deloitte Technology Fast 500™ awards.As a thought leader, he has authored a number of award winning books on leadership, innovation, mindfulness, resilience, organizational transformation, and entrepreneurship, including the #1 Wall Street Journal and USA Today bestseller Lift – Fostering the Leader in You Amid Revolutionary Global Change (Fast Company), and the #2 Wall Street Journal and USA Today bestseller Everything Connects – Cultivating Mindfulness, Creativity, and Innovation for Long-Term Value (Fast Company). His work has appeared in Fast Company, Business Insider, The Wall Street Journal, Businessweek, Fox, CBS, Financial Times, Mergers & Acquisitions, Forbes, and Leadership Excellence, among others.He holds a strong belief that it is through knowledge sharing that we may provide the greatest clarity on how to improve our collective future. As a globetrotter, he is passionate about nature, people, culture, music, and design, and he loves to cook.Get his new book now at: www.faisalhoque.comwww.livelifedriven.com

Clark County Today News
Pathway Conference connects Washougal students with trades industries

Clark County Today News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 3:17


On Nov. 3, students enrolled in the Career & Technical Education (CTE) program at Washougal High School gained valuable insight into the work world at the annual Pathway Conference. https://bit.ly/3hB6sig #WashougalSchoolDistrict #WashougalHighSchool #Students #CTE #CareerAndTechnicalEducation #Program #PathwayConference #FieldTrips #TradesEmployers #JobReadinessPanelPresentations #Trades #WashougalWa #ClarkCountyWa #ClarkCountyNews #ClarkCountyToday

HYDRATE with Tracy Duhs
What is the invisible that connects everything with Dr. Daniel Fels.

HYDRATE with Tracy Duhs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 43:16


Here I am at the water conference in Bad Soden, Germany meeting researchers that are opening up new conversations about hydration, water, and invisible source that connects us all. Having a background in evolutionary biology and behavioral ecology, Daniel focused his PhD research on host parasite systems because had a fascination with cellular communication since early childhood. At a young age he read the book: Secret Life of Plants and was inspired to learn that that all life is invisibly connected. Cells iminiate light. A weak emission of electromagnetic signals. What is the invisible that connects everything? Daniel is a Biologist and independent researcher, but what makes him unique is that he is a high school professor. I like this about Daniel because he likes to takes complex concepts and break them down so a student or lay person can easily understand biology

Let’s Chop It Up! w Ziz
4DADJS RADIO / DJ JAZZYWHUT!! ( THE EAZE UP SHOW- EPISODE 161) EP. 84

Let’s Chop It Up! w Ziz

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 138:08


DJ Jazzywhut!! CONNECTS https://www.instagram.com/dj_jazzywhut/ CHECK OUT ALL ZIZ's MUSIC - https://zizmusicyall.bandcamp.com/ Ziz Connects https://youtube.com/c/Zizyall https://anchor.fm/letschopitupwziz https://www.instagram.com/letschopitupwziz_/ https://www.instagram.com/ziz_yall/ https://linktr.ee/Ziz134 DONATE TO THE SHOW ON CASH APP - $Letschopitupwziz ****You have a small or large business and would like to sponsor the show, contact us through this email- tapinradiowziz@gmail.com**** Hour 1: Da Newness: Paranormal Ft. Dali & Bobby Craves - River Tam Infinito 2017 Ft. Ka Sekhem - Needle Grace Page Nine (Dion Brown Remix) Swamp Thing - Nemesis Rah-O - S.P.A.C.E. The Quon Ft. A.D. - Float Athletic Mic League Ft. Marv Won - Gundam (Prod. 14K) Masta Conga Ft. Azariah Hoppin' On Stalley - Red Light (Prod. B.A.M.) J57 Ft. Homeboy Sandman & DJ Eclipse - Night Creatures Soul Rocca Ft. J-Live - Real Recognize Real Billy NoJokes & Germz - Choppy Waters Apollo Brown x Philmore Greene - Steep Life Certain.Ones presents... Boogie Wookie - Bleu (Ft. Feral Serge & Keef Wookie) Nord1kone & Lmt. Break - High Velocity Dub Sonata Ft. Muja Messiah, Guilty Simpson & Copywrite - Everywhere I Go Che Uno, Falcon Outlaw, New Villain & KNG Bondalero - Hell Fire Club Wolfman Jeckyll Ft. Milez Dirt Nap (Prod. BodyBagBen) Sean Wrekless Ft. Jamil Honesty - Kerosene Killy Shoot & Onaje Jordan Ft. General BackPain & Chuck Chan - The Riddle of Steel Hour 2: Celebrating Jazzy's 50th with a selection of some all time fave joints: Sankofa - This Is 50! Pete Rock & CL Smooth Ft. Dead & Rob-O - In The Flesh (1994) Nas - Memory Lane (Prod. DJ Premier) (1994) De La Soul Ft. Biz Markie -Lovely How I Let My Mind Float (1993) Craig Mack - Flava In Ya Ear (Prod. Easy Mo Bee) (1994) Chubb Rock - The One (Prod. Hitman Howie Tee) (1991) The D.O.C. - No One Can Do It Better (Prod. Dr Dre)(1989) EPMD - You're A Customer (1987) Boogie Down Productions - My Philosophy (1988) ATCQ - Buggin' Out (1991) Redman - I'm A Bad (Prod. Erick Sermon) (1992) Capital Tax Ft. Boogie Gee - Nottie Natural (Prod DJ Smooth G) (1993) JVC Force - Big Trax (1992) Wu-Tang Clan - Da Mystery of Chessboxin' (1993) Eric B & Rakim - Microphone Fiend (1988) The Beatnuts - Straight Jacket (1994) Gang Starr - Here Today, Gone Tomorrow (1991) MF DOOM Ft. Kurious - ? (1999) Souls Of Mischief - '93 Til Infinity (Prod. A-Plus) (1993) --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/4dadjsradio/message

Using the Whole Whale Podcast
Crypto DAFs are 3X MORE Generous that Traditional DAFs | Endaoment.org

Using the Whole Whale Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 44:29


Alexis Miller, Donor Engagement and Strategic Partnerships Lead at Endaoment.org shares how crypto DAFs work and why nonprofits should start paying attention. When compared with traditional DAF payouts, Endaoment is showing 3x payout rate of funds- 22% to 58%.  We also discuss other ways crypto donors differ from traditional fiat donors.   About Alexis Miller Alexis Miller is the Donor Engagement and Strategic Partnerships Lead at Endaoment, the first 501(c)3 community foundation built on the Ethereum blockchain. Alexis works to facilitate collaboration between nonprofit organizations and crypto donors. Before joining Endaoment, Alexis worked as a philanthropic advisor and a development professional. She earned a Masters in Social Work from the University of Pennsylvania and now lives in Washington DC. Resource Links Endaoment Community Hub *includes a crypto 101 glossary - https://endaoment.notion.site/ Endaoment website - endaoment.org Twitter - discord.gg/endaoment       Rough Transcription   [00:00:00] Well, we found a reoccurring guest, well I'll say organization joining us today from endowment, and they are helping turn crypto holdings into crypto givings, which is a topic that I love. I just love it. I'm long crypto philanthropy. Alexis Miller donor Engage. Strategic partnerships Lead at Endowment is joining us today. [00:00:32] Kind of as a follow up to our conversation a year ago. We'll put that in the show notes. And Alexis, after graduating from the University of Pennsylvania, Master's degree in Social work, Went on to donor services officer and Baltimore Community Foundation. So definitely kind of one of us, as well as working at, uh, Associated Jewish Community Federation of Baltimore. [00:00:56] So now you have landed at endowment, and maybe for our newer listeners, can you explain what endowment spelled? Endowment? Mm-hmm. . I'm not pronouncing it right. I feel like you really have to put M faces on the Dow. Can you explain what. Yes. Thank you for having me, George. And for that introduction. So endowment, spelled E n d a o m e n T. [00:01:22] I always try to, sometimes people Google us and can't find us because we're spelled d a o, not d o w, like the traditional way. We are a 5 0 1 C three. Non-profit community foundation that essentially exists for the crypto community. So we are built on the Ethereum blockchain, so our actual non-profit entity structure is built using. [00:01:46] Blockchain technology, and we essentially serve as that community foundation resource. So we were created really to solve two problems. The first is to allow a tax compliant and easy way for donors to be able to give Crypto or NFTs. And on the flip side, allowing non-profits to be able to receive donations that originated in crypto. [00:02:10] No cost to the nonprofit. So that is a little bit of what we do. I will get into the details, but our kind of bread and butter is our crypto donor advised fund. So similar to other community foundations that offer a donor advised fund, charitable checking account. Essentially we do the same just using crypto. [00:02:30] Maybe we can make sure that this makes sense, because I feel like there was a lot of words with lots of words, a lot of acronyms, because that's what technical people seem to enjoy doing by making a ton of acronyms. Maybe we start with the, as you were explaining, Dow and what that actually means. The d a o as I understand it. [00:02:52] What, what, what does that actually mean as it's part of your name? It is part of our name, so, DOW stands for a decentralized autonomous organization and basically what that means. An organization or an entity where the decisions are being made by the community as opposed to like a top down approach. So having your CEO or your executive director make all of the decisions, you're actually putting voices into the hands of your community or stakeholders to have a say in how the organization is run. [00:03:28] So that. A term that's used widely in the crypto space is a dow, but the concept is something that other folks are using just maybe in a little bit of a different way. So in short, we're talking about a daf, but. For crypto. Is that a fair quick summary? Yes, yes. Another acronym. You know, like it's, it's funny, my, my a donor advised fund. [00:03:53] You're right. Yes. We're gonna have a lot of gloss. It's all good. It, it's funny cuz you know, my background's in non-profit and I feel like non-profits use a ton of acronyms and like insider language. And now I'm in this fine, I'm kind of balancing the non-profit world with the crypto world. And they also use a ton of acronyms, very different acronyms, but you know, gotta get used to both of the lingos for sure. [00:04:16] So let's just make this tangible. Somebody has a crypto windfall. They're then interested in deploying that capital for social impact, making the world less terrible. They come to endowment.org. What happens? Good question. So, you know, as I mentioned before, we're built on the Ethereum blockchain, which I'm, I'm gonna get technical for a, a second and then I will make this more easily digestible. [00:04:50] But basically the blockchain is just the technology that underpins. This whole crazy world of cryptocurrency. So think of it as like, a public ledger where basically all of the transactions and data is taking place. So what that means in practice is our nonprofit is actually set up so that you can see all of the transactions taking place. [00:05:14] So, All money flowing into endowment and all money flowing out of endowment is technically publicly available without any personal information. But all of that information lies using what's called blockchain technology. So that's kind of like the basis, So we're built on. Blockchain technology, and when someone comes to, you know, endowment.org or app.endowment.org, they would connect their wallet that holds their cryptocurrency and they could take an action on our platform so they could open up a donor advised fund by clicking a button, they could make a direct donation to a nonprofit of their choice. [00:05:53] Basically skipping the fund process and just giving a one off donation to any nonprofit in the us and. We handle all of the tax receipting so that individual donor is giving us their name, their email, their address so that they can get a tax deduction if they choose. And you know, within 24 to 48 hours, we are turning around that donation and getting it into the nonprofits bank account as US dollars in cash and turning it from the cryptocurrency that it originated in into us. [00:06:29] Gotcha. And to date you have deployed, it looks like over 50 million according to the website, to a total of 924 organizations. I'm curious, uh, how has growth been? Because right now, I don't know if you've noticed things like Ethereum and others are down 60, 70% just this year. Has that slowed growth? What is it looking like for endowment right now? [00:07:02] Yeah, so we are right at the $50 million mark and. In terms of growth, you know the market is down for sure, but our average donor is someone who has been in the crypto space since, you know, 20 16, 20 17, 20 18. And most of our donors, while they still might be, you know, down some money or down large amounts of money, They're pretty much up for when they originally invested in the crypto ecosystem. [00:07:34] So for us, we're still seeing a lot of activity. It's definitely slowed a bit. But we're still seeing that. So to kind of like take a step back, I'll give you some, some statistics based on this year versus last year in terms of how we're doing in terms of getting money out into the hands of nonprofits. [00:07:52] So our, and, and again, as I mentioned like blockchain, everything's transparent. We also are, so on our website you can actually see, uh, a lot of these statistics that I'm going to share. And, you know, we really try to keep our community informed. The ecosystem and the impact that people are having through using endowment. [00:08:14] So we have granted, to date 58% of funds that are sitting in donor advised funds. So 58% of the capital that has gone into endowment has been distributed out to various nonprofits across the country. Just to give you a comparison, the average I believe this is through Fidelity, is 22% a national average for donor advised. [00:08:39] Deploying capital. So as you can see, you know, And that's annually, I guess for the, the DAF distribution and Yeah. Yeah. Annually for the DAF distribution. So you can see that our community is really, really focused on getting money out into the community to support their favorite nonprofit or to support an area of interest. [00:08:58] And they just need a little assistance identifying who to actually support. So 58%. Capital that has been basically ingested by endowment has been distributed out to various non-profits. And that's lifetime. That's a lifetime distribution number. Lifetime distribution. Yep. And, and we started at the end of 2020. [00:09:15] So year to date, we've had $21.15 million donated to endowment. So 21.15 out of the 50 million has been donated. This year, you know, in 2022, and we've granted this year 17.9 million which is both of those numbers are up from last year. So if you think of, you know, 2021, the crypto market was a lot higher. [00:09:39] Yet we've actually done more volume in terms of both donations and grants in 2022. Then, sorry, one more time. Was 17 distributed over 20? 17 distributed this year in 2022, and you have collected 21 million and we've collected 21 million. I mean, you're tracking at 80% at that point, so that, you know, I think it's even more impressive if I'm just speaking, honestly, looking at the annual cause I feel like there's many sins hidden in average numbers. [00:10:06] Yeah. This is not a sin. This is actually. Contrary to what I would've believed in a down market where I imagine a donor coming in who has transferred over their, you know, do coin. Millions may have chosen not to liquidate, but to hold and maybe hold until it goes back up. This doesn't seem to be the case, and I am right in that assumption that when a donor comes. [00:10:31] Connects, their wallet moves over an asset that that asset isn't immediately liquidated like it is with say, the giving block when a donation is triggered on site directly to a non-profit. So we do actually liquidate it to US dollar coin. Okay. So yeah, so we are taking in whatever cryptocurrency is donated to us. [00:10:53] We always say that anything that there's a liquid market for, we will take. So we don't have, you know, a hundred cryptocurrencies listed on our website. Okay. We really will take anything and work with any donor who has any crypto. We immediately convert it into US dollar coin. And then it's SDC, I believe. [00:11:09] Yes. Yeah. Yep. So U sdc and then it's granted out as US dollars to the nonprofits bank account. Mm-hmm. one, one thing we launched last month in our version two of our platform is actual portfolio allocations, which has been super exciting and was the top feedback we received from our donor community last year. [00:11:30] So, It's always exciting when you can take feedback and actually build something or do something about it and not just say, Thank you so much for your feedback. We'll take it into consideration. So endowment just launched our version two of our platform and one of those features includes portfolio allocations where people can actually take that us d c, that US dollar coin that's in their donor advised fund and actually invest it in. [00:11:55] Right now we have three different. Crypto native portfolio allocations that they can invest it in. So when they're not granting out, they, instead of kind of having their funds set idly, they can actually deploy their capital and hopefully earn a little bit of interest making their fund grow, which means more money to charity. [00:12:16] I don't fully understand that. Can you explain more? How, how is my fund growing? So you're putting together portfolios I understand of nonprofits. Let's say I wanna go help the environment because maybe the coin of my choice is proof of work and it's torching a bunch of electricity and I wanna like make amends on that. [00:12:38] Is that what we're talking about? There is a essentially an index fund for. That you had packaged for the environment, for social justice, for women's rights, Actually, The kind of the opposite. So it's actually like taking, it's taking your cryptocurrency and actually investing it in like an, the version of like an etf, right? [00:13:01] So most donor advised funds, you're actually investing those assets in like a money market or in some sort of actual like financial investment vehicle. So, Community foundation's, Fidelity Schwab allow their donors mm-hmm. to take, you know, if you have a hundred thousand dollars in your donor advised fund, you can actually invest that in a money market or in an ETF that the board obviously approves, and you can earn a little bit of yield on that. [00:13:29] So. Mm-hmm. , you know, when I was in the community foundation space, we would have donors in a, in a good year who were making. Eight to 10% on their money, so that capital is being invested and then you're able to actually give more money out to charity. So we're doing the same thing, but with crypto. [00:13:48] Portfolios essentially. So instead of investing in, you know, a Fidelity ETF or something, you're investing in Ethereum or you're investing in Ave or Compound, which are the three portfolios that our board has approved right now. So you're taking your idle capital in your donor advised fund that you're not granting out imminently and you're actually investing it to hopefully yield a little bit of a return so that you have more money to grant out to charity in the long term. [00:14:19] That's, you know, that's interesting. I won't touch on it too much though. I, I feel like one of the reasons that this year you're tracking at what sounds like four x the rate of distribution, then standard DAFs. So by the way, I'm coming up with a title of this podcast right now. I feel like a good one. [00:14:36] Crypto philanthropists, four x, more generous than greedy. Little fiat DAFs, right, Who are tracking at 20%. In general, your overall numbers are three x, right? If we're talking 20% into 60% distribution, I'm all about the distribution. I'm all about putting the money to work. Nothing frustrates me more than money sitting on the sidelines while non-profits are out there doing the work right now. [00:15:05] And so I get, I'll just be honest, hesitant about, Hey, here's a way for you to like stash it and make 0.78% on compound. By the way, no subtle risk to what may actually happen to that capital. Looking at what happened to DAFs this year alone, with the market dropping 20% that were in safe, I'm using air quotes, safe investments just means less freaking money for non-profits headed into a recession. [00:15:35] You can tell I'm frustrated by that , so I think this is interesting. , but it doesn't, it it's not, It's not exciting in the sense that like getting dollars out the door, which is, which is really great. I wanna come back to, unless you have a finer point and you wanna push back on that, I'm fine to. Listen, I, I, you know, I, I agree with you for sure. [00:15:57] Like money needs to go out into the hands of non-profits. You know, I will say that we are working at a way faster pace than traditional DAFs in terms of getting that money out. We have a four x this year, four x this year. Yes. We have, you know, a two year inactive fund policy is an example. Most community foundations have five years where you don't have to do anything with your. [00:16:17] For five years. Hmm. Ours is two. And I will say just anecdotally, based on our community, people are super generous and wanna get money out into the community. So even if we're letting them invest a small portion of their donor advised fund, they are not necessarily investing their entire donor advised fund. [00:16:37] They are still getting money out into the hands of nonprofits. Yeah. And we've seen this time and time again with Ukraine, with reproductive rights. All of the horrible things that are going on in this world, You know, we have been able to raise money imminently, and the fact that we send grants via a bank wire and not a check, like most traditional DAF providers, we are able to actually deploy capital in one to two days to these non-profits that really need it. [00:17:06] So, you know, everything we do at end. Very, very mission driven and mission-aligned, and we are taking some of the traditional narratives of donor advised funds and, and of philanthropy and really flipping it on its head. My last point about this, and then we can totally move on, is our fee structure, because that is something compared to the traditional donor advised fund that really, really sets us apart. [00:17:30] You know, we take a transaction fee, it's one and a half percent. It's super upfront and transparent on our website, and it's actually weighted at the throughput. So we take 0.5% when someone is making that initial investment into their donor advised fund, and we take 1% when it's going out to the receiving nonprofit. [00:17:53] So we're actually financially incentivizing ourselves by taking a larger fee to get money out of the DAF and into the hands of nonprofits. Most traditional donor advisement providers are taking a fee based on assets under management. So if someone has $500,000 in their DA and they grant out $200,000, they're left with $300,000 and that. [00:18:16] Donor advised fund provider is getting less money. So there's no financial incentive for these larger daph providers to actually get money out into the hands of nonprofits that need it imminently. So, you know, we're trying to really change the narrative and one of the reasons, and one of the ways we're doing that is with our fee structure in terms of waiting more on the output and on the throughput. [00:18:40] Sorry. Not taking a fee based on how much money is actually in the donor advised fund. The adage, show me the incentive. I'll show you. The behavior is ringing in my ears. I wonder, coming back to the fact that you're built on Ethereum, which is a publicly auditable database living on the blockchain, that it's publicly available that I can check. [00:19:04] You said words, they sounded. . Here's the thing. I can check that. I can check the holdings, I can look on the chain, I can see where the assets are and I can see where they aren't. I think that's a sort of like amazing trust but verify. Mm-hmm. that traditional DAFs just don't have for sure. And I think that maybe part of this ethos, it's, it's easier to stay honest when you're kept honest. [00:19:31] For sure. We, we, That's something great about crypto Phil. Yeah, it's not just our board. You know, since we are structured as a nonprofit, you know, we do have a board of directors and it's not just our board us, us being accountable to our board and to our staff, right? But we're actually being accountable to our entire community and ecosystem. [00:19:49] And even beyond that, because somebody who is not a donor to endowment, has no relation to endowment, can actually see that public trail on the blockchain. So anyone. Check our work can see the activity that's happening. And that for me personally, just coming out of the non-profit, traditional non-profit landscape is something that was really, really exciting about what endowment is doing. [00:20:14] Because there is that public trail, you are able to check activity and it's just adding layers of transparency that people are really looking for. Both donors, non-profits, and just people in general. This world needs to be more transparent and upfront and, you know, inviting people into the conversation. [00:20:33] And, you know, we definitely are doing that at endowment and, and we're kind of practicing what we're preaching as well. [00:20:42] Okay. I was doing some back of the envelope math, so already asterisk. Be careful with that. 924 organizations have been the generous recipients of that amount of, you know, percent of 50 million that has been distributed. 924 is not a lot. That's actually a, a rather small distribution on average looks like $54,000, uh, headed toward, on average. [00:21:06] These organizations, again, average is a dangerous number, probably throws against a power law for the distribution of this capital. So a sort of consolidation of cause. What is top of mind? What is noisiest? What is emotionally resonant of the moment? And as I explore some of the, the top organizations getting funds and community funds, it does seem like there is a pretty high consolidation around those topics of reproductive rights, of gun violence, of, as you mentioned, Ukraine. [00:21:41] Can you tell me a bit about. How a nonprofit listening right now that is not the, in the limelight in the moment right now on that cause, how might they engage with this platform or at large crypto donors that seem to be following the shiny social issue of the moment? Sure. So I think it's important to note that, you know, we have nonprofits that are signed up with endowment that haven't. [00:22:12] funds. Right? And that's okay because you are adding awareness to your donor community that you offer this type of giving vehicle. So you know, once a non-profit is onboarded with endowment, again, we're completely free for non-profits. So there's no contract. You know, nonprofits aren't paying. To potentially get a crypto donation. [00:22:34] We're completely free. We're really offering this public goods infrastructure where we want every nonprofit to be able to benefit from, we call them crypto originated donations. Since we transfer it into US dollars, we want every nonprofit to be able to participate in this ecosystem and benefit from this new asset class and donor group without ever having to pay. [00:22:55] Because if. Wait, it then all of the large nonprofits who have the budget will be able to benefit and the small grassroots nonprofits get left out. So when, you know, our CEO built endowment, that was really important to him to keep it free for all nonprofits. So that's like my first note is like, get set up with endowment. [00:23:15] Like gonna give us a little shout out here. We're completely free. You don't have to pay and get set up and like start communicating to your donor base that you're now set up to receive crypto donations. So, You know, I always tell nonprofits like start spreading the word within your own donor community, right? [00:23:32] If you are a nonprofit and you have a newsletter, if you use Twitter, if you use Facebook, if you use Instagram, spread the word because you don't know who's a crypto holder, and just because somebody hasn't come knocking on your door and saying, Hey, we have Bitcoin, do you accept? It? Doesn't mean that they're not holding crypto. [00:23:49] The other aspect is on the donor education side, because. Right now, again, I'm not a cpa. This is not tax advice, like I'm not a financial professional. But crypto is tax the same way as stock is where if you have appreciated crypto assets or appreciated stock assets and you donate them to a 5 0 1 C three, you can mitigate your capital gains taxes while also taking a tax deduction. [00:24:14] So there's actually a benefit financially why someone would donate crypto. There is an education gap because there are so many people out there who are holding crypto who would never think of it as an asset that you can donate. And I just think about non-profits and the education that they've had to do about stock donations. [00:24:35] I mean, it has taken years and years to educate the masses that you can donate stock, and it's a change in behavior for people, you know, instead of donors putting. Their $5,000 donation on a credit card are sending you a check. If they have appreciated stock assets, they can actually donate it and it's beneficial for them and for the nonprofit. [00:24:56] So once a nonprofit starts educating A that they are set up with a platform like endowment to receive the crypto donations, and B, start educating their donor community on the actual benefits of giving crypto, you'll probably see people coming out of the woodworks. So, That's kind of my plug for how nonprofits can kind of benefit from this and start spreading the word. [00:25:21] And then you see nonprofits who are like totally embracing this crazy crypto community. You know, like there are nonprofits who, a lot of them are larger nonprofits, but they have a, you know, gaming in community manager, or they have like a dedicated staff person, whether on their development team or their marketing team who. [00:25:42] On Twitter trying to find NFT projects to collaborate or learning more about the space. And I would just say like, you know, if you work at a non-profit and you're crypto curious, like do some research, like find out what's out there because there's a lot of people in the crypto space and in the nft, the non fungible token, like the little digital JPEGs as people call them. [00:26:06] There are a lot of people who are looking to give back and to do good and just start like seeing what's out there. Because I'm not saying you should hire someone on your non-profit team to spearhead this, but if you're curious at all about the space, start doing research and talk to your team about it. [00:26:22] Because there's people who wanna do good in this world and support non-profits. And you know, we, we now have created a platform where you're able to do. Yeah, it's, I mean, you're, you're spot on with regard to the opportunity. You know, there's, I'll, I'll pause on it cause I'm gonna put a pin in. There's no downside. [00:26:44] I'm gonna put a pin in that for a second. Just to add to this, the idea that, because no one has come to you saying like, Hey, I'm a crypto donor, itching to give you money. Doesn't mean they're not out there. A recent study from Investipedia showed that 38% of millennials hold cryptocurrency, 38%. So there is a high probability that existing donors to your organization, uh, meaningful percent of them are, are already holding cryptocurrency. [00:27:18] What's more, if we're talking about millennials, we're entering into in this. Five to 10 years, the largest wealth shift in human history of boomers, shifting wealth, transferring wealth to millennials. I'll let that sink in for a hot second, as you may write off. Now, that said, Alexis, it has been an adage that has kept me alive for quite some time of not being the first penguin in the. [00:27:48] Are you familiar with that? Penguins actually, when they're trying to suss out whether or not there's a shark in the water before they go fishing, they'll all cuddle up right next to the edge, and whoever's the first penguin in the water, they see and they look over and they're like, Did Jim get eaten? [00:28:03] Did he not get eaten ? And if it's safe, they all start jumping in and getting fish. Now where I'm going with this is that we're still pretty early. There's still a lot of confusion, I would say around. Whether or not accepting crypto hurts the environment supports terrorism. You know, blind, small puppies kills rainbows. [00:28:25] In a more practical sense, earlier this year, Wikipedia chose to stop accepting crypto after having accepted it since very early on. Can you talk me through some of the pain points or potential honest downside? That are talked about with regard to non-profits choosing to move forward or not on accepting crypto. [00:28:54] Sure. Before I get into that, I want, since you just gave that great stat on millennials with crypto, I wanna give another stat and stat. Stat sta an article. Sta sta sta . Yeah. So, and then I will get to your question, but so to add to that We just did an article in, In Giving Compass and in Candid, and I quoted a Fidelity research that said that, you know, One third, 33% of crypto holders have actually donated digital assets to nonprofits, and half, nearly half, 46% of those donors felt it was difficult to find charities, which directly accepted cryptocurrency donations. [00:29:40] So that to me is saying that. People want to donate crypto, they just can't find non-profits to accept it, which is just going back to my point of like, get signed up. Because if it's not on your website and you're not promoting it, then people are gonna go elsewhere. So I just wanted to share that stat. [00:29:59] It's something that I, you know, I have been sharing a lot recently because it just adds to the point about. Why it's so important for nonprofits to get set up to not have to pay for this, because people are looking to donate crypto and they just are gonna turn to the next nonprofit who is set up to receive it. [00:30:17] So that is my stat add-on. To go to your point about, you know, kind of like the hesitations or maybe like the weaknesses in crypto, you know, It's a really interesting space because of a lot of the privacy and security and you know, when I first started with endowment, I was completely new to the crypto space and I had a lot of preconceived notions about like, Everyone in crypto is like a crypto tech bro, and they're sitting behind their computer and they, you know, like are all engineers. [00:30:54] And I had all of these preconceived notions about like who is in crypto. And now that I do this for a living, I have met so many amazing people who are in the space who do not at all look like. What I imagined, and there is a huge women in crypto community that I'm, you know, I've connected with a lot of people who have similar backgrounds to me. [00:31:17] I just found someone the other day who also has their master's in social work, and I'm like, I never thought sitting in my, you know, social justice class that I would be sitting here working at a crypto nonprofit, but here I am. So I think a lot of it is like the preconceived notions and the judgements that people make. [00:31:34] Like there are a. Diverse people who are in the space. You know, crypto's also. International, Right? Really anyone who has access to internet can access crypto. And we've seen a lot of use cases of people who aren't able to access bank accounts, be able to open up a crypto wallet cuz all you need is an internet connection. [00:31:57] So it's actually, there's a lot of use. Cases, especially in other countries of how people have been able to use crypto. Not just to give back like we're doing an endowment, but actually instead of traditional banking because for one reason or another they don't have access to traditional finance and banking means. [00:32:14] So it's been a really interesting use case. On the flip side, there's a lot of securities and risks. Like I wouldn't encourage anyone to just open a crypto wallet if you don't know what you're doing. You need to be able to educate yourself on the landscape. And you see all the same headlines as I do with different protocols who are going belly up and CEOs leaving, and there's a lot of noise in the space for sure. [00:32:39] And part of it is like having a trusted source of where to turn to. And I think for. I'm grateful that when I started with endowment, my team was super helpful in educating me and telling me like, Don't interact with this company or protocol and this is where you should focus your efforts. And you know, like different podcasts to listen to and blogs to read because there is a lot of noise and that is really important because you don't know what. [00:33:09] Fake and what's not, and you don't know what's legitimate and what's not. So that's definitely a hurdle because if you don't have a team like endowment or a friend who's in the space, it is really hard to know what's valid and what's not. You know, speaking to like some of the environmental impacts, you know, like we're built on the Ethereum blockchain and we just moved to proof of stake, which just lowered the environmental impacts by 99 point, like nine, 7% or something. [00:33:36] You know, a lot of other things in our world today take up a lot of energy and. Ethereum just merge, which I don't need to go into the details, but basically like the energy consumption that Ethereum is using has been increasingly lowered which has been huge for the industry. And, you know, we do work with environmental nonprofits that are signed up with us and like see the, that the benefits are kind of outweighing the, the negatives. [00:34:03] Is there anything else specifically you wanted me to touch on in terms of like, The negatives, I guess, of the crypto space or, or the perceived negatives of the space? I suppose if there was a I'm, I guess I'm in the mind of a non-profit that is worried that they start talking about the word crypto and those headlines of fraud, of criminal activity of, you already mentioned the environmental component, which is awesome. [00:34:35] Just. Make sure that that is clear as a bell because you are on Ethereum, literally because you exist when somebody moves their money onto there, connects their wallet and moves their Bitcoin, there it is liquidated and is actually on an energy efficient network. You are actually a net positive for moving cryptocurrencies onto a green network quite literally. [00:34:56] So that is hopefully becoming a moot point. The criminal activity one could be one that, let's just say older donors assume that it's all Silk Road type of nefarious activities. Russian billionaires being able to avoid sanctions, fill in the blank. Cnbc, uninformed post about how crypto's being used, how is that responded to, or can it be responded to because the same arguments can, should be made about cash. [00:35:29] Cash is the number one full stop used for criminal activity worldwide. Yeah, so, you know, I will say with endowment there, you know, there's a, an ofac like bad actor, bad wallet list that exists and. We are crosschecking wallets that interact with endowment. I don't know the, you know, I'm not, I'm not on the engineering team, so I don't know the logistics of how it happens, but you know, because people interact with our platform using their wallet, we are able to crosscheck it on the ofac. [00:36:07] Bad actor wallet list. So that is, you know, for us as an organization, that's kind of how we are checking ourselves to your point. Exactly. There is bad stuff going on in every industry, whether that's with crypto, whether that's with cash. There are bad actors everywhere in this world. And you know, we've seen it a lot in philanthropy, like people are. [00:36:31] Making a lot of money with their company that's maybe not doing so good in the world, and they're parking their money to be charitable and they're getting buildings named after them, and that money is dirty money essentially. So I would say like, this is my personal opinion, that. It's happening everywhere. [00:36:50] And that just because the headlines are talking about crypto now doesn't mean that that doesn't exist in the world today. And you know, if anything, using a platform like us, people are charitably inclined and they're doing good in the world. And you know, our donors also like, Most of our donors are under the age of 45. [00:37:09] Most of our donors have made their wealth in a very short amount of time and feel so grateful to give back to the communities that have helped them or that they live in, or that they've benefited from. You know, time and time again, we talk to donors and they say, I've never been able to give more than $500 to charity, and now I'm giving $50,000 or $500,000. [00:37:29] And just the. Heartwarming sentiments of these people who have made a lot of money in a short amount of time is really, really inspiring. So there are bad actors everywhere. There are also people who are incredibly generous and philanthropic and wanna give back, and in my opinion, the headlines need to focus more on the use cases for crypto and how it's being used for good and how it's helping people who don't have access to bank accounts as opposed to the opposite area. [00:37:59] Gotcha. Yeah. And thanks for, for making that point. I know it's, uh, it, it's one that probably comes up, uh, a bit. I wanna talk about one more feature on the site before we run out of time here, which are your community funds, because I think it lends itself potentially to a strategy. Can you explain what these funds are? [00:38:18] I'm on the site and I'm seeing something like the Art Blocks Fund or the end guidance ending. And gun violence fund advised by hug and some are advised by endowment. I'm interested actually, if you can talk about the ones that are advised by other projects and other groups here. What is this? So community funds are. [00:38:43] Really think of them as area of interest funds. So somebody could come to our site and open up a fund that is supporting gun violence, that is supporting reproductive rights or Ukraine. And these community funds are most often utilized by groups of people, whether that's an NFT project, whether that. We talked about Dows in the beginning of this conversation, whether that's advised by a Dow, whether that's advised by a group of friends, and it's really a great way to be able to raise money for the cause or area of interest that you care about. [00:39:23] So we saw this. With reproductive rights, right? So endowment as an entity set up a protect reproductive rights fund where we vetted seven non-profits, both national and local. We wanted a combination of, you know, like the more well known organizations paired with the small grassroots non-profits. We identified seven non-profits that we were gonna split donations to those organizations. [00:39:51] So anyone. Come to our site, make a donation to our Protect reproductive rights fund, and we would evenly distribute to those seven non-profits. That was a great opportunity for anyone who wanted to support the cause, but didn't know where to turn to or didn't wanna do the research on their own. In addition to that, we had other groups of people and FT. [00:40:11] Artists dows different protocols, some companies that opened up their own funds that they could actually fundraise from. So an example. There's a Dow, an NFT project called Cowgirl Dow and Molly Dixon, who's their founder and artist, she set up a. Fund where a hundred percent of the NFTs were supporting various reproductive rights nonprofits. [00:40:38] So anyone who purchased one of her NFTs, a hundred percent of the proceeds were going to this fund. And then she was using her community to actually vote on what nonprofits to support. So it was giving people a voice, giving them a say in how the funds are being distributed. And then because it was. [00:40:57] Public fund on endowment. Anyone could just donate into that fund. You didn't have to purchase an nft. You could just go to her fund, make a donation, and know that your money was supporting reproductive rights nonprofits. So they're a really great tool in vehicle for kind of that collective giving model. [00:41:16] You know, like in. A lot of nonprofits offer giving circles or have a way where people can kind of pool their funds together and distribute among various nonprofits, and that's essentially what our community funds are doing, is giving a say to various communities across the country that want to give back to a specific area of interest and mobilize their community to get involved in some capacity. [00:41:40] Gotcha. This is the index fund of non-profits that I think I was thinking of earlier, but what great functionality and also transparent, again because it is built on the blockchain. Alexis, thank you so much. Are there any final thoughts, bits of advice, stats, , that that's, that you were hoping to share before we sign? [00:42:05] No, this is, This has been great. I mean, I would just add, you know, End of year and it's giving season. And I would encourage, you know, from the donor side of things, if anyone has it, if anyone's listening and has cryptocurrency, please consider donating to your favorite nonprofit. And from the nonprofit side, get signed up with us before the end of the year. [00:42:27] Or just do some research and like figure out what works for you. Or just survey your community and see if anyone has crypto. Like take an action, do something out of your comfort zone, this giving season. And. , you don't know where it'll lead. And I, I will end with that, but this has been great and you know, I'll give a little plug. [00:42:46] Like for anyone who wants to learn more we have a whole like resource. Center, we have a crypto 1 0 1 dictionary for nonprofits who have heard terms like blockchain and dow and don't know what they mean and wanna learn more. It's on our website. You know, we are really here as an educational resource and if anyone has questions they're curious about the space, like please reach out to us. [00:43:06] Our website is endowment.org or on twitter@endowment.org on Discord. You can email us. All of the links will be shared in the show notes and. Thank you George, this, this has been a great conversation. Well, thanks for your time and we appreciate the work. Thanks.

Grow Your Life
189: Write Better Sales Copy That Connects To Get More Paid Clients - #GrowYourLife

Grow Your Life

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 25:10


In this episode of the #GrowYourLife podcast, we discuss how to understand your target customer and what frustrations they may have. We also talk about how to communicate problems and solutions in your copy, and why highlighting how your product or service is the best chance for the prospect to succeed is essential. When writing copy, it's crucial to focus on the problem that the prospect is having, and to be confident and empathetic in your approach. Additionally, it's important to be honest and frank with prospects without discouraging them from working with you. If you're looking for help writing effective copy that connects with your audience, this episode is for you.

The Gray & Green Show
Medium Monday- Terri connects with her dead mother

The Gray & Green Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 8:57


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Dustin Gold Standard
Full Ep 44, In Case You Missed It: Warning! Technocrats Are Coming For Our Kids! “Smart” Sock Connects Baby To The Internet Of Bodies, Monitors Emotions, Sends Data To Cloud

The Dustin Gold Standard

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 130:35


In Episode 44 of "The Dustin Gold Standard," Dustin completes his review of Dr. Charles Morgan III, focusing on the government's ability to plant memories into our heads while we are asleep. Dustin breaks down several “smart” devices that are marketed to children and connects them back to the government's technology. Join the discussion and get the ad-free video version of this podcast: Paine.TV/gold Follow Dustin on Twitter: Twitter.com/dustingoldshow and Twitter.com/hackableanimal Get involved with the Telegram discussion: https://t.me/dustingoldshow Join in on live audio conversations: https://wisdom.app/dustingoldshow Ask a question and get a 60-second answer from me: https://wisdom.app/dustingoldshow/ask Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Late Confirmation by CoinDesk
THE HASH: How the Fashion Industry Connects With Crypto - Explained by Spatial Labs Founder

Late Confirmation by CoinDesk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 32:00


The most valuable crypto stories for Friday, Nov. 4, 2022.'The Hash' hosts discuss recent criticism of Aptos' "fair" token distribution following a wave of criticism from the project's community. In addition, Bloomberg reports that South Korean prosecutors suspect Do Kwon, the co-founder of Terraform Labs, may be in Europe. And also an interview with Founder and technologist Iddris Sandu as he explains how Spatial LABS connects the fashion industry with crypto.See also: Aptos CEO Defends 'Fair' Tokenomics That Prompted Community BacklashTerra's Do Kwon May Be in Europe: Report-This episode has been edited by Michele Musso. Our executive producer is Jared Schwartz. Our theme song is “Neon Beach.”-Minima is a new layer 1 blockchain, designed to run in full on a smartphone. Join over 300,000 Minima node runners on the Incentive Program today, to start earning $MINIMA every day until Mainnet launch. Get your node setup and earn $MINIMA at minima.global/get-involved. -Circle, the sole issuer of the trusted and reliable stablecoin USDC, is our sponsor for today's show. USDC is a fast, cost-effective solution for global payments at internet speeds. Learn how businesses are taking advantage of these opportunities at Circle's USDC Hub for Businesses.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Reason and Theology Show – Reason and Theology
Jay Dyer Connects the Dots for Taylor Marshall Followers

Reason and Theology Show – Reason and Theology

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022


Jay Dyer Connects the Dots for Taylor Marshall Followers Michael shows how Taylor Marshall’s views may lead to a radical version of Eastern Orthodoxy. He does so by reviewing Orthodox apologist Jay Dyer, who connects the dots for Marshall’s fans. In the process, he shows why both the Taylor Marshall and Jay Dyer positions are […]

Castle Super Beast
CSB 191: Bin Laden's Laptop Connects Anime To 911

Castle Super Beast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 236:34


Download for Mobile | Podcast Preview | Full Timestamps Hands on Bayo 3 Hitboxin' Witcher Remake, Henry Cavill Exits The Franco-Prussian War Created D&D Game Reviews: Purchase Guide vs Analysis You can watch us record the podcast live on twitch.tv/castlesuperbeast CD Projekt RED has announced The Witcher Remake, built from the ground up with Unreal Engine 5. This Witcher remake is being developed by Polish studio Fool's Theory with veteran Witcher staff. This is the previously announced title that was codenamed "Canis Majoris" Beau DeMayo says some of #TheWitcher writers 'actively disliked the books and games' when he was working on the series. When he became #XMen97's showrunner, his #1 rule was 'you had to be a fan' "You have to respect the work before you're allowed to add to its legacy" Liam Hemsworth will replace Henry Cavill as Geralt in ‘THE WITCHER' Season 4. henry cavill has been fighting the show-runners for years and it looks like he finally gave up his fight Nibellion quits Twitter NASCAR driver recreates wall ride from 2005 GameCube game to qualify for championship Overwatch 2 is offering a Pachimari weapon charm cosmetic that costs 700 coins in the game, or roughly $7 USD. However,  a real keychain with the same design costs $5 on Blizzard's Gear Store. So the digital item actually costs more than the real one.  It's faster to earn Overwatch 2 skins through playing WOW than the actual game, players suggest

Cloud N Clear
WHAT IS WEB3: HOW BlOCKDAEMON SECURLEY CONNECTS BUSINESS AND BLOCKCHAINS / 140

Cloud N Clear

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 30:39


LA Opera Podcasts: Behind the Curtain
Experiencing Omar with Ashley Faatoalia, Cedric Berry and Patrick Blackwell

LA Opera Podcasts: Behind the Curtain

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 32:10


In this episode, Director of LA Opera Connects, ​Andréa Fuentes, interviews Ashley Faatoalia, Cedric Berry and Patrick Blackwell who discuss their experiences as part of the cast for Omar. This recording was made as part of Connects professional development series for teachers, Opera for Educators. Don't miss the West Coast premiere of Omar at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, October 22 through November 13. Tickets are available now at LAOpera.org

At The End of The Tunnel
127: Christopher Rivas on How to Tell a Story that Inspires, Connects and Energizes

At The End of The Tunnel

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 79:05


Today I'm in conversation with one of the most talented and brilliant storytellers that I've ever heard, Mr. Christopher Rivas. As many of you longtime listeners know, I used to produce these inspirational variety shows called The Shine between the years of 2014 and 2019, and we did them all over the world; Los Angeles, New York, and London. And that's where I first connected with Christopher because he opened the show for us a couple of times. He's also a podcaster, and his podcast is about as unique and specific as they come. It's called Ruby Rosa. And it's an episodic show that details the legend of Porer Rub Rosa, who is set to be the Dominican diplomat and Latin lover that author Ian Fleming, allegedly based his famous 007-character on, also known as Bond, James Bond. And ever since learning this profound information in college, Christopher, who's half Dominican and half Columbian, and who had been low-key obsessed with James Bond ever since he was a kid, had this full circle moment because he discovered that the coolest, baddest spy of all time was based on somebody from his same Dominican heritage. And this led Christopher to create a one-man show called the Real James Bond was Dominican. But that's not all, Christopher also became a daily meditator in a very funny way. He basically lied to an attractive woman that he was an avid meditator because she was a meditator, and he managed to hide the fact that he actually never meditated a day in his life long enough for her to become his girlfriend.So you can imagine his surprise when she gifted for his birthday with an airline flight to a 10-day silent meditation retreat. And while it was indeed a struggle ever since that silent retreat, Christopher actually did become a daily meditator. Later he wrote a New York Times editorial called. I broke up with her because she's white and that ended up going viral.And so in this conversation, Christopher and I talk about the art of code-switching, and he shares this game that he learned from his father when he was just a child to, uh, to size people up. We talk about what famous Dominican actor inspired Christopher to create his own one-man show based on James Bond.We talked about the African American author who inadvertently motivated Christopher to pursue his mission. Of going all in on his brownness and being brown enough and how he stumbled upon the obscure article about the Real James Bond. We talked about the logistics of how one creates a one-man show and when and why Christopher slept in his car for a period of time.We talked about why his friends called him the White girl Whisperer, and how he handled hate mail from his viral New York Times editorial. We talked about why everything is a story and what are the elements of a good story and how his podcast has evolved. And as usual, our conversation was jampacked with other awesome stories and insights, and I know you're gonna get a ton of inspiration from listening to it.So without further ado, I want to introduce you to the Rebel him. . So without further ado, I want to introduce you to the storyteller himself, Mr. Christopher Rivas.