Podcasts about Hiding

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Best podcasts about Hiding

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Latest podcast episodes about Hiding

The Rialto Report
F.M. Bradley: Hiding in Plain Sight – Podcast 113

The Rialto Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 87:31


F.M. Bradley was a towering presence. He was the number one adult film star of color, when that should have meant a lot more. The post F.M. Bradley: Hiding in Plain Sight – Podcast 113 appeared first on The Rialto Report.

Stay Noisy
Ep 51 with Greg Molina (A Moments Notice)

Stay Noisy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 59:17


In this episode I sit down with a good homie of mine Greg Molina. We discuss his new project A Moments Notice. We also discuss new albums from Volumes & Imminence, as well as Deftones "Cannabis Collection." Intro Song: Endless Waltz by A Moments Notice (out Dec. 10th) Follow A Moments Notice: https://linktr.ee/Amomentsnoticeofficial Follow Stay Noisy: www.instagram.com/staynoisyca Featured Songs in the beginning: As Within, So Without: https://open.spotify.com/track/7nDxtAE0gCtnngG2ZGMblN Saltwound: https://open.spotify.com/track/4CEKw3mmkXen37Aciu67pL Demon in Me: https://open.spotify.com/track/5TC3mPMuAhrae5RNDnZno0 Volumes "Happier?" album: https://open.spotify.com/album/2A8YKx8YDBY5uCgVZJg6Oo?si=uBGXsSswRFe7RHa6d8M4Qg Imminence "Heaven in Hiding" album: https://open.spotify.com/album/39AMnevcJVGYVhCALp1kvQ?si=r5X9PeXHQiKVh_mZxU_XyA

The JayMac Podcast
How many people believe that the government is hiding something about the vaccine?

The JayMac Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 45:12


A new survey reveals that an alarming number of people believe that the government is hiding information about the vaccine.  Get Links to these stories https://feedly.com/i/subscription/feed%2Fhttps%3A%2F%2Ffeedly.com%2Ff%2FKUd2OQVncikG1b0zBV5LdzKf   Support the JayMac Podcast https://www.jaymcfarland.com/jaymac-support    Get your JayMac Merch https://streamlabs.com/joeysmith-svBAdy/merch

How To Be A Better Person with Kate Hanley
The Positive Emotion That's Hiding in Plain Sight, Just Waiting for You to Notice It. EP: 586

How To Be A Better Person with Kate Hanley

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 10:31


There's a positive emotion that can help you be happy with what you have and shift out of that mental state where you're feeling incomplete and like you might need something to fill a hole in your life. It's contentment. Not the "I have the remote, a blanket, and a cup of tea" kind of contentment. That's nice, but this is way deeper. And if you play along, you can feel it by the end of this episode. True story! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Wisconsin Life
Finding A Shoe In The Wall: Treasures Hiding In Our Homes

Wisconsin Life

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021


Anyone who's done serious renovation on an older home, ripping down lath and plaster, wrestling with stubborn two by fours and prying up floorboards, has probably harbored the fantasy of finding some kind of long-hidden treasure. Civil war medals, a moth-eaten bag of precious coins, possibly a secret diary full of scandalous confessions. Unfortunately, what is often discovered are crumbling foundations, rotted timbers and plumbing issues, if not a desiccated mouse or two. But sometimes a do-it-yourself-er finds a shoe. Author Ron Davis and WPR producer Brad Kolberg bring us the story.

Retro Movie Geek
RMG 275 – Lethal Weapon 2 (1989)

Retro Movie Geek

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 91:56


In this episode, the Retro Movie Geek crew is joined by Maggie Kruger, and they're geeking out over Lethal Weapon 2 (1989) and the cast & Richard Donner which Lethal Weapon movie they like best Riggs going feral Riggs and Murtaugh's relationship and much, much more! Synopsis: Badder and madder than ever, reckless Riggs and mellow Murtaugh, return to smash a drug syndicate led by a ruthless South African politician. Hiding behind diplomatic immunity, his arrest seems impossible - a word these detectives refuse to understand. And off they go...into romance, danger and more die-hard action than even THEY can handle! ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: LISTENER FEEDBACK: Leave us your voicemail feedback at (484) 577-3876. Check out Darrell's other cool podcasts here. Check out Peter's Retro Reviews over at ForgottenFlix.com here. Check out The Forgotten Flix Podcast here. Special thanks to Kevin Spencer for the fantastic show logo! Special thanks to Hayden for the use of his fantastic music for our opening theme this episode! You can check out more from this amazing artist here! Special thanks to Retro Promenade for the use of music from the album Carpenter. Music use permitted under a Creative Commons license. CLICK HERE and get a copy of the album and support these fantastic artists!

I Survived Theatre School
Carole Schweid

I Survived Theatre School

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 98:48


Intro: buzzsaws and clean slates, rage, Where the Wild Things AreLet Me Run This By You: MoneyInterview: We talk to Carole Schweid about Juilliard, Phoebe Brand, John Lehne, Michael Brand, Midnight Cowboy, musical comedy performance, open dance calls, starring in the original cast of A Chorus Line, Bob Fosse, Pat Birch, Martha Graham, Minnie's Boys, Mervyn Nelson, playing Fastrada in the first national tour of Pippin, being a lone wolf in theatre, Lewis J. Stadlen, doing West Side Story at Bucks County Playhouse, Shelly Winters, Mary Hinkson, Nellie Forbush in South Pacific, playing Tzeitel in Fiddler on the Roof, Peppermint Lounge, Nick Dante, Michael Bennett, Marvin Hamlisch, Public Theater, Gerry Schoenfeld, The Shubert, the wish for a job vs. the real experience of working, Theda Bara & The Frontier Rabbi, Agnes de Mille, Play With Your Food, Staged Reading Magic, Albert Hague.FULL TRANSCRIPT (unedited):2 (10s):And I'm Gina Pulice.1 (11s):We went to theater school together. We survived it, but we didn't quite understand it. 20 years later,2 (16s):We're digging deep talking to our guests about their experiences and trying to make sense1 (20s):If at all we survived theater school and you will too. Are we famous yet? As more space is actually a huge thing.2 (36s):Yeah. I have to apologize for the sound of buzz saws. What is going to be going the whole time I'm talking, doing well, you1 (50s):Took some trees down, right.2 (53s):You know, that's how it started. Yeah. It started with actually, you know, it all was a surprise to me, basically one we've been talking about taking down all the trees in the front of our house. And one day Aaron said, they're coming tomorrow to take down the trees. And I'm like, how much did that cost? Because you know, taking down trees is usually really expensive. And so he says, well, he's going to do everything in the front for whatever. It was $5,000.1 (1m 22s):Yeah. She was pretty good for more than one tree. Cause one tree we had removed was $5,000 at my mom's.2 (1m 28s):Well, and it's not like they have to extract the whole tree. It's just, you know, just chopping it down. Like it's not, I don't know if it's different when they have to take out the, yeah,1 (1m 38s):I think it is when they have to take the stump out the roots and all that.2 (1m 43s):So that was fine. Although I did think to myself, Hmm. We have $5,000 to spend and this is what we're spending it on.1 (1m 54s):I've been there. Oh, I've been there2 (1m 56s):So the morning, but I'm letting it go. And so the morning comes and he tells me to go outside so we can talk about the trees and, and, and I, anyway, we, we designate some trees and they're all in the lower part of the front of our house.1 (2m 10s):Yes. You, and by the way, for people that don't know, like you have a lot of land for, for, for, for not being in the super super country, you have a lot of courage. I mean, you got a lot of trees.2 (2m 21s):Well, yeah, we have an acre and it's a lot of trees and it's a lot of junk trees. What they call junk trees. Because the idea here is once upon a time, when everybody got their heat from wood, you had to have fast growing trees. So it's these skinny trees. Yeah. Anyway, so I thought we were sort of on the same page about what we were going down. This is where I'm getting with this. And I had a couple of meetings yesterday and I was hearing the sound pretty close, but it wasn't until I looked outside that I saw, they took everything out.2 (3m 1s):The, every living thing out in the, in the front, in front of our house, including the only tree I was really attached to was I have a beautiful lilac tree.1 (3m 14s):Okay. Oh shit. And everything out.2 (3m 21s):What's that? Why they1 (3m 22s):Take everything out? Is that the plant? I think,2 (3m 25s):I think what happened was for the first couple of days, the boss was here. And then I think yesterday, the boss was like, you guys just go and finish up. And I don't know that anyway, you know what, I'm just choosing it to be, I'm choosing to look at it like, okay, well we're getting to start over and it can be exactly how we want it to be. So yeah,1 (3m 45s):That is a great attitude because there's nothing you can do you really do about it? Absolutely. Zero. You can do about threes coming out.2 (3m 53s):The only bummer is that it sounds like buzz saws all day at my house and at my neighbor's house, I'm sure they're annoyed with us too. Well,1 (4m 2s):What are you going to put? It is. Okay. So, so, okay. The good, that's the sort of wonky news, but what the good news is, what are you going to put in? Like, is there going to be a whole new,2 (4m 12s):I think it's just going to GRA, I mean, I think it's just going to be grass, which is fine. I mean, my thing was actually, it does a little bit of a metaphor because when we first moved here, we loved how quiet and private and everything is. And part of why everything feels very private at our house is there's trees and bushes blocking our view of anything. I mean, all we can see is trees and bushes when we're laying on the front, which for a while seemed cozy. And then it started to seem like annoying that we could never see. And actually there's kind of a really beautiful view of the mountains behind us. So our mountains Hills.1 (4m 51s):Yeah. But I mean, small mountains, like small2 (4m 53s):Mountains. Yeah. So I realized that it does coincide with our psychological spelunking and trying to just be like more open about everything. Like totally. You know what I mean? Like this is just be open to people seeing our house. This is open to seeing out and let's have, and actually my kids were kind of like, oh, but it's just also open and we don't have any privacy. And I'm like, yeah, well you have your room and bathroom. I mean, there's, there's places to go if you don't want people to, to see you, but let's just be open.1 (5m 31s):There's like a whole, yeah. It's a great metaphor for being visible. Like I am all about lately. I have found a lot of comfort and refuge in the truth of the matter, even if it's not pretty, even if I don't actually like it. So like getting the facts of the matter and also sharing the, of the matter without a judgment. So I appreciate this, like wanting to be seen and then letting go of what people make of that, whether your house is this way or that way, or the neighbors think this or that, I'm also the, I I'm all about it.1 (6m 15s):I'm like, you know, this is, there's something about transparency. That's very comforting for me. It's also scary because people don't like it when they can see, or they can say whatever they want, but the hiding, I think I'm pretty convinced hiding from myself and from others leads to trouble.2 (6m 37s):It leads to trouble. And any time you're having to kind of keep track of what you're, you know, being open about and what you're not, and what you've said, you know, it just it's like it's T it's listen. If I only have a certain amount of real estate in my mind, I really don't want to allocate any of it too. Right. Hiding something and trying to remember. Right.1 (7m 1s):And it's interesting, the more that we do this podcast, the more I see that, like, you know what I thought gene, I thought when we're dead, this podcast is going to remain. And then our children's children's children. I mean, I don't have kids, but my nieces and nephew and your children's children's children will have a record of this. And, and I'd rather it be a record of the truth, the truth and transparency, then some show about pretending. So I think it's going to be good for them to be able to look back and be like, for me, it's like the, my crazy aunt, like, what was she doing? And what did she think? And, and, oh my God, it's a record of the times too.1 (7m 43s):Yeah.2 (7m 43s):I think about that kind of a lot. And I think about, of course I say all this and my kids are probably like going to be, have no interests unless the, until they get to a certain age, I mean, I'll put it to you this way. If I could listen to a podcast of my mother in her, you know, in the time that I don't really the time of life, certainly before I was born, but in my life where I still didn't see her as a person until, you know, I'd love to just things like what her voice sounded like then, and that kind of thing. I mean, it's interesting.1 (8m 16s):I have nothing of my mom, like we have a very few, it was interesting because we didn't, you know, we, there was not a lot of video of my mother and today's actually the 10th anniversary of her passing.2 (8m 28s):Oh, wow. Wow. That's hard.1 (8m 31s):It is hard. You know, it is hard. And I'm working through, I started therapy with a new therapist, like a regular LCSW lady. Who's not because my last guy was an Orthodox Jewish man who wanted me to have children. Like it was a whole new, I just got involved in all the Shannon Diego's of like weirdness. I attracted that weirdest and whatever. So this lady is like a legit, you know, therapist. And they only bummer is, and I totally understand she's on zoom, but like, I I'm so sick of like, I would love to be in a room with a therapist, but I get it. She's in, she's an older lady, which is also great. I was so sick of having like 28 year old therapists.1 (9m 13s):Yeah,2 (9m 13s):Yeah, yeah. For sure.1 (9m 16s):I don't even seem right. Unless clients are like, you know, fit seven to 17. So anyway, so, but all this to say about my mom, I was thinking about it and I think what's harder than right. My mom's death right now is that there's I just, you know, and this is something I wanted to bring up with you is just like, I have a lot of rage that's coming up lately about my childhood and we weren't allowed to feel rage. And my mom was the only one allowed to feel rage. And so this rage mixed with perimenopause slash menopause. I mean, like I still get a period, but like, it's, it's a matter of time before that's over.1 (9m 58s):So, but the rage, so I guess, right. I get, you know, people like to talk about rage as some or anger as something we need to process and we need to do this and that, but the truth of the matter is since we're being transparent, like rage can be really scary. Like sometimes the rage, I feel, it's not like I'm going to do anything. Why wonky? I hope, but it's more like a, I don't know what to do with it. That is my, and I was talking in therapy about that. Like, I'm not actually sure. Practically when the feelings come up, what to do with rage. And I feel like it speaks to in our culture of like, we're all about now, this sort of like, we talk about this fake positivity and shit like that.1 (10m 41s):And also like embracing all your feelings, but there's not really practical things that we learn what to do when you feel like you're going to take your laptop and literally take it and throw it across the room and then go to jail. Like you, you. So I have to like look up things on the internet with literally like what to do with my rage.2 (11m 1s):I think that's why that's part of my attraction to reality. Television shows is a, is a performance of rage. That's that I wouldn't do just because I don't think I could tolerate the consequences. I mean, an upwards interpretation is, oh, it's not my value, but it's really just like, I don't think I can manage the content of the consequences. I'm totally at having all these blown up1 (11m 30s):And people mad at me and legal consequences. I can't,2 (11m 35s):It's something very gratifying about watching people just give in to all of their rage impulses and it's yeah. I, it it's, it may be particularly true for women, but I think it's really just true for everybody that there's very few rage outlets, although I guess actually maybe sports. Well, when it turns, when it turns sideways, then that's also not acceptable.1 (12m 3s):Yeah. I mean, and maybe that's why I love all this true crime is like, these people act out their rage, but like lately to be honest, the true crime hasn't been doing it for me. It's interesting. That is interesting. Yeah. It's sort of like, well, I've watched so much of it that like now I'm watching stuff in different languages, true crime. And I'll start again. No, no, just stories. I haven't all been the only stories that I haven't heard really, really are the ones from other countries now. So I'm watching like, like true crime in new, in Delhi.2 (12m 42s):Do you need your fix? I actually was listening to some podcasts that I listened to. There's always an ad and it's exactly about this. It's like, we love true crime, but we've heard every story we know about every grisly murder, you know, detail. And it was touting itself as a podcast of, for next time I listened to it. I'll note the name of it so I can share it with you. You know, about this crimes. You haven't heard about1 (13m 9s):T the thing is a lot of them now, because I'm becoming more of a kind of sewer. Like a lot of it is just shittily made. So like the, the they're subtitled and dubbed in India, like India. So you've got like the, the they're speaking another language and then they're and if they don't match, so then I'm like, well, who's right. Like, is it the dubbing that's right. Or the subtitles that are right. And, and actually the words matter because I'm a writer. So it was like one anyway, it's poorly done is what I'm saying in my mind. And so it sort of scraped scraping the bottom of the barrel. It's like deli 9 1 1. I swear to God. That's what it, and, and it's, and also it's, it's horrifying because the, you know, the legal systems everywhere fucked, but India has quite a system.2 (13m 57s):I think that to the rage, like, tell me more about what comes up for you with rage and where you,1 (14m 6s):Yeah. Okay. So some of it is physiological, like where I feel literally like, and I think this is what my doctor's talking about. The menopause symptoms. I literally feel like a gnashing, my teeth. Like, I feel a tenseness in my jaw. Like, that's literally that. And she's like, that could also be your heart medication. So talk to your heart doctor. I mean, we're checking out all the things, but like, but it's tension. That's what it really feels like in my body is like tight tension where I feel earth like that. If I had to put a sound effect to it, it's like, ah, so I, I feel that is the first symptom of my rage. And then I feel like, and, and I say out loud, sometimes I hate my life.1 (14m 54s):That's what I say. And that is something I have never allowed myself to say before. Like I, I think unconsciously, I always told myself, like, you just, you have to be grateful and you know, those are the messages we receive, but sometimes life just fucking sucks. And sometimes my life, I just, I just can't stand. And, and in moments, you know, I never loved myself. So it's mostly a physical symptom followed by this is intolerable, what someone is doing. Sometimes my dog or my husband, but even, even if the coworking space, you know, like the lady was talking too loud and I was like, oh my God, this is intolerable.1 (15m 34s):She has to shut up. So agitation, that's what it is. And, and then it passes when I, if I, if I can say, oh my gosh, I am so fricking in Rouge right now. Then it passes.2 (15m 52s):Yeah. Well, it, it kind of sounds like from, from you and probably for most people, the only real option is to turn it in on yourself, you know, like you're not going to put it elsewhere. So you've, you know, you have, which is, so I guess maybe it's okay if you turn it on yourself, if you're doing, if you're working, if you're doing it with acceptance, which is the thing I'm gathering from you, as opposed to stewing and festering. And1 (16m 21s):I mean, it becomes, it's interesting. Yes, it is. So it's like, so red, hot, and so sudden, almost that the only thing I can do is say, okay, this is actually happening. Like, I can't pretend this isn't happening. I, it I'm like physically clenching my fists. And then I, yeah, there is a level of acceptance. I don't get panicked anymore. Now that I, that something is wrong. I just say, oh, this is rage. I name it. I'm like, I feel enraged and white, hot rage, and then it, and then it, and then I say, that's what this is.1 (17m 3s):I don't know why. I don't know where it's coming from. Right. In this moment. It's not proportionate to the lady, like literally talking on the phone at my coworking space that she's not shouting. So it's not that. And I don't want to miss that. I'm not like I can't fool myself to think that it's really, that lady's problem. That I feel like throwing my laptop at her head. And then, and then it passes. But, but, but it is, it is more and more. And, and I think a lot of it, not a lot of it, but you know, my doctor really does think that it's, it's hormonal. A lot of it just doesn't help the matter. I mean, it's not like, oh, great. It's hormonal. Everything's fine. But it, it does help to make me feel a little less bonkers.2 (17m 45s):Maybe you should have like a, a whole rage. Like what, like a rate. Well, first I was thinking you should have a range outfit. Like, oh, for me, if I, I noticed I pee in the winter anyway, I pick like my meanest boots and my leather jacket. When I'm feeling, you know, maybe say maybe kind of a rage outfit, when did Pierce?1 (18m 9s):No, I, I scratched myself in my sleep. Oh no, it's okay. It happens all the time. I do it in my sleep. It's a thing that it's like a little skin tag that I need to get removed. It's2 (18m 23s):So you could have a rage outfit and then you could have a rage playlist, And then you might even have like rage props. I'm just trying to think about a way that your ma you, you could write because if, if how you process something is artistically creatively, then maybe you needed a creative outlet that's specifically for, for race.1 (18m 48s):Yeah. And you know, the, I, I love that. And now I'm thinking about like, as a kid, we, because we, anger was so off limits to us. I used to violently chew gum. Like I would chew on the gum. That was a way, and my mom did the same thing, even though she also got her rage out, but it was like, you know, when people violently chew on their gum, like that was a way I could get my aggression out. That's so sad that that's like the only way.2 (19m 16s):Well, I mean, you find it wherever you can find me. It's like water looking for whatever that expression is, right? Yeah. Huh. Well, I have to get more in touch with my rage because I I'm told that I seem angry a lot.1 (19m 33s):You do.2 (19m 35s):I, I do get told that, but, but that sucks for me because I feel like I'm not expressing my anger and I'm, but I'm not. So I'm not, and I'm being seen as angry at certain times. So that means I didn't even get the benefit of like letting out the anger that somebody is.1 (19m 56s):Right. You didn't even get to act out the anger. It's like, yeah. So for me, miles tells me that all the time, like, he's like, you seem really in couples therapy. Also, I have to admit yesterday was a big day. We had couples therapy on zoom. Then I had individual therapy. And in between I had all kinds of like, just stuff happening. So, but yeah, I'm told I a miles is like, you seem so angry and he's not wrong. And, and we take it out on the people that we live in a two by four apartment with. So I also feel like this office space is helping with that, but yeah, I dunno, I'm going to have to keep exploring my, my rage and that's what it is.1 (20m 37s):And also it is like, I am the character in where the wild things are that kid, that is what I feel like. And it feels it's like the perfect cause he wants to gnash his teeth and, and he does, and a thrash, thrash, thrashing mash, or the words 2 (21m 6s):Let me run this by you that I wanted to do when we're going to talk to Molly that we didn't get to do. And it was based on made, you know, and just about money and, and wondering like what your relationship is right now with money. And also, but when were you at your lowest with money? What do you remember as being your lowest moment? Sure, sure. With money with money.1 (21m 40s):Okay. I have moments of what first comes to mind was when right. I was at DePaul. So it's an apropos in college and there was obviously a sense. I had a sense of lack, always, even though based on whatever, but it was phone. Somehow my accounts were always negative, right? Like, and I would call the number, the banking number, incessantly to check, and it would always be negative. So I have this panic thoughts about that. Like being a time of like, and that's not the only time that happened like that.1 (22m 23s):Where, what is the feeling? The feeling was that, and this was in college where it started to happen, where I felt like there's never enough. No, one's going to help me. I'm irresponsible with money. Was the message I told myself and I probably was, I was in college, but I can't handle money. And literally that, that panic was also, I mean, it was true. I had no money, but my parents would have backed me, probably helped me out, but I was too scared to ask for help. So that's like, that's when, when you asked that question, that's where I go.1 (23m 4s):But, but that's also a college kind of me. So like in terms of an adult, me, that's a really great, great question. My lowest, I don't know. What about you?2 (23m 22s):Well, I've got a lot of Loma Loehmann's moments with money when I was in high school. The thing was, I lost my wallet all the time.1 (23m 35s):Oh, I remember this. I remember you talking about,2 (23m 38s):Yeah, that'd be still lose stuff all the time. That actually started at a young age with, you know, my mom would, she, my mom was really into jewelry and she would buy me destroyed. And there's nothing wrong with the fact that she brought me jewelry, but I lost it. You know, she buy me nice gold jewelry1 (23m 59s):Because she likes nice things. That's right. Yeah.2 (24m 4s):In college it was pretty bad. And the first time it was pretty bad. I had to move back in with my mom because I couldn't afford rent. And then the second time I just, I re I really, if I had more bravery, I probably would have signed up to be one of those girls in the back of the Chicago reader. Like, I, I, I just figured what ha how literally, how else? Because I had a job, but I only worked however much I could work given the fact that we were in rehearsals and like busy all day, so I never could make enough money. And then I just, I think I always have had a dysfunctional relationship with money.1 (24m 51s):Wait a minute, but I have to interrupt. Why, why didn't our parents fucking help us? Okay. Look, I know I sound like a spoiled asshole brat, but like, when I think of the anxiety that we were going through and I know your mom did, so I'm not going to talk shit about your mom or anything, but I'm just saying like, why did we feel so alone in this when we were so young, this is not right.2 (25m 11s):Yeah. Well, my mom did help me out as much as she possibly could, but I think part of it too, my dad certainly didn't think it was that. I mean, when my mom was 18 and my dad was 19, they bought a house and had a baby. So I think part of it is, has been like, what's the matter with you? Cause I didn't go to college, you know, that's the other thing. So, so then when I, then I had a period for like 10 years where I always had three jobs, me two, what1 (25m 46s):Did you have enough then? I mean like, could you make rapid enough?2 (25m 49s):I had enough then yeah, I had enough then. But then when Aaron decided he wants to go to medical school, it was really on me to, to bring in the income. I mean, his parents always gave him money. They helped, it was a lot more. I mean, and actually it's why he became a therapist because I thought, well, we're going to be living with no income because he's going to be a student. Right. So I better giddy up and get a job. So the whole time I was in social work school, I was bartending. I remember that. And then I went quickly into private practice so that I could make money.2 (26m 29s):And it turned out to be, it turned out to backfire on me. Tell1 (26m 35s):Me, tell me, tell me more.2 (26m 37s):It backfired in two ways. Number one, I was, I shouldn't have been operating a private practice without my LCSW. I had my MSW and I was working at the time in a psych hospital. And all of the psychiatrist said, you should start your private practice. You should start your private practice. And I remember saying at the beginning, I don't know if I'm allowed to oh yes, yes. You definitely can. I know tons of MSWs into plenty of people and it's true. I don't know if it's still true now in New York, but at that time you could walk around and see plenty of nameplates for offices where somebody in private practice and that just have an MSW.2 (27m 18s):They just had to have a supervisor1 (27m 19s):Or something.2 (27m 22s):I don't know. Okay. I dunno. Right. So that ended up coming to haunt me when a disgruntled patient. And they're all disgruntled in some way, a family who actually had been swindled by a con artist, like they, they were a blue blood, rich ass family and they got swindled by a con artist. And so they were talking about rage. They had a lot of rage about that. When this guy who was paying for his daughter's treatment, didn't think it was going where, you know, he wanted it to right.2 (28m 4s):He started pushing back about the fee and then he was submitting to his insurance company and they were not reimbursing because I didn't have the LCSW. So then he reported me to the New York state office of professional discipline or1 (28m 21s):Whatever yeah.2 (28m 21s):Regulation or whatever. Yeah. And I ha I had to go through a whole thing. I had to have a lawyer and I had to go, yeah, yeah. It was a nightmare. It was a complete and total nightmare. And I, and I said nothing, but like, yeah, I did that. I did do that. And I did it because I needed to make the money. I mean, in some ways I don't regret it because I did it worked for the time that it worked. And then by the time it stopped working, I was ready to leave private practice anyway. Oh my God. Yeah. But then it also backfired because we were taking in this money, which we desperately needed living in New York city with two kids.2 (29m 3s):And, and we were, we were spending it all and not hold withholding any for taxes. So then that started, that started, that started almost 10 year saga of just, I mean, I, it's embarrassing to even say how much money we've paid in just in fees, compounded fees. Nope. I'm sure. In the last 10 years we've given the government a million dollars.1 (29m 29s):That sounds, that sounds about right. And you know, I think the thing with money too, is the amount of forgiveness I've need to muster up for the financial decisions that I have made. So one of them that I'm super embarrassed about is that, and I, and I hear you when it's like, yeah, I, it, it's embarrassing. I, I, when I did my solo show, I inherited the year that my mom died. My great aunt also died, who I very barely knew. And I inherited like, like a lot of money. Well, to me, a lot, like 50 grand from her, and I spent 15,000 on a publicist for my solo show that did nothing.1 (30m 14s):So I was swindled. Oh,2 (30m 17s):I'm so sorry to hear that. That really did nothing.1 (30m 22s):I could have done it all on my own. I could have done it all on my own, on drugs, in a coma. Do you know what I'm saying? Like, like, come on. So I have done made some questionable decisions. I did the best we did the best we could with, with the information that we all had at the time. I would never make that decision. I wouldn't, I will never make that mistake again. So yeah. Money is very, very, obviously this is so like kind of obvious to say, but it is, it is. So it is a way in which we really, really use it to either prize or shame ourselves. Right. And, and, and w I do it either way, like I do it.1 (31m 2s):Oh, I'm so fancy. I inherited this dough. And then I also do it. It's that thing that they talk about in program, which is like, you're the worm, but you're the best worm for the festival, special worms. And like, you're not a worker among workers. I'm just like the best idiot out there. It's like,2 (31m 18s):Dude. Yeah. And you're making me realize that money might be the only very quantifiable way of understanding your psychology list. The money is like, understanding your psychology through math. It's going okay. If you're a person like me who gets offered a credit card at age 20 totally signs up and, and immediately maxes it out at whatever, to get 27% interest rate. So whatever little thousand dollars of clothes I got, I probably paid $10 for it. And for the longest time. So, so that's me being afraid of the truth of my financial situation, being unwilling to sacrifice, having, you know, whatever, cute clothes being about the immediate gratification of it all and not thinking longterm.2 (32m 15s):Yeah.1 (32m 16s):Okay. Well, not asking for help either. Like, like, I don't know who I'd asked, but someone had to know more than me. I didn't ask my parents. They didn't really know what was happening at, or that just was their generation of like, not teaching us about money. It was sort of like, good luck. Get it together. We got it together. You get it together. Okay. Fine. But like unwillingness and fear to ask, to be taught something about money. Like, I didn't know, Jack shit about credit or interest Jack shit.2 (32m 46s):Yeah. And I recently realized that I'm basically redoing that with my kids, because we supposedly have this allowance. Only one of my kids ever remembers to ask for it because you know, only one of my kids is very, you know, very interested in money, but like, in a way I can understand why the others don't because it's like, well, anytime they want something, I pay for it. I never say sometimes I'll say recently, I've gotten better about saying, if we're going to go back to school shopping I'll especially if the oldest one, I'll say, this is your budget. If you, if you spend it all on one pair of sneakers, then I hope you're okay with your sweat pants that don't fit and wear them everyday for the rest of the school year.2 (33m 31s):Right. But it's, we've, we've just been extremely inconsistent in tying, like, for example, chores to your allowance,1 (33m 42s):It's fucking miserable and hard. And I have trouble doing that for myself. I wouldn't be able to do that for my children. If I had children, I can't not give the dog people food. What are you talking about? How am I going to bring it? Doesn't shock me. We didn't learn the skills and I'm not blaming. I mean, I'm blaming, of course my parents, but I'm also just saying, it's just the facts. If we're going to be that in the truth, like, I didn't learn, I didn't educate myself and nobody educated me. So I'm really learning through trial and error. Mostly error, how to be okay with money. And it is you're right. Like finances, romance, and finance teach us the most about our psychology.2 (34m 24s):Yeah. Yeah. Romance finance. I love that. 1 (34m 28s):I think that my boss at Lutheran social services to say all the time, finance and romance, romance, and finance, that's what all these addictions are about is that's how you see them. I'm like, she's right. I mean, she was, I liked her. She was bonkers, but I liked her. She said some good. She, she also is famous for saying, and she didn't say it, but she would always quote, the, no one gets out of here alive. You know, none of us getting out of here life, we might as well start2 (34m 54s):. Well, today on the podcast, we were talking to Carol Schweid and original cast member of the original production of a chorus line on Broadway. She's got great stories to tell she's a fascinating person. And I think you're going to really enjoy this conversation with Carol Schweid. Exactly. Carol shrine. Congratulations. You survived theater school. I did. You did.2 (35m 34s):And where did you go to theater school. Okay. First of all,3 (35m 38s):Let me just take my coffee, my extra coffee off of the stove and put it on my table. Cause it's gonna burn because we don't want that.4 (35m 51s):Okay. You're I am looking for a cop. If you have one, you know, this is ridiculous.3 (36m 2s):Hi there. Hi. This is a riot that you talk about surviving theater school. I think it's great. Okay. So this is working, right? You can hear me. Yeah, no, totally. A hundred percent. So this is my, I started college at Boston university. I was an acting major, which I loved. I really did, but I, what I loved more than anything was I loved the history of the theater. We had a great professor who told the tales of the gladiators and the, you know, the gladiators on the island and the fighting, and then the island, the survivors, and then the island would slowly sink into the water.3 (36m 45s):What is this? What did I miss? It was the early history of the theater. It was starting on the church steps. It was, you know, the second, whatever all of that history was, I found it really interesting. I also loved the station shop crew stuff. I liked learning about lighting. I was terrible at it. I, you know, I would fall off ladder, but I, I, I enjoyed the backstage stuff as much as I enjoy. I just, I liked it. I, we did the rose tattoo and my, and my first job was to take care of the goat. I was on the prop crew.3 (37m 28s):I took care of the goat. Was it a stuffed goat? No, it was a real goat. Wow. What can I tell you? The rose tattoo. There's a goat in the play. I didn't realize you could have livestock and colleges, college, whatever it was. I look like I have jaundice with is that something's wrong with the light jump I sent you stop your, where is the microphone part of your, do you want me to hold it up better? Because when you move, it hits your shirt and it makes like a scratching, right? That's right. I'll do it this way. I won't move around. When you look tan, you look, you don't like jaundice at all. Okay. Well then that's all right. Good. Thanks. Were the goat handlers.3 (38m 8s):Good to talk to you. I mean, that was, and I didn't mind, I didn't mind being an usher. All of those things, you know, I remember somebody sitting us down and saying, you're you are the first person. The audience we'll meet tonight as an usher. I took all of the stuff I did, but the acting business was very confusing to me. I didn't quite know. I had done a lot of theater and dancing and been in the shows and stuff, but I really, I was a little more of a dancer than an actor. I'd taken class in the city. I'd followed some cute guy from summer camp to his acting class. But half the time, I honestly didn't understand a word.3 (38m 48s):Anybody said, I just, nobody does. I really didn't get it so much at the time I loved it, but I didn't always get it. And for some reason, and I have no idea where this, why this happened. I had a boyfriend in summer stock whose mother worked at Barnard and her best friend was a woman named Martha Hill. Martha Hill ran the dance department at a school called Julliard. Nope. I had no idea. Cool. Just a little, nothing school. This is back in the day. It's a long time ago. It was just a plain old school. It wasn't like a school, you know, where you bow down. And I really was a very good dancer and always loved dancing.3 (39m 33s):You know, I've been dancing since I'm like a kid, a little five or six or whatever. So I was a little disenchanted with my successes at Boston U even though I had friends, I was having a great time. I mean, Boston in the late sixties was amazingly fun, but I felt like I wasn't getting it. I mean, it wasn't a school that was cutting people. Thank God, because that would have been torture. I don't know how anybody survives that, but I audition for this dance department in this school called Juilliard and got in and then told my parents that I was going to change colleges. I remember making up a dance in the basement of my dorm in Boston.3 (40m 17s):Cause you had a sort of take class and then you had to show something that you should have made up. And somebody else from college was leaving school to come to New York to be a singer. So we decided we were going to be roommates. And then we had a summer stock. Somebody at BU started some summer theaters. So I had a job or two, I think I had some friends from there. So I ended up moving, changing colleges and going to Juilliard. And I spent three years there. I was a modern dancer major. So we had the Limone company, including Jose Lamone wow teachers and the Graham company.3 (40m 59s):I mean, Martha, Martha Graham did not teach, but her company did as a winter and Helen, I was Helen McGee. One of the, they were maniacs. I mean, they're, they're like gods and goddesses and their whole life is about dance. And I was one of those demonstrators for her eight o'clock beginning class, my third year of school. I mean, I, it was all about technique. We had amazing ballet teachers. We had Fiorella Keane who, I mean, Anthony tutor taught class there and he was Anthony. I mean, so I got a out of being at that school that I have never lost. I mean, I can, I'm making up the answers for high school kids now really.3 (41m 42s):I'm just finishing up a production of grease, which is really kind of boring, but whatever I liked Greece, tell me more. Yeah. It's okay. If you hear it enough, you really get sick of it. Well, that's true. Yeah. I mean high school kids doing high school kids is like, Jesus, God, you just want to slit your throat. The moodiness when it comes to the girls. I mean, I love them. I really love them. I love the guys because puppies, they fall all over each other and they're fabulous, but that's a lie anyway. So I did something that I don't know why I did it and how it worked out. That way I left. I had a very best friend in college that was, you know, and I came to New York and made, made and shared an apartment with this slightly crazy woman.3 (42m 32s):And a year later I got myself a studio apartment on west end avenue and 71st street. And my mom co-signed the lease. And I spent three years dancing, honestly dancing almost every day. I wanted to take sights singing, but they wouldn't let me because I was in the dance department. And I didn't know, you could advocate for that. Sure. I didn't know. You could take classes at Columbia. I mean, who had time anyway, but was it a three-year program? It was a four year program, but I had taken a music class at BU that was like music appreciation one. Yeah. And for whatever reason, they gave me credit for that.3 (43m 14s):So I had a full year credit. Yep. Three years of Juilliard where I really worked my tail off. What's weird about it is that I am, you know, just a plain old Jewish girl from New Jersey, you know, a middle-class Jewish girlfriend. And to, to think that I could have a profession where people don't talk and don't eat, which is what the answers do is a riot to me. Yeah. Yeah. It's an absolute riot because you know, I mean, that should be basically the manual for dancers. Don't talk, don't eat, but I always knew that I was heading to Broadway. I really have always wanted to do that.3 (43m 55s):And I, and, and w was not really ever in question that I would, I somehow assumed if I worked hard and figured it out enough, I would find my way to working on Broadway. And I, and I made the right choice in the sense of switching colleges. Because in the seventies, if you look at your list of Broadway shows, all the directors were choreographers. They were all dancers, all of them Fauci, Michael Bennett champion, all of them. So I started working when I got out of school, you know, it was, and I had already done a couple of summers of summer stock and I did a summer Bushkill pencil, you know, these ridiculous, stupid theaters all over, but it was a blast.3 (44m 36s):It was fun. Where, what was your first job out of school? I was still, I was in school and it was the Mount Suttington Playhouse, which was like a tin shell in Connecticut. And I think it was still in college. Cause two guys from school had opened this theater at the skiing place, but it wasn't skiing. Then it was a sh it was like a tin shell. So couldn't really do a show when it was raining very well. And I believe it was stopped the world. I want to get off and I can still remember the Alto harmony to some of the songs. So you okay. Wait, so you don't consider, you didn't consider yourself a, an actor or did you?3 (45m 20s):Well, I did, but I think what happened was I had to audition for something. It'd be you like, they had grad programs and it wasn't that I was unsuccessful there, but somebody came and I didn't get cast. I didn't get hired. And I didn't understand, you know, like they give you all these acting exercises. We do sense memory. Well, I didn't know they were exercises. I didn't, they were they're like plea aids. Right. They're like learning things. I took this all very seriously. I would stand in a room and try to feel it was like that song from chorus line, you know, try to feel the emotion, feel the, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah.3 (46m 5s):I did all of that. I didn't really understand the simple, what am I want here? And what's in my way of trying to get it. Yeah. It took me so long to find teachers that I really could understand and make me a better actor. So when did you find them? When did you start to find them? Oh, that's interesting. Well, I found a couple of good teachers in New York. I mean, honestly there was a woman named Mary Tarsa who had been in the group theater and an older lady. I mean, it's a long time ago anyway, you know, but I remember sitting in her class and she would talk about using imagery and th and I started to sort of understand a little bit, which is amazing to me because after I moved to Westport and I met, do you know the name Phoebe brand?3 (46m 58s):Yeah. Phoebe brand was in our theater workshop. Oh, taught a class. She was already up in her eighties and she taught a class, a Shakespeare class on Sunday mornings. And all of a sudden these things that I didn't understand from decades before. Hmm. It sort of pulled it all together. But for me, I went, I was in California after I got married and moved to LA for a couple of years, found a teacher named John LAN and Lee H N E and two years in his class. I started to really understand how to do it. And then when I came back to New York, he sent me to Michael Howard and Michael Howard, Michael Howard was a great teacher for me.3 (47m 44s):He's still a great, I don't know if he's still around if he's teaching or not, but he was a wonderful teacher. And I started to understand how to do it. Was Len the, did he teach the method or what was yes, he was, he was an actor studio teacher. And I started to understand about being present on the stage and being able to deal with people. All of it, it just changed dramatically. I mean, I started to understand what this was about and seeing other good actors and chipping away at it and finding people to rehearse with. And1 (48m 22s):You, you, from what I know, and what I'm gathering is that once you graduated Juilliard, you were cast in New York.3 (48m 30s):Well, you know, I did get my very, my V I I've. I mean, I, I remember going to see midnight cowboy, which was about the same time as I got out of college. And I remember going into a terrible panic of, oh my God. I mean, really scared about all of it. And I, I went, I joined a class that a friend of mine, somebody told me about this class, you know, I always follow somebody to a class. I'm always, I have good friends. And I, somebody says, oh, I love this guy come to class and I'd show up.3 (49m 12s):And this was a musical comedy singing class, kind of where there were writers in the class and actors in the class. And the writers in the class would work on a musical that they didn't have permission for. It wasn't like they were, we were doing this for money or for, for future. So my friend who I became friends with wrote her musical version of barefoot in the park and which has never been done, but I remember I was in it and this guy was in it. And we, it was the kind of a class where it was a very warm, funny group, funny group of wacko theater people. And I would go to open calls and I'd usually go to open dance calls because that was a door for me.3 (49m 59s):And also I used to have to sneak out of Jew, not sneak necessarily, but essentially sneak out to take my singing lessons. And I took singing lessons every, you know, every week for years, for three years, I would, you know, and I, and I was not really, I don't think a very good singer, but I became a good singer. I would sneak out of school and go to an acting class. I don't even know when I started that, but I know that I would find the time to do it and then talk about acting and find a teacher so that when I would audition for a musical and I would get through the dancing. Usually if I got through the first cut, I would make it to the end. I wouldn't always get the job, but if I made it through that first horrible, random cut, you know, where there's 200 people in your dancing across the stage and it's yes, no, yes, no.3 (50m 47s):Is it really?1 (50m 48s):Because I'm not a dancer. So I never had this. I, when my agents are like, oh, there's an open dance call. I'm like, ah, that's you sent the wrong person, the email. So it's really like that, like in, in chorus line where they say, you know,3 (51m 1s):Oh yeah. It's like all that jazz. It's really like that.2 (51m 6s):Wait, I have a question. I want to hear the re the rest of that. But I, I just, I've never asked anybody. What's the biggest difference between the people who got cut immediately. I mean, was it training or were there people that, in other words, were there people who were just walking in off the street with no training trying to audition? Yeah,1 (51m 29s):No, truly an open call.3 (51m 31s):No. And sometimes these were equity calls. Cause I, I, I did get my equity card on a summer. That one summer I worked for a non-union, you know, we were in either Bushkill Pennsylvania or Southern Eaton Connecticut, or I did a couple of those summers. And then the next summer, the choreographer from that show had an equity job. And he hired like three of us from our non-unions summer stock, because we were good enough. And1 (52m 4s):So when you went to these open calls, everyone, there was a bad-ass dancer. No one, there was like,3 (52m 10s):That's not true. That's not true. There were all different levels of dancers, but it was also a look await, you know, it was always, I was always like seven pounds overweight. It was like, the torture is thing of weight does enough to put anybody over the edge1 (52m 26s):That they literally3 (52m 27s):Weigh you, Carol. Oh God. No. Oh, but it's so look, and I will tell you there's one. There was one time when I remember auditioning for above Fossey show and there were a lot of people on the stage and we were whatever we were doing. And then at 1.3 Fossey dancers, it was their turn. And these three gals, okay. Their hair was perfect. Their makeup was fabulous. They had a little necklace, they had a black leotards, you know, cut up high, but not out of control. Good tights, no, no runs, nice shoes, nails done.3 (53m 7s):And they were fantastic. They were clean. They were technically, and we all sort of went, oh fuck.1 (53m 16s):Right.3 (53m 18s):Right. And I have friends who became Fossey dancers. I mean, I worked for Bob, but I have friends who did a lot of shows him. And they had that same experience where they saw other people, the way it should be. And then they would go back a month later and get the job because they knew what it took. It was all about knowing what it takes. But the thing about having studied acting and having slowly studied singing is that in the world of musical theater, I was ahead of the game because there's not that much time. So you have to be willing to spend all of your time.3 (54m 0s):Right.1 (54m 1s):There are some people I'm assuming Carol, that could dance wonderfully, but couldn't do the singing and the acting part. And that's where you were like, that's the triple threat newness of it all is like, you could do3 (54m 12s):Well, I could do them better than a lot of people. And I certainly could sing well, and I had, I could sing a short song and I knew that you sing a short song. I knew that you'd probably do an uptempo, you know? And also I tend to be a little angry when I go into an audition. It's like, why do I fuck? Do I have to audition? I better, duh. So I needed to find things that allowed me to be a little angry so I could be myself. And I could also be a little funny if I could figure out how to do that. So all of these things worked in my favor. And then of course, like everybody else in her, a lot of people, pat Birch, who was a choreographer, she had like a gazillion shows running, including Greece on Broadway. And now over here, I don't know if she did grease, but she did over here.3 (54m 55s):She did. She was very prolific choreographer. She had been a Martha Graham dancer and she had taught a couple of classes at Julliard. And when it came to my auditioning for her, she needed girls who could dance like boys. She didn't need tall leggy, chorus girls. We were doing the show she was working on, was a show called Minnie's boys. And it was a show about the Marx brothers and the last number of the show. We were all the whole chorus was dressed up like different Marx brothers. And she needed girls who could be low to the ground, who can, you could turn who and I was the right person.3 (55m 36s):And I remember being in that class, that wonderful musical theater class with a teacher named Mervin Nelson, who was just a great older guy who kind of worked in the business. I remember I had to go to my callback. I went to my class and the callback was at night. And I remember him walking me to the door, putting his arm around me and saying, go get the job. And if you don't get this one, we'll get you. The next one1 (56m 4s):That makes me want to3 (56m 4s):Cry. Well, it made me feel like part of the family, cause we all want to be part of that theater family. And so I tend to do that when I'm with an actor, who's going to go get a job or go get, you know, you want to feel like it's possible. Yeah. You feel like you can, you deserve it.1 (56m 29s):You said, you mentioned briefly that you worked for Bob3 (56m 32s):Fossey. I did.1 (56m 35s):Oh my gosh. Did you turn into one of those ladies that looked like a bossy dancer too? Like, did you then show up to those auditions? Like, oh3 (56m 43s):No, I don't think I, I couldn't, I didn't, I could not get into a chorus of Bob Fossey, but I did get to play for strata in Pippin in the, in the, in the first national tour. And he, Bob was the, he was the director and I, I knew I was the right person for that job. It was also a funny, kind of lovely circumstances that I was in some off-Broadway an off-Broadway show that had started as an awful off, off of a, that, that Bubba, that moved to an off-Broadway theater. I got some excellent reviews. And I think the day the review came out was the day I had my audition for Bob Fossey.3 (57m 24s):So I, and I played it. I had talked to people who knew him. I talked to, you know, I, I knew that I, I don't know, I just, I, I had done some work and I just, I don't know the right person at the right time, somebody, he needed it. That part required a good dancer. Who could, I don't know how I got the part. I just,1 (57m 57s):I'm kind of getting the impression that we're talking about being a strong dancer.3 (58m 0s):Well, let's strong dancer. And also being able to, being able to talk and sing was really the key. I'm not sure that I certainly, as a young person, I, I didn't do nearly as much comedy as I did when I got a little older, but, and also there were a lot of divisions. You sort of either did musicals or you did straight plays and it was hard to get into an audition even for a straight play. And the truth is I think that a lot of us who thought we were better than we were as you get better, you see when you really, wasn't a very strong actor.1 (58m 43s):Right. But there's something about that. What I'm noticing and what you're talking about is like, there's something about the confidence that you had by maybe thinking that you might've been a little better than you were that actually behooves young actors and performers that, you know, cause when Gina and I talked to these people were like, oh my God, they have a healthy ego, which actually helps them to not give up as where I was like, I'm terrible. I'm giving up at the first hour.3 (59m 9s):Exactly. Right. Right. And, and it, and it goes back and forth. It's like a CSO one day, you feel like, oh yeah, I'm good at this. I can walk it. I get, I'm like, I'm okay with this. And the next day you just to hide under the bed, I think that's sort of the way it goes. I didn't know that people who worked on Broadway even then all had coaches and teachers and support systems and you know, being kind of a little more of a lone Wolf, which I was, and still fight against in a way I come against that a lot, for whatever reasons, you know, whatever it doesn't work, what to be a lone Wolf.3 (59m 54s):Yeah. Yeah. You can't do this alone. You can't do it without a support system. It's just too hard because when I actually had the best opportunity I had, which was being part of a chorus line, it was harder than I thought to just be normal, come up with a good performance every night, you know, it was up and down and loaded and that you lost your voice and had nobody to talk to because you couldn't talk anyway. And we didn't have the internet yet. You know, there was so many, it was so much pressure and so much, and I hadn't really figured out how to create that support system up for myself.3 (1h 0m 42s):And it was harder, harder than it needed to be. Did you ultimately find it with the cast? No. Oh, not really where they mean, oh, none of the cast was fine. It wasn't that anybody was mean it's that I didn't take care of myself and I didn't know how I was supposed to take care of my shirt. How old were you when you were cast in a chorus line? 27? Maybe I was, I was young and, but I wasn't that young. I just, but it wasn't that C w it was a strange situation to, I was, I had already had one Broadway show, so I had done, and then I had gone out of town to bucks county Playhouse.3 (1h 1m 25s):And did west side story Romeo was your first Broadway show. I'm sorry. It was called Minnie's boys. Oh, that was it. That was my, I did. And it was a show about the Marx brothers. Right. And I don't know if you know who Louis. We would probably do Louis Stadol and Louis J Staglin who works with, he works with Nathan Lane a lot. Oh yeah. Yeah. He's like second bun and he's incredibly talented. He played Groucho. Okay. We were all 25 years old. We were kids. We were right out of college. And the weirdest part of all was that the mother was played by Shelley winters. And this was a musical. What a weird you've really. Okay. So then you went onto chorus line.3 (1h 2m 6s):Well then, well then in between that, this is like, you know, then, then I went out of town to bucks county. I love being in bucks county for a year. We did west side story. We did Romeo and Juliet during the week. We do them together, one in the morning, one in the afternoon for high school kids. And then on the weekends, we do one of the, and I was the only person in the cast who liked dancing at 10 o'clock in the morning. You know, I didn't mind doing west side at 10 in the morning. I'd been up at eight, being a demonstrator for Mary Hinkson, teaching people how to do a contraction. So I didn't care. I love working in the daytime. That's what I play with your food is such a nice success. My lunchtime theaters here, I get tired at night.3 (1h 2m 47s):I don't know.2 (1h 2m 49s):Most people do wait. So was the, was the audition process for chorus line?3 (1h 2m 56s):I have a great story. I can tell you what my story is. Okay. So I, I was in, I don't know what I was doing. I had done a lot of off-Broadway work. I had been doing, I had been working a lot. And then of course there were the year where I didn't work. And then I went off to south North Carolina and played Nellie Forbush in south Pacific, in the dinner theater for three months. And I loved that. Actually, I think it was one of those times I had a job and a boyfriend and it was like a relief. It was wonderful to have like a life and then do the show at night. You know, I, I enjoyed that a lot and I didn't, you know, it was a big part and I didn't panic about seeing it.3 (1h 3m 37s):And it was just, I learned a lot from doing a part like that. I was doing Fiddler on the roof at a dinner theater in New Jersey, down the street from where my folks lived. And occasionally my mom would stop by her rehearsal and watch the wedding scene. Honest to God. I'm not kidding. She's like, Carol, you ever gonna get married? Are you ever gonna? Okay. So I'm doing Fiddler on the roof, in New Jersey. And there's a guy in the cast, one of the bottle dancers who were dropping off at night on 55th street, because he's working on this little musical about dancers and he would bring in monologues and he'd asked me to read them at rehearsal because he wanted to hear them out loud.3 (1h 4m 25s):And there was some stuff about this place to ever hear the peppermint lounge back in the studio. Right. It was a disco thing, but it was also a place where there was something. I remember one the couch girls, girls who would just lie on the couches and the guys, I mean really crazy stuff that did not make it into the show, but some interesting stuff. And I was playing the eldest daughter sidle, and it's a terrific part for me. So I was good. Yeah. And Nick knew I was a dancer. Anyway, this little show called the chorus line was in its workshop. Second workshop. They had already done the I, cause I was not a Michael Bennett dancer. I didn't, you know, I, I, I had auditioned for my goal once for the tour of two for the Seesaw.3 (1h 5m 10s):And it was the leading part and I didn't get it. I auditioned, I sang and I read and I read and I sang and I didn't get the part. And I came home and I was like in hysterics for like five days. I just, you know, I, I didn't get the part year and a half later, I'm doing Fiddler on the roof with Nick, Dante in New Jersey. And somebody leaves the second workshop and Nick brings up my name because there's a job all of a sudden to cover, to be in the opening and to cover a couple of parts next, bring up my name. And Michael Bennett says, wait a minute. I know her. I know she's an actress and she's a singer. Can she dance?3 (1h 5m 52s):So I showed up the next morning and I danced for 10 minutes and I got the job. I mean, I think, wow. Yeah. That's a great story.2 (1h 6m 1s):No. So that means you didn't have to participate in3 (1h 6m 4s):Callbacks or nothing. Oh, I started that day. I mean, honestly, it was Fiddler on the roof, you know what, I don't remember whether, how it went. Cause we were already in performance tour or something, you know, I, I it's a long time ago, so I don't really remember, but I know that this particular story is the absolute truth. That's fantastic. That2 (1h 6m 27s):Was it a hit right away3 (1h 6m 29s):Chorus line. Well, it wasn't, we were in previews. I'm no, we weren't even previous the second workshop, which means it was still being figured out. And when I came to the first rehearsal and sat and watched what was going on, I could not believe what I was seeing because the truth of what was happening on stage and the way it was being built was astounding. It was absolutely astounding because something about it was so bizarre. Oh. And also, also Marvin Hamlisch was the rehearsal pianist on Minnie's boys.3 (1h 7m 10s):Wow. So I knew him a little bit, not well, you know, but he was the rehearsal pianist that nobody would listen to a show about the Marx brothers, Marvin would say, wait, this is the Marx brothers. You got to have a naked girl running out of the orchestra pit. You gotta, you gotta, and of course, nobody would listen to him. Wait a minute, just turn this off, stop, stop, turn off. Sorry. So I couldn't get over what I was seeing. And I, I knew from the beginning, of course, I think most of us did that. Something very, very unique was going on and it was always changing. Like Donna McKechnie came in late at the audition, all dressed up in like a fur thing.3 (1h 7m 56s):And it was like, I'm sorry, I'm late. I'm sorry. I'm late. And then Zach says, would you put on dance clothes? And she said, no, no, wait a minute. Anyway, you couldn't help. But know sort of, you just kind of put,2 (1h 8m 8s):I mean, I remember seeing it when I was a kid and not, not being able to relate as an actor, but now that I think back, it just must've felt so gratifying to be seen for all of the, you know, because like we w the Joe Montana episode, we3 (1h 8m 28s):Haven't listened to yet, but I'm looking forward to2 (1h 8m 30s):It here today. But he was saying, I love3 (1h 8m 33s):Him2 (1h 8m 34s):For you. You were saying that when he won the Tony and everybody would say, well, it's like to win the Tony, what's it? Like he said, it's like, you won the lottery, but you been buying tickets for 15 years. You know, that's the part of acting that people now, I think it's a pretty common knowledge that it's really difficult to be an actor, but I don't know how Hmm, how known that was then. And it just, must've been so gratifying for all of those people. I mean, who are living in their real life? The story of that musical. Yeah.3 (1h 9m 9s):I think that that's true. And also, I mean, it really did come out of people's experiences. Those stories are so, so to be part of something like that, and down at the public theater, which of course it was a vol place to be, you know, you, you knew that Meryl Streep was walking down the hallway and you knew that. I mean, talk about confidence. I mean, I don't know if you've read her new book, no book about her. No, it's worth the time I listened to it. Actually, I didn't read it. I listened to, it's quite wonderful because you see a very confident person who's working on creating who she is.1 (1h 9m 47s):Do you feel, I feel like you have a really strong sense of confidence about yourself too. Where did that come from? Would you agree? First of all, that you have, it sounds like you had some comps, some real chutzpah as a youngster and maybe now as well. Where'd that come from3 (1h 10m 5s):Beats me. I have it now because I, I, I, I've had a lot of, a lot of experience. And I, I think that, that, I, I think I know a lot about this, but I don't know that I had it. The trick was to have this kind of confidence when it really matters. Yes. And I think I had it, like if I was in an off-Broadway show, I could say, I don't think that's good enough. Could you restage this blah, blah, blah. Or if I'm in North Carolina, I'm not, I think we need to dah, dah, dah, dah, dah. But when it comes down to the real nitty gritty of standing up for yourself, when it really, really matters, boy, that's harder than it looks.3 (1h 10m 51s):You know, even things like, I mean, my character, when I eventually took over the role of Miralis, which I under, you know, I was we've covered all these parts. There were nine of us. We sang in the little booth in the wings. We had microphones and little headsets. And the coolest part of all was Jerry Schoenfeld, who was the chairman of the Schubert organization would bring any visiting dignitary who was visiting the city that he was showing around his theaters. He would bring them into our little booth. And then we would watch the show from stage left in our little booth while we're singing, give me the ball, give him the ball. Cause half the dancers on the stage, cause stop singing because they had a solo coming up.3 (1h 11m 31s):So, you know, singing in a musical is not easy. You know, there's a lot of pressure and you got to hit high notes and you, you know, you just wake up in the middle of the night going torture, torture, and you have to work through that and finally go, fuck it. You know, fuck it. I don't care what I weigh. Fuck it. I don't care if I, if I can't hit the high note, but it, it takes a long time to get there. You know, I see people who do this all the time. I don't know how they live. I don't know how they sleep at night. There's no wonder people like to hire singers who have graduated from programs where they really understand their voice, know how to protect that, which you don't, you know, you have to learn, you have to learn how to really take.3 (1h 12m 24s):That's why, you know, it's wondering about ballet companies now have misuses and we didn't have any of that. You were hanging out there alone. I felt maybe I'm wrong, but that's how I felt. And if I was vulnerable or if I didn't feel well, and I was like, oh, what am I going to do? I can't tell anybo

Looking Up with Don
LUWD #0099 Ceres: Hiding in the Hyades

Looking Up with Don

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 13:39


"The Antarcitia solar eclipse is on December 4. If you intend to see it, you should be heading out the door about now."Don Machholz

RNZ: Morning Report
Covid-19: Vaccine resistance hiding on Kāpiti Coast

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 2:46


The sunny Kāpiti Coast north of Wellington is known for its laid-back lifestyle, and its mix of retirees, hippies, hipsters and tight-knit Maori communities. However, it's this mix that may be behind deep pockets of vaccine resistance. Ruth Hill filed this report from the Kāpiti Coast.

Set Lusting Bruce: The Springsteen Podcast
Amber Rose Washington Part 2

Set Lusting Bruce: The Springsteen Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 44:16


Amber Rose Washington @AmberRoseWash is an author, songwriter, musician, producer, public speaker, and advocate for the transgender community. In part two of our talk, she talks about her Podcast "THE JOURNEY, Unscripted" and her book Hiding from Myself and shares her journey of rebirth.

The Opperman Report
YT Catching Predators 2 / Marilyn Manson: The Monster Hiding in Plain Sight

The Opperman Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 44:42


The Opperman Report'
YT Catching Predators 2 / Marilyn Manson: The Monster Hiding in Plain Sight

The Opperman Report'

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 44:42


The Saad Truth with Dr. Saad
Kyle Rittenhouse Is Coming For Me - I‘ve Gone Into Hiding (The Saad Truth with Dr. Saad_325)

The Saad Truth with Dr. Saad

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 2:02


Kyle Rittenhouse has been deemed innocent of all charges. I'm back to hiding under the desk. _______________________________________ If you appreciate my work and would like to support it: https://subscribestar.com/the-saad-truth https://patreon.com/GadSaad https://paypal.me/GadSaad _______________________________________ This clip was posted earlier today (November 19, 2021) on my YouTube channel as THE SAAD TRUTH_1337: https://youtu.be/qWCzIxt4i0A _______________________________________ The Parasitic Mind: How Infectious Ideas Are Killing Common Sense (paperback edition) was released on October 5, 2021. Order your copy now. https://www.amazon.com/Parasitic-Mind-Infectious-Killing-Common/dp/162157959X/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= https://www.amazon.ca/Parasitic-Mind-Infectious-Killing-Common/dp/162157959X https://www.amazon.co.uk/Parasitic-Mind-Infectious-Killing-Common/dp/162157959X _______________________________________ Please visit my website gadsaad.com, and sign up for alerts. If you appreciate my content, click on the "Support My Work" button. I count on my fans to support my efforts. You can donate via Patreon, PayPal, and/or SubscribeStar. _______________________________________ Dr. Gad Saad is a professor, evolutionary behavioral scientist, and author who pioneered the use of evolutionary psychology in marketing and consumer behavior. In addition to his scientific work, Dr. Saad is a leading public intellectual who often writes and speaks about idea pathogens that are destroying logic, science, reason, and common sense. _______________________________________  

Coruscant Nights
Kazimir & Rondo 2: Clone in Hiding

Coruscant Nights

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 39:18


Kazimir & Rondo 2: Clone in Hiding   Where will you hide when the clones come for you?   ------------------- Thanks to DeWayne from Tubular Teens with Titans for contributing to this episode. ------------------- Join our Discord Donate for Destiny ------------------- Join us on Patreon! Buy us a Ko-fi!  Get some Coruscant Nights shirts and stickers!   Find more Coruscant Nights Twitter YouTube ------------------- Age of Rebellion, Edge of the Empire, and Force and Destiny RPGs ©Fantasy Flight Games and Lucas Books Star Wars ©Disney All music ©Mark Eberhardt, 2021

Real Coffee with Scott Adams
Episode 1564 Scott Adams: Weasels in the News Everywhere and I'll Show You Where They're Hiding

Real Coffee with Scott Adams

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 56:15


My new book LOSERTHINK, available now on Amazon https://tinyurl.com/rqmjc2a Find my "extra" content on Locals: https://ScottAdams.Locals.com Content: Biden negotiated, China won Rittenhouse jury, and update MSNBC Joy Reid, racist CNN Bakari Sellers, 4 lies in 15 seconds Rep. Cori Bush invented getting shot at? Fake news and fake fact-check on Bill Gates ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ If you would like to enjoy this same content plus bonus content from Scott Adams, including micro-lessons on lots of useful topics to build your talent stack, please see scottadams.locals.com for full access to that secret treasure. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/scott-adams00/support

Coffee With Scott Adams
Episode 1564 Scott Adams: Weasels in the News Everywhere and I’ll Show You Where They’re Hiding

Coffee With Scott Adams

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 56:15


Content: Biden negotiated, China won Rittenhouse jury, and update MSNBC Joy Reid, racist CNN Bakari Sellers, 4 lies in 15 seconds Rep. Cori Bush invented getting shot at? Fake news and fake fact-check on Bill Gates If you would like to enjoy this same content plus bonus content from Scott Adams, including micro-lessons on lots … The post Episode 1564 Scott Adams: Weasels in the News Everywhere and I'll Show You Where They're Hiding appeared first on Scott Adams Says.

Bill Whittle Network
Hiding Thumbs Down: The Tide Has Turned and Conservatives Are in Hot Pursuit

Bill Whittle Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 13:17


A classic war in the Pacific story (from the battle of Leyte Gulf), creates a template for dealing with the information war in modern America. Bill Whittle says conservatives have not only turned the Progressive offensive back, but are now in hot pursuit. Moving Back to America with Bill Whittle comes to your twice weekly thanks to our Members. Join them at https://BillWhittle.com

Colleen & Bradley
11/16 Tues Hr 2: D-BAGS: Marilyn Manson: He was hiding in plain sight...

Colleen & Bradley

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021


PLUS: What was your favorite recess game? HWWWL: Colleen watched THE SHRINK NEXT DOOR so you don't have to AND D-BAG DOUBLE DOWN: Khloe, just pick ONE face filter and stick with it!

One of These Years: a podcast about the Detroit Lions
Progress? Yes, but there's no hiding the Lions' biggest weakness

One of These Years: a podcast about the Detroit Lions

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 67:34


Detroit had every opportunity to notch its first win, at Pittsburgh, and couldn't take advantage. Is there a breaking point coming at QB? And what silver linings are there for the Lions, even in frustration?  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

It's Not About You - Trauma, PTSD, Abuse & Recovery - Joe Ryan

Become A Subscriber https://joeryan.com/subscribe/For access to all episode and bonus content. Shame keeps us isolated and living in fear of being exposed. To dismantle shame, we must enter our shame and not run and hide from it. We come out of hiding by exposing ourselves to ourselves. Once we start owning our shame, we fear being seen less, feel more alive and free. So much of our lives was us living a lie; we didn't know it. We built layers of protection around us to protect us from feeling our shame, and we created a false self to survive. We became what we thought others needed us to be so that we could feel loved and accepted. We believed this false self was our identity, and we did anything to protect this image. If anyone saw through our false self, we immediately entered into our shame, and the feelings of worthlessness would take us over. We live guarded with multiple layers of defenses, never to allow ourselves to be seen by others or ourselves. Nothing outside of us will heal our shame; we must go inward and expose ourselves to feelings of worthlessness. We become vulnerable to our fears. We teach ourselves that our perception of ourselves is not our reality; it's shame keeping us hostage. - Website: https://joeryan.com - Instagram: https://instagram.com/joeryan - Subscribe: https://joeryan.com/subscribe/ - Coaching: https://joeryan.com/coaching/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/joeryan/message

100% BS with Bella Solanot
#32 - Krista Williams: Where Is Your Ego Hiding?

100% BS with Bella Solanot

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 59:40


100% BS is joined by the wonderful Krista Williams from the Almost30 podcast. It was an honor to speak with such an eloquent and wise woman about the upward trend in consciousness, the ego-driven desire to evangelize, and the ways that we can come to terms with good/evil and right/wrong as necessary to our existence. By exploring the places that your ego likes to hide, Krista helps you find ways to come back to yourself and the simple truth of oneness. In pondering how we outsource our power to big corporations, we find that the common behavior of performing for approval is one that emulates the way brands market their virtues simply to benefit the bottom line —  and in turn, pacifies the darker deeds happening behind the scenes. How does one dismantle the ego-driven desire to change people's minds? How do we approach conversations about taboos and extremes without endorsing those ideas? And why does censorship contribute to disempowering people? All this and more with Krista!------Follow Krista on IGCheck out Almost30Get to know Krista on her websiteFollow Bella on IGCheck out my writing on SubstackJoin my newsletter for more!!100% BS on YouTube

First15 Devotional
The Desire to be Fully Known and Fully Loved

First15 Devotional

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 15:51


In today's podcast we're going to look at the desire we all share to be fully known and fully loved. You and I were made for this. And pursuing that sense of knowledge and love from the world has left so many of us wounded. But the good news is that God has a path for healing, relationship, and love that's void of shame, and wants to guide us down that path today as we create space and follow him together. The main concept for this week is derived from The Seven Longings of the Human Heart by Mike Bickle and Deborah Hiebert. Our Scripture for today comes from Ephesians 2:4-5, and today's worship is Out of Hiding by Steffany Gretzinger. Click here to follow First15 Worship on your favorite streaming platform!

Do We Know Things?
Hiding in Plain Sight: Discovering the Clitoris

Do We Know Things?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 38:36


Did you know a man, actually several, had to "discover" the clitoris? On today's episode, I welcome Sarah Chadwick, author of The Sweetness of Venus: A History of the Clitoris. We will learn about the ups and downs in the life of the clitoris: it's involvement in witchcraft, its repeated “discovery” and repression, and why we need more nicknames for it. The Clitoris! What do we know? Do we know things? Let's find out!Script for this episode: https://www.doweknowthings.com/episodesFind Sarah Chadwick on Instagram.Hosted by Dr. Lisa Dawn Hamilton, psychology professor and sex educator.Music and editing Jeremy Dahl https://www.palebluedot.ca/Script assistance by Matt Tunnacliffe See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

radiofreeredoubt
Episode 21-35 Hiding From Drones and Food Storage Resources

radiofreeredoubt

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 92:27


Fantastic Geeks (and where to find them)
Revealing Your SLYTHERIN SECRETS! | What is the “Evil” house hiding?

Fantastic Geeks (and where to find them)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 75:38


Family drama, elaborate fake relationships, and blowing up houses... in Minecraft. What else do Slytherins keep hidden from everyone? Does the house with the darkest reputation have the juiciest secrets? Find out as Tessa and Brizzy reveal your Slytherin confessions! Keep up with Fantastic Geeks: TW: https://twitter.com/fantasticgeeks | FB: https://www.facebook.com/groups/fantasticgeekspod | Leave a Voice Message on Anchor: https://anchor.fm/fantasticgeeks | Email: fantasticgeekspod@gmail.com | Tessa: IG: https://www.instagram.com/tessanetting | TT: https://tiktok.com/@tessanetting | TW: https://twitter.com/tessanetting | YT: https://www.youtube.com/tessanetting | Anna: IG: https://www.instagram.com/brizzyvoices | TW: https://twitter.com/brizzyvoices | YT: https://www.youtube.com/brizzyvoices --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/fantasticgeeks/message

Slow Drag with Remedy
92 :: As You Take Your Key

Slow Drag with Remedy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 11:42


Show Notes: ---------------------- Appreciation written, produced, and narrated by Remedy Robinson, MA/MFA Twitter: https://twitter.com/slowdragremedy Email: slowdragwithremedy@gmail.com Podcast music by https://www.fesliyanstudios.com Rate this Podcast: https://ratethispodcast.com/slowdrag ---------------------- References:   Elvis Costello Wiki Resource, “Room with No Number”: http://www.elviscostello.info/wiki/index.php/Room_With_No_Number   “Room with No Number”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dg0XPZVQiso   Purchase “The Most Terrible Time in My Life…Ends Thursday” https://www.amazon.com/Most-Terrible-Time-Life-Thursday-ebook/dp/B07XLXS5PL/ref=sr_1_1?crid=Y4SGCT62WPEK&dchild=1&keywords=the+most+terrible+time+in+my+life+ends+thursday&qid=1608873405&sprefix=The+Most+Terrible+Time+in+%2Caps%2C195&sr=8-1   "Room with No Number" Lyrics: Picture a hotel room Clothes scattered across the floor Covers pulled back from the pillow A sign hung on the door Two lovers locked up tight Through the endless days and nights Hiding something they can't show Something no one else must know   Chorus: There's a room without a number While the sign outside says there's no vacancy As you take your key, they smile at you so understandingly   She cried out in the night Woke the porter from his sleep He grinned slyly to himself As he went to fetch his keys Look what love has brought them to This terrible nightmare His or hers, he could not tell As they were still sleeping there   (Chorus)   And I wish you could be The man he was before he was me (fireworks)   A girl arrived at first light And enquired if they'd been seen And why the numbers ran from twelve Missing out thirteen And they said oh my darling Put it down to superstition Try to avoid a scandal And don't arouse suspicion They re-arranged the furniture They even papered over the door   There's a room without a number While the sign outside says there's no vacancy As you take your key, they smile just so so you know   There's a room without a number While the sign outside says there's no vacancy As you take your key, they smile just so so you know   (Chorus)  

Sports & S#!t
Courtesy Hugs? Toy Hall of Fame, Discontinued Snack Foods, China Hiding Submarines and Much More!

Sports & S#!t

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 38:09


Courtesy Hugs? Toy Hall of Fame, Discontinued Snack Foods, China Hiding Submarines and Much More! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/sportsandshitpod/message

Directly to You
#BuyMetroidDread is Working!

Directly to You

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 118:36


On this week's episode of our weekly Nintendo gaming podcast AJ & Parker discuss their thoughts on Mario Party Superstars, Metroid Dread's October 2021 sales, the 2022 games lineup for Switch so far, Twitch getting a Switch app, Happy Home Paradise, Pokemon controversy and how Pokemon Company handles it, YouTube removing public dislike count, community Q&A, & MORE! Timestamps 0:00 - Housekeeping 1:45 - What We're Playing 26:09 - Great Metroid Dread Sales! & Metroid Prime Remake? 41:40 - 2022 on Switch is looking Swell 54:55 - Twitch is on Nintendo's Hardware with a Rhyming name 57:40 - Happy Home Paradise makes a smort decision & 2.0 is the end! 1:05:55 - Pokemon Balance between fan feedback and creator vision 1:27:25 - Youtube is Hiding the Dislike Count 1:37:42 - More Nintendo DLC coming to NSO? 1:48:45 - Q&A (and cameo from a baby) AJ's last video: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... Parker's last video: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... Watch an Action Point ► https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... ------------------------------------------------------------ Want to be a part of our Community? ------------------------------------------------------------ Subscribe to the new home for our Nintendo gaming podcast Directly to You on YouTube! ➡️http://bit.ly/DTYonYT ------------------------------­------------------------------ Support the Channel! ------------------------------------------------------------ AMAZON SHOP - Buy what you normally would AND support F4! ↘️ https://www.amazon.com/shop/fanatixfour ------------------------------------------------------------ Like Audio Podcasts? ------------------------------------------------------------ LISTEN ON ANCHOR! ➡️ https://anchor.fm/directly-to-you RATE US ON iTUNES! ➡️ https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/d... RATE US ON GOOGLE PLAY! ➡️ https://play.google.com/music/listen#... ------------------------------­------------------------------ Join The Discussion On Social Media ------------------------------------------------------------ ► Twitter - https://twitter.com/FanatixFour ► Aj's Twitter - https://twitter.com/AMcRaeJr ► Parker's Twitter - https://twitter.com/ParkerDeal ► Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/fanatixf ► Instagram - http://www.instagram.com/fanatixfour #directlytoyou #dty #fanatixfour #nintendoswitch --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/dty/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/dty/support

Wine Thirty with Andrew & Lindsey
Car Chases, Spacehey, Kendall Jenner

Wine Thirty with Andrew & Lindsey

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 40:50


**Trigger Warning**This episode does discuss...-Murder/serial killers-Abortion-Prostitution-Sex trafficking Andrew & Lindsey drink a The Wonderful Wine Co. 2019 white wine from Winc and chat about...-Hiding dead bodies-Kendall Jenner's wedding attire-Spacehey-Car chases-Rooting for the bad guyAndrew & Lindsey are currently...WATCHING________________YouSurvivorBachelorette AustraliaPLAYING____________HadesAnimal CrossingTown of SalemBest FiendsLISTENING TO__________________Red (Taylor's Version) - Taylor SwiftNirvanaRockwellAbsofactoMilky ChanceFinal Fantasy VIII SoundtrackREADING______________From the Files of Madison FinnFind the perfect gifts for your loved ones this holiday season and checkout our sponsor for this episode at StanceSupport the show (https://paypal.me/freshethic1)

Speak Truth Without Fear
EP. 47 – What the Biden Admin is hiding from the media at the Border – Jordan Sarmo | Ben Bergquam

Speak Truth Without Fear

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 47:05


Join Jordan, Ross & over one hundred other like minded individuals in the Fearless Community! Click the link below to join and try today for FREE! https://www.speaktruthwithoutfear.com/community/ WEBSITE:  www.speaktruthwithoutfear.com Follow us on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/speaktruthwithoutfear/  https://www.instagram.com/jordansarmo/  

The Dark Web Vlogs
FBI Files - Inter-Dimensional Aliens Are Hiding From Us In Plain Sight!

The Dark Web Vlogs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 9:12


FBI Files - Inter-Dimensional Aliens Are Hiding From Us In Plain Sight!

Two Dudes and a Mic
#180 - YT Hiding Dislikes

Two Dudes and a Mic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 30:52


We discuss performance autopsies, inflation and reasons to move to the EU.

Your Morning Show On-Demand
INTERVIEW: Tom Wilson Has A Secret Hiding Spot For His Stanley Cup Ring

Your Morning Show On-Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 11:09


Turns out that Washington Capitals star Tom Wilson is a huge star of Yellowstone and Squid Game when traveling during the season!Join John, Riley, and Rose as we talk to Wilson about his pre-game routines with T.J. Oshie and how he maintains his facial hair during the season and playoffs. We also find out what Wilson's go-to song choices are when preparing for a game and how often he wears his Stanley Cup ring. Plus what are Wilson's go-to spots in the DMV? All that and more in our interview with Tom Wilson!You can listen to Wilson's entire interview with John, Rose, and Riley below and you can buy tickets to see Wilson play at Capital One Arena throughout the season HERE!

Sports! Sports. Sports?
Episode 216: Hiding Facts! Seeing Double. Playing Dirty?

Sports! Sports. Sports?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 66:07


The two-hundred sixteenth episode, recorded on November 10, 2021. - The NFL Knew About A-Rodg - Is Mac Jones Dirty? - Josh Allen v. Josh Allen - Taunting in the No Fun League And Also: - HOT TATERS Connect with us! FACEBOOK: www.facebook.com/sportssportssportspod/ INSTAGRAM: www.instagram.com/sportssportssportspod/ TWITTER: twitter.com/SportsX3Pod EMAIL: sportssportssportspod@gmail.comA Day Late and a Dollar Short

Mum to Millionaire: Motivation Mindset Mumpreneur Podcast
7: Why ALL Children DON'T Matter! SEND Crisis & Local Authorities Hiding Information From Parents

Mum to Millionaire: Motivation Mindset Mumpreneur Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 52:30


The education system and accessing support for our children is getting worse. Councils are hiding information from parents, breaking them down psychologically and leading them down a path of legal action and tribunals. Today our guest Beth (@beth_tastic on twitter) talks about her battle with the local authority and we have an in-depth discussion about the SEND Crisis (Special Educational Needs and Disability) that has been happening for years. For helpful resources go to http://veenav.com/podcast This is the first time on a podcast I took notes whilst I listened to a guest! I thought I had done all the actions of getting help for my son in his current situation of being abandoned by his current school. After recording this episode, I went on to write some letters to some key people I had previously missed out! --- Go to our Instagram to see all our podcast guests http://instagram.com/mumtomillionaire --- ** The Host Of Mum To Millionaire ** Veena V is a qualified hypnotherapist, helping you achieve confidence in all areas of your life. She's a single mum to a very energetic teenager and is a former award-winning radio presenter and businesswoman. Download your free 'Unstoppable Confidence Meditation' here: https://www.veenav.com/meditation ** Podcast Schedule ** EVERY THURSDAY 'Fight It Thursday' - Highlighting a woman who is currently fighting the system and fighting for justice. Providing you with inspiration to stand up for yourself, reclaim your power and fight. EVERY MONDAY 'Mental Health Monday' - Therapists, counsellors and life coaches supporting you to get through life's challenges with easy-to-implement tools and techniques. Get ready to rewire your subconscious mind and rewrite your story. ** Subscribe To Be Notified Of Upcoming Episodes ** Fighting the educational and legal system is draining, frustrating, and emotional. That's why the Mum To Millionaire Podcast has been designed to support women through the process with free therapy sessions and practical advice from those within the educational sector. Plus, we share inspiring stories of women who fought the system. We cover mental health, family court, failings of the legal system, educational healthcare plans (EHCP), alternative provisions and so much more. My son was excluded 7 times in Year 7 from his secondary school, even though they knew he was a victim of domestic abuse and suffered from severe anxiety. That's why I am so passionate about raising awareness of the negative impact that school exclusions play in the lives of children and why we need to reform to provide ‘education for all'

Dirty Little Secret - The Jubal Show
College Waxing Voyageur is hiding something from her husband in this Dirty Little Secret!

Dirty Little Secret - The Jubal Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 4:35


Dirty Little Secret is when someone calls The Jubal Show with one of their top secrets. No matter how big or dirty the secret is, Jubal Fresh, Alex Fresh and English Evan give the caller an anonymous nickname so no one knows who they are. College Waxing Voyager has a Dirty Little Secret that she's been hiding from her husband for six years! Then The Jubal Show tries to convince her to tell him! Leave a rating and review wherever you listen. It will help the show out in a big way. If that's not your thing, you can find us on social media here:https://instagram.com/thejubalshowhttps://twitter.com/thejubalshowhttps://www.tiktok.com/@thejubalshow

The Joe Show
Christmas Gift Hiding Spot

The Joe Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 6:22


The PJC Cast
Hiding Shorts in the Woods

The PJC Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 42:47


The Bert Show
Davi's Been Hiding Something All Year...And Now She's Ready To Come Clean

The Bert Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 15:06


All year, Davi has been hiding something from us. She was hesitant about telling others what she's experiencing. But now, she's ready to come clean in hopes that her honesty will help others with the same struggle.Listen...  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/the-bert-show.

Restaurant Marketing School
Leveraging Facebook: How to Build a Community That's Hiding in Plain Sight

Restaurant Marketing School

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 4:00


Our communities are made up of the people who love what we love. But how do you build communities without paying an arm and a leg for their data? In this episode, Josh Kopel shares his strategy for leveraging Facebook to reach your people.

UF Health Podcasts
Feline hypertension may be hiding in plain sight

UF Health Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021


Hypertension — or consistently high blood pressure — is a common problem in older…

Neshamos.org Podcast: Stories of Hope and Healing
No Longer Hiding (feat. Rivka Tauber)

Neshamos.org Podcast: Stories of Hope and Healing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 64:15


Rivka Tauber is a writer, Torah educator, and public speaker who grew up in Crown Heights and recently made aliyah to Jerusalem. In this episode, Rivka shares her journey from the challenges of depression and the struggle of finding reasons to live to the wholeness she discovered in her connection with others, her relationship with G-d, in therapy, and so much more along the way. Thank G-d, today, she is free from the obsession over the future and is able to live in the present. Today, she helps others who are struggling and works to show up as her whole self. You can follow Rivka on instagram at instagram.com/rivkamakesaliyah. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/neshamos-podcast/support

The Hard Thing Podcast
Behind What Masks Are You Hiding, Getting Sober | Ep. 124: Simon Chapple.

The Hard Thing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 48:20


Today we discuss hiding from problems and coming to terms with reality. Welcome back to the 124th episode of the Hard Thing Podcast. Today I share my conversation with https://besober.co.uk/ (Simon Chapple). Here are some highlights from today's show: Simon's hardest thing was quitting alcohol and exploring what comes after We talked about the masks we wear and what we hide behind them We talk about how to sober up from alcholol We talk about how long it takes to get sober and how it differs person to person We talked about having a marathon mindset Being willing to try everything is the key Some things work and some don't and you have to find what works We also got some great action items from today's guest: Get out of denial Get 100% clear on your values Build your support group Gather data Thanks for listening to the show. Make sure you subscribe so you never miss an episode. Support the Show:  Patreon donation link:  https://www.patreon.com/thehardthingpodcast (https://www.patreon.com/thehardthingpodcast) Audible (Free Audiobook): audibletrial.com/thehardthingpodcast  Share the podcast with one person who could really use it.  Leave a rating and a review. Subscribe to the podcast so you don't miss any episodes. We are on Google Play, Apple Podcasts, and Spotify.  Buy one of our Shirts or Hoodies https://thehardthingpodcast.com/shop/ (https://thehardthingpodcast.com/shop/) Again thanks so much for listening, and stay tuned for next week. Keep doing Hard Things, and Keep Overcoming Average. This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Podcorn - https://podcorn.com/privacy Support this podcast

The Dave Ramsey Show
My Husband Is Hiding Cash in a Secret Bank Account (Hour 3)

The Dave Ramsey Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 41:12


Debt, Retirement, Investing, Relationships, Home Buying As heard on this episode: Churchill Mortgage: https://bit.ly/2JcfkGy  Bethel Tech: https://bit.ly/2Zvx3Ey Sign up for a FREE trial of Ramsey+ TODAY: https://bit.ly/3rZTUAx Tools to get you started:  Debt Calculator: https://bit.ly/2Q64HME Insurance Coverage Checkup: https://bit.ly/3sXwUn5 Complete Guide to Budgeting: https://bit.ly/3utmVXi Check out more Ramsey Network podcasts: https://bit.ly/3fHhbVE

eleventylife
Episode #126 - Solo Button | Hiding In Us

eleventylife

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 42:18


Matt breaks down the new song Hiding In Us from the new EP Revenge of The Mountain Medley. This audio is taken from the first ever video version of the podcast. You can check out the video here: Solo Button: Hiding in Us Listen to the new EP "Revenge of The Mountain Medley". Rock Candy Studios - Check out other shows on the network or come record with us at the studio. Discord Channel  - Find friends on the Eleventylife Discord Channel.

Turley Talks
Ep. 722 BIDEN HIDING as Democrats COMMIT SUICIDE after HUMILIATING LOSS!!!

Turley Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 13:49


Highlights:   “As of today, Biden is basically in hiding. He made no attempt to speak to reporters upon his return from that disastrous trip to Europe, which was an embarrassment in and of itself. The New York Post went even further, saying that he looked crestfallen upon his return… I'd say he's hiding under his desk, but it doesn't even appear that he's left his bedroom!”“The Democrats are doing everything they can to try to pretend that what happened on Tuesday of this week DIDN'T HAPPEN! It didn't happen, and we know that because they're currently doubling-down on their attempt to get Brandon's Build Back Better fiasco passed.”“The Democrats and their surrogates in the lamestream media are what we call a ‘ruling class'. And a ruling class by definition has no interest in the values and concerns of those it rules!... When it comes to election time, SURE, they give their heart-tugging speeches, they bite their lips telling us they feel our pain, but as we can so plainly see from this week, when we voice our concerns at the ballot box in a way that they don't like, we're insulted, we're mocked, we're dismissed as bigoted bumpkins and racist rubes.”Timestamps:  [03:28] Why Biden is hiding[04:28] Democrats ignoring their losses and how their doubling down on their political agenda[07:39] How the state of Virginia made history and why the MSM ignored Winsome Sears victory speech[10:30] Why the Democrats' recalcitrance will ultimately result in their own demiseResources: Ep. 467 Woke Colleges are CLOSING DOWN PERMANENTLY Throughout the Nation!!!Get your own MyPillow here. Enter my code TURLEY at checkout to get a DISCOUNT: https://www.mypillow.com/JOIN US for our Virtual gathering of New Conservative Patriots on November 12th and 13th and Learn How YOU Can Build a Society FREE from WOKENESS! Register today at http://conferences.turleytalks.com/no...JOIN ME and DONALD TRUMP JR in PHEONIX for the AMERICAN FREEDOM TOUR Nov 19-20! In honor of our 5 years on YouTube, Get 40% OFF Your Registration!!! https://aft.turleytalks.com/phoenixGet Your Brand-New PATRIOT T-Shirts and Merch Here: https://store.turleytalks.com/Become a Turley Talks Insiders Club Member and get the first 7 days FREE!!: https://insidersclub.turleytalks.com/welcomeFight Back Against Big Tech Censorship! Sign-up here to discover Dr. Steve's different social media options …. but without the censorship! https://www.turleytalks.com/en/alternative-media.com Thank you for taking the time to listen to this episode.  If you enjoyed this episode, please subscribe and/or leave a review.Do you want to be a part of the podcast and be our sponsor? Click here to partner with us and defy liberal culture!If you would like to get lots of articles on conservative trends make sure to sign-up for the 'New Conservative Age Rising' Email Alerts. 

The Dave Ramsey Show
My Husband Is Hiding Cash in a Secret Bank Account (Hour 3)

The Dave Ramsey Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 40:20


Debt, Investing, Retirement, Home Buying, Relationships As heard on this episode: Grand Canyon University: https://www.gcu.edu/myoffer Sign up for a FREE trial of Ramsey+ TODAY: https://bit.ly/3rZTUAx Tools to get you started:  Debt Calculator: https://bit.ly/2Q64HME Insurance Coverage Checkup: https://bit.ly/3sXwUn5 Complete Guide to Budgeting: https://bit.ly/3utmVXi Check out more Ramsey Network podcasts: https://bit.ly/3fHhbVE

Real Coffee with Scott Adams
Episode 1551 Scott Adams: Today I Will Talk About the Complete Self-Annihilation of the Democrat Party, Lots More

Real Coffee with Scott Adams

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 57:35


My new book LOSERTHINK, available now on Amazon https://tinyurl.com/rqmjc2a Find my "extra" content on Locals: https://ScottAdams.Locals.com Content: The employee vaccination mandate The Middle Party Natural antibodies, the vaccination, booster shots Hiding behind the definition of CRT Defining CRT versus specifics of what's taught GOP, the "Party of Parents" ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ If you would like to enjoy this same content plus bonus content from Scott Adams, including micro-lessons on lots of useful topics to build your talent stack, please see scottadams.locals.com for full access to that secret treasure. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/scott-adams00/support

Coffee With Scott Adams
Episode 1551 Scott Adams: Today I Will Talk About the Complete Self-Annihilation of the Democrat Party, Lots More

Coffee With Scott Adams

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 57:35


Content: The employee vaccination mandate The Middle Party Natural antibodies, the vaccination, booster shots Hiding behind the definition of CRT Defining CRT versus specifics of what's taught GOP, the “Party of Parents” If you would like to enjoy this same content plus bonus content from Scott Adams, including micro-lessons on lots of useful topics to … The post Episode 1551 Scott Adams: Today I Will Talk About the Complete Self-Annihilation of the Democrat Party, Lots More appeared first on Scott Adams Says.

Stryker & Klein
Klein's Hiding Spot

Stryker & Klein

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 8:38


Klein has many hiding spots in his house. Only problem is, he can't remember where they  are.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.