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Latest podcast episodes about Sri Lanka

The Grade Cricketer
187. Season Finale, with Shane Watson and Chris Rogers

The Grade Cricketer

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 129:11


187. Season Finale, with Shane Watson and Chris Rogers“Every week! Every week!” As we wind down the summer (there's more cricket than ever) we start by exploring this profound quote in light of some more dark club cricket shit, followed by the lightness of Australia's lead over England in the Women's Ashes. Alyssa Healy gets the Women's World Cup on TV, CA says no to Smith, Smith says yes to NFTs, South Africa sweeps India, and England posts the most one-sided one run win against the Windies. Shane Watson is on Zoom and Chris Rogers is in the studio, before we finish it off with AskTGCs about trappings and tubbing at an indoor centre. Thanks for the Australian summer, we'll be back in 3-4 weeks.But not if you're on Patreon! We're storming through, and we've got a special offer for 7 days only. If you join now, we're offering 15% off for an annual subscription - it wraps up at the end of January. Do it, don't do it, but if you do you'll get all the Patreon trappings including every track we've done with Gus Cannon this year.Check out our Patreon for exclusive content every single week at https://www.patreon.com/gradecricketer including #AskTGC Fridays and the exclusive audio from all of our YouTube videos.This episode is brought to you by Budgy Smuggler. You can get free shipping on your order by using the code 'CHAMP' at https://www.budgysmuggler.com.auT20 Stars products are made from one of the best cricket manufacturers in the world and they have cut out the middle person so the cricket gear goes straight from the manufacturer to you.T20 Stars are celebrating a huge week of cricket by giving all TGC listeners 10% off on all bats, balls, gloves and pads. USE THE CODE TGC10 to claim the discount.Free shipping and free returns - visit www.t20stars.comWe're getting behind #nationalbackyardcricket, which supports libraries across regional Australia as well as tertiary education projects in India, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Tanzania, South Africa, Afghanistan and Indonesia. Register your team, and game, to help support these projects. The official day is Sunday 6 Feb, but you can play any time in the lead up. Head to nationalbackyardcricket.com to get in and around it.You can follow The Grade Cricketer on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter:https://www.facebook.com/gradecricketerhttps://www.instagram.com/thegradecricketer/https://twitter.com/gradecricketerThe Grade Cricketer hosts are Ian Higgins and Sam Perry.You can follow them on Instagram and Twitter:Ian Higgins:https://www.instagram.com/higgins_ian/https://twitter.com/1an_HigginsSam Perry:https://www.instagram.com/sj_perry/https://twitter.com/sjjperry

Fazit - Kultur vom Tage - Deutschlandfunk Kultur
Colomboscope-Kunstfestival auf Sri Lanka

Fazit - Kultur vom Tage - Deutschlandfunk Kultur

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2022 6:46


Arend, Ingowww.deutschlandfunkkultur.de, FazitDirekter Link zur Audiodatei

World Business Report
South Africa opens vaccine manufacturing site

World Business Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 26:28


South Africa's President Ramaphosa has opened a vaccine manufacturing site in Cape Town. The BBC's Vumani Mkhize was at the event, and brings us the details. And we get reaction to the development from Thomas Cueni, director general of the International Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers and Associations in Basel. Also in the programme, the vice president of the European Securities and Markets Authority has called for a ban in the European Union on mining of the cryptocurrency Bitcoin, on environmental grounds. Erik Thedeen explains his thinking. Rising food and fuel prices are making daily life tougher for the people of Sri Lanka, and the BBC's Anbarasan Ethirajan reports on the difficulties people in the country face. Plus, less than 10 per cent of trade involving members of the East Africa economic bloc the EAC is currently delivered by rail. Tanzania and Burundi hope to change that and are planning a new rail connection between the two countries. We hear what the countries hope to achieve with the proposal from Nuzulack Dausen, executive editor of the NuktaAfrica news agency in Dar es Salaam.

Midnight Train Podcast
The Shocking History of Execution.

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 122:40


Tonight we are going to tell you a tale. A superb tale. A tale as old as time that takes us from the beginnings of civilization until today. This tale will thrill you and chill you. It may elicit feelings of dread and sadness. It may make you angry.  At times it may make you uneasily laugh like the friend at school that was kicked in the balls but couldn't show his weakness. It's a subject that people continually argue about and debate with savage ferocity. Tonight we are talking about executions! We'll talk about the methods and the reasons behind executions throughout the years. Then we'll talk about some famous executions, as well as some of the more fucked up ones. And by fucked up, we mean botched. Bad stuff. This episode isn't meant to be a debate for or against executions but merely to discuss them and the crazy shit surrounding them. So with all that being said, Let's rock and roll!           Capital punishment has been practiced in the history of virtually all known societies and places. The first established death penalty laws date as far back as the Eighteenth Century B.C. in the Code of King Hammurabi of Babylon, which codified the death penalty for 25 different crimes.  The Code of Hammurabi was one of the earliest and most complete written legal codes and was proclaimed by the Babylonian king Hammurabi, who reigned from 1792 to 1750 B.C. Hammurabi expanded the city-state of Babylon along the Euphrates River to unite all of southern Mesopotamia. The Hammurabi code of laws, a collection of 282 rules, established standards for commercial interactions and set fines and punishments to meet the requirements of justice. Hammurabi's Code was carved onto a massive, finger-shaped black stone stele (pillar) that was looted by invaders and finally rediscovered in 1901. The text, compiled at the end of Hammurabi's reign, is less a proclamation of principles than a collection of legal precedents, set between prose celebrating Hammurabi's just and pious rule. Hammurabi's Code provides some of the earliest examples of the doctrine of “lex talionis,” or the laws of retribution, sometimes better known as “an eye for an eye the greatest soulfly song ever!   The Code of Hammurabi includes many harsh punishments, sometimes demanding the removal of the guilty party's tongue, hands, breasts, eye, or ear. But the code is also one of the earliest examples of an accused person being considered innocent until proven guilty. The 282 laws are all written in an “if-then form.” For example, if a man steals an ox, he must pay back 30 times its value. The laws range from family law to professional contracts and administrative law, often outlining different standards of justice for the three classes of Babylonian society—the propertied class, freedmen, and slaves.   A doctor's fee for curing a severe wound would be ten silver shekels for a gentleman, five shekels for a freedman, and two shekels for a slave. So, it was less expensive when you were a lower-class citizen. Penalties for malpractice followed the same scheme: a doctor who killed a wealthy patient would have his hands cut off, while only financial restitution was required if the victim was a slave. Crazy!   Some examples of the death penalty laws at this time are as follows:         If a man accuses another man and charges him with homicide but cannot bring proof against him, his accuser shall be killed. Holy shit.         If a man breaks into a house, they shall kill him and hang him in front of that same house.          The death penalty was also part of the Hittite Code in the 14th century B.C., but only partially. The most severe offenses typically were punished through enslavement, although crimes of a sexual nature often were punishable by death. The Hittite laws, also known as the Code of the Nesilim, constitute an ancient legal code dating from c. 1650 – 1500 BCE. The Hittite laws were kept in use for roughly 500 years, and many copies show that other than changes in grammar, what might be called the 'original edition' with its apparent disorder, was copied slavishly; no attempt was made to 'tidy up' by placing even apparent afterthoughts in a more appropriate position.    The Draconian constitution, or Draco's code, was a written law code enforced by Draco near the end of the 7th century BC; its composition started around 621BC. It was written in response to the unjust interpretation and modification of oral law by Athenian aristocrats. Aristotle, the chief source for knowledge of Draco, claims that he was the first to write Athenian laws and that Draco established a constitution enfranchising hoplites, the lower class soldiers. The Draconian laws were most noteworthy for their harshness; they were written in blood rather than ink. Death was prescribed for almost all criminal offenses. Solon, who was the magistrate in 594 BCE, later repealed Draco's code and published new laws, retaining only Draco's homicide statutes.   In the 5th century B.C., the Roman Law of the Twelve Tables also contained the death penalty. Death sentences were carried out by such means as beheading, boiling in oil, burying alive, burning, crucifixion, disembowelment, drowning, flaying alive, hanging, impalement, stoning, strangling, being thrown to wild animals, and quartering. We'll talk more about that later. The earliest attempt by the Romans to create a code of law was the Laws of the Twelve Tables. A commission of ten men (Decemviri) was appointed (c. 455 B.C.) to draw up a code of law binding on patrician and plebeian and which consuls would have to enforce. The commission produced enough statutes to fill ten bronze tablets.    Mosaic Law codified many capital crimes. There is evidence that Jews used many different techniques, including stoning, hanging, beheading, crucifixion (copied from the Romans), throwing the criminal from a rock, and sawing asunder. The most infamous execution of history occurred approximately 29 AD with the crucifixion of that one guy, Jesus Christ, outside Jerusalem. About 300 years later, Emperor Constantine, after converting to Christianity, abolished crucifixion and other cruel death penalties in the Roman Empire. In 438, the Code of Theodosius made more than 80 crimes punishable by death.    Britain influenced the colonies more than any other country and has a long history of punishment by death. About 450 BC, the death penalty was often enforced by throwing the condemned into a quagmire, which is not only the character from Family Guy, and another word for dilemma but in this case is a soft boggy area of land. By the 10th Century, hanging from the gallows was the most frequent execution method. William the Conqueror opposed taking life except in war and ordered no person to be hanged or executed for any offense. Nice guy, right? However, he allowed criminals to be mutilated for their crimes.    During the middle ages, capital punishment was accompanied by torture. Most barons had a drowning pit as well as gallows, and they were used for major as well as minor crimes. For example, in 1279, two hundred and eighty-nine Jews were hanged for clipping coins. What the fuck is that you may be wondering. Well, Clipping was taking a small amount of metal off the edge of hand-struck coins. Over time, the precious metal clippings could be saved up and melted into bullion (a lump of precious metal) to be sold or used to make new coins. Under Edward I, two gatekeepers were killed because the city gate had not been closed in time to prevent the escape of an accused murderer. Burning was the punishment for women's high treason, and men were hanged, drawn, and quartered. Beheading was generally accepted for the upper classes. One could be burned to death for marrying a Jew. Pressing became the penalty for those who would not confess to their crimes—the executioner placed heavy weights on the victim's chest until death. On the first day, he gave the victim a small quantity of bread, on the second day a small drink of bad water, and so on until he confessed or died. Under the reign of Henry VIII, the number of those put to death is estimated as high as 72,000. Boiling to death was another penalty approved in 1531, and there are records to show some people cooked for up to two hours before death took them. When a woman was burned, the executioner tied a rope around her neck when she was connected to the stake. When the flames reached her, she could be strangled from outside the ring of fire. However, this often failed, and many were burnt alive.   In Britain, the number of capital offenses continually increased until the 1700's when two hundred and twenty-two crimes were punishable by death. These included stealing from a house for forty shillings, stealing from a shop the value of five shillings, robbing a rabbit warren, cutting down a tree, and counterfeiting tax stamps. However, juries tended not to convict when the penalty was significant, and the crime was not. Reforms began to take place. In 1823, five laws were passed, removing about a hundred crimes from the death penalty. Between 1832 and 1837, many capital offenses were swept away. In 1840, there was a failed attempt to abolish all capital punishment. Through the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, more and more capital punishments were abolished, not only in Britain but also all across Europe; until today, only a few European countries retain the death penalty.   The first recorded execution in the English American colonies was in 1608 when officials executed George Kendall of Virginia for supposedly plotting to betray the British to the Spanish. In 1612, Virginia's governor, Sir Thomas Dale, implemented the Divine, Moral, and Martial Laws that made death the penalty for even minor offenses such as stealing grapes, killing chickens, killing dogs or horses without permission, or trading with Indians. Seven years later, these laws were softened because Virginia feared that no one would settle there. Well, no shit.   In 1622, the first legal execution of a criminal, Daniel Frank, occurred in, of course, Virginia for the crime of theft. Some colonies were very strict in using the death penalty, while others were less so. In Massachusetts Bay Colony, the first execution was in 1630, but the earliest capital statutes did not occur until later. Under the Capital Laws of New England that went into effect between 1636-1647, the death penalty was set forth for pre-meditated murder, sodomy, witchcraft, adultery, idolatry, blasphemy, assault in anger, rape, statutory rape, manstealing, perjury in a capital trial, rebellion, manslaughter, poisoning, and bestiality. A scripture from the Old Testament accompanied early laws. By 1780, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts only recognized seven capital crimes: murder, sodomy, burglary, buggery, arson, rape, and treason. And for those wondering, The Buggery Act of 1533, formally An Act for the punishment of the vice of Buggerie, was an Act of the Parliament of England that was passed during the reign of Henry VIII. It was the country's first civil sodomy law.   The Act defined buggery as an unnatural sexual act against the will of God and Man. This term was later determined by the courts to include only anal penetration and bestiality.   The New York colony instituted the so-called Duke's Laws of 1665. This list of laws directed the death penalty for denial of the true God, pre-meditated murder, killing someone who had no weapon of defense, killing by lying in wait or by poisoning, sodomy, buggery, kidnapping, perjury in a capital trial, traitorous denial of the king's rights or raising arms to resist his authority, conspiracy to invade towns or forts in the colony and striking one's mother or father (upon complaint of both). The two colonies that were more lenient concerning capital punishment were South Jersey and Pennsylvania. In South Jersey, there was no death penalty for any crime, and there were only two crimes, murder, and treason, punishable by death. Way to go, Jersey Raccoons!   Some states were more severe. For example, by 1837, North Carolina required death for the crimes of murder, rape, statutory rape, slave-stealing, stealing banknotes, highway robbery, burglary, arson, castration, buggery, sodomy, bestiality, dueling where death occurs, (and this insidious shit), hiding a slave with intent to free him, taking a free Negro out of state to sell him, bigamy, inciting slaves to rebel, circulating seditious literature among slaves, accessory to murder, robbery, burglary, arson, or mayhem and others. However, North Carolina did not have a state prison and, many said, no suitable alternative to capital punishment. So, instead of building a fucking prison to hold criminals, they just made the penalty for less severe crimes punishable by death. What the shit, North Carolina?!?   The first reforms of the death penalty occurred between 1776-1800. Thomas Jefferson and four others, authorized to undertake a complete revision of Virginia's laws, proposed a law that recommended the death penalty for only treason and murder. After a stormy debate, the legislature defeated the bill by one vote. The writing of European theorists such as Montesquieu, Voltaire, and Bentham had a significant effect on American intellectuals, as did English Quaker prison reformers John Bellers and John Howard.   Organizations were formed in different colonies for the abolition of the death penalty and to relieve poor prison conditions. Dr. Benjamin Rush, a renowned Philadelphia citizen, proposed abolishing capital punishment. William Bradford, Attorney General of Pennsylvania, was ordered to investigate capital punishment. In 1793 he published “An Enquiry How Far the Punishment of Death is Necessary” in Pennsylvania. Bradford strongly insisted that the death penalty be retained but admitted it was useless in preventing certain crimes. He said the death penalty made convictions harder to obtain because in Pennsylvania, and indeed in all states, the death penalty was mandatory. Juries would often not return a guilty verdict because of this fact, which makes sense. In response, in 1794, the Pennsylvania legislature abolished capital punishment for all crimes except murder “in the first degree,” the first time murder had been broken down into “degrees.” In New York, in 1796, the legislature authorized construction of the state's first prison, abolished whipping, and reduced the number of capital offenses from thirteen to two. Virginia and Kentucky passed similar reform bills. Four more states reduced their capital crimes: Vermont in 1797 to three; Maryland in 1810, to four; New Hampshire in 1812, to two and Ohio in 1815 to two. Each of these states built state penitentiaries. A few states went in the opposite direction. Rhode Island restored the death penalty for rape and arson; Massachusetts, New Jersey, and Connecticut raised death crimes from six to ten, including sodomy, maiming, robbery, and forgery. Many southern states made more crimes capital, especially for slaves. Assholes.   The first profound reform era occurred between 1833-1853. Public executions were attacked as cruel. Sometimes tens of thousands of eager viewers would show up to view hangings; local merchants would sell souvenirs and alcohol. Which, I'm not sure if I hate or absolutely love. Fighting and pushing would often break out as people jockeyed for the best view of the hanging or the corpse! Onlookers often cursed the widow or the victim and would try to tear down the scaffold or the rope for keepsakes. Violence and drunkenness often ruled towns far into the night after “justice had been served.” People are fucking weird, dude. Many states enacted laws providing private hangings. Rhode Island (1833), Pennsylvania (1834), New York (1835), Massachusetts (1835), and New Jersey (1835) all abolished public hangings. By 1849, fifteen states were holding private hangings. This move was opposed by many death penalty abolitionists who thought public executions would eventually cause people to cry out against execution itself. For example, in 1835, Maine enacted what was in effect a moratorium on capital punishment after over ten thousand people who watched a hanging had to be restrained by police after they became unruly and began fighting. All felons sentenced to death would have to remain in prison at hard labor and could not be executed until one year had elapsed and then only on the governor's order. No governor ordered an execution under the “Maine Law” for twenty-seven years. Though many states argued the merits of the death penalty, no state went as far as Maine. The most influential reformers were the clergy, of course. Ironically, the small but influential group that opposed the abolitionists was the clergy.    Ok, let's talk about electrocution. Want to know how the electric chair came to be? Well, Electrocution as a method of execution came onto the scene in an implausible manner. Edison Company, with its DC (direct current) electrical systems, began attacking Westinghouse Company and its AC (alternating current) electrical systems as they were pressing for nationwide electrification with alternating current. To show how dangerous AC could be, Edison Company began public demonstrations by electrocuting animals. People reasoned that if electricity could kill animals, it could kill people. In 1888, New York approved the dismantling of its gallows and the building of the nation's first electric chair. It held its first victim, William Kemmler, in 1890, and even though the first electrocution was clumsy at best, other states soon followed the lead.   Between 1917 and 1955, the death penalty abolition movement again slowed. Washington, Arizona, and Oregon in 1919-20 reinstated the death penalty. In 1924, the first execution by cyanide gas took place in Nevada, when Tong war gang murderer Gee Jon became its first victim. Get this shit. The frigging state wanted to secretly pump cyanide gas into Jon's cell at night while he was asleep as a more humanitarian way of carrying out the penalty. Still, technical difficulties prohibited this, and a special “gas chamber” was hastily built. Other concerns developed when less “civilized” methods of execution failed. In 1930, Mrs. Eva Dugan became the first female to be executed by Arizona. The execution was botched when the hangman misjudged the drop, and Mrs. Dugan's head was ripped from her body. More states converted to electric chairs and gas chambers. During this time, abolitionist organizations sprang up all across the country, but they had little effect. Several stormy protests were held against the execution of certain convicted felons, like Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, who were convicted of spying on behalf of the Soviet Union. The couple was convicted of providing top-secret information about radar, sonar, jet propulsion engines, and valuable nuclear weapon designs. At that time, the United States was supposedly the only country with nuclear weapons. Convicted of espionage in 1951, they were executed by the United States federal government in 1953 in the Sing Sing correctional facility in Ossining, New York, becoming the first American civilians to be executed for such charges and the first to receive that penalty during peacetime. However, these protests held little opposition against the death penalty itself. In fact, during the anti-Communist period, with all its fears and hysteria, Texas Governor Allan Shivers seriously suggested that capital punishment be the penalty for membership in the Communist Party.   The movement against capital punishment revived again between 1955 and 1972.   England and Canada completed exhaustive studies which were largely critical of the death penalty, and these were widely circulated in the U.S.  Death row criminals gave their moving accounts of capital punishment in books and films. Convicted robber, kidnapper, and rapist Caryl Chessman, published “Cell 2455 Death Row” and “Trial by Ordeal.” Barbara Graham's story was utilized in the book and movie “I Want to Live!” after her execution. She was executed in the gas chamber at San Quentin Prison on the same day as two convicted accomplices, Jack Santo and Emmett Perkins. All of them were involved in a robbery that led to the murder of an elderly widow.  Television shows were broadcast on the death penalty. Hawaii and Alaska ended capital punishment in 1957, and Delaware did so the following year. Controversy over the death penalty gripped the nation, forcing politicians to take sides. Delaware restored the death penalty in 1961. Michigan abolished capital punishment for treason in 1963. Voters in 1964 abolished the death penalty in Oregon. In 1965 Iowa, New York, West Virginia, and Vermont ended the death penalty. New Mexico abolished the death penalty in 1969.   The controversy over the death penalty continues today. There is a strong movement against lawlessness propelled by citizens' fears of security. Politicians at the national and state levels are taking the floor of legislatures and calling for more frequent death penalties, death penalties for more crimes, and longer prison sentences. Those opposing these moves counter by arguing that harsher sentences do not slow crime and that crime is slightly or the same as in the past. FBI statistics show murders are now up. (For example, 9.3 persons per 100,000 were murdered in 1973, and 9.4 persons per 100,000 were murdered in 1992, and as of today, it's upwards of 14.4 people per 100,000. This upswing might be because of more advanced crime technology, as well as more prominent news and media.   Capital punishment has been completely abolished in all European countries except for Belarus and Russia, which has a moratorium and has not conducted an execution since September 1996. The complete ban on capital punishment is enshrined in the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union (EU). Two widely adopted protocols of the European Convention on Human Rights of the Council of Europe are thus considered a central value. Of all modern European countries, San Marino, Portugal, and the Netherlands were the first to abolish capital punishment, whereas only Belarus still practices capital punishment in some form or another. In 2012, Latvia became the last EU member state to abolish capital punishment in wartime.   Ok, so now let's switch gears from the history of capital punishment and executions in general and get into what we know you beautiful bastards come here for. Let's talk about some methods used throughout the years, and then we'll talk about some famous executions and some fucked and messed up ones.   Methods:   We've discussed a few of these before, but some are so fucked up we're going to discuss them again.   Boiling To Death:   A slow and agonizing punishment, this method traditionally saw the victim gradually lowered — feet-first — into boiling oil, water, or wax (although uses of boiling wine and molten lead have also been recorded).   If the shock of the pain did not render them immediately unconscious, the person would experience the excruciating sensation of their outer layers of skin, utterly destroyed by immersion burns, dissolving right off their body, followed by the complete breakdown of the fatty tissue, boiling away beneath.   Emperor Nero is said to have dispatched thousands of Christians in this manner. At the same time, in the Middle Ages, the primary recipients of the punishment were not killers or rapists but coin forgers, particularly in Germany and the Holy Roman Empire. In Britain, meanwhile, King Henry VIII introduced the practice for executing those who used poison to commit murder.   Shockingly, the practice is believed to have been carried out as recently as 2002, when the government of Uzbekistan, led by Islam Karimov, was alleged to have tortured several suspected terrorists to death by boiling.   The Blood Eagle:   A technique ascribed to ancient Norse warriors, the blood eagle, mixed brutality and poetic imagery that only the Vikings could. First, the victim's back would be hacked open, and the skin ripped apart, exposing the spinal column.   The ribs would then be snapped from the spine and forcibly bent backward until they faced outwards from the body, forming a pair of bloody, shattered eagle's wings. As a horrifying finale, the lungs would then be pulled from the body cavity and coated with stinging salt, causing eventual death by suffocation.   There is some question whether this technique was ever actually used as the only accounts come from Norse literature. Odin did this shit, you know it.   Several scholars claim that the act we know of today is simply a result of poor translating and misunderstands the strong association of the eagle with blood and death in Norse imagery. That said, every account is consistent in that in each case, the victim is a nobleman being punished for murdering his father.   The good news for any poor soul who might have suffered this brutal death? The agony and blood loss from the initial wounds would probably have caused them to pass out long before the lungs were removed from their bodies.    Impalement:   Most famously used by Vlad the Impaler, 15th-century ruler of Wallachia (in present-day Romania) and inspiration for Count Dracula, the act of impalement has a long, grim history. While images tend to depict people skewered through the midsection and then held aloft — in a manner that would almost certainly bring about a rapid death — the actual process was a much longer, horrifically drawn-out ordeal.   Traditionally, the stake would be partially sharpened and planted, point up, in the ground. The victim would then be placed over the spike as it was inserted partway into the rectum or vagina.   As their body weight dragged them further onto the pole, the semi-greased wooden stake would force its way up through their body, piercing organs with agonizing slowness as it eventually penetrated the entire torso, finally tearing an exit wound through the skin of the shoulder, neck or throat. Holy shishkabob. Or bill. Or Karen.   The earliest records of the torture come from 1772 B.C. in Babylon, where the aforementioned King Hammurabi ordered a woman be executed in this way for killing her husband. But its use continued until as recently as the 20th century when the Ottoman government employed the technique during the Armenian genocide of 1915-1923. Which is super fucked up.   According to some accounts, it could take the victim — exposed, bleeding, and writhing in tormented agony — as long as eight whole days to die. Oh my hell!   Keelhauling:   Walking the plank might not be the most pleasant of deaths, but it seems moderately more humane than the other favored maritime punishment of keelhauling.   A punishment that often ended in death due to the severity of the wounds sustained (or was simply carried out until the point of death), it saw the victim, legs weighted and suspended from a rope, dropped from the bow of the ship, and then rapidly pulled underwater along the length of the hull — and over the keel (the beam that runs longitudinally down the center of the underside to the stern.   In the age of old, old wooden sailing ships, the hull of a vessel would generally be coated in a thick layer of barnacles, whose shells could be rock hard and razor-sharp.   As the drowning sailor was yanked relentlessly through the saltwater, these barnacles would strip the skin from his body, gouging out raw chunks of flesh and even, by some accounts, tearing off whole limbs or severing the head.   If the sailor was still alive, they might be hung from the mast for 15 minutes before going in again. In some cases, the victim would have an oil-soaked sponge — containing a breath of air — stuffed into their mouth to prevent a “merciful” drowning.   Employed mainly by the Dutch and the French from the 1500s until it was abolished in 1853, accounts of its use date back to Greece in 800 B.C.   The Roman Candle:   Many of the worst execution methods ever devised involve fire — from burning witches at stake in medieval Britain to roasting criminals alive in the hot metal insides of the brazen bull in Ancient Greece — but few match the sheer lack of humanity as the Roman Candle.   A rumored favorite of the mad Roman Emperor Nero, this method saw the subject tied to a stake and smeared with flammable pitch (tree or plant resin), then set ablaze, slowly burning to death from the feet up.   What sets this above the many other similar methods is that the victims were sometimes lined up outside to provide the lighting for one of Nero's evening parties.   Being Hanged, Drawn, And Quartered:   First recorded in England during the 13th century, this unusually extreme — even for the time — mode of execution was made the statutory punishment for treason in 1351. Though it was intended to be an act of such barbarous severity that no one would ever risk committing a treasonous act, there were nevertheless plenty of recipients over the next 500 years.   The process of being hanged, drawn, and quartered began with the victim being dragged to the site of execution while strapped to a wooden panel, which was in turn tied to a horse.   They would then experience a slow hanging, in which, rather than being dropped to the traditional quick death of a broken neck, they would instead be left to choke horribly as the rope tore up the skin of their throat, their body weight dragging them downwards.   Some had the good fortune to die at this stage, including the infamous Gunpowder Plot conspirator Guy Fawkes, who ensured a faster death by leaping from the gallows.   Once half-strangled, the drawing would begin. The victim would be strapped down and then slowly disemboweled, their stomachs sliced open, and their intestines and other significant organs hacked apart and pulled — “drawn” — from the body.   The genitals would often be mutilated and ripped from between their legs. Those unlucky enough to still be alive at this point might witness their organs burned in front of them before they were finally decapitated.   Once death had finally claimed them, the recipient's body would be carved into four pieces — or “quartered” — and the parts sent to prominent areas of the country as a warning to others.   The head would often be taken to the infamous Tower of London, where it would be impaled on a spike and placed on the walls “for the mockery of London.”   Rat Torture:   As recently depicted in that horrible show, Game Of Thrones, rat torture is ingenious in its disgusting simplicity. In its most basic form, a bucket containing live rats is placed on the exposed torso of the victim, and heat is applied to the base of the bucket.   The rats, crazy with fear from the heat, tear and gnaw their way into the abdomen of the victim, clawing and ripping through skin, flesh, organs, and intestines in their quest to escape.   Possessing the most powerful biting and chewing motion of any rodent, rats can make short work of a human stomach. Along with the unimaginable pain, the victim would also suffer the sick horror of feeling the large, filthy creatures writhing around inside their guts as they died.   While associated with Elizabethan England — where the Tower of London was said to have housed a “Dungeon of Rats,” a pitch-black room below high watermark that would draw in rats from the River Thames to torment the room's inhabitants — the practice has been used far more recently.   General Pinochet is said to have employed the technique during his dictatorship of Chile (1973-1990), while reports from Argentina during the National Reorganization Process in the late 1970s and early '80s claimed victims were subjected to a version in which live rats — or sometimes spiders — were inserted into the subject's body via a tube in the rectum or vagina….yep.   Bamboo Torture   Forcing thin shards of bamboo under the fingernails has long been cited as an interrogation method, but bamboo has been used to creatively — and slowly — execute a person, too. Allegedly used by the Japanese on American prisoners of war, it saw the victim tied down to a frame over a patch of newly sprouting bamboo plants.   One of the fastest-growing plants in the world, capable of up to three feet of growth in 24 hours, the sharp-tipped plants would slowly pierce the victim's skin — and then continue to grow. The result was death by gradual, continuous, multiple impalements, the equivalent of being dropped on a bed of sharpened stakes in terrible slow motion.   Despite the practice having roots in the former areas of Ceylon (now Sri Lanka) and Siam (now Thailand) in the 19th century, there are no proven instances of it being used during WWII.   It's certainly possible, however, and it has been shown that the technique, among the worst execution methods ever, works: A 2008 episode of MythBusters found that bamboo was capable of penetrating a human-sized lump of ballistic gelatin over three days.   https://m.imdb.com/list/ls059738828/

new york canada japanese europe fighting american thailand man greece god history tower french spanish live oregon england british european human rights germany hawaii council burning babylon dc dungeon alaska united states vermont roman empire russia death washington public act arizona holy fbi maine north carolina pennsylvania new england philadelphia massachusetts west virginia middle ages netherlands delaware maryland new mexico rhode island connecticut romans norse new jersey bc ohio dutch portugal iowa michigan nevada wwii violence count dracula indians code new hampshire christians politicians argentina mrs controversy assholes ironically game of thrones commonwealth kentucky trial parliament european union divine rock and roll rats christianity ancient greece draco ac punishment britain chile soviet union henry viii family guy san marino armenian sri lanka death row jews voltaire bce roman law aristotle romania king henry viii boiling dugan execution old testament jesus christ moral conqueror shocking vikings jerusalem drawn san quentin prison wallachia communists ethel rosenberg vlad impaler european union eu laws ordeal athenian nero thomas jefferson belarus tong bradford european convention juries fundamental rights pressing latvia convicted allegedly siam ottoman voters reforms charter mythbusters montesquieu mesopotamia onlookers attorney general sing sing solon gunpowder plot draconian electrocution elizabethan england communist party holy roman empire guy fawkes south jersey english american babylonians ceylon bentham clipping river thames uzbekistan emperor constantine penalties roman candle john howard william bradford ossining beheadings islam karimov benjamin rush hammurabi euphrates river hittite theodosius twelve tables english quaker
Marketplace Morning Report
Global oil prices hit their highest level in more than seven years

Marketplace Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 9:53


From the BBC World Service: The crude oil price spike is tied to rising geopolitical risks, with concerns over a Russian invasion of Ukraine and supply disruptions in the United Arab Emirates after a deadly drone attack. Plus, at the virtual Davos summit, Chinese President Xi Xinping defended his common prosperity strategy. And, concerns over China’s influence at Sri Lanka’s new port city development.

Marketplace All-in-One
Global oil prices hit their highest level in more than seven years

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 9:53


From the BBC World Service: The crude oil price spike is tied to rising geopolitical risks, with concerns over a Russian invasion of Ukraine and supply disruptions in the United Arab Emirates after a deadly drone attack. Plus, at the virtual Davos summit, Chinese President Xi Jinping defended his common prosperity strategy. And, concerns over China’s influence at Sri Lanka’s new port city development.

The Grade Cricketer
186. 4-0, with Simon Katich & Phil Walker

The Grade Cricketer

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 105:23


The men's Ashes is over and we're all a bit sad, angry, pissed off, drunk and other visceral emotions. Cam Green's tall isn't he? Phil Walker dials in from The UK to give us some very visceral and poetic minutes. Kohli steps down as captain after not being reprimanded. The Big Bash is a domestic T20 League in Australia. The Under 19 World Cup is on and Higgos is living out his dream of batting 3 for Australia. Simon Katich is on to discuss playing with Usman at Randwick-Petersham and the future of coaching. #AskTGC asks what the point of any of this is. Check out our Patreon for exclusive content every single week at https://www.patreon.com/gradecricketer including #AskTGC Fridays and the exclusive audio from all of our YouTube videos - specifically our daily reactions to every day's play during The Ashes and The South Africa v India Test series.This episode is brought to you by Budgy Smuggler. You can get free shipping on your order by using the code 'CHAMP' at https://www.budgysmuggler.com.auT20 Stars products are made from one of the best cricket manufacturers in the world and they have cut out the middle person so the cricket gear goes straight from the manufacturer to you.T20 Stars are celebrating a huge week of cricket by giving all TGC listeners 10% off on all bats, balls, gloves and pads. USE THE CODE TGC10 to claim the discount.Free shipping and free returns - visit www.t20stars.comWe're getting behind #nationalbackyardcricket, which supports libraries across regional Australia as well as tertiary education projects in India, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Tanzania, South Africa, Afghanistan and Indonesia. Register your team, and game, to help support these projects. The official day is Sunday 6 Feb, but you can play any time in the lead up. Head to nationalbackyardcricket.com to get in and around it.You can follow The Grade Cricketer on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter:https://www.facebook.com/gradecricketerhttps://www.instagram.com/thegradecricketer/https://twitter.com/gradecricketerThe Grade Cricketer hosts are Ian Higgins and Sam Perry.You can follow them on Instagram and Twitter:Ian Higgins:https://www.instagram.com/higgins_ian/https://twitter.com/1an_HigginsSam Perry:https://www.instagram.com/sj_perry/https://twitter.com/sjjperry

Marketplace All-in-One
France teachers strike over changing COVID rules

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 7:16


From the BBC World Service: Fed up with inconsistency around COVID rules, French teachers stage the biggest education strike in decades. Plus: Indonesia resumes thermal-coal exports, and a look at how people in Sri Lanka are dealing with an economic crisis pushing up the cost of food and fuel.

Marketplace Morning Report
France teachers strike over changing COVID rules

Marketplace Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 7:16


From the BBC World Service: Fed up with inconsistency around COVID rules, French teachers stage the biggest education strike in decades. Plus: Indonesia resumes thermal-coal exports, and a look at how people in Sri Lanka are dealing with an economic crisis pushing up the cost of food and fuel.

Revival Center
Revival Talks Ep. 67 Missions in Southern Asia with Pastor Michael D.

Revival Center

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 52:40


As we move into January, we at the Revival Center focus on Missions and start off our year oriented toward reaching the lost. In this episode Pastor Devon sits down with Pastor Michael D. who is the former superintendent of Sri Lanka and works with missions in countries all across Southern Asia. They talk about the need for mission, the life of the church in Sri Lanka, and achieving the Great Commission. Revival Talks is a series of discussions where staff from our church and members of our community sit down and talk about various topics in light of what is going on in our church, our community, and our world.For more information about our church visit us on our website or our Facebook pageWebsite: http://revivalcenterag.comFacebook: http://facebook.com/revivalcenterag

Thale-Harate Kannada Podcast
ಕಲೆ-ತಪಸ್ಸು-ಕಾಣ್ಕೆ. The Legacy of Ananda Coomaraswamy ft. Surya Prakash BS

Thale-Harate Kannada Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 58:45


ನಿರೂಪಕ ಸೂರ್ಯ ಪ್ರಕಾಶ್ ಅವರು ವಿದ್ವಾಂಸ ಆನಂದ ಕುಮಾರಸ್ವಾಮಿಯವರು ಭಾರತೀಯ ಸಂಸ್ಕೃತಿ, ದರ್ಶನಗಳು, ಮತ್ತು ಕಲೆಯ ಬಗೆಗಿನ ಆಳವಾದ ಚಿಂತನೆಗಳು ಹಾಗು ಅವರ ಕೊಡುಗೆಗಳ ಬಗ್ಗೆ ಮಾತನಾಡುತ್ತಾರೆ.Host Surya Prakash talks about the legacy and the contributions of polymath Ananda Coomaraswamy on understanding and appreciating philosophies, cultures, and art from the Indian subcontinent.Announcement! You can now watch new Thale-Harate episodes on YouTube with video! Visit https://ivm.today/haratevideo to see all Thale-Harate video episodes.ಸೂರ್ಯ ಪ್ರಕಾಶ್ ಅವರು ನಮ್ಮ ತಲೆ-ಹರಟೆ ಕನ್ನಡ ಪಾಡ್ಕಾಸ್ಟ್ ನ 126ನೆ ಸಂಚಿಕೆಯಲ್ಲಿ ಪವನ್ ಶ್ರೀನಾಥ್ ಅವರೊಂದಿಗೆ ಅನಂದ ಕುಮಾರಸ್ವಾಮಿಯವರ ಕೊಡುಗೆಗಳು ಹಾಗು ಅದರಿಂದ ಕಲೆತ ವಿಷಯಗಳನ್ನು ಹಂಚಿಕೊಳ್ಳುತ್ತಾರೆ. ಕುಮಾರಸ್ವಾಮಿಯವರ ಕೃತಿಗಳಲ್ಲಿ ಕಾಣಸಿಗುವ ಪ್ರಮುಖ ವಿಚಾರಗಳು ಮತ್ತು ಪರಿಕಲ್ಪನೆಗಳನ್ನು ಸಾಧಾರವಾಗಿ ತಿಳಿಸುತ್ತಾರೆ. ಬನ್ನಿ ಕೇಳಿ!Ananda Kentish Muthu Coomaraswamy (1877-1947) is a Sri Lanka-born scholar, thinker, art historian and philosopher. He interpreted and communicated Indian art, philosophy, texts, and traditions to Western and Global audiences. A peer of Rabindranath Tagore and other Indian thinkers, Coomaraswamy also contributed to the Swadeshi movement and made important academic contributions to the understanding of Indian and Eastern philosophies, art and traditions. His views are said to belong to the school of Perennial Philosophy or Philosophia perennis.On Episode 126 of the Thale-Harate Kannada Podcast, Surya Prakash talks to Pavan Srinath about his personal appreciation and learnings from Coomaraswamy's works, which he has been reading and learning from over the past 15 years. Surya shares important ideas and concepts from Coomaraswamy's works, and illustrates it with examples drawn from his work from phases of Coomaraswamy's life.Related Links:- Article: Ananda Coomaraswamy and his century-long legacy by Janik Sittampalam- The Dance of Siva - Fourteen Indian Essays by Ananda Coomaraswamy [Free PDF link] [Amazon ebook & book]- More writings by Ananda Coomaraswamy on The Internet Archive.Related Episodes:- ಓರಿಯೆಂಟಲಿಸಂ ಮತ್ತು ಸಮಾಜ ಶಾಸ್ತ್ರಗಳು. Orientalism and the Social Sciences (with Vivek Dhareshwar)- ಸಂಪ್ರದಾಯ ಮತ್ತು ಸುಧಾರಣೆ. Tradition and Reform (with AP Ashwin Kumar)ಫಾಲೋ ಮಾಡಿ. Follow the Thalé-Haraté Kannada Podcast @haratepod. Facebook: https://facebook.com/HaratePod/ , Twitter: https://twitter.com/HaratePod/ and Instagram: https://instagram.com/haratepod/ .ಈಮೇಲ್ ಕಳಿಸಿ, send us an email at haratepod@gmail.com or send a tweet and tell us what you think of the show!You can listen to this show and other awesome shows on the new and improved IVM Podcast App on Android: https://ivm.today/android or iOS: https://ivm.today/ios and check out our website at https://ivmpodcasts.com/ .You can also listen to the podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Gaana, Amazon Music Podcasts, JioSaavn, Castbox, or any other podcast app. We also have some video episodes up on YouTube! ಬನ್ನಿ ಕೇಳಿ!

Parenting for the Future
Nurturing the Kindness Superpower: A conversation with Nadine Fonseca

Parenting for the Future

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 38:49


Nadine Fonseca is mother to four children and founder and Chief Executive Officer of Mighty Kind Kids  which publishes the amazing Mighty Kind Magazine. The magazine is a quarterly, anti-biased children's series that celebrates the role of kindness and compassion as the foundation for anti-biased learning and in bringing the human family closer together. Each issue is based on the premise that kindness, empathy, and compassion are teachable skills and readers learn fun facts about the world we share, read stories about kids doing good, and get actionable ideas for service and volunteer work. Mighty Kind has reached almost all 50 US states, as well as Mexico, Canada, Sri Lanka, France, Egypt, England, Ireland, Slovenia, Japan, and Finland. She joins us on Parenting for the Future to talk about how Mighty Kind is building a global community of kids who care and serving as an indispensable resource to the parents and adults who mentor and raise them.

Ali on the Run Show
466. Hiruni Wijayaratne, South Asia's Fastest Marathoner

Ali on the Run Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 71:51


“I feel like I'm in love again with the process of waking up early, putting my shoes on, bundling up, and going for a run. It doesn't feel quite easy or fun all the time yet, but I'm definitely in love with the process again.” For most professional athletes, a day in the life includes running, eating, recovering, napping, resting, running again, eating again, and sleeping. But for Hiruni Wijayaratne — the 11-time Sri Lankan record holder in distances from the 5,000 meters to the marathon, and the fastest female marathoner in South Asia — running has to happen before or after her other jobs. Hiruni lives in Colorado, where she works full-time in the tech industry, coaches with Runcoach, and trains at an elite level under the coaching of Ric Rojas. On this episode, Hiruni talks about her years-long quest to qualify for Sri Lanka's Olympic marathon team, and what it's been like to fall short of that goal and break her mind, body, and spirit in the process. She talks about her struggles over the past few years, and about clawing her way back to loving running again. Most recently, Hiruni ran the California International Marathon (with training partner Nell Rojas!), where she earned her second-fastest marathon time, finishing in 2:34:22. But the road to the CIM start line wasn't easy, and today Hiruni is here to talk about what it means to bet on yourself — and how she's learned to do it. SPONSOR: The WineShine Half Marathon — Register today for the inaugural event, happening July 16, 2022. See you in Napa! What you'll get on this episode: What it was like being in the Boulder area during the massive fires in December (4:10) All about Hiruni's recent wedding! (11:15) What Hiruni's job is like, what it entails, and when she runs (13:00) All about those 12 seconds at CIM (16:45) The road to CIM (18:20) What Hiruni's relationship with running is like now (23:40) Hiruni's high point in CIM training (28:00) Hiruni's CIM goals (32:30) How CIM played out for Hiruni (41:35) How Hiruni learned to bet on herself (51:50) On goal setting in the new year (58:15) Check out: Nell Rojas on Episode 434 of the Ali on the Run Show Nell Rojas on Episode 431 of the Ali on the Run Show Nell Rojas on Episode 229 of the Ali on the Run Show Follow Hiruni: Instagram @hiruni_w Follow Ali: Instagram @aliontherun1 Join the Facebook group Twitter @aliontherun1 Support on Patreon Blog Strava Listen & Subscribe: Apple Podcasts Spotify SoundCloud Overcast Stitcher Google Play SUPPORT the Ali on the Run Show! If you're enjoying the show, please subscribe and leave a rating and review on Apple Podcasts. Spread the run love. And if you liked this episode, share it with your friends!

World Business Report
Sri Lanka seeks China debt restructure

World Business Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 26:27


President Rajapaksa of Sri Lanka has asked China to restructure its debt repayments. Deshal de Mel is an economist at Verite Research, and tells us how Sri Lanka built up more than $5bn in loans from China for roads, ports and an airport over the past decade. Also in the programme, the Norwegian fertiliser giant Yara International will stop buying potash from Belarus by the end of April, due to the impact of international sanctions on the country. Hanna Liubakova is a Belarusian journalist currently in exile, and explains the significance of the potash industry to Belarus. The BBC's Laurence Knight explores the potential for psychedelic drugs in the treatment of mental health conditions. Plus, our regular workplace commentator Stephanie Hare considers the prospects for a "basic income for the arts" scheme being introduced in Ireland, which will involve a minimum income being paid to several thousand people working in the sector. Today's edition is presented by Rob Young, and produced by Joshua Thorpe and George Thomas.

The Grade Cricketer
185. 3-0 Still, with Nick Larkin & Barney Ronay

The Grade Cricketer

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 118:22


Check out our Patreon for exclusive content every single week at https://www.patreon.com/gradecricketer including #AskTGC Fridays and the exclusive audio from all of our YouTube videos - specifically our daily reactions to every day's play during The Ashes and The South Africa v India Test series.This episode is brought to you by Budgy Smuggler. You can get free shipping on your order by using the code 'CHAMP' at https://www.budgysmuggler.com.auT20 Stars products are made from one of the best cricket manufacturers in the world and they have cut out the middle person so the cricket gear goes straight from the manufacturer to you.T20 Stars are celebrating a huge week of cricket by giving all TGC listeners 10% off on all bats, balls, gloves and pads. USE THE CODE TGC10 to claim the discount.Free shipping and free returns - visit www.t20stars.comWe're getting behind #nationalbackyardcricket, which supports libraries across regional Australia as well as tertiary education projects in India, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Tanzania, South Africa, Afghanistan and Indonesia. Register your team, and game, to help support these projects. The official day is Sunday 6 Feb, but you can play any time in the lead up. Head to nationalbackyardcricket.com to get in and around it.You can follow The Grade Cricketer on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter:https://www.facebook.com/gradecricketerhttps://www.instagram.com/thegradecricketer/https://twitter.com/gradecricketerThe Grade Cricketer hosts are Ian Higgins and Sam Perry.You can follow them on Instagram and Twitter:Ian Higgins:https://www.instagram.com/higgins_ian/https://twitter.com/1an_HigginsSam Perry:https://www.instagram.com/sj_perry/https://twitter.com/sjjperry

The Radio Vagabond
219 INTERVIEW: Travel Blogger Legend, Travel Dave UK

The Radio Vagabond

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022 32:51


I met up with my old friend Dave Brett in November, when we were both visiting World Travel Market in London. Dave is a solo adventure travel blogger and we've met several times here and on conferences around the world. We even went on a press trip together to Sri Lanka a few years ago – you might remember him singing on the bus in one of the episodes from there. So, it was about time we sat down and recorded a chat about travelling and how he works as a travel writer. Read his blog post from the slow train trip in the Pyrenees that Dave talks about in this episode – and see the YouTube video he made on that trip. Be sure to check out Dave's Blog, Travel Dave UK where he's travelling the world, one adventure at a time. His globe-trotting adventure travel blog featuring travel tips and advice, travel stories, travel videos and travel photography that will inspire your next trip abroad, and help you plan it too. To read more, please visit his ”About Travel Dave Page”. Follow Travel Dave UK on social media: Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

RN Breakfast - Separate stories podcast
Cricket Australia face backlash amid abuse allegations

RN Breakfast - Separate stories podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 6:20


Cricket Australia is under fire for its handling of a sexual abuse complaint made by former Australian Under 19 player, Jamie Mitchell. The Australian Federal Police are investigating allegations that the player was sexually assaulted while on a tour of Sri Lanka in 1985.

Perko's Podcast
Perko's Podcast Episode 032, Part Two: Creating a Life Manifesto w/ Sidhara Udalagama

Perko's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 31:58


Welcome back to Perko's Podcast!Well, today on the podcast we are doing something a little bit different than we would usually do. Part of what I do beyond recording podcasts is coaching leaders through various exercises that help them to reach their goals without losing their souls. My friend Sidhara Udalagama was kind enough to let me facilitate one of these exercises for her called a Life Manifesto. A life manifesto is the exercise of prayer and thought to develop wording around how you want to live your one and only life. I thought that since we are approaching a new year when most of us typically evaluate and set goals for the next 365 days that this would be a great exercise to share with you. My friend Sid is an amazing speaker, creative and corporate consultant. Sid grew up in Sri Lanka but spent her adult years in England working in full time ministry after graduating with an MSc in Occupational Psychology.  Sid is currently working with Compassion Australia which is a fantastic organisation and you will hear more about her work shortly.Sid is passionate about people fulfilling their God given potential in this world and becoming all that they were created to be. Both her roles in the church and corporate world enable her to outwork this passion. She is a powerful and gifted communicator of God's Word and loves that the Bible has the power to change lives.Sidhara is married to her husband Dev and enjoys eating, traveling the world and repeating those two things... preferably together.Contact Jason:hello@jasonperkoperkins.comInstagram: @jasonperkoperkinsTwitter: @perkosplaceFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/jasonperkoperkins/https://linktr.ee/jasonperkoperkinsIf you like what you hear, feel free to share this episode with a friend! We would also love if you would share this episode on your social media and tag us so we can connect with you or leave a review!We want to continue to bring you content that will help you reach your strategic goals without losing your soul for years to come.

Tous les cinémas du monde
Une histoire à soi, ou les enjeux et les douleurs de l'adoption internationale

Tous les cinémas du monde

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 48:30


Ils s'appellent Justine, Mathieu, Nicolas ou Céline et Anne-Charlotte. Mais dans une autre vie, pendant ne serait-ce que quelques mois, ils ont été nommés Joohee, Matheus, Niyongira ou Chandralatha dans leur pays d'origine, la Corée du Sud, le Brésil, le Rwanda ou le Sri Lanka. Un film documentaire, Une histoire à soi, donne à entendre les témoignages, les parcours de vie parfois chaotiques et douloureux de cinq personnes adoptées en France. Que racontent ces destins de l'importance de connaître ses origines, son histoire, des rapports Nord-Sud aussi ? C'est ce que nous explorons avec la réalisatrice Amandine Gay. Quatre ans après son premier long métrage «Ouvrir la voix», dans lequel elle donnait la parole à 24 femmes afro-descendantes, la documentariste revient donc avec un sujet qu'elle aborde de la même façon sous un angle novateur.    À l'affiche également de notre émission cette semaine, nous feuilletons le petit journal du cinéma avec Elisabeth Lequeret, et nous allons à Haïti où notre correspondante Amélie Baron a pu rencontrer la réalisatrice Gessica Geneus qui portera les couleurs de son pays au festival de Cannes.

SBS Tamil - SBS தமிழ்
Focus: Sri Lanka - தமிழ் பேசும் மக்களின் கட்சிகளின் கூட்டு ஆவண வரைபில் மீள் திருத்தம்

SBS Tamil - SBS தமிழ்

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 5:30


Mathivaanan, our correspondent in Sri Lanka, compiled a report focusing on major events/news in North & East / Sri Lanka. - தமிழ் பேசும் மக்களின் அரசியல் கட்சிகள் ஒன்றிணைந்து, தமது அரசியல் தீர்வு உள்ளிட்ட பிரச்சினைகளுக்கு தீர்வு காணும் நோக்கில் இலங்கை அரசாங்கத்துக்கு அழுத்தம் வழங்குமாறு வலியுறுத்தி, இந்திய பிரதமருக்கு அனுப்புவதற்கு ஏற்கனவே தயாரிக்கப்பட்ட  வரைபில் குறிப்பிடப்பட்ட சில விடயங்களில்  கட்சித் தலைவர்களில் சிலர் உடன்படாத நிலையில் அது மீள் திருத்தம் செய்யப்பட்டுள்ளது. இந்நிலையில் தற்போது அதனை ஏற்றுக்கொள்ள இலங்கை தமிழரசுக்கட்சி மறுத்துள்ளது. இதுபற்றிய கூடுதல் விவரங்களுடன் இணைகிறார் நமது இலங்கைச் செய்தியாளர் மதிவாணன்.

The Grade Cricketer
184. Omicron Here Now, with Steve O'Keefe

The Grade Cricketer

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 87:43


Higgos and Pez have COVID. Was it worth it? Probably. The fallout from the MCG continues and there are still 2 Tests to go. Should Joe Root be captain? Does it matter? Will Scott Boland ever play again? Probably yes. Will Swepson play? Probably yes. Will the SCG spin? When was cricket good? Quinton de Kock has retired from Tests, so will this mean the end of civilised society? Hey, Devon Conway scored some more runs. He's good. Check out our Patreon for exclusive content every single week at https://www.patreon.com/gradecricketer including #AskTGC Fridays and the exclusive audio from all of our YouTube videos - specifically our daily reactions to every day's play during The Ashes and The South Africa v India Test series.This episode is brought to you by Budgy Smuggler. You can get free shipping on your order by using the code 'CHAMP' at https://www.budgysmuggler.com.auT20 Stars products are made from one of the best cricket manufacturers in the world and they have cut out the middle person so the cricket gear goes straight from the manufacturer to you.T20 Stars are celebrating a huge week of cricket by giving all TGC listeners 10% off on all bats, balls, gloves and pads. USE THE CODE TGC10 to claim the discount.Free shipping and free returns - visit www.t20stars.comWe're getting behind #nationalbackyardcricket, which supports libraries across regional Australia as well as tertiary education projects in India, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Tanzania, South Africa, Afghanistan and Indonesia. Register your team, and game, to help support these projects. The official day is Sunday 6 Feb, but you can play any time in the lead up. Head to nationalbackyardcricket.com to get in and around it.You can follow The Grade Cricketer on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter:https://www.facebook.com/gradecricketerhttps://www.instagram.com/thegradecricketer/https://twitter.com/gradecricketerThe Grade Cricketer hosts are Ian Higgins and Sam Perry.You can follow them on Instagram and Twitter:Ian Higgins:https://www.instagram.com/higgins_ian/https://twitter.com/1an_HigginsSam Perry:https://www.instagram.com/sj_perry/https://twitter.com/sjjperry

SBS Sinhala - SBS සිංහල වැඩසටහන
News Highlights from Sri Lanka: The true story of what the Central Bank did and did not say to save Sri Lanka from the dollar deficit - ශ්‍රී ලාංකීය පුවත් විමසුම: ශ්‍රී ලංකාව ඩොලර්

SBS Sinhala - SBS සිංහල වැඩසටහන

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 15:00


SBS Sinhala radio brings you the most prominent news highlights of Sri Lanka in this featured current affairs segment. - සවන්දෙන්න ගෙවීගිය සතියේ ශ්‍රී ලංකාවෙන් වාර්තා වුනු නවතම පුවත් වල ඇතුලාන්ත තොරතුරු SBS සිංහල සේවයේ සෑම සඳුදා දිනකම ගෙනෙන 'සතියේ ශ්‍රී ලාංකික පුවත් විමසුමෙන්"

Movement By Lara: Redefining Yoga
492. Using Daily Rituals To Take Your Yoga Practice Deeper with Kori Hahn

Movement By Lara: Redefining Yoga

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 34:16


When Kori Hahn was twenty, she packed up everything she owned – which wasn't much – and drove nonstop for seven days, ending up in Alaska. She lived off-grid and made her own way through life, which gave her a lifelong taste for living mindfully and slowing down. From there, she began to travel extensively, leading her to Sri Lanka as of this conversation.Kori wanted to prove to the yogis of the world the importance of intuition. Rooted in that driving idea, she dove into the pursuit of writing a book, Rituals of the Soul. Through that process, she learned to redefine, for herself, what yoga is, and what it means to her.She joins the podcast to share how you can use the eight principles of yoga to live a more balanced, meaningful life while cultivating a deeper connection to purpose.To learn more, and for the complete show notes, visit: lytyoga.com/blog/category/podcasts/Resources:santoshasociety.comRead: Rituals of the SoulInstagram: @santosha.societySponsors:Visit tryveganmealprep.com and use code LYTYOGA for 25% off your first orderRedefining Yoga is a production of Crate Media See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

SBS Tamil - SBS தமிழ்
Year in Review: Sri Lanka 2021 - இலங்கை 2021: ஒரு மீள்பார்வை

SBS Tamil - SBS தமிழ்

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 12:18


Mathivaanan, our correspondent in Sri Lanka, reviews major events, news and stories that made the headlines in Sri Lanka this year. - முடிவிற்கு வரவுள்ள 2021ம் ஆண்டில் இலங்கையில் அதிகம் பேசப்பட்ட, அதிக தாக்கத்தையோ அல்லது அதிர்ச்சியையோ ஏற்படுத்திய சம்பவங்கள் மற்றும் நிகழ்வுகள் குறித்து இன்றைய பார்வைகள் நிகழ்ச்சியில் முன்வைக்கிறார் நமது இலங்கைச் செய்தியாளர் மதிவாணன்.

SBS Sinhala - SBS සිංහල වැඩසටහන
SBS Sinhala Radio News on 31 Dec 2021: Australia is on the rise of COVID cases with the New year, warns health officials - දෙසැ 31දා SBS සිංහල පුවත්: නව වසර උදාවේදී ඕස්ට්‍රේලිය

SBS Sinhala - SBS සිංහල වැඩසටහන

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 11:48


Listen to the latest news from Australia, Sri Lanka, across the globe, and the latest news from the sports world on SBS Sinhala radio news bulletin – Friday 31 December 2021 - සවන්දෙන්න 2021 දෙසැම්බර් 31 වන සිකුරාදා SBS සිංහල ගුවන්විදුලියේ ප්‍රවෘත්ති ප්‍රකාශයට...

Fitbet with Dilruk Jayasinha and Ben Lomas Podcast

A belated Merry Xmas! The Fitbet fellas were able to make it work! Ben's in a park and Dil's overseas. Huge updates. Inappropriate behavior and way too much Xmas Ham.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Melting Pot
Rashantha Devanesan Founder Kadambari Jewels

Melting Pot

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 24:22


Rashantha is the founder of  Kadambari jewels. Gorgeous handcrafted  jewellery inspired by ancient Indian, Central and Southeast Asian cultures. Her work supports charities in Singapore, India and Sri Lanka and she has a faithful following of clients in many parts of the world. Rashantha lives in Singapore and has been designing Kadambari jewels for over ten years. Apple Podcasts: https://buff.ly/2Vf8vv8⠀Spotify: https://buff.ly/2Vf8uHA⠀Google Podcasts:https://buff.ly/2Vds6LX⠀....-Original music credit: Rish Sharma.His music is available on Spotify, Apple Music, YouTube and other streaming platforms.  -Audio post production at HNM Studios New Delhi India.-October2019 voicesandmore Pte Ltd All rights reserved Get bonus content on PatreonSupport this show http://supporter.acast.com/melting-pot. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Grade Cricketer
183. 3-0, with Nick Compton

The Grade Cricketer

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 97:58


Check out our Patreon for exclusive content every single week at https://www.patreon.com/gradecricketer including #AskTGC Fridays and the exclusive audio from all of our YouTube videos - specifically our daily reactions to every day's play during The Ashes and The South Africa v India Test series.This episode is brought to you by Budgy Smuggler. You can get free shipping on your order by using the code 'CHAMP' at https://www.budgysmuggler.com.auT20 Stars products are made from one of the best cricket manufacturers in the world and they have cut out the middle person so the cricket gear goes straight from the manufacturer to you.T20 Stars are celebrating a huge week of cricket by giving all TGC listeners 10% off on all bats, balls, gloves and pads. USE THE CODE TGC10 to claim the discount.Free shipping and free returns - visit www.t20stars.comWe're getting behind #nationalbackyardcricket, which supports libraries across regional Australia as well as tertiary education projects in India, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Tanzania, South Africa, Afghanistan and Indonesia. Register your team, and game, to help support these projects. The official day is Sunday 6 Feb, but you can play any time in the lead up. Head to nationalbackyardcricket.com to get in and around it.You can follow The Grade Cricketer on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter:https://www.facebook.com/gradecricketerhttps://www.instagram.com/thegradecricketer/https://twitter.com/gradecricketerThe Grade Cricketer hosts are Ian Higgins and Sam Perry.You can follow them on Instagram and Twitter:Ian Higgins:https://www.instagram.com/higgins_ian/https://twitter.com/1an_HigginsSam Perry:https://www.instagram.com/sj_perry/https://twitter.com/sjjperry

SBS Sinhala - SBS සිංහල වැඩසටහන
Things you need to pay attention to stay healthy in this year end Festive season - මේ උත්සව සමයේදී සහභාගී වන ප්‍රිය සම්භාෂණ වලදී අනවශ්‍ය ලෙසට ආහාර

SBS Sinhala - SBS සිංහල වැඩසටහන

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 14:26


SBS Sinhala Discussion with Dr.Niranjani Wickramasinghe, Clinical Dietitian in Sri Lanka and Public Health and Nutrition Research Officer at Curtin University, Perth on Things you need to pay attention to stay healthy in this New Year season  - ශ්‍රී ලංකාවේ සායනික ආහාරවේදියෙක වශයෙන් සේවය කල සහ පර්ත් හි Curtin විශ්ව විද්‍යාලයේ මහජන සෞඛ්‍ය හා පෝෂණ පර්යේෂන නිලධාරිනියක වන ආචාර්ය නිරංජනී වික්‍රමසිංහ මහත්මිය සමග SBS සිංහල සේවය සිදු කල සාකච්චාව

Perko's Podcast
Perko's Podcast Episode 032: Creating Your Life Manifesto w/ Sidhara Udalagama

Perko's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 35:34


Welcome back to Perko's Podcast!Well, today on the podcast we are doing something a little bit different than we would usually do. Part of what I do beyond recording podcasts is coaching leaders through various exercises that help them to reach their goals without losing their souls. My friend Sidhara Udalagama was kind enough to let me facilitate one of these exercises for her called a Life Manifesto. A life manifesto is the exercise of prayer and thought to develop wording around how you want to live your one and only life. I thought that since we are approaching a new year when most of us typically evaluate and set goals for the next 365 days that this would be a great exercise to share with you. My friend Sid is an amazing speaker, creative and corporate consultant. Sid grew up in Sri Lanka but spent her adult years in England working in full time ministry after graduating with an MSc in Occupational Psychology.  Sid is currently working with Compassion Australia which is a fantastic organisation and you will hear more about her work shortly.Sid is passionate about people fulfilling their God given potential in this world and becoming all that they were created to be. Both her roles in the church and corporate world enable her to outwork this passion. She is a powerful and gifted communicator of God's Word and loves that the Bible has the power to change lives.Sidhara is married to her husband Dev and enjoys eating, traveling the world and repeating those two things... preferably together.Contact Jason:hello@jasonperkoperkins.comInstagram: @jasonperkoperkinsTwitter: @perkosplaceFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/jasonperkoperkins/https://linktr.ee/jasonperkoperkinsIf you like what you hear, feel free to share this episode with a friend! We would also love if you would share this episode on your social media and tag us so we can connect with you or leave a review!We want to continue to bring you content that will help you reach your strategic goals without losing your soul for years to come.

SBS Sinhala - SBS සිංහල වැඩසටහන
Australian News in Sinhala on 28 Dec: NSW Health changes its isolation rules for healthcare workers - දෙසැ 28 දා SBS සිංහල ප්‍රවෘත්ති: NSW සෞඛ්‍ය සේවකයින්ට බලපාන නිර

SBS Sinhala - SBS සිංහල වැඩසටහන

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 13:44


Listen to the latest news from Australia, Sri Lanka, across the globe, and the latest news from the sports world on SBS Sinhala radio news – Tuesday 28 December 2021. - ඔස්ට්‍රේලියාවේ සහ ශ්‍රී ලංකාවේ නවතම පුවත් මෙන්ම විදෙස් පුවත් සහ ක්‍රීඩා පුවත් රැගත් SBS සිංහල සේවයේ 2021 දෙසැම්බර් 28 වන දා අඟහරුවාදා වැඩසටහනේ ප්‍රවෘත්ති ප්‍රකාශයට සවන් දීමට ඉහත ඡායාරූපය මත ඇති speaker සලකුණ මත click කරන්න.

In Retrospect
Episode 046, "Finnafro," an interview with Atem Reed

In Retrospect

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 60:33


Atem Reed is a dentist that has lived in Russia, Sri Lanka, Senegal and South Africa, just to name a few. And don't tell him you hate dentists...he's a tender soul. 

The Conspiracy Show with Richard Syrett
The Star of Bethlehem & Deep Questions About Christmas

The Conspiracy Show with Richard Syrett

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 98:17


STAR OF BETHLEHEM OR UFO? In the first half, guest-host Victor Viggiani examines the lore of the star of Bethlehem which, according to the Bible, guided three wisemen to where a new born child of significant eminence lay in a construct that sheltered animals. Tradition says they came to hail the birth of a new king. Is it possible the star of Bethlehem was actually UFO? https://sites.google.com/site/zlandco... http://www.nigelkerner.com/home.html Guest: Nigel Kerner was born in Sri Lanka, his mother from a British planting family and his father an officer in the British Royal Navy Fleet Air Arm. This international family base provided the background for an obsessive and serious interest in international human affairs and how these interface with science, religion and philosophy. He has felt driven, from his young years, to expose the humbug and hypocrisy in modern scientific and religious and social thinking. His formal graduate education is in biomedical science and human behavioural psychology. His fascination with the puzzling and enigmatic phenomenon of UFOs resulted in his first book 'The Song of the Greys.' ? A NEW UNDERSTANDING OF CHRISTMAS In hour two, Victor and guest examine a number of provocative questions surrounding Christmas: Who actually were the Magi? Kings or Scientists? What was the celestial phenomenon we are told the Magi followed in the sky? Why was Mary chosen to be the Mother of Jesus? What was the role played by King Herod in the highly politicized world in Judea before and after Christ's birth. Also - how did the Prophecies in the Old Testament foretell the birth of history's most influential man, a man destined to be born in a stable, among lowly farm animals and shepherds? Guest: Father Robert Geis is a Prelate Protosyncellus in the Eastern Orthodox rite. He has published a number of books on philosophy and theology, as well as Holy Scripture. His work on the Resurrection in the National Catholic Herald is cited as "a remarkable book." His work on immortality received high marks in the philosophic journal The Review of Metaphysics. He has also written and published one of the most definitive works on Papal authority, Peter and Linus, the question of Papal Infallibility. Many of his works are housed in the US Library of Congress. Listen live every Sunday at 11pm on Zoomer Radio

Talk Healthy Today
Using the 8 Ancient Principles of Yoga to Create a Modern & Meaningful Life with Kori Hahn

Talk Healthy Today

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 43:20


Lisa is joined by Kori Hahn who talks about her book Rituals of the Soul: Using the 8 Ancient Principles of Yoga to Create a Modern & Meaningful Life. Kori Hahn is a surfer, a yoga and meditation teacher, a world traveler, and a mother. When she was twenty years old, she traveled to Alaska, where she lived for twelve years in a remote cabin in close contact with nature, chopping firewood, hauling water, and skiing down towering mountains. In 2014, she founded the Santosha Society, a community gathering place dedicated to travel, surfing, and the soulful. Through it, Hahn has hosted numerous trips around the world for hundreds of women who study Ayurveda, yoga, meditation, and all things related to soul growth, knowledge, and fulfillment. Hahn's teachings can also be found online in blogs and podcasts. When she isn't traveling, she lives in Sri Lanka with her son. Learn more at santoshasociety.com. Book Description: Rituals of the Soul: Using the 8 Ancient Principles of Yoga to Create a Modern & Meaningful Life Kori Hahn has always done life her way — living off the grid as a young woman in Alaska; studying with spiritual teachers and soul guides in Mexico, Sri Lanka, and Morocco; surfing around the world. Yet her primary, perennial quest has been an inner one. To that end, she evolved the practices she shares in this book, simple daily steps grounded in sacred yogic texts that will help you live your life your way, with maximum meaning and joy. Timeless principles of awareness, intuition, self-knowledge, and manifestation become contemporary practices incorporating visualization, breath work, journaling affirmations, and meditation. These habits of being grow the soul, enable our bravest and best selves, and, as Hahn shows, can take you wherever you most want to be. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

SBS Sinhala - SBS සිංහල වැඩසටහන
News Highlights from Sri Lanka: 1,200 containers were stuck at the Colombo Port as CBSL refused to release foreign exchange - ශ්‍රී ලාංකීය පුවත් විමසුම: අත්‍යවශ්‍ය භාණ්ඩ රැග

SBS Sinhala - SBS සිංහල වැඩසටහන

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 19:48


SBS Sinhala radio brings you the most prominent news highlights of Sri Lanka in this featured current affairs segment. - සවන්දෙන්න ගෙවීගිය සතියේ ශ්‍රී ලංකාවෙන් වාර්තා වුනු නවතම පුවත් වල ඇතුලාන්ත තොරතුරු SBS සිංහල සේවයේ සෑම සඳුදා දිනකම ගෙනෙන 'සතියේ ශ්‍රී ලාංකික පුවත් විමසුමෙන්"

Distract Me, Please
Pull up in the Sri Lanka VLOGMAS DAY 24

Distract Me, Please

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 30:28


The best part is the ending... I wish I was joking. This is a regular podcast vlog where I take you through a regular day in my life. The only exciting parts of my day is when I decide to be a menace. :) Also are you a Nicki fan? (Socials) https://linktr.ee/bryannasilva --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

10% Happier with Dan Harris
How to Be OK with Change | Bonus Meditation with Anushka Fernandopulle

10% Happier with Dan Harris

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 7:03


Relax into a flow of breath sensations, and hone your ability to decrease stress & resistance, and experience a more harmonious happy life.About Anushka Fernandopulle:Anushka teaches meditation, works as an organizational consultant, and does leadership coaching with individuals and teams. She has practiced meditation for over 25 years, including four years in full-time intensive training in monasteries and retreat centers in the US, India and Sri Lanka.Her work is informed by a BA in anthropology/religion from Harvard University, an MBA from Yale focused on leadership and organizational behavior, and certification in coaching from the Coaches Training Institute.To find this meditation in the Ten Percent Happier app, you can search for “Breathing, Flow, & Change,” or click here.Click here to give a gift subscription to the Ten Percent Happier app. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Midnight Train Podcast
Christmas Disasters

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 115:39


For bonuses and to support the show, sign up at www.patreon.com/themidnighttrainpodcast   This week is our Christmas special here on the train. First, we've covered Krampus, Christmas killings, and ghost story Christmas traditions. Then, in keeping with our tradition of crazy Christmas episodes, today, we bring you some crazy Christmas disasters! Christmas isn't immune to crazy shit going on, from natural disasters to fires. Not only that, we're giving you guys a pretty good dose of history today. So with that being said, let's get into some crazy Christmas stuff!   While this first topic isn't necessarily a disaster in the usual sense, it definitely caused nothing but problems. And yes, it's a disaster. In 1865 on Christmas Eve, something happened that would change things for many people in this country and still causes grief to this day. While most people in the u.s. were settling down for the night with their families, leaving milk out for Santa, and tucking the kids in for the night, a group of men in Pulaski, Tennessee, were getting together for a very different purpose. Frank McCord, Richard Reed, John Lester, John Kennedy, J. Calvin Jones, and James Crowe were all officers with the Confederacy in the civil war. That night, they got together to form a group inspired at least in part by the then largely defunct Sons of Malta. While it started as a social club, within months, it would turn into one of the most nefarious groups around, the Ku Klux Klan. According to The Cyclopædia of Fraternities (1907), "Beginning in April, 1867, there was a gradual transformation. ...The members had conjured up a veritable Frankenstein. They had played with an engine of power and mystery, though organized on entirely innocent lines, and found themselves overcome by a belief that something must lie behind it all – that there was, after all, a serious purpose, a work for the Klan to do." It borrowed parts of the initiation ceremony from the sons of Malta with the same purpose: "ludicrous initiations, the baffling of public curiosity, and the amusement for members were the only objects of the Klan," according to Albert Stevens in 1907. In the summer of 1867, local branches of the Klan met in a general organizing convention. They established what they called an "Invisible Empire of the South." Leading Confederate general Nathan Bedford Forrest was chosen as the first leader, or "grand wizard," of the Klan; he presided over a hierarchy of grand dragons, grand titans, and grand cyclops. The organization of the Ku Klux Klan coincided with the beginning of the second phase of post-Civil War Reconstruction, put into place by the more radical members of the Republican Party in Congress. After rejecting President Andrew Johnson's relatively lenient Reconstruction policies from 1865 to 1866, Congress passed the Reconstruction Act over the presidential veto. Under its provisions, the South was divided into five military districts. Each state was required to approve the 14th Amendment, which granted "equal protection" of the Constitution to formerly enslaved people and enacted universal male suffrage. From 1867 onward, Black participation in public life in the South became one of the most radical aspects of Reconstruction. Black people won elections to southern state governments and even the U.S. Congress. For its part, the Ku Klux Klan dedicated itself to an underground campaign of violence against Republican leaders and voters (both Black and white) to reverse the policies of Radical Reconstruction and restore white supremacy in the South. They were joined in this struggle by similar organizations such as the Knights of the White Camelia (launched in Louisiana in 1867) and the White Brotherhood. At least 10 percent of the Black legislators elected during the 1867-1868 constitutional conventions became victims of violence during Reconstruction, including seven who were killed. White Republicans (derided as "carpetbaggers" and "scalawags") and Black institutions such as schools and churches—symbols of Black autonomy—were also targets for Klan attacks. By 1870, the Ku Klux Klan had branches in nearly every southern state. The Klan did not boast a well-organized structure or clear leadership even at its height. Local Klan members, often wearing masks and dressed in the organization's signature long white robes and hoods, usually carried out their attacks at night. They acted on their own but supported the common goals of defeating Radical Reconstruction and restoring white supremacy in the South. Klan activity flourished particularly in the regions of the South where Black people were a minority or a slight majority of the population and were relatively limited in others. Among the most notorious zones of Klan activity was South Carolina, where in January 1871, 500 masked men attacked the Union county jail and lynched eight Black prisoners. Though Democratic leaders would later attribute Ku Klux Klan violence to poorer southern white people, the organization's membership crossed class lines, from small farmers and laborers to planters, lawyers, merchants, physicians, and ministers. In the regions where most Klan activity took place, local law enforcement officials either belonged to the Klan or declined to act against it. Even those who arrested Klansmen found it difficult to find witnesses willing to testify against them.    Other leading white citizens in the South declined to speak out against the group's actions, giving them implicit approval. After 1870, Republican state governments in the South turned to Congress for help, resulting in three Enforcement Acts, the strongest of which was the Ku Klux Klan Act of 1871.   For the first time, the Ku Klux Klan Act designated certain crimes committed by individuals as federal offenses, including conspiracies to deprive citizens of the right to hold office, serve on juries and enjoy the equal protection of the law. In addition, the act authorized the president to suspend the habeas corpus, arrest accused individuals without charge, and send federal forces to suppress Klan violence. For those of us dummies that may not know, a "writ of habeas corpus" (which literally means to "produce the body") is a court order demanding that a public official (such as a warden) deliver an imprisoned individual to the court and show a valid reason for that person's detention. The procedure provides a means for prison inmates or others acting on their behalf to dispute the legal basis for confinement.   This expansion of federal authority–which Ulysses S. Grant promptly used in 1871 to crush Klan activity in South Carolina and other areas of the South–outraged Democrats and even alarmed many Republicans. From the early 1870s onward, white supremacy gradually reasserted its hold on the South as support for Reconstruction waned; by the end of 1876, the entire South was under Democratic control once again.   Now, this was just the first version of the Klan. A second version started up in the early 1900s and later on another revival which is the current iteration of the Klan. We're not going to go into the later versions of the Klan because well…. Fuck 'em! We've already given them too much air time! But… This most definitely qualifies as a Christmas disaster.   Next up, we have a couple natural disasters.    First up, Cyclone Tracy. Cyclone Tracy has been described as the most significant tropical cyclone in Australia's history, and it changed how we viewed the threat of tropical cyclones to northern Australia.   Five days before Christmas 1974, satellite images showed a tropical depression in the Arafura Sea, 700 kilometers (or almost 435 miles for us Americans) northeast of Darwin.   The following day the Tropical Cyclone Warning Center in Darwin warned that a cyclone had formed and gave it the name Tracy. Cyclone Tracy was moving southwest at this stage, but as it passed the northwest of Bathurst Island on December 23, it slowed down and changed course.   That night, it rounded Cape Fourcroy and began moving southeast, with Darwin directly in its path.   The first warning that Darwin was under threat came at 12:30 p.m. on Christmas Eve when a top-priority flash cyclone warning was issued advising people that Cyclone Tracy was expected to make landfall early Christmas morning.   Despite 12 hours' warning of the cyclone's impending arrival, it fell mainly on deaf ears.   Residents were complacent after a near-miss from Cyclone Selma a few weeks before and distracted by the festive season.   Indeed in the preceding decade, the Bureau of Meteorology had identified 25 cyclones in Northern Territory waters, but few had caused much damage. Severe Tropical Cyclone Tracy was a small but intense system at landfall.   The radius of the galeforce winds extended only 50 kilometers from the eye of the cyclone, making it one of the most miniature tropical cyclones on record, according to the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).   Records show that at least six tropical cyclones had severely impacted Darwin before Tracy.   The worst of these was in January 1897 when a "disastrous hurricane" nearly destroyed the settlement, and 28 people died.   However, unlike Tracy, it is thought this cyclone did not directly pass over Darwin.   And while Tracy was reported as a category four cyclone, some meteorologists today believe it may have been a category five shortly before it made landfall.   At midnight on Christmas Day, wind gusts greater than 100 kilometers or over 62 miles per hour began to be recorded.   The cyclone's center reached East Point at 3:15 a.m. and landed just north of Fannie Bay at 3:30 a.m.   Tracy was so strong it bent a railway signal tower in half.    The city was devastated by the cyclone. At least 90 percent of homes in Darwin were demolished or badly damaged. Forty-five vessels in the harbor were wrecked or damaged.   In addition to the 65 people who died, 145 were admitted to the hospital with serious injuries.   Vegetation was damaged up to 80 kilometers away from the coast, and Darwin felt eerily quiet due to the lack of insect and birdlife.   Within a week after the cyclone hit, more than 30,000 Darwin residents had been evacuated by air or road. That's more than two-thirds of the population at that time.   Cyclone Tracy remains one of Australia's most significant disasters.   As Murphy wrote 10 years after the cyclone: "The impact of Cyclone Tracy has reached far beyond the limits of Darwin itself. All along the tropical coasts of northern Australia and beyond a new cyclone awareness has emerged."   Merry fucking Christmas! Damn, that sucks. The information in this section came from an article on abc.net.au   Next up, we are going way back. The Christmas Flood of 1717 resulted from a northwesterly storm, which hit the coastal area of the Netherlands, Germany, and Scandinavia on Christmas night of 1717. During the night of Christmas, 1717, the coastal regions of the Netherlands, Germany, and Scandinavia were hit by a severe north-western storm. It is estimated that 14,000 people died. It was the worst flood for four centuries and the last significant flood to hit the north of the Netherlands.   In the countryside to the north of the Netherlands, the water level rose up to a few meters. The city of Groningen rose up to a few feet. In the province of Groningen, villages that were situated directly behind the dikes were nearly swept away. Action had to be taken against looters who robbed houses and farms under the fraudulent act of rescuing the flood victims. In total, the flood caused 2,276 casualties in Groningen. 1,455 homes were either destroyed or suffered extensive damage. Most livestock was lost.   The water also poured into Amsterdam and Haarlem and the areas around Dokkum and Stavoren. Over 150 people died in Friesland alone. In addition, large sections of Northern Holland were left underwater and the area around Zwolle and Kampen. In these areas, the flood only caused material damage. In Vlieland, however, the sea poured over the dunes, almost entirely sweeping away the already-damaged village of West-Vlieland.   We also found this report from a German website. It's been translated, so our apologies if it's wonky.    "According to tradition, several days before Christmas, it had blown strong and sustained from the southwest. Shortly after sunset on Christmas Eve, the wind suddenly turned from west to northwest and eased a little. The majority of the residents went to bed unconcerned, because currently was half moon and the next regular flood would not occur until 7 a.m. At the time when the tide was supposed to have been low for a long time, however, a drop in the water level could not be determined. Allegedly between 1 and 2 a.m. the storm began to revive violently accompanied by lightning and thunder. Between 3 and 4 o'clock in the morning the water reached the top of the dike. The current and waves caused the dike caps to break, so that the tide rolled over the dike into the flat land with a loud roar of thunder. Many only had time to save themselves in the dark on the floor under the roof. Most of the time there was not even time to take clothes, drinking water and some food with you. Numerous houses could not withstand the rising water and the current. In the higher and higher water and the increasing current, windows were Doors and entire walls dented. Allegedly the hurricane and the storm surge raged against the coast for three full days, so that it was not until December 28 that the water fell so far that one could come to the aid of one's neighbors with simply built "boats." In many places, the dykes had been razed to the ground, which meant that in lower-lying areas, every regular flood caused renewed flooding. At the places where the dykes were broken, deep valleys, some of which were large, formed. In many places where the dike is led around in a semi-arch, these walls, also known as pools or bracken, are still visible and testify to the force of the water. At that time, many people are said to have believed that the march was forever lost. In the low-lying areas, the water was later covered with ice floes, sometimes held up for months. Up until the summer months, bodies were said to have been found repeatedly during the clean-up work on the alluvial piles of straw and in the trenches. Many people who survived the flood later fell victim to so-called marching fever. New storm surges in the following years ruined the efforts for the first time to get the dike back into a defensible condition, and many houses, which were initially only damaged, have now been completely destroyed. Numerous small owners left the country so that the Hanover government even issued a ban on emigration."   Looks like the Netherlands got a proper Christmas fucking as well! Some towns were so severely destroyed that nothing was left, and they simply ceased to exist. Damn.    Cyclones and floods… What else does mother nature have for us? Well, how's about an earthquake! On Friday, December 26, 2003, at 5:26 a.m., Bam city in Southeastern Iran was jolted by an earthquake registering a 6.5 magnitude on the Richter scale. This was the result of the strike-slip motion of the Bam fault, which runs through this area. The earthquake's epicenter was determined to be approximately six miles southwest of the city. Three more significant aftershocks and many smaller aftershocks were also recorded, the last of which occurred over a month after the main earthquake. To date, official death tolls have 26,271 fatalities, 9000 injured, and 525 still missing. The city of Bam is one of Iran's most ancient cities, dating back to 224A.D. Latest reports and damage estimates are approaching the area of $1.9 billion. A United Nations report estimated that about 90% of the city's buildings were 60%-100% damaged, while the remaining buildings were between 30%-60% damaged. The crazy part about the whole thing… The quake only lasted for about 8 seconds.   Now I know what you're thinking… That's not Christmas… Well, there spanky, the night of the 25th, Christmas, people started to feel minor tremors that would preface the quake, so fuck you, it counts.   We have one more natural disaster for you guys, and this one most of you guys probably remember. And this one was another that started last Christmas night and rolled into the 26th, also known as boxing day. So we're talking about the Boxing Day Tsunami and the Indian ocean earthquake in 2004.    A 9.1-magnitude earthquake—one of the largest ever recorded—ripped through an undersea fault in the Indian Ocean, propelling a massive column of water toward unsuspecting shores. The Boxing Day tsunami would be the deadliest in recorded history, taking a staggering 230,000 lives in a matter of hours.   The city of Banda Aceh on the northern tip of Sumatra was closest to the powerful earthquake's epicenter, and the first waves arrived in just 20 minutes. It's nearly impossible to imagine the 100-foot roiling mountain of water that engulfed the coastal city of 320,000, instantly killing more than 100,000 men, women, and children. Buildings folded like houses of cards, trees, and cars were swept up in the oil-black rapids, and virtually no one caught in the deluge survived.   Thailand was next. With waves traveling 500 mph across the Indian Ocean, the tsunami hit the coastal provinces of Phang Nga and Phuket an hour and a half later. Despite the time-lapse, locals and tourists were utterly unaware of the imminent destruction. Curious beachgoers even wandered out among the oddly receding waves, only to be chased down by a churning wall of water. The death toll in Thailand was nearly 5,400, including 2,000 foreign tourists.   An hour later, on the opposite side of the Indian Ocean, the waves struck the southeastern coast of India near the city of Chennai, pushing debris-choked water kilometers inland and killing more than 10,000 people, primarily women and children, since many of the men were out fishing. But some of the worst devastations were reserved for the island nation of Sri Lanka, where more than 30,000 people were swept away by the waves and hundreds of thousands left homeless.   As proof of the record-breaking strength of the tsunami, the last victims of the Boxing Day disaster perished nearly eight hours later when swelling seas and rogue waves caught swimmers by surprise in South Africa, 5,000 miles from the quake's epicenter.   Vasily Titov is a tsunami researcher and forecaster with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Center for Tsunami Research. He credits the unsparing destructiveness of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami on the raw power of the earthquake that spawned it. The quake originated in a so-called megathrust fault, where heavy oceanic plates subduct beneath lighter continental plates.    "They are the largest faults in the world and they're all underwater," says Titov.   The 2004 quake ruptured a 900-mile stretch along the Indian and Australian plates 31 miles below the ocean floor. Rather than delivering one violent jolt, the earthquake lasted an unrelenting 10 minutes, releasing as much pent-up power as several thousand atomic bombs.   In the process, massive segments of the ocean floor were forced an estimated 30 or 40 meters (up to 130 feet) upward. The effect was like dropping the world's most giant pebble in the Indian Ocean with ripples the size of mountains extending out in all directions.   Titov emphasizes that tsunamis look nothing like the giant surfing break-style waves that many imagine.   "It's a wave, but from the observer's standpoint, you wouldn't recognize it as a wave," Titov says. "It's more like the ocean turns into a white water river and floods everything in its path."   Once caught in the raging waters, the debris will finish the job if the currents don't pull you under.   "In earthquakes, a certain number of people die but many more are injured. It's completely reversed with tsunamis," says Titov. "Almost no injuries, because it's such a difficult disaster to survive."   Holy fuck… That's insane!   Well, there are some crazy natural disasters gifted to us by mother nature. So now let's take a look at some man-made disasters… And there are some bad ones.    First up is the 1953 train wreck on Christmas Eve in New Zealand. So this is actually a mix of mother nature fucking people and a man-made structure failing. This event is also referred to as the Tangiwai disaster. The weather on Christmas Eve was fine, and with little recent rain, no one suspected flooding in the Whangaehu River. The river appeared normal when a goods train crossed the bridge around 7 p.m. What transformed the situation was the sudden release of approximately 2 million cubic meters of water from the crater lake of nearby Mt Ruapehu. A 6-meter-high wave containing water, ice, mud, and rocks surged, tsunami-like, down the Whangaehu River. Sometime between 10.10 and 10.15 p.m., this lahar struck the concrete pylons of the Tangiwai railway bridge.   Traveling at approximately 65 km per hour, locomotive Ka 949 and its train of nine carriages and two vans reached the severely weakened bridge at 10.21 p.m. As the bridge buckled beneath its weight, the engine plunged into the river, taking all five second-class carriages with it. The torrent force destroyed four of these carriages – those inside had little chance of survival.   The leading first-class carriage, Car Z, teetered on the edge of the ruined bridge for a few minutes before breaking free from the remaining three carriages and toppling into the river. It rolled downstream before coming to rest on a bank as the water level fell. Remarkably, 21 of the 22 passengers in this carriage survived. Evidence suggested that the locomotive driver, Charles Parker, had applied the emergency brakes some 200 m from the bridge, which prevented the last three carriages from ending up in the river and saved many lives. Even still, 151 of the 285 passengers and crew died that night in the crash.   This information was taken from nzhistory.gov.    Next up is the Italian Hall disaster.    Before it was called Calumet, the area was known as Red Jacket. And for many, it seemed to be ground zero for the sprawling copper mining operations that absorbed wave after wave of immigrants into the Upper Peninsula.   Red Jacket itself was a company town for the Calumet and Hecla Mining Company, a large firm that in the 1870s was known as the world's largest copper producer. For a time, C&H had the world's deepest copper mines.   But the company wasn't immune from the organized labor push that swept across the Keweenaw Peninsula and other parts of the U.P. in 1913. Miners in Montana and Colorado had unionized, and in July of that year, the Western Federation of Miners called a strike against all Copper Country mines. According to a mining journal published that year, they were pushing for a $3 daily wage, 8-hour days, safer working conditions, and representation.   "The strike took place in a very complicated time in American history," said Jo Holt, a historian with the National Park Service's Keweenaw National Historical Park. "We had all these different things coming together. An increasingly industrialized country was grappling with worker's rights, gender issues, and immigration. We were moving from a gilded age into a progressive era, and recognizing the voice of labor.   "We see this event happen in the midst of that struggle."   "The reason it resonates today is we are still having these conversations. How do we create a just economy that functions for everybody? ... We are still, almost hundred and 10 years later, in the midst of these conversations."   As the strike wore into fall and the holiday season, a women's auxiliary group to the WFM organized a Christmas Eve party for the miners' families at the Italian Benevolent Society building, better known as the Italian Hall.   It was a big, boisterous affair, researchers have said. The multi-story hall was packed, with more than 600 people inside at one point. Children were watching a play and receiving gifts. Organizers later said the crowd was so large that it was hard to track who was coming in the door.   When the false cry of "Fire!" went up, pandemonium reached the sole stairway leading down to the street.   "What happened is when people panicked, they tried to get out through the stairwell," Holt said. "Someone tripped or people started to fall, and that's what created the bottleneck. It was just people falling on top of each other."   The aftermath was horrifying. As the dead were pulled from the pile in the stairwell, the bodies were carried to the town hall, which turned into a makeshift morgue. Some families lost more than one child. Other children were orphaned when their parents died.   One black and white photo in the Michigan Technological University Archives shows rows of what looks like sleeping children lying side-by-side. Their eyes are closed. Their faces were unmarred. The caption reads: "Christmas Eve in the Morgue."   After the dead were buried, some families moved away. Others stayed and kept supporting the strike, which ended the following spring.   Rumors emerged later that the Italian Hall's doors were designed to open inward, preventing the panicked crowd from pushing them outward to the street. Those were debunked, along with the suggestion in Woody Guthrie's "1913 Massacre" song that mining company thugs were holding the doors shut from the outside that night.   Damn… Mostly kids. On Christmas. That's a tough one.   Here's another touchy one. A race riot erupted in Mayfield, Kentucky, just before Christmas 1896. Although slavery in the U.S. ended after the Civil War, the Reconstruction period and beyond was a dangerous time to be black. Things were awful for non-whites in the former Confederacy, amongst which Kentucky was especially bad for racial violence. In December 1896, white vigilantes lynched two black men within 24 hours of each other between the 21st and 22nd, one for a minor disagreement with a white man and the other, Jim Stone, for alleged rape. A note attached to Stone's swinging corpse warned black residents to get out of town.   In response to this unambiguous threat, the local African-American population armed themselves. Rumors spread amongst the town's white people that 250 men were marching on the city, and a state of emergency was called. The whites mobilized, black stores were vandalized, and fighting broke out between the two sides on December 23. In the event, three people were killed, including Will Suet, a black teenager who had just got off the train to spend Christmas with his family. It was all over on Christmas Eve, and a few days later, an uneasy truce between the races was called.   Ugh! Y'all know what time it is? That's right, it's time for some quick hitters.   Many of us enjoy the Christmas period by going to the theatre or watching a movie. In December 1903, Chicago residents were eager to do just that at the brand-new Iroquois Theatre, which had been officially opened only in October that year. 1700 people in all crammed themselves in to see the zany, family-friendly musical comedy, Mr. Bluebeard. But just as the wait was over and the show started, a single spark from a stage light lit the surrounding drapery. The show's star, Eddie Foy, tried to keep things together as Iroquois employees struggled to put the curtains out in vain.   However, even the spectacle of a Windy City-native in drag couldn't stop the terrified crowd stampeding for the few exits. These, preposterously, were concealed by curtains and utterly inadequate in number. When the actors opened their own exit door to escape, a gust of wind sent a fireball through the crowded theatre, meaning that hundreds died before the fire service was even called. 585 people died, either suffocated, burned alive, or crushed. The scene was described in a 1904 account as "worse than that pictured in the mind of Dante in his vision of the inferno". Next up, the politics behind this ghastly event are pretty complicated – one Mexican lecturer described the massacre as "the most complicated case in Mexico" – but here's an inadequate summary. The small and impoverished village of Acteal, Mexico, was home to Las Abejas (the bees'), a religious collective that sympathized with a rebel group opposing the Mexican government. Thus, on December 22, 1997, members of the then-ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party crept down the steep hill slopes above the village. They chose their moment to attack carefully as people gathered at a prayer meeting when they finally slunk into Acteal.   Over the next few hours, assassins armed with guns executed 45 innocent people in cold blood. Amongst the dead were 21 women, some of whom were pregnant, and 15 children. Worst of all, investigations into this cowardly act seem to implicate the government itself. Soldiers garrisoned nearby did not intervene, despite being within earshot of the gunfire and horrified screams. In addition, there was evidence of the crime scene being tampered with by local police and government officials. Though some people have been convicted, there are suspicions that they were framed and that the real culprits remain at large.   -Twas the night before Christmas, when all through the house, not a creature was stirring… except the Soviet Union. The Marxist-Leninist Khalq and Parcham parties had ousted the Afghan president in April 1978. Still, communism was so unpopular in Afghanistan that the mujahideen succeeded in toppling them just over a year later. So Khalq and Parcham turned to the Soviet Union for help, and on Christmas Eve that year, they obliged by sending 30,000 troops across the border into Afghanistan by the cover of darkness. Bloody fighting ensued, and soon the Soviet Union had control of the major cities.   The Soviets stayed for nine years, at which time the mujahideen, backed by foreign support and weapons, waged a brutal guerrilla campaign against the invaders. In turn, captured mujahideen were executed, and entire villages and agricultural areas were razed to the ground. When the Soviets finally withdrew in February 1989, over 1 million civilians and almost 125,000 soldiers from both sides were killed. From the turmoil after the Afghan-Soviet War emerged, the Taliban, installed by neighboring Pakistan, and with them Osama bin Laden. This indeed was a black Christmas for the world.   -How about another race riot… No? Well, here you go anyway. Although, this one may be more fucked up. The Agana Race Riot saw black and white US Marines fight it out from Christmas Eve to Boxing Day, 1944. Guam was host to both black and white US Marines in 1944. But instead of fighting the enemy, the white troops elected to turn on the all-black Marine 25th Depot Company. First, the white Marines would stop their fellow soldiers from entering Agana, pelt them with rocks, and shout racist obscenities at them. Then, on Christmas Eve 1944, 9 members of the 25th on official leave were seen talking to local women, and white Marines opened fire on them. Then, on Christmas Day, 2 black soldiers were shot dead by drunken white Marines in separate incidents.   Guam's white Marines were decidedly short on festive cheer and goodwill to all men. Not content with these murders, a white mob attacked an African-American depot on Boxing Day, and a white soldier sustained an injury when the 25th returned fire. Sick of their treatment by their fellow soldiers, 40 black Marines gave chase to the retreating mob in a jeep, but further violence was prevented by a roadblock. Can you guess what happened next? Yep, the black soldiers were charged with unlawful assembly, rioting, and attempted murder, while the white soldiers were left to nurse their aching heads.   One more major one for you guys, and then we'll leave on a kind of happier note. This one's kind of rough. Be warned.    In late December 2008 and into January 2009, the Lord's Resistance Army (LRA) brutally killed more than 865 civilians and abducted at least 160 children in the northern Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). LRA combatants hacked their victims to death with machetes or axes or crushed their skulls with clubs and heavy sticks. In some of the places where they attacked, few were left alive.   The worst attacks happened 48 hours over Christmas in locations some 160 miles apart in the Daruma, Duru, and Faradje areas of the Haut-Uele district of northern Congo. The LRA waited until the time of Christmas festivities on December 24 and 25 to carry out their devastating attacks, apparently choosing a moment when they would find the maximum number of people altogether. The killings occurred in the Congo and parts of southern Sudan, where similar weapons and tactics were used.   The Christmas massacres in Congo are part of a longstanding practice of horrific atrocities and abuse by the LRA. Before shifting its operations to the Congo in 2006, the LRA was based in Uganda and southern Sudan, where LRA combatants also killed, raped, and abducted thousands of civilians. When the LRA moved to Congo, its combatants initially refrained from targeting Congolese people. Still, in September 2008, the LRA began its first wave of attacks, apparently to punish local communities who had helped LRA defectors to escape. The first wave of attacks in September, together with the Christmas massacres, has led to the deaths of over 1,033 civilians and the abduction of at least 476 children.   LRA killings have not stopped since the Christmas massacres. Human Rights Watch receives regular reports of murders and abductions by the LRA, keeping civilians living in terror. According to the United Nations, over 140,000 people have fled their homes since late December 2008 to seek safety elsewhere. New attacks and the flight of civilians are reported weekly. People are frightened to gather together in some areas, believing that the LRA may choose these moments to strike, as they did with such devastating efficiency over Christmas.   Even by LRA standards, the Christmas massacres in the Congo were ruthless. LRA combatants struck quickly and quietly, surrounding their victims as they ate their Christmas meal in Batande village or gathered for a Christmas day concert in Faradje. In Mabando village, the LRA sought to maximize the death toll by luring their victims to a central place, playing the radio, and forcing their victims to sing songs and call for others to come to join the party. In most attacks, they tied up their victims, stripped them of their clothes, raped the women and girls, and then killed their victims by crushing their skulls. In two cases, the attackers tried to kill three-year-old toddlers by twisting off their heads. The few villagers who survived often did so because their assailants thought they were dead.   Yeah...so there's that. We could go much deeper into this incident, but we think you get the point.    We'll leave you with a story that is pretty bizarre when you stop and think about it. But we'll leave you with this story of an unlikely Christmas get-together. This is the story of the Christmas truce.    British machine gunner Bruce Bairnsfather, later a prominent cartoonist, wrote about it in his memoirs. Like most of his fellow infantrymen of the 1st Battalion of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, he was spending the holiday eve shivering in the muck, trying to keep warm. He had spent a good part of the past few months fighting the Germans. And now, in a part of Belgium called Bois de Ploegsteert, he was crouched in a trench that stretched just three feet deep by three feet wide, his days and nights marked by an endless cycle of sleeplessness and fear, stale biscuits and cigarettes too wet to light.   "Here I was, in this horrible clay cavity," Bairnsfather wrote, "…miles and miles from home. Cold, wet through and covered with mud." There didn't "seem the slightest chance of leaving—except in an ambulance."   At about 10 p.m., Bairnsfather noticed a noise. "I listened," he recalled. "Away across the field, among the dark shadows beyond, I could hear the murmur of voices." He turned to a fellow soldier in his trench and said, "Do you hear the Boches [Germans] kicking up that racket over there?"   Yes," came the reply. "They've been at it some time!"   The Germans were singing carols, as it was Christmas Eve. In the darkness, some of the British soldiers began to sing back. "Suddenly," Bairnsfather recalled, "we heard a confused shouting from the other side. We all stopped to listen. The shout came again." The voice was from an enemy soldier, speaking in English with a strong German accent. He was saying, "Come over here."   One of the British sergeants answered: "You come half-way. I come half-way."   In the years to come, what happened next would stun the world and make history. Enemy soldiers began to climb nervously out of their trenches and meet in the barbed-wire-filled "No Man's Land" that separated the armies. Typically, the British and Germans communicated across No Man's Land with streaking bullets, with only occasional gentlemanly allowances to collect the dead unmolested. But now, there were handshakes and words of kindness. The soldiers traded songs, tobacco, and wine, joining in a spontaneous holiday party in the cold night. Bairnsfather could not believe his eyes. "Here they were—the actual, practical soldiers of the German army. There was not an atom of hate on either side."   And it wasn't confined to that one battlefield. Starting on Christmas Eve, small pockets of French, German, Belgian, and British troops held impromptu cease-fires across the Western Front, with reports of some on the Eastern Front as well. Some accounts suggest a few of these unofficial truces remained in effect for days.   Descriptions of the Christmas Truce appear in numerous diaries and letters of the time. One British soldier, a rifleman, named J. Reading, wrote a letter home to his wife describing his holiday experience in 1914: "My company happened to be in the firing line on Christmas eve, and it was my turn…to go into a ruined house and remain there until 6:30 on Christmas morning. During the early part of the morning the Germans started singing and shouting, all in good English. They shouted out: 'Are you the Rifle Brigade; have you a spare bottle; if so we will come halfway and you come the other half.'"   "Later on in the day they came towards us," Reading described. "And our chaps went out to meet them…I shook hands with some of them, and they gave us cigarettes and cigars. We did not fire that day, and everything was so quiet it seemed like a dream."   Another British soldier, named John Ferguson, recalled it this way: "Here we were laughing and chatting to men whom only a few hours before we were trying to kill!"   Other diaries and letters describe German soldiers using candles to light Christmas trees around their trenches. One German infantryman described how a British soldier set up a makeshift barbershop, charging Germans a few cigarettes each for a haircut. Other accounts describe vivid scenes of men helping enemy soldiers collect their dead, of which there was plenty.   One British fighter named Ernie Williams later described in an interview his recollection of some makeshift soccer play on what turned out to be an icy pitch: "The ball appeared from somewhere, I don't know where... They made up some goals and one fellow went in goal and then it was just a general kick-about. I should think there were about a couple of hundred taking part."   German Lieutenant Kurt Zehmisch of the 134 Saxons Infantry, a schoolteacher who spoke both English and German, described a pick-up soccer game in his diary, which was discovered in an attic near Leipzig in 1999, written in an archaic German form of shorthand. "Eventually the English brought a soccer ball from their trenches, and pretty soon, a lively game ensued," he wrote. "How marvelously wonderful, yet how strange it was. The English officers felt the same way about it. Thus Christmas, the celebration of Love, managed to bring mortal enemies together as friends for a time."   So much more can be said about this event, but that seems like an excellent place to leave off this Christmas episode! And yes, when you really do stop and think about it… That's a pretty crazy yet fantastic thing.   Greatest disaster movies of all time   https://www.ranker.com/crowdranked-list/the-greatest-disaster-movies-of-all-time

action chicago reading australia new zealand australian american thailand mexico americans german fuck children santa christmas black stone indian colorado fire south numerous louisiana democrats republicans congress english bam french south africa love starting civil war british iran germany frankenstein land democratic tennessee cold lord scandinavia netherlands pakistan afghanistan african americans south carolina montana iroquois constitution mexican soldiers united nations sudan marine osama rumors doors amsterdam ku klux klan shortly john kennedy damn forty belgium kentucky richter krampus laden bloody malta guam sons klan leipzig knights uganda national park service friesland massacre soviet union christmas eve sri lanka sick union curious miners windy city no man disasters holt marines reconstruction bureau buildings indian ocean northern territory republican party enemy afghan bluebeard congo bois amendment us marines democratic republic boxing day meteorology woody guthrie taliban belgians haarlem groningen morgue klansmen kampen ka mayfield hanover zwolle upper peninsula allegedly chennai soviets confederacy western front christmas day christmas well dokkum congolese pulaski daruma human rights watch battalion fraternities sumatra calumet cyclop remarkably eastern front institutional revolutionary party andrew johnson cyclone tracy organizers christmas truce congo drc national oceanic phuket atmospheric administration noaa east point john ferguson jim stone richard reed wfm lra boxing day tsunami red jacket agana banda aceh c h ulysses s invisible empire mt ruapehu civil war reconstruction john lester keweenaw peninsula one british duru white brotherhood charles parker nathan bedford forrest acteal
Dead Rabbit Radio
Ep 798 - Childhood's End: Was Arthur C. Clarke A Pedophile?

Dead Rabbit Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 49:17


Today we uncover a terrible secret about Arthur C. Clarke, find out Rudolph used to be a jerk, and then we explore whether or not Tik Tok may enslave us all in the AI realm!   Patreon  https://www.patreon.com/user?u=18482113 MERCH STORE!!! https://tinyurl.com/y8zam4o2 Amazon Wish List https://www.amazon.com/hz/wishlist/ls/28CIOGSFRUXAD?ref_=wl_share   Help Promote Dead Rabbit! Dual Flyer https://i.imgur.com/OhuoI2v.jpg "As Above" Flyer https://i.imgur.com/yobMtUp.jpg “Alien Flyer” By TVP VT U https://imgur.com/gallery/aPN1Fnw   Links: The McSweeney's Store https://store.mcsweeneys.net/products/mcsweeneys64 Yes, Arthur C. Clarke was likely a pedophile https://www.patreon.com/posts/yes-arthur-c-was-30298650 It doesn't do any harm ...most of the damage comes from fuss made by hysterical parents. https://www.thefreelibrary.com/It+doesn%27t+do+any+harm+...most+of+the+damage+comes+from+fuss+made+by...-a060659502 Arthur C. Clarke https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_C._Clarke Man on the moon https://www.theguardian.com/books/1999/sep/12/sciencefictionfantasyandhorror.arthurcclarke Arthur C Clarke not a paedophile: Sri Lanka https://archive.md/HmoTV#selection-331.0-331.43 NOTW editor 'spiked paedophilia scoop on Arthur C Clarke for fear of Murdoch' https://www.independent.co.uk/news/media/press/notw-editor-spiked-paedophilia-scoop-on-arthur-c-clarke-for-fear-of-murdoch-7920816.html We Asked People What Childhood Moment Shaped Them the Most https://www.vice.com/en/article/bjxp5m/we-asked-people-what-childhood-moment-shaped-them-the-most 'PREDATOR' PRODUCER Chris Cuomo's CNN staffer John Griffin arrested for ‘luring underage girls to his ski house for sexual training' https://www.the-sun.com/news/4254945/former-chris-cuomo-cnn-staffer-arrested/ ENTERTAINMENT LAWYER 12/13 **1** (CNN Producer story) http://www.agcwebpages.com/BLINDITEMS/2021/DECEMBER.html EXCLUSIVE: Pedophile X-Men actor convicted of sexually abusing Nickelodeon child star is STILL working with underage kids https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3115792/Pedophile-X-Men-actor-convicted-sexually-abusing-Nickelodeon-child-star-working-underage-kids.html ENTERTAINMENT LAWYER 12/14 **8** (Rich DeepFake story) http://www.agcwebpages.com/BLINDITEMS/2021/DECEMBER.html ‘Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer' Mysteries, Explained https://www.snopes.com/news/2016/11/29/rudolph-the-red-nosed-reindeer-explained/ Colie.1 https://www.tiktok.com/@colie.1/video/7036087438397213998?is_copy_url=1&is_from_webapp=v1 How Does TikTok Make Money? https://www.gobankingrates.com/money/business/how-does-tiktok-make-money/ What Is TikTok? https://www.investopedia.com/what-is-tiktok-4588933   Listen to the daily podcast anywhere you listen to podcasts! ------------------------------------------------ Logo Art By Ash Black Opening Song: "Atlantis Attacks" Closing Song: "Castle Greyskull" Music By Simple Rabbitron3000 created by Eerbud Thanks to Chris K, Founder Of The Golden Rabbit Brigade Dead Rabbit Archivist Some Weirdo On Twitter AKA Jack YouTube Champ Stewart Meatball The Haunted Mic Arm provided by Chyme Chili Special Thanks to Fabio N. Pintrest https://www.pinterest.com/basque5150/jason-carpenter-hood-river/ http://www.DeadRabbit.com Email: DeadRabbitRadio@gmail.com Twitter: @DeadRabbitRadio Facebook: www.Facebook.com/DeadRabbitRadio TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@deadrabbitradio Jason Carpenter PO Box 1363 Hood River, OR 97031 Paranormal, Conspiracy, and True Crime news as it happens! Jason Carpenter breaks the stories they'll be talking about tomorrow, assuming the world doesn't end today. All Contents Of This Podcast Copyright Jason Carpenter 2018 - 2021

The Grade Cricketer
182. 2-0, with Ali Martin

The Grade Cricketer

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 83:22


Check out our Patreon for exclusive content every single week at https://www.patreon.com/gradecricketer including #AskTGC Fridays and the exclusive audio from all of our YouTube videos - specifically our daily reactions to every day's play during The Ashes and The South Africa v India Test series.This episode is brought to you by Budgy Smuggler. You can get free shipping on your order by using the code 'CHAMP' at https://www.budgysmuggler.com.auT20 Stars products are made from one of the best cricket manufacturers in the world and they have cut out the middle person so the cricket gear goes straight from the manufacturer to you.T20 Stars are celebrating a huge week of cricket by giving all TGC listeners 10% off on all bats, balls, gloves and pads. USE THE CODE TGC10 to claim the discount.Free shipping and free returns - visit www.t20stars.comWe're getting behind #nationalbackyardcricket, which supports libraries across regional Australia as well as tertiary education projects in India, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Tanzania, South Africa, Afghanistan and Indonesia. Register your team, and game, to help support these projects. The official day is Sunday 6 Feb, but you can play any time in the lead up. Head to nationalbackyardcricket.com to get in and around it.You can follow The Grade Cricketer on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter:https://www.facebook.com/gradecricketerhttps://www.instagram.com/thegradecricketer/https://twitter.com/gradecricketerThe Grade Cricketer hosts are Ian Higgins and Sam Perry.You can follow them on Instagram and Twitter:Ian Higgins:https://www.instagram.com/higgins_ian/https://twitter.com/1an_HigginsSam Perry:https://www.instagram.com/sj_perry/https://twitter.com/sjjperry

Tamil Audio Books
Kanden Ilangayai Full Audiobook | கண்டேன் இலங்கையை - அமரர் கல்கி | Travelogue | பயணக்கட்டுரை

Tamil Audio Books

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 211:29


இன்றைக்கு 83 ஆண்டுகளுக்கு முன்னால் முதன்முதலாக 'மரகதத் தீவு' என்று வர்ணிக்கப்படும் இலங்கைக்கு அமரர் கல்கி பயணம் செய்த அனுபவங்களை "கண்டேன் இலங்கையை" எனும் தலைப்பிலான பயணக்கட்டுரைத் தொகுப்பாக வெளியானது. இந்த கட்டுரைகள் எழுதப்பட்ட காலத்தில் இருந்த சிலோன், இப்போதைய ஸ்ரீலங்கா, பலவிதங்களில் மாற்றம் கண்டுள்ளது எனினும் அடிப்படையான பண்பாடும் சுவைகளும் மரபுகளும் அப்படியேதான் உள்ளன என்று தோன்றுகிறது. கல்கியின் நகைச்சுவையை அனைவரும் கேட்டு ரசிக்க வேண்டும். கேட்டு ரசித்து சிரித்து மகிழுங்கள். 'Kanden Ilangayai' is a series of articles written by Amarar Kalki, after his travel to Sri Lanka 83 years ago. This travelogue is filled with Kalki's usual humour, sarcasm and wit. Listen laugh and enjoy. Donate and Support us at www.kadhaiosai.com Audio Mastering courtesy - Baba Prasad, Founder, Digi Sound Studio --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/kadhai-osai/message

Nomad Podcast
Azariah France-Williams - A Displaced Christmas (N263)

Nomad Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 24:15


Merry Christmas to One and All from Nomad Podcast.  In this devotional episode, Fr Azariah France Williams recalls the story of Viraj Mendis, who sought sanctuary in the UK from Sri Lanka. He lived for several years in a room in the Church of the Ascension, in Hulme, Manchester, being protected by the community. In 1989, the police raided the church and he was forcibly deported. This episode also features the poet and artist Steve Beal. And David Benjamin Blower performs the medieval traditional Christmas carol, Coventry Carol. Show Notes → Nomad is able to produce episodes like this one because a group of faithful listeners help us pay the bills. Our supporters gain access to the Nomad community - which manifests as Nomad Book Club and The Beloved Listener Lounge - and bonus episodes, such as Nomad Contemplations, Nomad Devotionals and Nomad Revisited. And you may find yourself the proud owner of a Beloved Listener mug! Head over to our Patreon page and our own members page to donate. You might also want to have a look at our blog, which we use to share the stories of the evolving faith of our podcast listeners. And if you're looking for other people to share this journey with, then register on our Listener Map and our Nomad Gathering Facebook page, and see if any other nomads are in your area.

Tamil Audio Books
Kanden Ilangayai Audiobook | கண்டேன் இலங்கையை - அமரர் கல்கி கட்டுரை - 12 | Travelogue | பயணக்கட்டுரை

Tamil Audio Books

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 23:14


இன்றைக்கு 83 ஆண்டுகளுக்கு முன்னால் முதன்முதலாக 'மரகதத் தீவு' என்று வர்ணிக்கப்படும் இலங்கைக்கு அமரர் கல்கி பயணம் செய்த அனுபவங்களை "கண்டேன் இலங்கையை" எனும் தலைப்பிலான பயணக்கட்டுரைத் தொகுப்பாக வெளியானது. இந்த கட்டுரைகள் எழுதப்பட்ட காலத்தில் இருந்த சிலோன், இப்போதைய ஸ்ரீலங்கா, பலவிதங்களில் மாற்றம் கண்டுள்ளது எனினும் அடிப்படையான பண்பாடும் சுவைகளும் மரபுகளும் அப்படியேதான் உள்ளன என்று தோன்றுகிறது. கல்கியின் நகைச்சுவையை அனைவரும் கேட்டு ரசிக்க வேண்டும். கேட்டு ரசித்து சிரித்து மகிழுங்கள். 'Kanden Ilangayai' is a series of articles written by Amarar Kalki, after his travel to Sri Lanka 83 years ago. This travelogue is filled with Kalki's usual humour, sarcasm and wit. Listen laugh and enjoy. Donate and Support us at www.kadhaiosai.com Audio Mastering courtesy - Baba Prasad, Founder, Digi Sound Studio --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/kadhai-osai/message

Tamil Audio Books
Kanden Ilangayai Audiobook | கண்டேன் இலங்கையை - அமரர் கல்கி கட்டுரை - 11 | Travelogue | பயணக்கட்டுரை

Tamil Audio Books

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2021 21:11


இன்றைக்கு 83 ஆண்டுகளுக்கு முன்னால் முதன்முதலாக 'மரகதத் தீவு' என்று வர்ணிக்கப்படும் இலங்கைக்கு அமரர் கல்கி பயணம் செய்த அனுபவங்களை "கண்டேன் இலங்கையை" எனும் தலைப்பிலான பயணக்கட்டுரைத் தொகுப்பாக வெளியானது. இந்த கட்டுரைகள் எழுதப்பட்ட காலத்தில் இருந்த சிலோன், இப்போதைய ஸ்ரீலங்கா, பலவிதங்களில் மாற்றம் கண்டுள்ளது எனினும் அடிப்படையான பண்பாடும் சுவைகளும் மரபுகளும் அப்படியேதான் உள்ளன என்று தோன்றுகிறது. கல்கியின் நகைச்சுவையை அனைவரும் கேட்டு ரசிக்க வேண்டும். கேட்டு ரசித்து சிரித்து மகிழுங்கள். 'Kanden Ilangayai' is a series of articles written by Amarar Kalki, after his travel to Sri Lanka 83 years ago. This travelogue is filled with Kalki's usual humour, sarcasm and wit. Listen laugh and enjoy. Donate and Support us at www.kadhaiosai.com Audio Mastering courtesy - Baba Prasad, Founder, Digi Sound Studio --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/kadhai-osai/message

The Grade Cricketer
181. 1-0, with Trent Copeland

The Grade Cricketer

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 90:30


Australia romp to a demon-arousing win at the Gabba and all of the nation's sensory needs are met. We cover it all (selectively) in 40 minutes of visceral catharsis, which is then followed by the Visceral Minute.Copes then joins in, adding intelligence and knowledge, before our most in-depth analysis of the BBL, aka Blobby Season, to date.#AskTGC traverses first-borns, rhyming slang, and sad, wistful English people. Thanks (as ever) to everyone.Check out our Patreon for exclusive content every single week at https://www.patreon.com/gradecricketer including #AskTGC Fridays and the exclusive audio from all of our YouTube videos - specifically our daily reactions to every day's play during The Ashes.This episode is brought to you by Budgy Smuggler. You can get free shipping on your order by using the code 'CHAMP' at https://www.budgysmuggler.com.auT20 Stars products are made from one of the best cricket manufacturers in the world and they have cut out the middle person so the cricket gear goes straight from the manufacturer to you.T20 Stars are celebrating a huge week of cricket by giving all TGC listeners 10% off on all bats, balls, gloves and pads. USE THE CODE TGC10 to claim the discount.Free shipping and free returns - visit www.t20stars.comWe're getting behind #nationalbackyardcricket, which supports libraries across regional Australia as well as tertiary education projects in India, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Tanzania, South Africa, Afghanistan and Indonesia. Register your team, and game, to help support these projects. The official day is Sunday 6 Feb, but you can play any time in the lead up. Head to nationalbackyardcricket.com to get in and around it.You can follow The Grade Cricketer on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter:https://www.facebook.com/gradecricketerhttps://www.instagram.com/thegradecricketer/https://twitter.com/gradecricketerThe Grade Cricketer hosts are Ian Higgins and Sam Perry.You can follow them on Instagram and Twitter:Ian Higgins:https://www.instagram.com/higgins_ian/https://twitter.com/1an_HigginsSam Perry:https://www.instagram.com/sj_perry/https://twitter.com/sjjperry

The Forum
Algae: Slime life

The Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 39:23


They're slimy and slippery. They're part of the green film you see on garden ponds. They can clump together and wash up on the shores of beautiful beaches. A lot of them are invisible to the naked eye. These underappreciated organisms called algae are indispensable to the presence of life on earth but not all is straightforward about them. They can be single celled or multi cellular. They can be ugly and slimy or sometimes beautiful: indeed are even a tourist attraction. They may be found in the sea or on land. They can be life-creating and yet life-destroying and toxic in excess. So perhaps it's time we paid more attention to algae and their evolution. Rajan Datar is joined by Ruth Kassinger, author of Slime: How algae created us, plague us and just might save us; Dr Brenda Soler-Figueroa, a marine scientist at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Centre; Dr Gothamie Weerakoon Senior Curator of Lichens and Slime Moulds at the Natural History Museum of London and author of Fascinating Lichens of Sri Lanka; and Stefan Bengtson, emeritus professor at the Swedish Museum of Natural History. (Photo: Volvox algae colonies, spherical forms outlined by biflagellate cells interconnected by cytoplasmic bridges. Credit: DeAgostini/Getty Images)

The B List with Petshopboy
Pull Up in the Sri Lanka What?! with Steven Krugle

The B List with Petshopboy

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 63:40


B is joined by Steven Krugle, the man, the myth, and the legend behind the iconic @FacesByBravo account to discuss their IRL brushes with cancelled Housewives, Ultimate Girls Trip, and the Brittany Murphy doc. For access to bonus episodes and additional content please visit patreon.com/theblist

The PurposeGirl Podcast: Empowering women to live their purpose with courage, joy, and fierce self-love.

Have you ever had a perfect “Shark Tank” idea but not known how to do it? A product you want to create but you know nothing about funding or manufacturing? My guest didn't either but she knew she needed to solve curvy busty women's issue with athletic bras!    And she did just that! Bloom Bras is the most size inclusive line on the market ranging in sizes 28C -56L designed with NASA, shipping and packaging experts and Oprah's corset maker to bring the vision to life.   Now she is part of supporting creative people like you in finding manufacturers and getting your ideas and your products off the ground.   We talk about: After running a half marathon with an underwire bra under her sports bra, she had no skin left from all the chafing she know she needed to make a difference for herself and all the other women out there. She had written the business plan 15 years ago and now was the time! Her struggles finding a manufacture to work with a new start up company and worked around this using kickstarter and the massive community she created around supporting other female entrepreneurs. Sustainability in manufacturing, and how Elyse built a factory in Sri Lanka that uses solar power and wind power, and how they use local labor to actually manufacture the product so that they're not having to travel. How in order to be successful you need to step into the discomfort of saying "I have a great idea and I need money and you need to believe in me". How important it is to create a community around supporting other women's dreams and their business.   You can check out Bloombras at on Facebook at Facebook.com/bloombras, Instagram at instagram.com/BloomBras or on their website at https://bloombras.com/   Give them some love on social media and check out their bras today!   Let's change the world. Go to Apple Podcasts and leave a 5-star review and subscribe so you never miss an episode!

10% Happier with Dan Harris
Rewire Your Relationship To Your Body | Bonus Meditation with Anushka Fernandopulle

10% Happier with Dan Harris

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 7:33


Gratitude practices are transformative. Experiment with gratitude for your own body, noticing the relaxation and ease that results.About Anushka Fernandopulle:Anushka teaches meditation, works as an organizational consultant, and does leadership coaching with individuals and teams. She has practiced meditation for over 25 years, including four years in full-time intensive training in monasteries and retreat centers in the US, India and Sri Lanka. Her work is informed by a BA in anthropology/religion from Harvard University, an MBA from Yale focused on leadership and organizational behavior, and certification in coaching from the Coaches Training Institute.To find this meditation in the Ten Percent Happier app, you can search for “Grateful For Your Body,” or click here: https://10percenthappier.app.link/content?meditation=de800c6b-56cc-4e97-ad22-a3b68e74086f.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Las Culturistas with Matt Rogers and Bowen Yang
"Hundred. Period!" (w/ Matt & Bowen)

Las Culturistas with Matt Rogers and Bowen Yang

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 123:51


The culture catch-up to end all culture catch-ups, this episode has Matt Rogers & Bowen Yang dropping a dramatic announcement about the long-delayed LCCA's, reviewing their Thanksgivings and previewing their New Years, and demanding the readers to send in photos of their fabulous hikes! And then: culture. House of Gucci. Prosthetics culture. Adele's 30. Rebecca Hall's Passing. Nicki on the Potomac reunion. The legendary Stephen Sondheim. West Side Story buzz (RACHEL ZEGLER COME ON THE POD). The flop Grammy Nominations drama. Channeling whilst creating art. Selling Sunset. Survivor. A recap of The Morning Show finale and a celebration of the third graders. And the question: should Bowen be Boq in Wicked? This specnomenal episode pulled all the way up in the Sri Lanka. Wouldn't you agree? We do... Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com