Podcasts about shrubs

A small- to medium-sized perennial woody plant

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Latest podcast episodes about shrubs

Cambie Report
E3-1415 Shrub of reasonable doubt

Cambie Report

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2022


Doug McCallum walks, Sim in Doha and libraries should be free The post E3-1415 Shrub of reasonable doubt appeared first on Cambie Report.

Rosie on the House
11/19/22 - OUTDOOR LIVING HOUR! Planting Trees And Shrubs In Your Yard!

Rosie on the House

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2022 39:03


From ground planting to containers, Jay Harper says its the 'most wonderful time of the year' in the low desert to plant citrus, stone fruit and shade trees to establish roots while the ground is still warm.  Annuals for beautiful landscape colors.  Your choice and care of winter rye lawns, summer bermuda or convert to artificial turf.  Even plant or prune roses for that spring push of new blooms.

Grow, cook, eat, arrange with Sarah Raven & Arthur Parkinson
Using the Spectacular Structure and Scale of Trees, Shrubs and Climbers - Episode 94

Grow, cook, eat, arrange with Sarah Raven & Arthur Parkinson

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 19:37


While the smaller, delicate beds can often top off a lovely garden, it's shrubs, trees and climbers which can often add the most architectural structure and a real sense of scale.Some are great for reaching staggering heights, others for their role as a prolific perfume factory - join Sarah and Arthur as they share their pick of shrubs, trees and the climbers that can often intersperse them for a rich dash of colour.In this episode, discover:Which Crab Apple trees are fantastic for attracting the intoxicating buzz of wildlife Lovely varieties of Honeysuckle, and other scented shrubs for structure and architecture Staggering, cascading climbers for unparalleled height, like the stalwart Cobaea ScandensOrder Sarah's book: https://bit.ly/2TWHJczOrder Arthur's book: https://bit.ly/3xOov7HView all products mentioned and find further advice from Sarah: https://bit.ly/3f2DFiHGet in touch: info@sarahraven.comShop on the Sarah Raven Website: http://bit.ly/3jvbaeu Follow Sarah: https://bit.ly/3jDTvBpFollow Arthur: https://bit.ly/3jxSKK5

The James McMahon Music Podcast
Episode 76: Nige Tassell on what happened to the C86 kids

The James McMahon Music Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 34:16


If, like me, you're of the opinion that the only things that really matter in life are pop music and football, you may well be aware of the writing of one Nige Tassell, who has written brilliantly over the course of a number of acclaimed tomes, about both. His newest book, out now on Nine Eight books – who really should be paying us for the number of times they get namedropped on this podcast – concerns the former. It's called Whatever Happened To The C86 Kids? An Indie Odyssey, and it is just that, the book seeing Nige trawling the UK in an attempt to track down all the musicians who appeared on the NME's seminal cassette – from Primal Scream to The Wedding Present, via Close Lobsters, Big Flame, The Shrubs and all the rest - a cassette which you might argue is indie's year zero. Certainly a record that's hugely important to me and the countless others who've picked up discordant guitars since. BREAKING! And Nige's new book just got named the 14th best music book in the Rough Trade Books of 2022 list!Join the Substack!

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 640 (10-31-22 Halloween Special): A Water-related Halloween-themed Tree Quiz

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:22).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Image Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 10-28-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio, with a special episode for Halloween 2022.  This episode is part of series this year of episodes related to trees and shrubs. SOUND – ~5 sec and fade - Tree creaking in wind. Creaking wood is often part of a scary Halloween soundscape of dark forests or old houses.  Does that creaking have anything to do with water?  That's one of five questions this episode poses, challenging you to make connections among Halloween, tree parts, and water.  After each question, you'll have about three seconds of some Halloween music to consider your answer.  Good luck, and I hope you do TREE-mendously. No. 1.  Scary human skeletons are a common Halloween feature.  In humans and other animals, skeletons support the body.  What part of trees, through which water and nutrients are transported, functions as the trees' structural support?  MUSIC - ~3 sec.  That's the xylem, also called the wood, which makes up the bulk of a tree trunk. No. 2.  Blood is a featured in many a frightful Halloween scene or costume.  Blood is a water-based fluid that humans and other animals use to transport oxygen, energy molecules, and other biochemicals to body parts.  What part of the tree carries energy molecules and other biochemicals to tree parts?  MUSIC - ~3 sec.  That's the phloem, which makes up a relatively thin layer just under a tree's bark. No. 3.  Ghosts or other specters are often depicted in white or black.  How do light and dark colors affect water in a tree?  MUSIC - ~3 sec.  Dark colors in or around trees absorb more solar radiation and therefore can increase temperature.  The light color or some trees, such some birches, can help reduce this effect.  Temperature, along with humidity, affects water movement into and out of trees, particularly by affecting transpiration, that is, the evaporation of water from plant parts. No. 4.  Wind whistling through trees is weather people often associate with Halloween nights.  How does wind affect the water in a tree?  MUSIC - ~3 sec.  Wind can increase transpiration both by bringing drier air to leaves and by moving away air that has absorbed moisture from the leaves. And no. 5.  Back to creaking wood.  How does water or dryness affect sounds in wood?  MUSIC - ~3 sec.  In wooden houses, creaking can result from temperature and humidity changes that swell or shrink the wood.   In trees, a crackling or popping sound—detected by scientists using microphones placed next to tree trunks—can result from air bubbles within the tree trunk, caused by tree dehydration.  Incidentally, frequent creaking sounds in trees may be an indicator of weak tree structure, so a creaking tree sometimes not only sounds scary but also is reason to be wary. I hope your Halloween this year and in years to come includes fun and functional trees along with adequate good water for them and for you.  We close with the full 50 seconds of the Halloween music you've heard during the questions.  Here's “A Little Fright Music,” composed for Virginia Water Radio by Torrin Hallett, currently with the Symphonic Orchestra of the State of Mexico. MUSIC – ~50 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of “Cripple Creek” to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Virginia Water Radio thanks Kevin McGuire, Virginia Water Resources Research Center, and Eric Wiseman, Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation, for their help with this episode. The wind and creaking tree sounds were recorded by Virginia Water Radio in Blacksburg, Va., on October 5, 2014. “A Little Fright Music” is copyright 2020 by Torrin Hallett, used with permission.  As of October 2022, Torrin is the associate principal horn of the Symphonic Orchestra of the State of Mexico.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 601, 10-31-21.  Thanks very much to Torrin for composing this music especially for Virginia Water Radio. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGE (Unless otherwise noted, photographs are by Virginia Water Radio.) A strange “face” seems to peer out from the stump of a downed willow tree at the Virginia Tech Duck Pond in Blacksburg, October 10, 2022. SOURCES Used for Audio Pete and Ron's Tree Service [Tampa, Fla.], “Sounds Your Tree Could Make and Their Causes,” online at https://www.prtree.com/blog/2021/3/15/sounds-your-tree-could-make-and-their-causes. Maya Wei-Haas, “What Does a Dying Forest Sound Like?”;  Smithsonian Magazine, April 21, 2016, online at https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/what-does-dying-forest-sound-180958859/. Baird Foundation Repair [Texas], “Why Do Houses Creak?” online at https://www.bairdfoundationrepair.com/why-do-houses-creak/. Steven G. Pallardy, Physiology of Woody Plants, Third Edition, Elsevier/Academic Press, Burlington, Mass., 2008. Peter Scott, Physiology and Behaviour of Plants, John Wiley & Songs, Ltd., West Sussex, England, 2008. John R. Seiler, John W. Groninger, and W. Michael Aust, Forest Biology Textbook, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Va., 2022, online at https://dendro.cnre.vt.edu/forbio/, as of 10-11-22.  Access requires permission of the Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Conservation, online at https://frec.vt.edu/; phone (540) 231-5483. Texas A&M University AgriLife Extension, “How Trees Grow,” online at https://agrilife.org/treecarekit/introduction-to-tree-care/how-trees-grow/. University of California-Santa Barbara, “Science Line: Why do black objects absorb more heat (light) than lighter colored objects?  What do wavelengths have to do with it?”; online at https://scienceline.ucsb.edu/getkey.php?key=3873. For More Information about Trees and Shrubs in Virginia and Elsewhere Arbor Day Foundation, “Tree Guide,” online at https://www.arborday.org/trees/treeguide/index.cfm. Center for Watershed Protection, “Trees and Stormwater Runoff,” online at https://www.cwp.org/reducing-stormwater-runoff/. Chesapeake Bay Program, “Field Guide: Plants and Trees,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/critters?s=&fieldGuideType=Plants+%26+Trees&fieldGuideHabitat=. eFloras.org, “Flora of North America,” online at http://www.efloras.org/flora_page.aspx?flora_id=1. James P. Engel, “Shrubs in the Understory,” February 2012, online at http://www.whiteoaknursery.biz/essays/ShrubsinUnderstory.shtml. Oscar W. Gupton and Fred C. Swope, Trees and Shrubs of Virginia, University Press of Virginia, Charlottesville, 1981. Sanglin Lee and Alan Raflo, “Trees and Water,” Virginia Water Resources Research Center, Virginia Water Central Newsletter, pages 13-18, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/49367.   (A Virginia Cooperative Extension version of this article—“Trees and Water,” by Sanglin Lee, Alan Raflo, and Jennifer Gagnon, 2018—with some slight differences in the text is available online at https://www.pubs.ext.vt.edu/content/pubs_ext_vt_edu/en/ANR/ANR-18/ANR-18NP.html.) Penn State Extension, “Trees, Shrubs, and Groundcovers Tolerant of Wet Sites,” prepared by N. Robert Nuss, and reviewed and revised by Scott Guiser and Jim Smellmer, October 2007, online at https://extension.psu.edu/trees-shrubs-and-groundcovers-tolerant-of-wet-sites. Plant Virginia Natives, “Virginia Native Shrubs—Backbone of Our Landscape,” undated, online at https://www.plantvirginianatives.org/virginia-native-shrubs. U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service, Forests of Virginia, 2018, Resource Update FS-264, Asheville, N.C., 2020; available online at https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/59963. U.S. Department of Agriculture/U.S. Forest Service, “State and Private Forestry Fact Sheet—Virginia 2022,” online (as a PDF) at https://apps.fs.usda.gov/nicportal/temppdf/sfs/naweb/VA_std.pdf. U.S. Department of Agriculture/Forest Service/Climate Change Resource Center, “Forest Tree Diseases and Climate Change,” online at https://www.fs.usda.gov/ccrc/topics/forest-disease. U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)/Natural Resources Conservation Service, “PLANTS Database,” online at https://plants.usda.gov. Virginia Botanical Associates, “Digital Atlas of the Virginia Flora,” online at http://www.vaplantatlas.org/index.php?do=start&search=Search. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation/Natural Heritage, online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural-heritage/.   See also “The Natural Communities of Virginia: Ecological Groups and Community Types,” online (as a PDF) at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural-heritage/natural-communities/document/comlist07-21.pdf. Virginia Department of Forestry, “Virginia's Forests,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/.  Some of the useful pages at that site are the following:“Benefits of Trees,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/education-and-recreation/learn-about-education-recreation/benefits-of-tree/;“Common Native Trees of Virginia,” 2020 edition, online (as a PDF) at https://dof.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/Common-Native-Trees-ID_pub.pdf;Tree and Forest Health Guide, 2020, online (as a PDF) at https://dof.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/Tree-and-Forest-Health-Guide.pdf;“Trees for Clean Water Program,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/urban-community-forestry/urban-forestry-community-assistance/virginia-trees-for-clean-water-grant-program/;“Virginia Statewide Assessment of Forest Resources,” November 2020, online (as a PDF) at https://www.stateforesters.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/2020-VA-Statewide-Assessment.pdf;“Tree Identification,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/education-and-recreation/learn-about-education-recreation/tree-identification/. Virginia Forest Landowner Education Program, Virginia Cooperative Extension and Virginia Tech College of Natural Resources and Environment, online at https://forestupdate.frec.vt.edu/. Virginia Forest Products Association, online at https://www.vfpa.net/. Virginia Native Plant Society, online at http://vnps.org/. Alan S. Weakley, J. Christopher Ludwig, and John F. Townsend, Bland Crowder, ed., Flora of Virginia, Botanical Research Institute Press, Ft. Worth, Tex., 2012.  Information is available online at The Flora of Virginia Project, http://www.floraofvirginia.org/. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Plants” subject category. Following are links to other episodes on trees and shrubs. Introduction to trees and water – Episode 621, 3-21-22.American Sycamore – Episode 624, 4-11-22.American Witch Hazel – Episode 639, 10-24-22.Ash trees – Episode 376, 7-10-17 and Episode 625, 4-18-22.Early spring wildflowers in woodlands – Episode 573, 4-19-21.Fall colors and their connection to water movement in trees – Episode 638, 10-10-22.“Fifteen Minutes in the Forest” video podcast series – Episode 637, 9-26-22.Forest lands and work in Virginia – Episode 623, 4-4-22. Maple trees – Episode 503, 12-16-19. Photosynthesis – Episode 602, 11-8-21. Poison Ivy and related plants, including the shrub Poison Sumac – &

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Mining Stock Daily
The West's Dependency on Chinese Metals Left the Room with Hu Jintao

Mining Stock Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 94:48


In this week's long-form, we welcome in Shrub Capital to MSD for the first time. He has a lot of ideas to share in regards to the West's reshoring of supply chains, including the metals market. Following the images out of China last week and Hu Jintao, Shrub and Trevor discuss the impacts of doing business with both China and Russia and how the west is looking at years of infrastructure development to reach demand. Paul Harris also welcomes in Equinox Partners in our second segment where they discuss the fund's move to bring Directors of publicly trades juniors closer to shareholder alignment. We'd like to thank our sponsors: Integra Resources is advancing the past-producing DeLamar Project in southwestern Idaho. The Company has continued to demonstrate resource growth and conversion through greenfield and brownfield exploration. Integra Resources trades on the TSX-V under ITR and the NYSE American under ITRG. Western Copper and Gold is focused on developing the world-class Casino project in Canada's Yukon Territory. The Casino project consists of an impressive 11 billion pounds of copper and 21 million ounces of gold in an overall resource. Western Copper and Gold trades on the TSX and the NYSE American with WRN. Be sure to follow the company via their website, www.westerncopperandgold.com. ASCU is an early-stage copper developer and explorer of the Cactus Mine and its satellite project, Parks/Salyer, both situated on a 4km mine trend on private land in Arizona's porphyry copper district. Opportunity for significant growth and scale exist along the trend, while future capex requirements outlined in the Cactus PEA benefit from significant onsite and nearby access to infrastructure. The Company is led by an executive management team and Board which have a long-standing track record of successful project delivery in North America. For more information, please visit www.arizonasonoran.com.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 639 (10-24-22): A Halloween Season Salute to the Witch Hazel Plant

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:15).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImageExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 10-21-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the weeks of October 24 and October 31.   This revised episode from Halloween 2014 is part of a series this year of episodes related to trees and shrubs. SOUNDS – ~9 sec What better than an Eastern Screech-Owl calling eerily from a dark woods to conjure up a Halloween landscape? But for this Halloween season episode, consider a much quieter, but still mysterious, part of that landscape: the American Witch Hazel plant.  This shrub or small tree—a native in Virginia and throughout the eastern United States—has two noteworthy water connections.  First is the use of its forked twigs in “dowsing,” “divining,” or “water witching” to try to find groundwater, a centuries-old practice that some people still follow.  In fact, the “witch” in the plant's common name may derive from an old English word that means “bend,” apparently referring to the plant's flexible twigs and, perhaps, to the belief that a dowsing rod will bend toward groundwater.  Second, extracts from the plant's bark and leaves have long been used—medicinally and cosmetically—as an astringent, that is, a substance used to dry fluids and shrink tissues. Besides its reputed water-finding ability and its established fluid-drying uses, American Witch Hazel is also remarkable for its unusual blooming time.  Bright yellow flowers appear in fall and can continue into December, often seen beside fruits from the previous season.  When those fruits ripen, seeds are forcibly ejected some distance, leading to yet another possible origin of the plant's name: that people attributed to witchcraft the mysterious sound of those far-flung seeds hitting the ground. From its name, to its uses, to its unusual flowering and fruiting, Witch Hazel offers botanical treats far beyond Halloween season's creepy screeches. SOUND – 3 sec – Screech-Owl We close a musical observation about how seeing a cold-weather flowering tree can inspire human resilience.  Here's about 50 seconds of a song called “Witch Hazel,” by Tom Gala, from his 2011 album, “Story After Story.” MUSIC - ~53 sec – Lyrics: “I am looking at Witch Hazel blooming in a garden—the bright yellow flowers in the middle of wintertime.  And I tell my heart be strong like the Witch Hazel flower, and you will not be injured by this dark and trouble time.” SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 238, 10-31-14. The Eastern Screech-Owl sound was recorded by Virginia Water Radio in Blacksburg, Va., on the night of August 12, 2013. “Witch Hazel,” from the 2011 album “Story After Story,” is copyright by Tom Gala, used with permission.  More information about Tom Gala is available online at https://open.spotify.com/artist/0kG6YXrfGPB6lygJwOUNqO. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGE An American Witch Hazel plant in Blacksburg, Va., blooming on October 13, 2022. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT WATER DOWSING The following information is quoted from the U.S. Geological Survey, “Water Science School/What is Water Dowsing?”; online at https://www.usgs.gov/special-topics/water-science-school/science/water-dowsing. “'Water dowsing' refers in general to the practice of using a forked stick, rod, pendulum, or similar device to locate underground water, minerals, or other hidden or lost substances, and has been a subject of discussion and controversy for hundreds, if not thousands, of years. “Although tools and methods vary widely, most dowsers (also called diviners or water witches) probably still use the traditional forked stick, which may come from a variety of trees, including the willow, peach, and witchhazel.  Other dowsers may use keys, wire coat hangers, pliers, wire rods, pendulums, or various kinds of elaborate boxes and electrical instruments. “In the classic method of using a forked stick, one fork is held in each hand with the palms upward.  The bottom or butt end of the ‘Y' is pointed skyward at an angle of about 45 degrees.  The dowser then walks back and forth over the area to be tested.  When she/he passes over a source of water, the butt end of the stick is supposed to rotate or be attracted downward. “Water dowsers practice mainly in rural or suburban communities where residents are uncertain as to how to locate the best and cheapest supply of groundwater.  “Because the drilling and development of a well often costs more than a thousand dollars, homeowners are understandably reluctant to gamble on a dry hole and turn to the water dowser for advice.” What does science say about dowsing? “Case histories and demonstrations of dowsers may seem convincing, but when dowsing is exposed to scientific examination, it presents a very different picture.  The natural explanation of ‘successful' water dowsing is that in many areas underground water is so prevalent close to the land surface that it would be hard to drill a well and not find water.  In a region of adequate rainfall and favorable geology, it is difficult not to drill and find water! “Some water exists under the Earth's surface almost everywhere. This explains why many dowsers appear to be successful.  To locate groundwater accurately, however, as to depth, quantity, and quality, several techniques must be used.  Hydrologic, geologic, and geophysical knowledge is needed to determine the depths and extent of the different water-bearing strata and the quantity and quality of water found in each.  The area must be thoroughly tested and studied to determine these facts.”SOURCES Used for Audio John-Manuel Adriote, “The Mysterious Past and Present of Witch Hazel,” by The Atlantic, November 6, 2012, online at http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2012/11/the-mysterious-past-and-present-of-witch-hazel/264553/.American Water Surveyors, “Water Witching: A Brief History,” by Gerald Burden, December 26, 2015, online at https://wefindwater.com/water-witching-a-brief-history/. Arbor Day Foundation, “Witchhazel/Hamamelis virginiania,” online at https://www.arborday.org/trees/treeguide/TreeDetail.cfm?ItemID=940. eFloras.org, “Flora of North America/Hamamelis,” online at http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=1&taxon_id=114541. Encyclopedia Britannica, “Hamamelidaceae plant family,” online at https://www.britannica.com/plant/Hamamelidaceae.  Oscar W. Gupton and Fred C. Swope, Trees and Shrubs of Virginia, University Press of Virginia, Charlottesville, 1981. Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center [Austin, Tex.], “Plant Database/Hamamelis virginiana,” online at https://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=havi4.Sarina Smith, “The Wonders of Witch Hazel,” February 4, 2020, Haverford College [Pennsylvania] Arboretum, online at https://www.haverford.edu/arboretum/blog/wonders-witch-hazel. U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)/Natural Resources Conservation Service, “PLANTS Database/American witchhazel,” online at https://plants.usda.gov/home/plantProfile?symbol=HAVI4. U.S. Geological Survey/Water Science School, “Water Dowsing,” online at https://www.usgs.gov/special-topics/water-science-school/science/water-dowsing. Alan S. Weakley, J. Christopher Ludwig, and John F. Townsend, Bland Crowder, ed., Flora of Virginia, Botanical Research Institute Press, Ft. Worth, Tex., 2012.  Information is available online at The Flora of Virginia Project, http://www.floraofvirginia.org/.For More Information about Trees and Shrubs in Virginia and Elsewhere Center for Watershed Protection, “Trees and Stormwater Runoff,” online at https://www.cwp.org/reducing-stormwater-runoff/. Chesapeake Bay Program, “Field Guide: Plants and Trees,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/critters?s=&fieldGuideType=Plants+%26+Trees&fieldGuideHabitat=. James P. Engel, “Shrubs in the Understory,” February 2012, online at http://www.whiteoaknursery.biz/essays/ShrubsinUnderstory.shtml. Sanglin Lee and Alan Raflo, “Trees and Water,” Virginia Water Resources Research Center, Virginia Water Central Newsletter, pages 13-18, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/49367. Penn State Extension, “Trees, Shrubs, and Groundcovers Tolerant of Wet Sites,” prepared by N. Robert Nuss, and reviewed and revised by Scott Guiser and Jim Smellmer, October 2007, online at https://extension.psu.edu/trees-shrubs-and-groundcovers-tolerant-of-wet-sites. Plant Virginia Natives, “Virginia Native Shrubs—Backbone of Our Landscape,” undated, online at https://www.plantvirginianatives.org/virginia-native-shrubs. Texas A&M University AgriLife Extension, “How Trees Grow,” online at https://agrilife.org/treecarekit/introduction-to-tree-care/how-trees-grow/. U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service, Forests of Virginia, 2018, Resource Update FS-264, Asheville, N.C., 2020; available online at https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/59963. U.S. Department of Agriculture/U.S. Forest Service, “State and Private Forestry Fact Sheet—Virginia 2022,” online (as a PDF) at https://apps.fs.usda.gov/nicportal/temppdf/sfs/naweb/VA_std.pdf. U.S. Department of Agriculture/Forest Service/Climate Change Resource Center, “Forest Tree Diseases and Climate Change,” online at https://www.fs.usda.gov/ccrc/topics/forest-disease. Virginia Botanical Associates, “Digital Atlas of the Virginia Flora,” online at http://www.vaplantatlas.org/index.php?do=start&search=Search. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation/Natural Heritage Program, online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural-heritage/.  See also “The Natural Communities of Virginia: Ecological Groups and Community Types,” online (as a PDF) at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural-heritage/natural-communities/document/comlist07-21.pdf. Virginia Department of Forestry, “Virginia's Forests,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/.  Some of the useful pages at that site are the following:“Benefits of Trees,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/education-and-recreation/learn-about-education-recreation/benefits-of-tree/;“Common Native Trees of Virginia,” 2020 edition, online (as a PDF) at https://dof.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/Common-Native-Trees-ID_pub.pdf;“Trees for Clean Water Program,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/urban-community-forestry/urban-forestry-community-assistance/virginia-trees-for-clean-water-grant-program/;“Virginia Statewide Assessment of Forest Resources,” November 2020, online (as a PDF) at https://www.stateforesters.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/2020-VA-Statewide-Assessment.pdf;“Tree Identification,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/education-and-recreation/learn-about-education-recreation/tree-identification/. Virginia Forest Landowner Education Program, Virginia Cooperative Extension and Virginia Tech College of Natural Resources and Environment, online at https://forestupdate.frec.vt.edu/. Virginia Forest Products Association, online at https://www.vfpa.net/. Virginia Native Plant Society, online at http://vnps.org/. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Plants” subject category. Following are links to other episodes on trees and shrubs. Introduction to trees and water – Episode 621, 3-21-22. American Sycamore – Episode 624, 4-11-22. Ash trees – Episode 376, 7-10-17 and Episode 625, 4-18-22. Early spring wildflowers in woodlands – Episode 573, 4-19-21. Fall colors and their connection to water movement in trees – Episode 638, 10-10-22. “Fifteen Minutes in the Forest” video podcast series – Episode 637, 9-26-22. Forest lands and work in Virginia – Episode 623, 4-4-22. Maple trees – Episode 503, 12-16-19. Photosynthesis – Episode 602, 11-8-21. Po

united states music university halloween english earth education college water state fall zoom sound research tech government benefits search north america environment witches normal natural web dark va humans tree rain climate change ocean atlantic snow types plant weather citizens agency trees stream priority plants bright environmental bay ash grade conservation wonders index charlottesville processes salute pond signature virginia tech arial asheville accent atlantic ocean life sciences natural resources maple forests adaptations compatibility colorful forestry msonormal ls times new roman sections aquatic poison ivy tex watershed chesapeake wg policymakers forest service shenandoah photosynthesis shrubs halloween season blacksburg acknowledgment university press cosgrove itemid encyclopedia britannica cambria math style definitions worddocument virginia department stormwater geological survey saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent punctuationkerning breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit trackmoves sols trackformatting lidthemeother x none wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr lidthemeasian snaptogridincell latentstyles deflockedstate msonormaltable centergroup undovr latentstylecount subsup donotpromoteqf mathfont brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc wrapindent narylim intlim defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked fifteen minutes qformat semihidden unhidewhenused latentstyles bmp table normal name title name strong name emphasis name normal name light grid accent name revision name table grid name list paragraph name placeholder text name quote name no spacing name intense quote name light shading name dark list accent name light list name colorful shading accent name light grid name colorful list accent name medium shading name colorful grid accent name medium list name subtle emphasis name medium grid name intense emphasis name dark list name subtle reference name colorful shading name intense reference name colorful list name book title name default paragraph font name colorful grid name bibliography name subtitle name light shading accent name light list accent name toc heading witch hazel living systems grades k space systems waterside name e cumberland gap arbor day foundation name list light accent dark accent colorful accent rhododendrons understory name date name plain text name body text name table simple name body text indent name table classic name list continue name table colorful name list table name message header name table columns name salutation name table list name table 3d name body text first indent name table contemporary name note heading name table elegant name block text name table professional name document map name table subtle name normal indent name table web name balloon text name list bullet name normal web name table theme name list number name normal table name plain table name closing name no list name grid table light name signature name outline list name grid table penn state extension forest resources name mention name hashtag name unresolved mention ben cosgrove audio notes msobodytext stormwater runoff tmdl 20image water center virginia standards
Focus on Flowers
Good Investments

Focus on Flowers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 2:00


Shrubs are long-lived garden residents and help create the architecture of a garden.

Insane Erik Lane's Stupid World
Pythons In Your Pants, Humping The Shrub, & A Pebble Pecker Prank

Insane Erik Lane's Stupid World

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2022 90:44


If you're going to smuggle snakes into the country, do you think you could find a better way to do it besides stuffing them into your britches? One man couldn't. My Insane FL Nephew, "Pancho Guero", his lair in FL this week, will be relating a story of a frustrated Brit who has a woman-shaped shrub & men are so attracted to it, they are fornicating with it. He'll also tell of a story that's just now getting exposed about a popular UK soccer star who was very "well endowed" & had passed out from a hard night of partying. That's when his friend decided to use decorative marbles in the most phallic way possible. The stupidity is split 3 ways this week & also includes... White House Unveils Artificial Intelligence ‘Bill of Rights' Plan; A FL ‘Hometown of Tomorrow' Kept Power on During Ian; An Unwanted & Inhospitable Lighthouse Finally Sells; A Wanted Fugitive Applied for a Job at a Police Station; "Stranger Things" Halloween Display on Hold After Neighbor's Complaint; People Won't Stop 'Swatting' a Guy Because He Said Norm Macdonald Wasn't Funny…back in 2018; Man told to get a hobby for his mental health goes out and buys 300 tarantulas; IN Man Arrested for Swinging Machete at People on Walking Trail; Man slapped after proposing with Ring Pop at Toronto Blue Jays game; A MI Farm Got Caught Using 'Raw Human Waste' as Fertilizer; Police Tase FL Man Who Was Using His Toddler as a Human Shield; It's Canned Water. And It's Nearly a Unicorn; STUDY: 7.4 million Brits masturbate when at work; America's First Gourmet Restaurant for Dogs Just Opened. Play along with "Pancho" this week & see if you can do better then he can at guessing in the "Insane Game Show" & find the answers to life's biggest questions when you here his profound wisdom as he answers more questions from those who want to "ASK PANCHO" for some advice! "Pancho" addresses the burning questions about “HELP: Have You Ever Tried A Happy Lamp?!" & “HELP: Am I Stuck In A Nora Ephron Movie?" Don't forget to download the TELEGRAM MESSENGER & join the "Insane Erik Lane's Stupid World" Channel to read the actual stories used for the podcast & check out the photos & videos with them! It's FREE & available for Windows, Linux, Android, & Apple for both mobile & desktop! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/eriklane/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/eriklane/support

Valley Nursery Plantcast
44: Even More Fall Color ... Shrubtastic Color

Valley Nursery Plantcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 13:32


Trees aren't the only ones out there bringing beauty to this season change. Shrubs are singing with color this month in hues of yellow, orange, red and purple. The texture and vibrance of these mid-level champions can prolong the appreciation of any garden. Find out about a few different options for your space in this episode from your friends at Valley Nursery.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 638 (10-10-22): Autumn's Turning Point for Trees and Water, Featuring “Colors” by John McCutcheon

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:22).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 10-7-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the weeks of October 10 and October 17, 2022.  This revised episode from October 2015 is part of a series this year of episodes related to trees and shrubs. MUSIC – ~12 sec – instrumental. In this episode, we feature music about an annual turning point that inspires humans but shuts down trees.  Have a listen for about 40 seconds. MUSIC – 40 sec – Lyrics: “Leaves turn green and then grow bright to every color, every type, and finally in the wind let go, to fall and paint the earth below.  Roots so deep, the trunk so high, her arms reached up into the sky; through her veins all colors run from everywhere to everyone.” You've been listening to part of “Colors,” by John McCutcheon, on his 1998 album “Four Seasons: Autumnsongs,” from Rounder Records.  Prior to moving to Atlanta in 2006, Wisconsin native John McCutcheon was a long-time resident of Charlottesville, Virginia.  The song's full lyrics describe a growing appreciation of the variety of fall leaf colors and their power to inspire and invigorate people.  But for deciduous trees—that is, those that lose all of their leaves annually—autumn colors and falling leaves are signs of internal changes leading to the relative inactivityof winter dormancy.  Reduced water movement is one of the key changes.  Leaf drop follows the sealing off of a leaf's veins from the stem vessels that carry water and dissolved materials to and from the leaf during the growing season.  During that growing season, evaporation of water from leaves—called transpiration—and the cohesion between water molecules are the main driving forces pulling water up from roots through woody stems to the leaves.  This water movement provides tree cells the vital fluid needed for the cells' structures and biochemical reactions that allow survival and growth.  That growth stops during winter dormancy, and water movement is much reduced. After leaf fall, left behind on winter twigs are characteristic marks called leaf scars containing bundle scars showing the previous growing season's points of fluid transfer between stems and leaves.  Above or beside the leaf scars are overwintering buds, harboring the tissues that will become next year's leaves and colors. Thanks to John McCutcheon and Appalseed Productions for permission to use this week's music, and we close with about 20 more seconds of “Colors.” MUSIC – ~23 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of “Cripple Creek” to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 285, 10-12-15. “Colors” from the 1998 album “Four Seasons: Autumnsongs,” on Rounder Records, is copyright by John McCutcheon/Appalsongs and Si Kahn/Joe Hill Music, used with permission of John McCutcheon.  More information about John McCutcheon is available online at http://www.folkmusic.com/.  Thanks to Erin Grace Deedy of Appalseed Productions for her help in acquiring permission to use this music.  More information about Appalseed Productions is available online at https://appalseed-productions-2.square.site/. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES (Unless otherwise noted, photographs are by Virginia Water Radio.) Red Maple in Blacksburg, Va., October 6, 2022.  Sugar Maple in Blacksburg, Va., October 6, 2022.Two Sugar Maples with a Pignut Hickory in between, on the Virginia Tech campus in Blacksburg, October 11, 2022. Sourwood on Brush Mountain near Blacksburg, Va., October 9, 2022. Blueberry shrub on Brush Mountain near Blacksburg, Va., October 9, 2022.Black Gum twig showing bud above a crescent-shaped leaf scar; the leaf scar contains three white bundle scars.  Photo by John Seiler, Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Conservation; used with permission.SOURCES Used for Audio John R. Seiler, John W. Groninger, and W. Michael Aust, Forest Biology Textbook, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Va., 2022.  Access requires permission of the Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Conservation, online at https://frec.vt.edu/; phone (540) 231-5483; e-mail: frec@vt.edu. F. Stuart Chapin, III, et al., Principles of Terrestrial Ecosystem Ecology, Second Edition, Springer Science+Business Media, New York, N.Y, 2011. Steven G. Pallardy, Physiology of Woody Plants, Third Edition, Elsevier/Academic Press, Burlington, Mass., 2008. U.S. Forest Service, “Why Leaves Change Color,” U.S. Forest Service, online (as a PDF) at https://www.fs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/stelprd3817419.pdf. For More Information about Trees and Shrubs in Virginia and Elsewhere Center for Watershed Protection, “Trees and Stormwater Runoff,” online at https://www.cwp.org/reducing-stormwater-runoff/. Chesapeake Bay Program, “Field Guide: Plants and Trees,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/critters?s=&fieldGuideType=Plants+%26+Trees&fieldGuideHabitat=. eFloras.org, “Flora of North America,” online at http://www.efloras.org/flora_page.aspx?flora_id=1. James P. Engel, “Shrubs in the Understory,” February 2012, online at http://www.whiteoaknursery.biz/essays/ShrubsinUnderstory.shtml. Oscar W. Gupton and Fred C. Swope, Trees and Shrubs of Virginia, University Press of Virginia, Charlottesville, 1981. Sanglin Lee and Alan Raflo, “Trees and Water,” Virginia Water Resources Research Center, Virginia Water Central Newsletter, pages 13-18, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/49367. Penn State Extension, “Trees, Shrubs, and Groundcovers Tolerant of Wet Sites,” prepared by N. Robert Nuss, and reviewed and revised by Scott Guiser and Jim Smellmer, October 2007, online at https://extension.psu.edu/trees-shrubs-and-groundcovers-tolerant-of-wet-sites. Plant Virginia Natives, “Virginia Native Shrubs—Backbone of Our Landscape,” undated, online at https://www.plantvirginianatives.org/virginia-native-shrubs. 622 - Texas A&M University AgriLife Extension, “How Trees Grow,” online at https://agrilife.org/treecarekit/introduction-to-tree-care/how-trees-grow/. U.S. Department of Agriculture/U.S. Forest Service, Forests of Virginia, 2018, Resource Update FS-264, Asheville, N.C., 2020; available online at https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/59963. U.S. Department of Agriculture/U.S. Forest Service, “State and Private Forestry Fact Sheet—Virginia 2022,” online (as a PDF) at https://apps.fs.usda.gov/nicportal/temppdf/sfs/naweb/VA_std.pdf. U.S. Department of Agriculture/U.S. Forest Service/Climate Change Resource Center, “Forest Tree Diseases and Climate Change,” online at https://www.fs.usda.gov/ccrc/topics/forest-disease. U.S. Department of Agriculture/U.S. Forest Service/Northern Research Station (Newtown Square, Penn.), “Forest Disturbance Processes/Invasive Species,” online at https://www.nrs.fs.fed.us/disturbance/invasive_species/.” U.S. Department of Agriculture/Natural Resources Conservation Service, “PLANTS Database,” online at https://plants.usda.gov. Virginia Botanical Associates, “Digital Atlas of the Virginia Flora,” online at http://www.vaplantatlas.org/index.php?do=start&search=Search. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation/Natural Heritage Program, “The Natural Communities of Virginia: Ecological Groups and Community Types,” online (as a PDF) at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural-heritage/natural-communities/document/comlist07-21.pdf. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation/Natural Heritage Division, online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural-heritage/. Virginia Department of Forestry, “Virginia's Forests,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/.  Some of the useful pages at that site are the following:“Benefits of Trees,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/education-and-recreation/learn-about-education-recreation/benefits-of-tree/;“Common Native Trees of Virginia,” 2020 edition, online (as a PDF) at https://dof.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/Common-Native-Trees-ID_pub.pdf;Tree and Forest Health Guide, 2020, online (as a PDF) at https://dof.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/Tree-and-Forest-Health-Guide.pdf;“Trees for Clean Water Program,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/urban-community-forestry/urban-forestry-community-assistance/virginia-trees-for-clean-water-grant-program/;“Virginia Statewide Assessment of Forest Resources,” November 2020, online (as a PDF) at https://www.stateforesters.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/2020-VA-Statewide-Assessment.pdf(see page 19 for statistics on forested land; p. 21 for economic benefits; and p. 23 for water quality benefits);“Tree Identification,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/education-and-recreation/learn-about-education-recreation/tree-identification/. Virginia Forest Landowner Education Program, Virginia Cooperative Extension and Virginia Tech College of Natural Resources and Environment, online at https://forestupdate.frec.vt.edu/. Virginia Forest Products Association, online at https://www.vfpa.net/. Virginia Native Plant Society, online at http://vnps.org/. Herbert S. Zim and Alexander C. Martin, as revised by Jonathan P. Latimer et al., Trees—A Guide to Familiar American Trees, St. Martin's Press, New York, N.Y., 2001. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html

music new york university earth education college water state change zoom research tech government benefits search north america wisconsin environment press normal natural web dark va tree rain climate change ocean principles snow roots mass weather citizens agency trees stream priority plants biology environmental bay ash images dynamic grade bio conservation colors index charlottesville processes penn leaf pond chemical signature virginia tech turning point arial asheville physiology scales accent atlantic ocean life sciences burlington natural resources maple forests reduced adaptations compatibility colorful forestry msonormal ls blueberry times new roman sections poison ivy watershed organisms chesapeake second edition policymakers forest service photosynthesis new standard shrubs blacksburg acknowledgment university press cambria math style definitions worddocument third edition virginia department stormwater saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent punctuationkerning breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit trackmoves sols trackformatting lidthemeother x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr lidthemeasian latentstyles deflockedstate msonormaltable centergroup subsup undovr latentstylecount donotpromoteqf mathfont brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc wrapindent intlim narylim defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked fifteen minutes qformat semihidden unhidewhenused latentstyles bmp table normal cripple creek name title name strong name emphasis name normal name subtitle name light shading accent name bibliography name light list accent name toc heading name light grid accent name table grid name revision name placeholder text name list paragraph name no spacing name quote name light shading name intense quote name light list name dark list accent name light grid name colorful shading accent name medium shading name colorful list accent name medium list name colorful grid accent name medium grid name subtle emphasis name dark list name intense emphasis name colorful shading name subtle reference name colorful list name intense reference name default paragraph font name colorful grid name book title rounder records living systems grades k biotic space systems waterside name e cumberland gap john mccutcheon name list light accent dark accent colorful accent rhododendrons understory name date name plain text name list number name normal table name plain table name closing name no list name grid table light name signature name outline list name grid table name body text name table simple name body text indent name table classic name list continue name table colorful name message header name table columns name list table name salutation name table list name table 3d name body text first indent name table contemporary name note heading name table elegant name block text name table professional name document map name table subtle name normal indent name table web name balloon text name list bullet name normal web name table theme penn state extension forest resources name mention name hashtag name unresolved mention sourwood 20oct audio notes tmdl stormwater runoff 20image water center virginia standards
The Good Glow
S12 Ep16: Soul Sisters - Shrubs & Rubs In The Big Apple

The Good Glow

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 36:24


Georgie finally gets her sign for inner peace, Claire is thinking big picture for her big dreams and guess who's coming to NYC?! We're also speaking about bringing back our Miracle Mornings and why you shouldn't wear big cardigans around big bunches of grapes. This season of Soul Sisters is brought to you with thanks to Malfy Gin  

North American Outdoors
S6 - E136: Your Home is NOT an Easy Target!

North American Outdoors

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 32:03


Your home is your safe space.  It's a place for you to relax, unwind, and let your guard down.  Until it isn't...Are you in the proper mindset...not "IF, THEN..."   IF this happens, THEN I will...but "WHEN, THEN..."  WHEN this happens, THEN I will...Are you always aware of your surroundings, even in your safe place?  Is your home an easy target?  Are there places leading up to your front door that an intruder can lay in ambush and quickly make you a victim?  Shrubs, lighting, places to hide?What about indoors?  Do you have a plan if someone were to break in while you were home?  Or even worse, what if you came home to someone already inside?Start thinking now how to make your home a place where intruders do NOT want to visit.  Ramp up the security, doorbell camera, motion lighting, and difficulty of access to your space right now.  Consider alternatives to add precious seconds to an attack. when the intruder only wants to "smash and grab and get away"  One thing many criminals do not like, is attention.  They want to get in, do their dirty deed, and get out as quickly as possible.  What can YOU do to make it difficult to intrude?  How can YOU make your home a very, very difficult target?Hope you take away some tips and tricks to keep your awareness level elevated, even in the comforts of your home.  Enjoy!

Lead-Lag Live
A Nasty Stock Market Collapse Incoming With Le Shrub

Lead-Lag Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 51:12


If you believe the bear market is over, I have $170 trillion of unfunded liabilities to sell you.Check The Lead-Lag Report on your favorite social networks. Twitter: https://twitter.com/leadlagreportYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/theleadlagreportFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/leadlagreportInstagram: https://instagram.com/leadlagreport              Sign up for The Lead-Lag Report at www.leadlagreport.com and use promo code PODCAST30 for 2 weeks free and 30% off.              Nothing on this channel should be considered as personalized financial advice or a solicitation to buy or sell any securities.              The content in this program is for informational purposes only. You should not construe any information or other material as investment, financial, tax, or other advice. The views expressed by the participants are solely their own. A participant may have taken or recommended any investment position discussed, but may close such position or alter its recommendation at any time without notice. Nothing contained in this program constitutes a solicitation, recommendation, endorsement, or offer to buy or sell any securities or other financial instruments in any jurisdiction. Please consult your own investment or financial advisor for advice related to all investment decisions.See disclosures for The Lead-Lag Report here: The Lead-Lag Report (leadlagreport.com)Queens On A RollThis podcast was created to educate & inspire people about the ably different...Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify The Baroo: A podcast for dogs and their peopleDogs make the best companions for humans. The Baroo aims to help make humans better...Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify

NO BULL - Market Talk with George Noble
Markets Can Stay Oversold Longer Than You Can Remain Solvent with Kantrowitz, Kayfabe, Shrub, & Bianco

NO BULL - Market Talk with George Noble

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2022 150:45 Very Popular


Recorded October 1, 2022. Donate generously to World Central Kitchen ➡️ https://donate.wck.org/fundraiser/3816260  Listeners have been asking how they can show their appreciation for the talks George is hosting. Top of mind right now are the millions suffering as a result of the tragedy in Ukraine. World Central Kitchen has joined the fight to provide humanitarian aid to those in need of fresh food and meals within Ukraine and in bordering countries. Please donate generously to World Central Kitchen on behalf of NO BULL - Market Talk with George Noble™️.   Follow Michael Kantrowitz on Twitter Follow Kayfabe on Twitter Follow Shrub on Twitter Follow Jim Bianco on Twitter Follow George Noble on Twitter and Youtube

NO BULL - Market Talk with George Noble
Tom Thornton - Markets in Turmoil with Nicoski, Harnett, Kayfabe & Shrub

NO BULL - Market Talk with George Noble

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 148:46


Recorded 09/29/2022.   Donate generously to World Central Kitchen ➡️ https://donate.wck.org/fundraiser/3816260  Listeners have been asking how they can show their appreciation for the talks George is hosting. Top of mind right now are the millions suffering as a result of the tragedy in Ukraine. World Central Kitchen has joined the fight to provide humanitarian aid to those in need of fresh food and meals within Ukraine and in bordering countries. Please donate generously to World Central Kitchen on behalf of NO BULL - Market Talk with George Noble™️.   Follow George Noble on Twitter and Youtube Follow Tom Thornton on Twitter & Hedgefund Telemetry  Follow David Nicoski on Twitter & Vermillion Research Follow Ian Harnett on Twitter & ASR  Follow Kayfabe on Twitter (https://twitter.com/kayfabecapital)  Follow Shrub on Twitter

Nebraska Extension Almanac Radio
Helping Trees and Shrubs Survive this Fall and Winter

Nebraska Extension Almanac Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 4:24


Virginia Water Radio
Episode 637 (9-26-22): Many Tree Tales are Told in “Fifteen Minutes in the Forest”

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:40).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 9-23-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the weeks of September 26 and October 3, 2022.  This episode is part of a series this year of episodes related to trees and shrubs. SOUND – ~6 sec That call of Mountain Chorus Frogs opens an episode where we learn about the video podcast series, “Fifteen Minutes in the Forest.”  Started in April 2020, the video series is produced by the Virginia Forest Landowner Education Program, conducted by Virginia Cooperative Extension.  As of September 9, 2022, the series included 82 episodes, covering topics such as tree identification, forest soils, invasive plants, forest management, tree syrups, and weird trees.  Several episodes are on specific water-related topics, like the Mountain Chorus Frogs you heard earlier.  Have a listen for about 90 seconds to excerpts from five of those episodes.  SOUNDS and VOICES  - 1 min./29 sec “Hi everyone.  Welcome to ‘Fifteen Minutes in the Forest.'  I'm Jennifer Gagnon with the Forest Landowner Education Program at Virginia Tech.  And today I'm joining you from Claytor Lake State Park in southwest Virginia.”  From “Vernal Pools,” Episode 74, April 2022. “This is a vernal pool in Claytor Lake State Park.  ...This pool at its largest is probably an acre in size.  This pool is big enough that it has Painted Sliders, we saw a Snapping Turtle in here, we have a Green Heron out here.  ...There's all kinds of animals. ...It's a beautiful pool.”  From “Vernal Pools,” Episode 74, April 2022.  “Our topic today is going to be about water quality.  And this ties in nicely with forestry.”  From “Best Management Practices for Water Quality,” Episode 19, September 2020. Today we're going to take a look at some of the best management practices that loggers and forestry operations can take in order to protect water quality.”  From “Best Management Practices for Water Quality,” Episode 19, September 2020. “One of the reasons we're studying Mountain Chorus Frogs is we're really trying to get a good idea of their distribution in Virginia.”  From “Mountain Chorus Frogs,” Episode 75, April 2022. “Hey everyone.  My name is Wally Smith, and I'm an associate professor of biology at UVA-Wise.  And we are here on the banks of the Clinch River in St. Paul, Virginia, today to talk about the Eastern Hellbender, which is one of our most unique amphibians here in Virginia and the central Appalachians.”  From “Eastern Hellbenders,” Episode 68, January 2022. “Well thank for spending fifteen minutes in the creek with us, and thanks to Sally for for spending time with us outside to share her knowledge about water quality.  And I hope you join us for another edition of ‘Fifteen Minutes in the Forest.'  Have a great weekend.”  From “How Clean is Your Creek,” Episode 26, November 2020. When COVID shut-downs began in 2020, the Virginia Forest Landowner Education team started the series as a way to stay engaged with clients.  To the team's surprise, the series became very popular.  Among the users are public school teachers, foresters, landowners, and other lovers of the outdoors. Along with the “Fifteen Minutes in the Forest” series, the Virginia Forest Landowner Education Program offers other short courses, conferences and workshops, Fall Forestry and Wildlife Field Tours, and retreats for beginning woodland owners.  For more information about these learning opportunities, search online for the Virginia Forest Landowner Education Program, or phone Jennifer Gagnon at (540) 231-6391. Thanks to Ms. Gagnon for permission to use excerpts of “Fifteen Minutes in the Forest” episodes.  And for a closing forest-and-water word, we end with a comment from Andrew Vinson, of the Virginia Department of Forestry, from the episode on best management practices for water quality. VOICE - ~4 sec - “Remember, healthy forests produce clean water.” SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Virginia Water Radio thanks Jennifer Gagnon, Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Conservation and the Virginia Cooperative Extension's Forest Landowner Education Program, for her help with this episode and for permission to excerpts of “Fifteen Minutes in the Forest” episodes.  The full series is available online at https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLOhBz_SGRw8UZo9aAfShRbb-ZaVyk-uzT.  Excerpts heard in this episode of Virginia Water Radio were taken from the following “Fifteen Minutes in the Forest” episodes:“Best Management Practices for Water Quality,” Episode 19, September 2020;“Eastern Hellbenders,” Episode 68, January 2022;“How Clean is Your Creek,” Episode 26, November 2020;“Mountain Chorus Frogs,” Episode 75, April 2022;“Vernal Pools,” Episode 74, April 2022. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com.IMAGES Screenshot from the opening of the video for “Fifteen Minutes in the Forest” Episode 19, “Best Management Practices for Water Quality.”Screenshot from the opening of the video for “Fifteen Minutes in the Forest” Episode 59, “The S Curve of Forest Carbon.”Screenshot from the opening of the video for “Fifteen Minutes in the Forest” Episode 68, “Eastern Hellbenders.” SOURCES Used for Audio Virginia Forest Landowner Education Program, online at https://forestupdate.frec.vt.edu/.  The “Fifteen Minutes in the Forest” program and other short course programs are available online at https://forestupdate.frec.vt.edu/landownerprograms/shortcourses/online.html. For More Information about Trees and Shrubs in Virginia and Elsewhere Center for Watershed Protection, “Trees and Stormwater Runoff,” online at https://www.cwp.org/reducing-stormwater-runoff/. Chesapeake Bay Program, “Field Guide: Plants and Trees,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/critters?s=&fieldGuideType=Plants+%26+Trees&fieldGuideHabitat=. eFloras.org, “Flora of North America,” online at http://www.efloras.org/flora_page.aspx?flora_id=1. James P. Engel, “Shrubs in the Understory,” February 2012, online at http://www.whiteoaknursery.biz/essays/ShrubsinUnderstory.shtml. Oscar W. Gupton and Fred C. Swope, Trees and Shrubs of Virginia, University Press of Virginia, Charlottesville, 1981. Sanglin Lee and Alan Raflo, “Trees and Water,” Virginia Water Resources Research Center, Virginia Water Central Newsletter, pages 13-18, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/49367.   (A Virginia Cooperative Extension version of this article—“Trees and Water,” by Sanglin Lee, Alan Raflo, and Jennifer Gagnon, 2018—with some slight differences in the text is available online at https://www.pubs.ext.vt.edu/content/pubs_ext_vt_edu/en/ANR/ANR-18/ANR-18NP.html.) Penn State Extension, “Trees, Shrubs, and Groundcovers Tolerant of Wet Sites,” prepared by N. Robert Nuss, and reviewed and revised by Scott Guiser and Jim Smellmer, October 2007, online at https://extension.psu.edu/trees-shrubs-and-groundcovers-tolerant-of-wet-sites. Texas A&M University AgriLife Extension, “How Trees Grow,” online at https://agrilife.org/treecarekit/introduction-to-tree-care/how-trees-grow/. U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service, Forests of Virginia, 2018, Resource Update FS-264, Asheville, N.C., 2020; available online at https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/59963. U.S. Department of Agriculture/U.S. Forest Service, “State and Private Forestry Fact Sheet—Virginia 2022,” online (as a PDF) at https://apps.fs.usda.gov/nicportal/temppdf/sfs/naweb/VA_std.pdf. U.S. Department of Agriculture/Forest Service/Climate Change Resource Center, “Forest Tree Diseases and Climate Change,” online at https://www.fs.usda.gov/ccrc/topics/forest-disease. U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)/Natural Resources Conservation Service, “PLANTS Database,” online at https://plants.usda.gov. Virginia Botanical Associates, “Digital Atlas of the Virginia Flora,” online at http://www.vaplantatlas.org/index.php?do=start&search=Search. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation/Natural Heritage Program, “The Natural Communities of Virginia: Ecological Groups and Community Types,” online (as a PDF) at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural-heritage/natural-communities/document/comlist07-21.pdf. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation/Natural Heritage Division, online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural-heritage/. Virginia Department of Forestry, “Virginia's Forests,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/.  Some of the useful pages at that site are the following:“Benefits of Trees,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/education-and-recreation/learn-about-education-recreation/benefits-of-tree/;“Common Native Trees of Virginia,” 2020 edition, online (as a PDF) at https://dof.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/Common-Native-Trees-ID_pub.pdf;“Forest Management and Health/Insects and Diseases,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/forest-management-health/forest-health/insects-and-diseases/;Tree and Forest Health Guide, 2020, online (as a PDF) at https://dof.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/Tree-and-Forest-Health-Guide.pdf;“Virginia Trees for Clean Water Program,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/urban-community-forestry/urban-forestry-community-assistance/virginia-trees-for-clean-water-grant-program/;“Virginia Statewide Assessment of Forest Resources,” November 2020, online (as a PDF) at https://www.stateforesters.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/2020-VA-Statewide-Assessment.pdf;“Tree Identification,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/education-and-recreation/learn-about-education-recreation/tree-identification/. Virginia Forest Products Association, online at https://www.vfpa.net/. Virginia Native Plant Society, online at http://vnps.org/. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Plants” subject category. Following are links to other episodes on trees and shrubs. Introduction to trees and water – Episode 621, 3-21-22.American Sycamore – Episode 624, 4-11-22.American Witch Hazel – Episode 238, 10-31-14.Ash trees – Episode 376, 7-10-17 and Episode 625, 4-18-22.Early spring wildflowers in woodlands – Episode 573, 4-19-21.Forest lands and work in Virginia – Episode 623, 4-4-22.Maple trees – Episode 503, 12-16-19.Photosynthesis – Episode 602, 11-8-21.Poison Ivy and related plants, including the shrub Poison Sumac –