Podcasts about tufts

Private research university in Medford and Somerville, Massachusetts

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Best podcasts about tufts

Latest podcast episodes about tufts

Sports Business Radio Podcast
SBR Roundtable: The Fall of FTX and Twitter

Sports Business Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 57:13


PODCAST: Sports Business Radio Host Brian Berger and Executive Producer Bryan Griggs discuss the fall of cryptocurrency company FTX and the sports partnerships the company has left in its wake following their recent bankruptcy filing. Berger and Griggs also discuss Twitter under Elon Musk, Budweiser's banishment by World Cup and the latest on the potential sale of the NFL's Washington Commanders. LISTEN to this conversation on Apple podcasts or Spotify podcasts. WATCH conversations on the Sports Business Radio YouTube channel at www.sportsbusinessradio.com. Follow Sports Business Radio on Twitter @SBRadio and on Instagram @SportsBusinessRadio. This week's edition of Sports Business Radio is presented by InsideTracker. InsideTracker is the ultra-personalized performance system that analyzes biomarker data from your blood, DNA, lifestyle and fitness tracker to help you optimize your body and reach your health & wellness goals. InsideTracker transforms your body's data into true knowledge, meaningful insights and customized action plans of evidence-backed nutrition, fitness and lifestyle recommendations. Founded in 2009 by leading scientists in aging, genetics and biometric data from MIT, Tufts, and Harvard, InsideTracker's mission is to improve the healthspan of people everywhere so they can enjoy longer, healthier lives - adding life to their years and years to their life. For a limited time, you can get 20% off the entire Inside Tracker store. Just go to InsideTracker.com/SBR and save 20% today. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Vet Blast Podcast
152: Practicing Narrative Medicine to Provide Individualized Care

The Vet Blast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 20:09


Karen Fine, DVM, is a small animal veterinarian and writer who operated a house call practice for 25 years and practices integrative medicine. Her memoir, The Other Family Doctor: A Veterinarian Explores What Animals Can Teach Us About Love, Life and Mortality is forthcoming in March 2023 from Penguin Random House. She is also the author of the textbook Narrative Medicine in Veterinary Practice from CRC Press, published in 2021. Fine, a Tufts graduate, practices in Central Massachusetts. Her website is www.karenfinedvm.com.

Myers Detox
Habits of a Happy Brain: Retrain Your Brain to Boost Your Feel Good Chemicals with Loretta G. Breuning

Myers Detox

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 37:29


Loretta G. Breuning joins the show to talk about how to develop healthy habits that retrain your brain and increase your feel good chemicals. Boosting these chemicals, that were once primarily used in evolutionary survival, requires a new approach in our 21st century lifestyle, and Loretta is here to tell us how. She explains how brain chemicals are controlled by neural pathways built from past experiences, how you can build new pathways by feeding your brain new experiences, and what exactly each of our brain chemicals are designed to do. So many fascinating topics and tips discussed in todays podcast. You'll leave with a new understanding of your brain and how you can become a happier person by using Loretta's incredible brain boosting strategies.   On today's podcast, you will learn: The purpose of each of our main neurotransmitters. The experiment where rats drank cocaine water until they died. Why your body releases cortisol so frequently. How to rewire your brain to release more feel good chemicals. How social media affects our brain, and ways to reduce its use. Loretta's top tips for boosting feel good chemicals.   Loretta G. Breuning's Bio: Loretta G. Breuning, PhD, is Founder of the Inner Mammal Institute and Professor Emerita of Management at California State University, East Bay. She is the author of many personal development books, including Habits of a Happy Brain: Retrain Your Brain to Boost Your Serotonin, Dopamine, Oxytocin and Endorphin Levels. As a teacher and a parent, she was not convinced by prevailing theories of human motivation. Then she learned about the brain chemistry we share with earlier mammals and everything made sense. She began creating resources that have helped thousands of people make peace with their inner mammal. Dr. Breuning's work has been translated into twelve languages. Before teaching, she worked for the United Nations in Africa. She is a graduate of Cornell University and Tufts.  The Inner Mammal Institute offers videos, podcasts, books, blogs, multimedia, a training program, and a free five-day happy-chemical jumpstart.  You can learn more about Loretta and her work at  

Conversations in the Coop
Episode 44 - Matt Hyde

Conversations in the Coop

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 21:59


This week, we head up campus to catch up with Trinity's new Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid, Matt Hyde. We talk with Matt about his longtime connection to the NESCAC prior to arriving at Trinity, from growing up in Williamstown, competing as a student-athlete at Bowdoin, and working at Tufts, and how he sees athletics and admissions working hand in hand.

Razib Khan's Unsupervised Learning
Erik Hoel: neuroscience is dead, long live neuroscience!

Razib Khan's Unsupervised Learning

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 76:37


Today, on the Unsupervised Learning podcast Razib talks to Erik Hoel, author of the novel The Revelations, and host of  The Intrinsic Perspective Substack. Hoel is a neuroscientist at Tufts who is interested in the problem of consciousness. Hoel admits right off that the questions and answers around consciousness motivate neuroscience in the first place, but throughout the conversation, he also points out that the discipline has a long way to go before it uncovers deep and insightful counterintuitive findings. In the early years of the 21st century, neuroscience was driven forward by amazing new technologies like functional magnetic resonance imagining (fMRI) that seemed to offer a window onto the brain's activity, but over the last few years, most researchers agree that many of these papers did not live up to the hype (getting caught up in the replication crisis and underpowered studies).  Razib also talks to Hoel about his recent paper, The overfitted brain: dreams evolve to assist generalization, which argues that by “hallucinating out-of-distribution sensory stimulation every night, the brain is able to rescue the generalizability of its perceptual and cognitive abilities and increase task performance.” In plainer English, dreams allow the brain to experiment with novel possibilities outside of the range of experience and let it be more flexible and well-prepared in the face of surprising stimuli. Razib and Hoel also discuss his unique perspective as a humanist and a scientist. Hoel's mother owned an independent bookstore, and he spent most of his childhood exploring its shelves. He reflects on how his Substack has grown (his piece The gossip trap won Scott Alexander's book review contest), to the point where he wonders if perhaps in the next decade he will be more a writer who does some neuroscience than a neuroscientist who does some writing. Share

The Dental Download
134: Multiple Application Cycles & Finding the Right Program (Colby Dean, D1 at Tufts)

The Dental Download

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 28:27


In this week's episode, Colby Dean joins us to talk about his life as a D1 at Tufts in Boston! He originates from Alabama and is a proud Native American. He completed both a bachelors degree and masters during his process of trying to get into dental school. Enjoy this week's episode about his "why dentistry" and his story of perseverance to make it happen. Engage with the podcast on Instagram: https://www.facebook.com/groups/703580220572972/ Join Our Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/703580220572972/ Haley's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/haleyschultzdental/

Sports Business Radio Podcast
Colin Hanks (@ColinHanks), Actor/Director/Producer + Matt Leinart (@MattLeinartQB), Co-Founder, Hall of GOATS

Sports Business Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 65:54


PODCAST: Colin Hanks (@ColinHanks), Actor, Director and Producer of the forthcoming HBO Sports documentary “Say Hey, Willie Mays”, which debuts on November 8th on HBO and streams on HBO Max, joins Sports Business Radio for a wide-ranging conversation. Hanks, who is a huge San Francisco Giants fan, previews the documentary about the life and baseball career of Hall of Fame Willie Mays. Hanks also discusses the future documentary he'll be teaming on with Ryan Reynolds that will showcase the life of late actor John Candy. And Hanks shares his founder's story for his handkerchief company - Hankskerchiefs. Matt Leinart (@MattLeinartQB), Fox Sports College football analyst, 2004 Heisman Trophy winner and Co-Founder of Hall of GOATS joins us to share some exciting news about what Hall of GOATS has coming up in the near future. Leinart also shares his thoughts on the college football season thus far and how things may unfold the rest of the season. LISTEN to this conversation on Apple podcasts or Spotify podcasts. WATCH these conversations on the Sports Business Radio YouTube channel at www.sportsbusinessradio.com. Follow Sports Business Radio on Twitter @SBRadio and on Instagram @SportsBusinessRadio. This week's edition of Sports Business Radio is presented by InsideTracker. InsideTracker is the ultra-personalized performance system that analyzes biomarker data from your blood, DNA, lifestyle and fitness tracker to help you optimize your body and reach your health & wellness goals. InsideTracker transforms your body's data into true knowledge, meaningful insights and customized action plans of evidence-backed nutrition, fitness and lifestyle recommendations. Founded in 2009 by leading scientists in aging, genetics and biometric data from MIT, Tufts, and Harvard, InsideTracker's mission is to improve the healthspan of people everywhere so they can enjoy longer, healthier lives - adding life to their years and years to their life. For a limited time, you can get 20% off the entire Inside Tracker store. Just go to InsideTracker.com/SBR and save 20% today. #ColinHanks #MattLeinart #WillieMays #MLB #CFB #NFL #NWSL  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

College Matters. Alma Matters.
Holden Dahlerbruch on Tufts University: International Relations & Interdisciplinary Studies, Coke Scholar, and Culinary Playground.

College Matters. Alma Matters.

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2022 59:03


In high school, Holden's passion for cooking landed him on a TV Show called Man versus Child: Chef Showdown as a child chef. Naturally, when time came for college, he wanted to go where he could build on his love for food. Holden joins us on our podcast to share his unusual undergraduate experience at Tufts, The Coke Scholarship, Pursuing his passion for food, and Advice for high schoolers. #CokeScholars In particular, we discuss the following with him: Overall Experience at Tufts Why Tufts? Passion for Cooking Study Abroad in Germany Advice to High Schoolers Topics discussed in this episode: Introduction to Holden Dahlerbruch, Tufts [] Hi Fives - Podcast Highlights [] Overall Tufts Experience [] Why Tufts? [] High School Interests [] The TV Show [] Passion for Cooking [] Culinary Playground [] Applying for Coke Scholarship [] Reasons for Getting the Scholarship [] The Coke Difference [] The Tufts Transition [] The Classes [] The Virtual Year [] The Year Abroad - Germany [] What Next? [] Advice for High Schoolers [] Memories [] Our Guests: Holden Dahlerbruch is a Senior at Tufts University double majoring in International Relations and Interdisciplinary Studies. Holden is a 2019 Coke Scholar. Memorable Quote: “First off, always ask. If you are too afraid to ask, you've lost the opportunity”. Holden. Episode Transcript: Please visit Episode's Transcript. Similar Episodes: College Experiences Calls-to-action: Subscribe to our Weekly Podcast Newsletter Follow us on Instagram To Ask the Guest a question, or to comment on this episode, email podcast@almamatters.io. Subscribe or Follow us wherever you get your podcasts.

Audible Bleeding
SVS Women's Section: Advice for Young Surgeons

Audible Bleeding

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 37:17


In this second episode highlighting the SVS women's section, Wen (@WenKawaji) and Amanda (@AmandaFobare) are joined by Dr. Furey, Dr. Bunnell and Dr. Kumar to discuss important topics such as the needs of a young vascular surgeon and how to pick your optimal practice.  Show Guests: Dr. Bunnell @avi-bunnell: Private practice vascular Surgeon in Tampa Florida specializing in venous disease, PAD, and carotid revascularization Dr. Furey @drpfureymd: Chief of vascular surgery and president of medical staff at Catholic Medical Center in Manchester, NH. Associate director of surgical services for New England Heart and Vascular  Dr. Kumar @ShivaniKumarMD : Graduates of Mount Sinai Medical Center in 2021, currently a vascular surgeon at Tufts medical center. Show Resource: We have shared a list of questions recent graduates have generated for the job search process. Check it out! For those of you who are not familiar with the women's section, we have a great episode that was recently published in September (see link below). To learn more about the Women's Section, please visit the SVS Women's Section website below. https://www.audiblebleeding.com/svs-womens-section/ https://vascular.org/vascular-specialists/networking/svs-womens-section What other topics would you like to hear about? Let us know more about you and what you think of our podcast through our Listener Survey or email us at AudibleBleeding@vascularsociety.org. Follow us on Twitter @audiblebleeding Learn more about us at https://www.audiblebleeding.com/about-1/ and #jointheconversation.

Birds Up Podcast
S2E5: Be Bold: A Campaign for Our Future - Dr. Taylor Eighmy, President of UTSA

Birds Up Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 61:50


UTSA Be Bold Campaign InfoBe Bold EventsGive to Be BoldPresident Eighmy BioUTSA Alumni AssociationAlumni Association Roadrunner Nation Tailgate Tickets

Combinate Podcast - Med Device and Pharma
055 - "Critical Tasks and Knowledge Tasks" with Alexandra Benbadis

Combinate Podcast - Med Device and Pharma

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 50:55


On this episode, I was joined by Alexandra Benbadis, Usability Leader at Sanofi. Alexandra and I discuss: - Critical Tasks: What the guidance says , how to select them and what it means for HF study design - Knowledge Tasks: Meeting regulatory expectations and evaluation the IFU - Usability, HF Studies and Residual Risk Prior to joining Sanofi as Usability Leader, Alexandra Benbadis was a Senior Human Factors Consultant at Emergo by UL. She's a two-time Tufts alumna and has taught two courses through the Tufts Experimental College focused on the design of public spaces and inclusive design.

The Rex Chapman Show with Josh Hopkins
Episode 60 - Ben Mankiewicz

The Rex Chapman Show with Josh Hopkins

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 65:20


On this edition of the Rex Chapman Show with Hopkins, the hosts are joined by TCM host, Ben Mankiewicz. Ben talks about his famous family, future projects, and Season 4 of his podcast "The Plot Thickens" - out October 25th centering on the story of Pam Grier as only she can tell it. Her sudden stardom, her iconic roles, her fights against the system. It's a story of bravery, both onscreen and off. It's a story about race in Hollywood and race in America. 05:00 - Ben's famous grandfather is the topic of 2020 film "Mank" 18:00 - Ben started his career as a television reporter in SC 23:30 - Ben went to Tufts because he was caught up in college rankings and was afraid to go to school in New York. 27:15 - Ben is one of the creators of Young Turks 34:00 - You have to give up music or movies forever, which one do you choose? 39:00 - The Plot Thickens is launching Season 4 on Pam Grier 44:45 - Podcasting as a collaborative art Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Sports Business Radio Podcast
Isaiah Austin - Former basketball star at Baylor University & current NBA League executive

Sports Business Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 65:10


PODCAST: Isaiah Austin, former basketball star at Baylor University and current NBA League executive joins Sports Business Radio for a wide-ranging conversation. Austin discusses being the #1 ranked basketball player for most of his high school career, starring at Baylor University and then being diagnosed with Marfan Syndrome during a physical days prior to the 2014 NBA Draft. After the diagnosis, the NBA restricted Austin from playing in the NBA. But NBA Commissioner Adam Silver befriended Austin and offered him a job at the NBA League Office and Austin is bringing his basketball acumen - on and off the court - to the league and to the elite junior basketball ranks to help others. Austin has an inspirational story that you will want to hear. LISTEN to this conversation on Apple podcasts or Spotify podcasts. WATCH this conversation on the Sports Business Radio YouTube channel at www.sportsbusinessradio.com. Follow Sports Business Radio on Twitter @SBRadio and on Instagram @SportsBusinessRadio. This week's edition of Sports Business Radio is presented by InsideTracker. InsideTracker is the ultra-personalized performance system that analyzes biomarker data from your blood, DNA, lifestyle and fitness tracker to help you optimize your body and reach your health & wellness goals. InsideTracker transforms your body's data into true knowledge, meaningful insights and customized action plans of evidence-backed nutrition, fitness and lifestyle recommendations. Founded in 2009 by leading scientists in aging, genetics and biometric data from MIT, Tufts, and Harvard, InsideTracker's mission is to improve the healthspan of people everywhere so they can enjoy longer, healthier lives - adding life to their years and years to their life. For a limited time, you can get 20% off the entire Inside Tracker store. Just go to InsideTracker.com/SBR and save 20% today. #IsaiahAustin #NBA #USABasketball #Baylor #Podcast  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Schrett's Takes
Season 7 Episode 12: Schrett's Takes x Amherst Student: Amherst Soccer Seniors Nico Kenary, Bernie White and Alex Shamerizadi

Schrett's Takes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 12:41


Amherst Soccer Seniors Nico Kenary, Bernie White and Alex Shamerizadi come on the show to discuss their expectations for the year, importance of leadership, how they rebounded from their loss to Tufts, lessons learned from past leaders and how they can continue to drive success this season. (This was recorded in early October)

Making Peace Visible
Film as a catalyst for reconciliation, with Libby Hoffman

Making Peace Visible

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 32:55


Imagine living next door to a person who murdered your father, raped your sister, or even killed your child. This was the case for many people in Sierra Leone who endured a  brutal civil war from 1991 to 2002: the majority of the 50,000 who died were those killed by their own neighbors. While working with a program that facilitates ritual reconciliation processes in Sierra Leone, a process known as fambul tok (or “family talk”), peacebuilder and philanthropist Libby Hoffman learned that justice for Sierra Leonians isn't about punishing or ousting a perpetrator. Rather, justice comes through making the community whole again. “When you hurt somebody, you don't just hurt them; you hurt the community as well,” says Hoffman. In this episode, host Jamil Simon speaks with Libby Hoffman about fambul tok, a process she calls “building peace from the inside out.” Fambul tok is an ancient tradition where disputes are solved through community-wide conversation around a bonfire. In this post-war context, Hoffman and her team facilitated the revival of the practice for Sierra Leonians. Hoffman also documented this remarkable peacebuilding process in her award-winning documentary film Fambul Tok, which has itself catalyzed further reconciliation within Sierra Leone's war-torn communities. Hoffman has now written a book on her experiences called The Answers Are There: Building Peace from the Inside Out.Libby Hoffman is the founder and President of Catalyst for Peace, a US-based private foundation building peace from the inside-out – creating space for those most impacted by violence to lead in building the peace, supported by healthy, inclusive systems. A former Political Science professor, Hoffman has a Master of Arts in Law and Diplomacy from Tufts' Fletcher School of Law and a BA in Political Science from Williams College.The film Fambul Tok is available for private viewing through War Stories Peace Stories' Peace Docs initiative. Watch the film here: vimeo.com/26644766. This episode was produced by Andrea Muraskin, with help from Faith McClure. Music by Xylo-Ziko via freemusicarchive.org. 

Sports Business Radio Podcast
Carli Lloyd (@CarliLloyd), 2-Time FIFA World Player of the Year

Sports Business Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 47:40


PODCAST: Carli Lloyd (@CarliLloyd), 2-Time FIFA World Player of the Year, 2-Time World Cup Champion, 2-Time Olympic Gold Medalist, USWNT Soccer legend, Minority Owner of Gotham FC of the NWSL, Teqball Ambassador and Author of the book “When Nobody Was Watching - My Hard Fought Journey to the Top of the Soccer World”, joins Sports Business Radio for a wide-ranging conversation. Lloyd discusses her iconic career, the state of women's soccer and what still needs to be done for women's sports, being an ambassador for Teqball and what lies ahead for her post soccer career. LISTEN to this conversation on Apple podcasts or Spotify podcasts. WATCH this conversation on the Sports Business Radio YouTube channel at www.sportsbusinessradio.com. Follow Sports Business Radio on Twitter @SBRadio and on Instagram @SportsBusinessRadio. This week's edition of Sports Business Radio is presented by InsideTracker. InsideTracker is the ultra-personalized performance system that analyzes biomarker data from your blood, DNA, lifestyle and fitness tracker to help you optimize your body and reach your health & wellness goals. InsideTracker transforms your body's data into true knowledge, meaningful insights and customized action plans of evidence-backed nutrition, fitness and lifestyle recommendations. Founded in 2009 by leading scientists in aging, genetics and biometric data from MIT, Tufts, and Harvard, InsideTracker's mission is to improve the healthspan of people everywhere so they can enjoy longer, healthier lives - adding life to their years and years to their life. For a limited time, you can get 20% off the entire Inside Tracker store. Just go to InsideTracker.com/SBR and save 20% today. #CarliLloyd #USWNT #GothamFC #Teqball #WorldCup #FIFA #WomeninSports #NWSL #Author #Podcast #Soccer Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Coltings Nakna Sanning
374. Tufts food compass - bästa maten?

Coltings Nakna Sanning

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 97:30


Sponsrad forskning med det uttalade syftet att påverka den politiska agendan, vad gör det med vår folkhälsa, egentligen? Det frågar vi oss i dagens avsnitt. Vi diskuterar också vem som gör den bästa forskningen, den i vit rock som får betalt av en beställare, eller den livsstilssjuke som försöker rädda sitt liv. Missa inte avsnitt 374!Huvudpartner:getacetrack.comKod: coltingelitista.seKod: coltingPartnerarktisnaturals.seKod: jonas20 Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Boundless Body Radio
Unsettled Science with Returning Guest Nina Teicholz! 347

Boundless Body Radio

Play Episode Play 33 sec Highlight Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 63:57


Check out our new Patreon page! Get access to the Boundless Body Radio Premium Podcast, with a new episode added every other week! Other perks include early releases of our episodes, extended video content, and group and one on one coaching!Nina Teicholz is a returning guest on our show! Be sure to check out her first two appearances on Boundless Body Radio on episode 50, and on episode 258! Nina Teicholz is a science journalist and author of the New York Times bestselling The Big Fat Surprise, which upended the conventional wisdom on dietary fat–especially saturated fat—and spurred a new conversation about whether these fats in fact cause heart disease. Named a *Best Book* of the year by the Economist, Wall Street Journal and Mother Jones, among others, it continues to be called a must-read for anyone seeking to understand the amazing story of how we came to believe fat is bad for health—and what a better diet might look like. Nina is also the founder of the Nutrition Coalition, a non-profit working to ensure that nutrition policy reflects a transparent process and is evidence-based. Nina Teicholz is a graduate of Stanford and Oxford Universities and previously served as associate director of the Center for Globalization and Sustainable Development at Columbia University. Find Nina at-https://unsettledscience.substack.com/ninateicholz.comTW- @bigfatsurpriseThe Nutrition CoalitionFind Boundless Body at-myboundlessbody.comBook a session with us here! 

Not Just Pixels
014 - Watercolor Side Business, Being a Director of UX, and Perfectionism with Amanda Santello of Forge

Not Just Pixels

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 45:52


Today, I'm talking to Amanda Santello.-Amanda is currently the Experience Design Lead at Forge, a construction company building the next-gen trades community. Before Forge, she worked as the Associate Director of Product Design at Chewy, and before that, the Director of Experience Design at Accenture.-I got a chance to meet Amanda for the first time during a club competition back at Tufts. And I'm so glad we got the chance to sit down and chat about a variety of topics including her watercolor side business, early days at an agency, what's it like to be a director of UX, and so much more. I really enjoyed our conversation, so without further ado, here's my conversation with Amanda Santello.===Highlights⭐ Amanda's watercolor side-business⭐ Early days working at a design agency⭐ Work at Accenture & Forge⭐ Differences between an IC vs director⭐ The idea of perfection===Links

Sports Business Radio Podcast
Ryan Leaf - Former NFL QB & Current Host of "The Straight Line with Ryan Leaf"

Sports Business Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 46:56


Ryan Leaf (@RyanDLeaf), the #2 pick in the 1998 #NFL Draft by the San Diego Chargers and Heisman Trophy candidate at Washington State, joins Sports Business Radio for a candid and raw conversation about his life, NFL career, incarceration, addiction and how he has turned his life around. Leaf is now a Dad, keynote speaker, Host of a new sport talk show “The Straight Line with Ryan Leaf” and he is the subject of the 10-episode podcast series, “BUST”. Leaf discusses the mistakes he has made in his life, but he shares what he has learned from those mistakes and how he is using his experiences to help others. His story is a MUST listen. Listen to the award-winning Sports Business Radio podcast on iTunes, Spotify, Amazon Music or at www.sportsbusinessradio.com. WATCH this conversation on the Sports Business Radio YouTube channel. Follow Sports Business Radio on Twitter @SBRadio and on Instagram @SportsBusinessRadio. This week's edition of Sports Business Radio is presented by InsideTracker. InsideTracker is the ultra-personalized performance system that analyzes biomarker data from your blood, DNA, lifestyle and fitness tracker to help you optimize your body and reach your health & wellness goals. InsideTracker transforms your body's data into true knowledge, meaningful insights and customized action plans of evidence-backed nutrition, fitness and lifestyle recommendations. Founded in 2009 by leading scientists in aging, genetics and biometric data from MIT, Tufts, and Harvard, InsideTracker's mission is to improve the healthspan of people everywhere so they can enjoy longer, healthier lives - adding life to their years and years to their life. For a limited time, you can get 20% off the entire Inside Tracker store. Just go to InsideTracker.com/SBR and save 20% today. Sports Business Radio is also presented by @Rhone. Rhone makes the absolute highest quality, best fitting and most comfortable performance driven clothing for men. Rhone is offering a 15% discount to Sports Business Radio listeners when you enter the promo code SBR15 at checkout.  #Football #NFL #RyanLeaf #MentalHealth #WashingtonStateCougars  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Nonstop Nommsen ... macht Laune
Forever Dinglish - mit Gayle Tufts

Nonstop Nommsen ... macht Laune

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 46:43


Diese Podcast- Folge macht mich fit für meine neue Heimat Berlin. Kurz vor dem Umzug besucht mich die Erfinderin des Dinglish: Entertainerin Gayle Tufts. Sie macht diese wunderbare Mischung aus Deutsch und Englisch zu ihrem Markenzeichen. Warum Sie das weiter so konsequent durchzieht - auch wenn sie seit 5 Jahren nun auf dem Papier Deutsche ist - und warum das gar nicht anders geht, erklärt sie Dir im Podcast. Gayle zieht in den 90ern aus New York ins pulsierende Berlin. Ihre neue künstlerische Heimat, vom Quatsch Comedy Club bis zu Friedrichsstadtpalast rockt sie hier jedes Haus. Im Podcast geht's um den Spirit der Hauptstadt, wie ihr der Sprung nach Berlin geglückt ist und warum sie einen "Bremer" ihr eigenen nennt. Wir begegnen uns seit vielen Jahren immer wieder vor der Fernsehkamera, was immer ein großes Vergnügen ist. Diese Freude hatte ich jetzt auch bei unserem Podcast, viel Spaß mit uns!

Inside the Admissions Office: Advice from Former Admissions Officers
Talent in College Admissions: Highlighting Artistic, Athletic, and Academic Abilities in Applications

Inside the Admissions Office: Advice from Former Admissions Officers

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 42:39 Very Popular


On today's episode, we chat with Kevin Dupont, an athletic recruitment specialist and Former Admissions Officer from UC Berkeley, Tufts, Cornell, and UCSC. Kevin and I discuss the myriad of different ways students can showcase their talents in their college applications. Kevin answers frequently asked questions about talent in college admissions such as “should I upload a portfolio?” and “is creating an app an impressive talent?” Check out our blog for more free resources: What College Admissions Officers Look For: Advice from Former Readers College Admissions 101: How to Start the Application Process Click here to sign up for a free consultation with an admissions expert. Register for one of our webinars. Questions or comments? Email contact@ingeniusprep.com Visit us at ingeniusprep.com to learn more. See you every other Monday!

Glowing Older
Episode 11:7 Michael Hebb on Launching Generations Over Dinner

Glowing Older

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 33:46


Generations Over Dinner is designed to alleviate ageism and loneliness by encouraging different generations to go deep at the dinner table. Learn how the founders joined a think tank of leaders in the aging space to create a turn-key program that any individual or senior living community can implement. About Michael Michael Hebb is the Founder of Over Dinner (Death Over Dinner, Drugs Over Dinner, Generations Over Dinner) and the author of Let's Table About Death (Over Dinner). He currently serves as a Board Advisor at the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts, is the primary editor of the COVID Paper; and in the recent past served as a Partner at RoundGlass and Senior Advisor to Summit Series, Theo Chocolate, CreativeLive, Architecture For Humanity, and Mosaic Voices Foundation. In 1997 Hebb co-founded City Repair and Communitecture with architect Mark Lakeman, winning the AIA People's Choice Award for the Intersection Repair Project. In 1999 Michael and Naomi Pomeroy co-founded Family Supper in Portland, a supper club that is credited with starting the pop-up restaurant movement. In the years following they opened the restaurants clarklewis and Gotham Bldg Tavern, garnering international acclaim. After leaving Portland, Hebb built Convivium, a creative agency that specialized in the ability to shift culture through the use of thoughtful food and discourse-based gatherings. Convivium's client list includes: The Obama Foundation, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, TEDMED, The World Economic Forum, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Clinton Global Initiative, X Prize Foundation, The Nature Conservancy. Key Takeaways Generations Over Dinner is the framework you need to have the experience. The turnkey program includes nine dinner scripts with three primary topics: love and relationships, purpose, and the future. Senior living communities can have their own Generations Over Dinner secure platform where they can plan dinners and invite residents and their kids, grandkids, and friends from outside the community. Loneliness is not alleviated by having more conversations or by being around more people. It is only alleviated by having high quality conversations and real connection.

Attirelepositif
Comment S'AIMER Concrètement ❤️ ? Cultivez L'AMOUR DE SOI-MÊME chaque jour !

Attirelepositif

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 21:58


Comment cultiver l'amour de soi et comment s'aimer concrètement ? Si vous vous posez ce genre de question et que vous avez l'impression de manquer d'amour se soi et de ne pas vous aimer concrètement à votre juste valeur, alors vous êtes au bon endroit et c'est de cela que nous allons parler dans cet épisode de podcast.    ➡️

Alabama's Morning News with JT
Ice Cream better for you than Multi Grain bagles?

Alabama's Morning News with JT

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 3:54


STUDY: ICE CREAM IS BETTER FOR YOU THAN A MULTIGRAIN BAGELA new study from Tufts University in Massachusetts suggests that ice cream is a healthier choice than a multigrain bagel and other foods like saltine crackers. In the research, experts at the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts developed a "Food Compass" to rank any type of food from 1 to 100 based on nutrition; the higher the number, the healthier the food. When comparing foods, the study gave an ice cream cone with nuts and chocolate ice cream a 37, while a multigrain bagel with raisins received a 19 and saltine crackers a 7. This is a pretty shocking study. Are the researchers right? Are multigrain bagels worse for you than an ice cream cone with nuts and chocolate?Healthy living expert who's become a national thought leader on prevention and finding the root cause of health issues DR. JOEY SPEERS

Live Purely with Elizabeth
Dr. William Li: Eating to Beat Disease and Your Body's Five Natural Defense Systems

Live Purely with Elizabeth

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 53:21


This week's episode will have you reaching for that apple or pear, as Elizabeth welcomes Dr. William Li, internationally recognized medical expert, New York Times Bestselling author, scientist, and speaker. Dr. Li is the President and Medical Director of the Angiogenesis Foundation, and has served on the faculties of Harvard, Tufts, and Darthmouth. He talks about his dedication to understanding the role our diet plays in helping our body heal itself, and shares all about the body's five natural defense systems such as regeneration with stem cells, immunity, and the gut microbiome and the exact foods we should be eating to function optimally. Dr. Li shines a light on some of the best foods you can start to add to your grocery list, and how they quite literally are medicine. Mentioned: Find All Season 4 Episodes Here Rind Say Hi To Elizabeth and Purely Elizabeth: Website | InstagramDr. William Li: Website | Eat To Beat Disease | Masterclass | The Angiogenesis Foundation 

Decode Your Burnout (formerly Optimize Your Life)
Dr. Loretta Breuning: Rewrite Your Operating System

Decode Your Burnout (formerly Optimize Your Life)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 31:27


Have you ever wondered why you feel the way you do? We are not just rational beings, but we're also emotional animals. And when our emotions get in the way of our goals, we must learn to overcome them. Today, we will discuss how our emotions work, the science behind human emotions, and how to use your inner mammal to achieve success.   As a teacher, Loretta had grown tired of the direction in which her school was headed. She didn't feel good about it and it reminded her of her father's experiences with stress over several decades. She realized that if she didn't make a change soon, she might end up like him, burned out from life-long stress.   After the pivotal moment of retiring at 50, she began reading books about evolutionary psychology and found it fascinating. Her interest in how human emotions develop was piqued when she learned that human emotions are similar to those of other animals. Even our positive and negative feelings are created by chemicals in our bodies. It was also apparent that humans have certain chemicals that create certain emotions, which led her to understand how her inner mammal functions.   ABOUT DR. LORETTA BREUNING:Loretta G. Breuning, Ph.D. is a graduate of Cornell University and Tufts. She is the founder of the Inner Mammal Institute and Professor Emerita of Management at California State University, East Bay. She has been writing about the human motivation for more than twenty years, including Habits of a Happy Brain: Retrain Your Brain to Boost Your Serotonin, Dopamine, Oxytocin, and Endorphin Levels. Before teaching and writing full-time, she worked for the United Nations in Africa. The Inner Mammal Institute offers videos, podcasts, books, blogs, multimedia, a training program, and a free five-day happy-chemical jumpstart.    Resources: 1) Book: Status Games: Why We Play and How to Stop: https://innermammalinstitute.org/statusgames/ 2) Website: https://innermammalinstitute.org 3) Get the Burnout Checklist: https://www.drsharongrossman.com/burnoutchecklist 4) Sign up for a free Breakthrough Session with Dr. Sharon: http://www.bookachatwithsharon.com/ 5) Take the first step to decode your burnout: http://decodeyourburnout.com/

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 09.01.22

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 56:58 Very Popular


Vax Whistleblower – Mary Hollen Anna Maria Mihalcea – D-Dimer elevation in the Unvaccinated. A Marker of Shedding? Why You Should Have Faith  Plandemic – Indoctrination    Green tea compound shows promise for treating rheumatoid arthritis Washington State University August 25, 2022 A compound found in green tea could be an effective treatment for rheumatoid arthritis, according to the results of a new study. Green tea being poured into a cup] EGCG – a compound found in green tea – could help treat rheumatoid arthritis, new research suggests. In the journal Arthritis and Rheumatology, researchers from Washington State University (WSU) in Spokane reveal how the compound – called epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) – reduced ankle swelling in a mouse model of the disease. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a disease that affects the joints of the body, most commonly the joints of the hands, feet, wrists, elbows knees and ankles. In RA, the immune system mistakingly attacks the synovial tissues surrounding the joints, causing inflammation, swelling and pain. This can cause damage to the cartilage and bone. Current treatments for RA include non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS), corticosteroids and JAK inhibitors. But study leader Salah-uddin Ahmed, of the WSU College of Pharmacy, notes that some of these treatments are expensive, reduce immune system activity and can be unsuitable for long-term use. In their study, Ahmed and colleagues suggest that the compound EGCG may be a promising alternative to current treatments for RA. EGCG targets key signaling protein to reduce RA inflammation EGCG is a chemical compound that belongs to a class of flavanols known as catechins. After giving EGCG to mouse models of RA for 10 days, the team noticed that treatment with the compound led to a significant reduction in ankle swelling. The researchers found that EGCG reduces the activity of TAK1 – a key signaling protein through which pro-inflammatory cytokines transmit their signals to trigger the inflammation and tissue damage found in RA. What is more, the team says that EGCG reduced inflammation in RA without interfering with other cellular functions – unlike some current medications for the disease. According to Ahmed, their study suggests the green tea compound may be highly effective against RA. Antioxidant-rich pomegranate juice may aid blood sugar management for diabetics: Human data Jordan University of Science and Technology, August 20, 2022 Daily consumption of pomegranate juice may help control blood sugar levels in type-2 diabetics, as well as improving the function of beta cells in the pancreas, say data from a human trial. Scientists from the Jordan University of Science and Technology report that pomegranate juice at a dose of 1.5 mL per kg of body weight (or 105 mL for a 70 kg human) was associated with reductions in fasting glucose levels in type-2 diabetics. “Studying the effects of pomegranate consumption (in a juice form) on the reduction of blood glucose levels in type-2 diabetes patients could lead to a dietary approach to control this disease,” they added. “Since there are many herbs and fruits that are easily available and of value in controlling this disease, this study may contribute to a better understanding and improved management of type 2 diabetes by the individual.” To investigate this, they recruited 85 people with type-2 diabetes and assigned them to receive 1.5 mL of the juice per kg of body weight. Blood sugar and insulin levels, and beta cell function were assessed three hours after ingestion. (Beta-cells are found in the pancreas and their primary function is to store and release insulin.) Results showed that pomegranate juice was associated with significantly lower fasting glucose levels (8.5 mmol/L) compared with the control participants (9.44 mmol/L). However, this result was an average for the whole cohort and about 20% of the participants did not experience this benefit. Going with the flow: Study shows canals and rivers help boost your mood King's College London, August 31, 2022 Researchers report that the combination of blue and green space with wildlife, has a greater impact on well-being than spending time in an environment that is characterized by only green space. The researchers used Urban Mind, a smartphone-based app, to collect thousands of real time audits about participants' location and mental well-being. Results from this first of its kind study showed positive associations between visits to canals and rivers and mental well-being, as well as a positive experience for feelings of safety and social inclusion relative to all other types of environments (such as indoors, or outside in an urban environment, or near green spaces). Andrea Mechelli, Professor of Early Intervention in Mental Health, King's College London, said, “Canals and rivers contain not only water but also an abundance of trees and plants, which means their capacity to improve mental well-being is likely to be due to the multiple benefits associated with both green and blue spaces. Canals and rivers also provide homes to a range of wildlife, and we know from other research that there is a positive association between encountering wildlife and mental well-being. Taken collectively, these findings provide an evidence base for what we thought about water and well-being and support the proposal that visits to canals and rivers could become part of social prescribing schemes, playing a role in supporting mental health.” The study found that visiting canals and rivers was associated with a greater improvement in mental well-being, and this relationship was still present when accounting for individual variation due to age, gender, education, ethnicity, and a diagnosis of a mental health condition. People also reported continued improvements in their mental well-being for up to 24 hours after the visit had taken place.”The powerful mix of blue, green and wildlife-rich space shows that although built for industry, repurposed canals are actually amongst our most important places of health and well-being in our towns and cities. Men, people over 65 sleep better when they have access to nature University of Illinois College of Agricultural, August 24, 2022 Men and persons age 65 and older who have access to natural surroundings, whether it's the green space of a nearby park or a sandy beach and an ocean view, report sleeping better, according to a new University of Illinois study published in Preventive Medicine. In the study, Grigsby-Toussaint worked with both U of I researchers and scientists from the New York University School of Medicine. The team used data from the CDC's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, which surveyed 255,171 representative U.S. adults, to learn whether there was an association between self-reported days of insufficient sleep and access to green space. The team also used a USDA index that scores the country's geographical areas for their natural amenities, using hours of sunlight, which is important in regulating a person's circadian rhythm, and temperature. In response to the survey question about sleep quality in the last month, the researchers found that the most common answer was that respondents had slept poorly for less than one week. “Interestingly, though, across the entire sample, individuals reporting 21 to 29 days of insufficient sleep consistently had lower odds of access to green space and natural amenities compared to those reporting less than one week,” she said. For men, the relationship between sleep and exposure to green space was much stronger than for women. And males and females 65 and over found nature to be a potent sleep aid, she added. Grigsby-Toussaint noted that living near green landscapes is associated with higher levels of physical activity and that exercise in turn predicts beneficial sleep patterns. But men appeared to benefit much more from their natural surroundings. The researcher speculated that women may take less advantage of nearby natural settings out of concern for their safety, but she added that more research is needed. New study links ultra-processed foods and colorectal cancer in men Tufts University and Harvard University, August 31 ,2022 For many Americans, the convenience of pre-cooked and instant meals may make it easy to overlook the less-than-ideal nutritional information, but a team led by researchers at Tufts University and Harvard University hope that will change after recently discovering a link between the high consumption of ultra-processed foods and an increased risk of colorectal cancer. In a study published in the BMJ, researchers found that men who consumed high rates of ultra-processed foods were at 29% higher risk for developing colorectal cancer—the third most diagnosed cancer in the United States—than men who consumed much smaller amounts. They did not find the same association in women. “We started out thinking that colorectal cancer could be the cancer most impacted by diet compared to other cancer types,” said Lu Wang, the study's lead author and a postdoctoral fellow at the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts. “Processed meats, most of which fall into the category of ultra-processed foods, are a strong risk factor for colorectal cancer. Ultra-processed foods are also high in added sugars and low in fiber, which contribute to weight gain and obesity, and obesity is an established risk factor for colorectal cancer.” The study analyzed responses from over 200,000 participants—159,907 women and 46,341 men—across three large prospective studies which assessed dietary intakeand were conducted over more than 25 years. The analyses revealed differences in the ways that men and women consume ultra-processed foods and the prospective associated cancer risk. Out of the 206,000 participants followed for more than 25 years, the research team documented 1,294 cases of colorectal cancer among men, and 1,922 cases among women. The team found the strongest association between colorectal cancer and ultra-processed foods among men come from the meat, poultry, or fish-based, ready-to-eat products. “These products include some processed meats like sausages, bacon, ham, and fish cakes. This is consistent with our hypothesis,” Wang said. The team also found higher consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages, like soda, fruit-based beverages, and sugary milk-based beverages, is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer in men. However, not all ultra-processed foods are equally harmful with regard to colorectal cancer risk. “We found an inverse association between ultra-processed dairy foods like yogurt and colorectal cancer risk among women,” said co-senior author Fang Fang Zhang, a cancer epidemiologist and interim chair of the Division of Nutrition Epidemiology and Data Science at the Friedman School. Overall, there was not a link between ultra-processed food consumption and colorectal cancer risk among women. It's possible that the composition of the ultra-processed foods consumed by women could be different than that from men. “Foods like yogurt can potentially counteract the harmful impacts of other types of ultra-processed foods in women,” Zhang said. 8 Benefits of Pine Bark Extract for Your Brain GreenMedInfo, August 31, 2022 Our brains can be harmed by many factors such as disease, stress from the environment, physical injuries or natural aging but pine bark extract may be one key to a healthier brain Pine bark extract (PE), trade name Pycnogenol (pronounced “pig-nah-gen-all”), has many beneficial properties such as being anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and neuroprotective. It can help with memory, cognition, inattention, hyperactivity, mood, thinking and various symptoms of brain injuries, aging and neurological diseases. Fights Inflammation and Protects the Brain In a systematic review and meta-analysis of Pycnogenol supplementation on C-reactive protein (CRP) — a marker of oxidative stress — researchers examined five trials including 324 participants. Pycnogenol supplementation had a significant effect in reducing CRP and demonstrated a strong anti-inflammatory effect.[i] In a study of gerbils, pine bark extract was administered at 100 milligrams (mg) per kilogram (kg) once a day for seven days before the brain was submitted to a brain ischemic injury. The PE treatment markedly inhibited the death of neurons in the brain, significantly decreased the pro-inflammatory cytokines — interleukin 1β and tumor necrosis factor α — and showed a strong activation effect on anti-inflammatory cytokines of interleukin 4 (IL-4) and interleukin 13 (IL-13). Pine bark protected the brain and decreased inflammation.[ii] Improves Attention, Memory, Executive Functions and Mood in Healthy People In a study over eight weeks, Pycnogenol supplementation improved sustained attention, memory, executive functions and mood ratings in 53 healthy students compared to an equivalent control group.[iii] In a trial of 60 healthy professionals from 35 to 55 years old, half of the participants supplemented with Pycnogenol of 50 mg three times a day for 12 weeks in combination with a controlled health plan — regular sleep, balanced meals and daily exercise — and the other half followed only the health plan as the control group. PE significantly improved mood by 16%, mental performance by 9%, attention by 13% and memory by 4%, and reduced oxidative stress by 30%, outperforming all results of the control group.[iv] Prevents Brain Aging and Cognitive Decline Brain aging is a complex process involving changes in the brain's structure, neuron activity and biochemical profile that has been linked to age-associated variations in cognitive function. Increased oxidative stress may also be an important factor related to reduced cognition in older people. In a systematic review of over 100 research trials and animal studies, the antioxidant Pycnogenol significantly improved cognitive function after chronic administration.[v] Improves Cognition and Stress in the Mildly Impaired or Highly Oxidative Stressed Eighty-seven healthy subjects with mild cognitive impairment scores were included in a trial with one group given standard management (SM) and the other half given Pycnogenol supplements for two months. The median increase in mild impairment scores was 18% with Pycnogenol compared to 2.48% in the SM group, largely due to its effects on oxidative stress levels.[vi] In a study of 88 healthy patients ages 55 to 70 who had high oxidative stress, half were supplemented with 100 mg per day of Pycnogenol for 12 months and the other half were the control group followed as a reference point for a year. Those in the pine bark group had significantly improved cognitive function scores, attention and mental performance and lowered oxidative stress levels compared to those in the reference group.[vii] Increases Cognitive Function and Helps Symptoms in Parkinson's Disease Researchers studied 43 Parkinson's disease (PD) patients who had been diagnosed at least one year before the trial. The condition was considered “mild,” with minimal progression. The standard management (SM) for PD — carbidopa/levodopa — was used in a similar-sized reference group of PD subjects for comparison purposes. The trial subjects were supplemented with Pycnogenol of 150 mg per day along with SM for a period of four weeks. Cognitive function was significantly higher with the Pycnogenol group. Target symptoms including tremors, rigidity, bradykinesia — slow or impaired movements in limbs — and speech were improved in the PE group compared to the control group. Oxidative stress was also significantly lower in the pine bark group at four weeks.[viii] Enhances Memory and Prevents Harmful Plaque and Tau Buildup in Alzheimer's Disease In Alzheimer's disease (AD), the release of amyloid-beta (Aβ) is a marker. Aβ aggregates into oligomers, then plaques, which induce inflammatory responses, synapse loss and misfolding of tau, a second hallmark of AD. Accumulation of tau misfolding leads to tangles in the brain and neuron cell death impacting brain synapses in a pattern of progression closely related to cognitive decline, which can happen years before memory loss symptoms even appear.[ix] Pycnogenol significantly decreased the number of plaques in both pre-onset and post-onset treatment paradigms and improved spatial memory in the pre-onset treatment only in an AD-induced mouse model.[x] In an in vitro study of AD-induced animals, pine bark — Oligopin — prevented and halted the progression of AD preclinically by inhibiting oligomer formation of not only Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42, but also tau in vitro.[xi] Reduces Inflammation and Improves Outcomes for Traumatic Brain Injuries In a scientific trial of 67 traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU), the intervention group received 150 mg of the PE supplement Oligopin with enteral nutrition — tube feeding through stomach or intestine — for 10 days while the control group received a placebo.[xii] Pine bark supplementation significantly decreased inflammatory biomarkers of IL-6, IL-1β and CRP compared to the control group after 10 days. In addition, pine bark reduced clinical scores for acute physiology and chronic health evaluation as well as sequential organ failure. The Nutric score — a way to measure if a patient is under-nourished and at critical risk of dying[xiii] — was reduced compared to the control group as well. Overall, the survival rate was 15% higher in the pine bark group compared to the placebo group. PE supplementation for TBI patients in ICUs reduced inflammation, improved their clinical status and malnutrition score and, thereby, reduced their mortality rate. Improves Attention, Focus, Thinking, Behavior and Antioxidant Levels in ADHD Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by impulsivity, distractibility and hyperactivity. One of the factors associated with ADHD is oxidative stress. Pycnogenol consists of bioflavonoids, catechins, procyanidins and phenolic acids.[xiv] Pycnogenol acts as a powerful antioxidant stimulating certain enzymes, like superoxide dismutase (SOD) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), which can defend against oxidative stress. In the pathophysiology of ADHD, damage to adrenaline, noradrenaline and dopamine metabolism occurs in the brain. These changes can modify attention, thinking and acting.[xv] In a trial of 43 children ages 6 to 14 with ADHD, patients were administered Pycnogenol — 1 mg per kg of body weight every day — or a placebo of look-alike pills daily for a month. The PE group had a significant decrease in GSSG and a highly significant increase in GSH levels as well as improvement of GSH/GSSG ratio in comparison to the placebo group. The total antioxidant status (TAS) decreased in children with ADHD who took pine bark, showing a normalization of TAS in ADHD children.[xvii] In a crossover study of 20 children with ADHD, participants experienced two experimental units — four weeks of pine bark supplementation with 25 or 50 mg PE and four weeks with placebo supplementation — separated by two weeks of a washout period. PE supplementation caused a significant reduction in inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity measures.

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk
It's Trash Time For Your Computer - Autonomous Car Crash Kills - Which is better for your car? Buttons or a Screen? - Now we have a Chip Backlog! - Facebook tracking Your Hospital Appointments

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2022 85:25


It's Trash Time For Your Computer - Autonomous Car Crash Kills - Which is better for your car? Buttons or a Screen? - Now we have a Chip Backlog! - Facebook tracking Your Hospital Appointments Hey, you know, it is probably time to do an upgrade on that computer of yours to Windows 11. Or maybe you're going to move over to the Linux world. That's what I did with my older computer. It's running Linux now. Much faster, but there's more to it than that. [Automated transcript follows] I send out my newsletter, my insider show notes every Monday morning. [00:00:22] Usually sometimes it's Tuesday, sometimes it's Wednesday depends on the week. This week I was at a client site over the weekend, actually, and Monday and Tuesday. Down in Atlanta. So I, I was busy down there. This is a DOD subcontractor. They just ship parts, but they are required by CMMC these new regulations I've actually been around for a while now to really. [00:00:49] Keep an eye on their cybersecurity. And so of course they bring me in and my team cuz you know, that's what we do. But I told you that because of my newsletter this week, I got some comments from a few people that the cybersecurity section in my newsletter was two articles from 2015. And , they both pointed it out. [00:01:13] I think it's great that everybody's paying that much attention. I actually, there's a few people that notice that, and it was my fault for not explaining what I was trying to do. And, and that's because I was in a hotel room and I was getting ready to go to the client site and do. Dates fix a couple of things, check the seals on computers and you know, all of those sorts of maintenance things you have to do clean them out. [00:01:38] I brought down a, a little blower and stuff. They, they were amazingly clean cuz we put them in a special cabinet that has these big air filters on them and stuff. Anyhow, the two articles this week on cybersecurity in my newsletter. Well, this is even in the free newsletter. Talked about two different things. [00:01:57] Lenovo was installing software and laptops and they apparently have still kind of done that. This was some years ago, like how seven years ago now, I guess. And they were putting it on there and you had no control over it. Okay. It was a real problem. And then the other one was. About your hard drives and what NSA did for years in modifying the firmware on the hard disk drives of a number of computers, many computers out there. [00:02:32] And in both cases, Lenovo and the NSA, the national security agency put software on the computers so that even if you erased your computers, you would still. Have their software on it, they would reinstall itself and Lenovo has been caught again, doing that. Okay. So there there's articles out there talking about just all of the stuff they've been doing. [00:03:00] So here's what I want to propose to you guys. And I did not make. This clear in the newsletter. And for that, I apologize, I was in a hurry and that was my intention and it just had never happened. Not, but not being in a hurry was my intention. But I, I, I intended to explain this a little bit better and I did on the radio a little bit this week as well. [00:03:22] And I'm doing it right now. My intention is to let you know that for decades now, bad guys have been able to embed malware into parts of your computer. So instead of just the operating system where they might have a. Replaced some sort of a library file. And now when your machine boots up, it's going to pull it in from that library file or one of the many other ways, uh, they, they will go beneath your operating system. [00:03:57] So they'll put things in the boot blocks of your computer. And as we just mentioned here, they will put things in the hard drive itself, not on the blocks of the hard drive, but in the control. Of the hard drive right there on the hard drive's board motherboard, if you will, for the hard drive and they can make it persistent. [00:04:21] Now we've tried to get around some of these problems. Apple came up with the T2 chip and what the T2 chip does is really lock things down on your apple. And that's always a good thing, right? And the apple TTU chip keeps track of passwords and makes things bootable and everything else. And apple has also really kind of spun things out a little bit here with their TTU chip. [00:04:51] They had some security problems. Uh they're in all of the newer apple computers. In fact, the one I use a lot is an older computer that doesn't. That T2 chip in it, but what Microsoft has done now, and this isn't really Microsoft, it's really the hardware vendors. They have something called a TP. And this TPM is there for security. [00:05:16] It's the trusted platform module. You want the version two or better, uh, as they come out, right. Kind of keep it up to date. But the T2, this trusted platform module is kind of like the apple T2 chip. It is nowhere near as. Complete, if you will, as the apple T two chip is, and it's designed primarily for booting your computer, which is really kind of cool. [00:05:47] There's a cute article over a medium. And it's saying that the authors of professor bill Buchanan, the author of this article says, uh, the TPM chip in your computer is perhaps a forgotten device. It often sits there not doing much and never quite achieving its full potential. You bought the laptop because it had one, but you just can't find a use for it. [00:06:09] The chip itself is rather jealous of the applet two chip and which does so much more and where people actually buy the computer for the things it bring. Few people actually buy a computer, cuz it has a TPM, but lots of people buy a MacBook and an iPhone because it is trusted to look after your sensitive data. [00:06:29] And he's absolutely right about that stuff. Now I've got clients who have been buying servers and other computers and the T2 chip has been. Option for them. I think that's probably almost gone nowadays. It is probably added in by default. These things are pretty cheap, cuz again, they don't really do much, but they are now a part of it because of what Microsoft has done. [00:06:58] Microsoft has made it so that you pretty much have to have one of. T2 chip or TPM chips, I should say the TPM 2.0 cuz you know, it's gotta be as good as apples T2 the TPM 2.0, which is a crypto processor so that you can run windows 11. Now, I don't want you to think that having this TPM chip in your computer, all of a sudden makes it safe, but it does do a few things that are very, very. [00:07:28] First of all, it has a random number generator, which is super important when we're talking about encrypt. And that random number generator is used to generate keys that are used for your disc encryption and potentially other things. So if you are encrypting the disc on your windows machine, you are really moving ahead in a very big way, because now if your computer is stolen and it boots up, they won't be able. [00:07:57] At any of that data, it'll all look like random trash. If it's done its job. Right. And it can also of course store the user's password in the chip. It has some what's called persistent memory. I told you all of the stuff because of what I want to tell you next. All of this stuff from Lenovo, from the NSA over the years. [00:08:20] And, and of course the bad guys, whether it's Russia, China, it can be really anywhere. North. Korea's been big on this. Iran's been doing this sort of thing. Uh, All of those guys may well have had access to your computer in the past, if you have an older computer. And because some of this software, some of this malware is persistent. [00:08:44] And because windows now is, as I said, pretty much requiring one of these TPM chips, the TPM 2.0 were better is what you want. I think that it's time to seriously consider buying a new windows computer. Now we're working with a client right now that has an engineer who has been continually upgrading his windows computer since I don't know, windows XP days, I think. [00:09:13] And every time he gets a new computer, he just goes ahead and migrates everything over. Doesn't upgrade. Doesn't update to the newest operating system. And for him, anyways, life is good. Well, it ain't so good folks because he has all kinds of nastiness, little turds. If you will, that are hiding all around his computer. [00:09:37] The registry is going to be scattered with these things. Some of them probably installed by some form of malware over the years, his disc is gonna be cluttered, everything. So I'm saying right now, Get a new computer and go ahead and make sure you reinstall windows. That's the first thing we do. In fact, what we do for our clients. [00:10:01] We have a version of windows that we have updated stream updated, and we don't have any of that bloatware on it. That the manufacturers get their 10 bucks from the various offenders, you know, to put the Norton antivirus and all this other useless stuff on your computer. So by reinstalling, just the windows. [00:10:23] And of course, since it's windows, you gotta install all of the drivers for your computer, too. But by doing that, you're getting rid of all of the bloatware. And then what you wanna do is either copy or restore your files onto the new computer. And then when you're done with that install, Your applications, the newest versions of your applications. [00:10:48] And I can hear people right now complaining, cuz I hear this all of the time. My gosh, I've had that application for 10 years and you can't even get it anymore. Blah blah. You know what? You should not be using that application. You need to get the newest version, or if that vendor's out of business, you need to make sure that you go one more step, find a compatible vendor or whatever. [00:11:12] We have to stop using old computers and old software. Uh, there's options here, but seriously, consider this because of what's been happening to us for years. Hey, visit me online. Sign up for my newsletter, Craig Peter son.com. [00:11:31] Well, autonomous cars are on the road and there was an accident in Germany. We don't have all of the details yet, but it's really concerning. And it's about the anonymous cars. Yeah. Autonomous cars. And, uh, we gotta study out. I want to talk about as well. [00:11:48] There are various levels of autonomy, I guess. Yeah. [00:11:53] That's the right word in these autonomous vehicles that we have and that we're looking forward to level one is kind of the gold standard, right? That's where we want to get. That's where the cars don't even need a churn pedals, your tension, nothing. They just drive themselves. We're not there. And you probably guess that. [00:12:15] And then there's level two where you, the driver's supposed to pay attention, but the car's pretty much going to drive itself. Well, there is an article here from the associated press talking about what happened in Germany. And, uh, this is a few weeks back and this is the first time I've seen this article, but they're saying. [00:12:41] Test car with autonomous steering capability, veered into oncoming traffic in Germany, killing one person and seriously injuring nine others. A spokesman for police in the Southwestern town of Roy. Again said the electric BMW. Nine with five people on board, including a young child swerved out of its lane at abandoned the road, triggering a series of collisions involving four vehicles after brushing an oncoming search, the BMW hit a Mercedes Benz's van head on resulting in the death of a 33 year old passenger in that. [00:13:27] The 70 year old driver, the Cien lost control of her car and crashed into another vehicle with two people on board, pushing it off the road and causing it to burst into flame Ruly. Again, police spokesman, Michael Shaw said four rescue helicopters and dozens of firefighters. Responded to the incident and the injured were taken to several hospitals in the region. [00:13:55] They included the 43 year old driver of the BMW three adults aged 31 42 and 47 and an 18 month old child who were all in the test vehicle. The article goes on, uh, is the police said in a statement, the crash vehicle was an autonomous electric test car, whether it was being steered by the 43, 3 year old driver or not is a subject of investigation. [00:14:24] So this is called a level two driving assistance system. It's already incorporated in production vehicles today. They can support the driver on when the driver turns them on according to BMW with the level two vehicles, the driver. Always retains responsibility. In other words, if that car gets into an accident while you are behind the wheel and responsible for it, it's your fault. [00:14:54] So that solves the problem of whose insurance covers what doesn't it? Yeah, it, it does it. Pretty well, because it's your fault is kind of the bottom line. So we are in the process of investigating the exact circumstances of the crash. BMW said, of course we are in close contact with the authorities. It's it's concerning very concerning and I am not ready yet. [00:15:23] Autonomous vehicles. Now we've seen, and we've talked about on the show before a number of problems with some of these different vehicles from Tesla and others, and they are on the roads in many states right now, even in the Northeast, not just the Teslas, but these fully autonomous test vehicles. And. [00:15:43] There are a number of things to be concerned about here. For instance, how can an autonomous vehicle determine what to do when there's a police officer in the middle of the road or a flagman? Or obviously it really can't determine it because it can't make out. What's what, in fact we might remember, and I'm sure they've made some adjustments here over at Tesla, but a Tesla car went ahead and, uh, struck and I think killed a lady who was crossing the road with her bicycle. [00:16:20] I think she was walking it across when she was hit. So how can they. How can they tell the difference between a car that's wrapped and has someone's face on it, maybe a politician full body on the back of a box truck as an advertisement. How can it tell the difference between that and a person that might be standing there? [00:16:44] It, it gets to be a real problem. We're already seeing that some of these autonomous vehicles go directly rear end fire trucks stopped at the side of the road with their lights on police cars stopped at the side of the road with the lights on just completely rear end them. We're seeing that. So how about when it gets a little more difficult than a fire truck parked on the side of the road? [00:17:10] Now these cars, apparently autonomous steering and, uh, lane detection and correction, all that sort of stuff. These vehicles are looking at things and trying to determine, well, what should I do here? And oftentimes what they determine is, oh, well, okay. That's just something that's fixed at the side of the road. [00:17:30] Like, like a sign post, like a speed sign. When in fact it's not. So we've gotta solve that problem. It, it still isn't solved yet. What caused this car to steer directly into oncoming traffic and, and head first into a Mercedes van? I, I don't know. They don't know yet. Anyways. I'm sure they'll find out soon enough. [00:17:57] There are real questions here. And then I wanna take it to the next levels. If the car is in, let's say level one where it's full autonomous, even if it's not, even if it's a level two, like this car was, or is, uh, what happens when the car is either going to hit a pedestrian or go over a cliff or into a brick wall? [00:18:23] That's even better. Cuz the car might not know the cliff is there. What decision should the car make? What kind of ethics should it be? You know, executing here. Can it even make an ethical decision? And this is the trolley testing in case you're not familiar with the whole trolley test thing. It's, let's say you are. [00:18:47] A trolley operator, you're going down a hill and there is a fork in the tracks. And all you can do is select track set a or track set B you can't stop the trolley. You can't slow the trolley down in track. Set a there's a group of seniors walking across the tracks that you will hit. If you go down tracks at a tracks at B there's, some young kids playing on the. [00:19:16] And if you choose B, you're gonna kill the kids. So ethical dilemma here, who do you kill? Cuz that's what the whole trolley test is about. Look it up online. There's a lot of different variations of this, but what about the car? What decision should the car make? Should the car make the decision to protect you the driver, or should the car be making the decision to protect the pedestrian? [00:19:43] If it's going to protect the pedestrian by plowing into that brick wall and potentially killing the occupants of the car. How about when there is the decision of the old people or the young. There is a lot to solve here. And some of these companies, including Mercedes have come out already with their decisions, Mercedes said they will protect the occupants of the vehicle. [00:20:11] now when you're driving the car yourself, of course, you're making that decision in a, a split second, maybe something you thought about, maybe not, you might make a rational decision. You might not. It's, you know, it's hard to say. And you'll find these articles in my newsletter this week at, uh, Craig peterson.com. [00:20:32] If you're not on the newsletter list, you can sign up. It's absolutely free. This is the free newsletter and you can see all my insiders show notes every week. But it's an issue, isn't it? The car veering into traffic hitting another one head first. How about later on when it's completely autonomous, what should it do? [00:20:58] By now you've seen one of these new cars with that big screen right there in the center of the console. I've got a few problems with this, more than a few problems with you people, right. To quote Seinfeld. Yeah. Let's talk about it. [00:21:15] Right here, you know, it, it's very cool to have that display in the center of the car console. [00:21:21] One of the major reasons that the automotive manufacturers are putting that console right there in the center is because we are demanding, uh, the apple car play the Android car functions in order to have some really cool stuff, right. Where we can just run our. And have all of this, uh, wonderful information. [00:21:47] What I really like about it and Android auto and, uh, the apple car both provide this. What I really like is you can use the navigation system that you prefer, that you like, that you want that's in your. I have switched over to apple maps. Now I used to use ways. And before that I would use Google maps and way before that map quest and, and others, my wife could tell you some stories of us trying to use some of the very first generation GPS stuff, having a, a laptop in the car and then having. [00:22:25] Keep pup on the dashboard to try and pick up at least three satellites. And, and, uh, if you went off course at all, went the wrong way, took the wrong. It would just insist on bringing you back to where you were when you went off course, as opposed to taking you from where you are, to where you want to go, which they do nowadays. [00:22:47] But I like that. Right. And, and I like the new features that are always coming out in these apps that we run on our smartphone. I do not like the fact that the cars have navigation in them. Eh, some of them are pretty cool. They're nice. Like in our car, if you use the in-car navigation, it mutes the music or the radio, whatever is playing on the driver's side speaker there in the front of the car. [00:23:17] And then it gives the driver the direction. So everyone else can just keep listening to whatever they were listening to before on the radio, et. You I'll need features like that. But what I don't like is they wanna get six or 800 bucks out of us in order to get new maps in order to get new software for the mapping system. [00:23:38] When we can get things like apple maps for free. Where they're not even using our data against us, like Google does right Android. Uh, very, very nice. I, I really like them. And the apple maps now is really good. I don't know if you remember how bad it was when it first came out, but Steve jobs brought all of the mapping, senior management into a room and asked them what happened. [00:24:05] Why is it so bad? You might remember that it took some people in Australia. Way off the beaten track out in the middle of nowhere with no water, with no fuel and they could have died out there, you know, Australia, everything's out to kill you and they might well have died and they didn't, which is good news. [00:24:27] But even in the us, it was just messing up. It wasn't very good. Wasn't taking you always to the right place and certainly not the best route. Now it's just gotten amazingly good. Very, very good. So I can choose, right. If I still want to use ways I can use it. If I wanna use apple, I can use it. Google maps. [00:24:45] I can use it some third party. I can use it, but if I've got the stuff that's built into the car, I'm stuck with the stuff that's built into the car, and maybe I can pay to upgrade it. A lot of people have found recently, Hey, guess what? That two G data network went. And that means now that your remote control for your card doesn't work anymore, you might have found your navigation doesn't work anymore. [00:25:13] I remember I had a garment that got live traffic updates, but it was using FM carriers on FM radio stations. And many of them dumped that. guess what your garment's no good anymore. At least that part of it isn't any good and garment charging for map updates. And I don't blame 'em for this stuff. Right. [00:25:33] But I would prefer to have my own device to use. So that's part of the problem. In fact, that's indicative of what I see to be the very big problem with these new in car systems, because that display in the computer behind it. Isn't just handling your navigation. It's controlling your seat, heaters, the radio, the music you're listening to the lights, the dimming, the headlights, almost everything in the car goes through. [00:26:08] Infotainment system, right? Yeah. Figured out where I'm going next. Cuz that infotainment system just like the maps on my car right now is going to become out outdated. And then what are you gonna do? And when I say out outdated, I don't just mean, oh, well I want the new features. It might be that you want the new maps. [00:26:34] Yeah. But what happens when it breaks? This leads us to a study that happened here. A Swedish publication had performed a test. They took 11 new cars alongside an older car, a Volvo C 70 from 2005. Now that Volvo had buttons and knobs, buttons and knobs, I've always liked that. And those 11 new cars all had these wonderful infotainment systems, all in one touch screens in the center of the console. [00:27:11] They tested this whole thing and they timed how long it took people to perform a li list of tasks in each car. So they included things like turning on that seat. Heater, turning up the temperature inside the car, the frost, adjust the radio, reset the trip. Computer, turn off the screen. Dim the instruments. [00:27:35] The old Volvo was the clear winner. . Yeah, indeed. So according to this article in ours, Technica, the four tasks were handled within 10 seconds, flat using buttons and knobs in the Volvo. So in the amount of time it took them to do all of the tasks, the four tasks that they were given out of that selection here, I just read the car, drove a thousand. [00:28:06] At 68 miles per hour. Now most of these other cars with that wonderful infotainment system required twice as long, or even more to complete those same four tasks. So some 30 seconds. So you're talking about traveling two or 3000 feet while you're messing around with that display in the central console. [00:28:34] Looks cool. Isn't this the neatest thing ever, but the problem is you have to hunt and now before you say, oh, well, Craig, these people weren't familiar with that console. Well, yeah. Okay. I'll give you that. But what they did with this test is. They let all of the participants play with the cars systems before they started the tests. [00:28:57] In other words, they knew the menus, they knew where things were and it still took that time. See, what we're really talking about here is muscle memory, the ability for your car or for you to know your. so you can reach out and you can turn that volume knob. You might have to glance real quick to make sure you got the volume knob, but you don't have to hunt and Peck through menus. [00:29:26] I like that. So as you can tell, I am not all that hot on these new, all touch interfaces. BMW has an interesting solution to this and that is that I drive system that little knob people didn't like it at first, but you get used to it, right? So, you know, if you need to turn on the seat heater, you just press a knob up, up right down. [00:29:52] And then TA your seat heater and you get to adjust it right there. That is muscle memory as well. So we've got some work to do here. Uh, there are some decent systems out there in Acura, MDX Mazda, CX 50, neither one of them uses a touchscreen infiltration inform attainment system. So that's good. We'll see how it all goes. [00:30:18] Make sure you're on my newsletter. So you can read this article and more. Craig peterson.com. [00:30:26] We've had a chip shortage. I'm sure you've heard of it. And it's been a real problem for everybody from car manufacturers through PC makers. Well, now we're seeing a sudden downturn what's happening now. The Congress has funded it. [00:30:43] Hey, surprisingly enough. Congress comes along to fix the chip problem with the chip bill, billions of dollars, tens of billions actually being spent on our chip plants here to help the chip industry make more chips, cuz we need chips, chips, chips, right? [00:31:03] Well, ours Technica has a great little article. They're actually taking it from the financial time searched waters. Uh, I subscribe the France for times for quite a while, but I don't anymore. And they're talking about how we went from a boom economy when it came to chips, these microchips, everything from, uh, Intel corporation out through the manufacturers of some of these much more common chip styles nowadays, the arm chips and how this new. [00:31:38] That's supposed to, uh, boost production is coming at a point where, okay, first of all, these manufacturers put billions of dollars into building new plants here in the us of a. So that's a good thing. And then Congress comes along sometime after the fact and gives him tens of billions more. And by the way, managed, and this apparently was Senator Chuck, Schumer's doing managed to remove a provision in the bill that said that none of that money for chip. [00:32:13] Plants could be spent in China. So yeah, there you go. China, you get billions more from us, potentially here as we build chip plants over there. But now what do we find out? Well, a bit of a turn here, because there is now excess inventory. Dan Hutchinson, who is the chief executive V L S I research. Who's been really watching the whole chip cycle since 1980s came out and said, quote, I have never seen a time when we had excess inventory and. [00:32:46] We had shortages. Okay. So the immediate cause of this is a rapid buildup and inventory in the chip supply chain since early the year 2022 here. So compared to February, there are enough chips on hand to support about a month and a half of production. Global inventory levels jumped up even higher and then even higher in July to almost two months. [00:33:13] So that's been an issue. And then on top of it, PC sales have been tumbling. Smartphone demand has dropped, and those have been the main causes as consumers are slowing their spending. Why are they slowing spending? Because they don't have the money they used to have because of the non inflation that's have. [00:33:33] Right now. So we've kind of got all of these things happening and to top it all off, as I said, they're taking tens of billions of dollars of our tax money and, uh, going to be spending it on all of this. It's just absolutely amazing. But the suddenness of this turn, again, according to financial times has, was when Intel stunned wall street with news that its revenue in the last quarter had fallen 2.6 billion. [00:34:02] 15%, which of course was short of what they were expecting on wall street. There. This is really quite amazing. They took an inventory adjustment that only hits like once a decade and Vidia man. They are about to, uh, to really get hit too. I don't, I don't think I talked about this, but. They're the largest maker of these GPUs, these graphics, processing boards, and supplemental chips that are on motherboards. [00:34:32] And a lot of computers used a lot in video graphics, machine learning, and of course, mining of cryptocurrencies and they have seen it fall dramatically 44% fall in these GPUs that have been used for gaming. Bitcoin and, and mining and, and other of these cryptocurrencies and micron, one of the largest makers of memory chip said it's free cash flow was likely to turn negative in the next three months after averaging $1 billion in recent quarters. [00:35:11] Isn't that amazing? So all of these problems have been. Also throughout Asia last, uh, month here over the last month, the chief executive of Chinese ship maker, semiconductor manufacturing, international corporation, S I C said that demand had slowed from smartphone and other consumer electronics makers. [00:35:32] And some of these manufacturers, electronics makers have stopped orders all together. So guess what happens when you do that? Think about what happened with. Down right. That really spurred this whole thing on a month before Taiwan, semiconductor manufacturing company, TSMC, which is like the biggest guy out there for making many of the chips we depend upon said it was expecting an inventory correction that would last until late next year. [00:36:05] So this has been a very abrupt slide. Chip makers in the us are trying to manage this decline at the very moment. They're laying the ground for huge increase in production because of the tens of billions they have spent. Plus the $52 billion bill that was signed into law here. What a month or two ago? [00:36:30] Uh, government support provided by the chips act. So on the same day that Congress passed the law, Intel expected to be the biggest beneficiary of all of these government grants of our tax dollars, sliced 4 billion summits, capital spending plans for the rest of the year. Now isn't that? What happens every. [00:36:52] Really isn't it. What happens every time? For instance, the, uh, build back better plan renamed the inflation causation actor, I think is what they might have called it. Um, that particular bill. Put money in for you to buy an electrical car electric car, like four grand, eight grand kind of depends, uh, across the board. [00:37:14] So what electronic electric car makers do they increase their prices? Yes, indeed. Buy, you know, Six or eight grand as much as 12 grand. Right? Because now we got government money. We don't have to have you pay for it. So we're gonna take a bigger profit and that profit's gonna come from the tax dollars that were taken from you and from me and from the widow down the street, right. [00:37:40] Yeah. That's what happens every time? Why do we have this whole thing about the loans for people who went to college? Well, why is college so expensive? Well, it, it continued to go up as government started providing grants and started backing loans. Right? All of the stuff the government was doing was ultimately driving up the cost of your schooling. [00:38:05] Now they've driven up the. Of electric cars because of the money they put in. And because of the money that they've put in for the chips act the 52 billion to make chips that, Hey, we got a glut right now. Yeah. Um, guess what. The manufacturers of chips, the companies that were spending the money in order to create plants, more plants, more chip factories, fabrication plants have decided they're gonna cut their spending. [00:38:38] Why not? Because they're gonna get money from you at the point of a gun, right? That's exactly what's happening. Oh man. So for now, again, according to the financial times, most chip supply chain experts predict a relatively shallow downturn provided that the global economy is headed first off landing something that's obviously not guaranteed, but it has really left them scrambling, trying to figure out what happened here, because it just fell apart so quickly. [00:39:13] Gartner group, you might know them. They put together a lot of studies on a lot of different industries had been expecting the growth in chip sales this year to have from 2020 ones, 26%. So it took its forecast down further to 7% and is now predicting a 2.5% contraction in 2023. Isn't that something, um, the, the Philadelphia semiconductor index, if you are an investor, you've heard of that before, and that comprises the 30 largest us companies involved in, in chip design manufacturer and sale fell back almost 40% as a stock market corrected this year. [00:39:57] After rising threefold after the early lockdown stock market slump, because people were working from home, they couldn't go in to work. Peop the kids were home, people were buying computers so they could play games or get on a video conference with the office, et cetera. It has really, really changed. Oh, and I mentioned Nvidia and how Invidia's been. [00:40:23] Pretty badly. And you'll find this article by the way, in my newsletter that went out on, um, Monday. And if you don't get my free newsletter, definitely get it to just app to date. Craig, Peter son.com/subscribe. It's it's all worth doing, but within video here's what's happening. One of the biggest cryptocurrencies out there has decided that they don't want to be part of this. [00:40:52] Energy problem that we have, you know, some of these minors for various types of cryptocurrencies have actually bought power plants, old coal PLA powered power plants that the states don't wanna buy power from anymore because it's, it's coal. Right. Kohl's evil. But the private sector came in and said, okay, well, if we run our own power company and we put these GPU's and special purpose made mining equipment into the power plant, we can save a lot of money. [00:41:27] That's how much power they need every. A whole power plant to run some of these mining operations. And remember the way you mine, the cryptocurrencies. In most cases, you have to solve very complex mathematical problems to prove that you did the work. That was needed in order to then, um, be awarded that Bitcoin or whatever it was that you were mining. [00:41:54] So pretty much all of the major cryptocurrencies are looking at how can we move away from this model? Because in, in some cases, you know, we're talking about electrical consumption, just for mining cryptocurrencies that serve passes, some countries entire need for electricity. That's how bad it is. And supposedly here, we've got one of the major cryptocurrencies that is changing. [00:42:24] The entire way you do mining, if you will. Very, very big changes. So expect GPUs and companies like Nvidia that make them to go way down in value here over the coming months. Hey, visit me online. Craig peterson.com. Subscribe to my podcast and find me at YouTube. Take care. [00:42:50] If Facebook, isn't the only company doing this, but there's an article from the markup. They did a study and caught Facebook. This is absolutely crazy receiving sensitive medical information. We're gonna talk about that right now. [00:43:06] This is really concerning for a lot of people. And, and for good reason, frankly, I've been talking about this. [00:43:13] I, I think the first time I talked about it was over a decade ago and it has to do with what are called pixels. Now, marketers obviously want to show you ads and they want show you ads based on your interest. And frankly, as a consumer, if I'm looking for a new F one. I wouldn't mind seeing ads from competing car dealers or, you know, used car places, et cetera, to try and sell me that Ford truck. [00:43:43] It makes sense, right? If I'm looking for shoes, why not show me ads for shoes, but what happens when we start talking about the medical business about the legal business things get murky and people get very upset. You see the way these pixels work is you'll put a pixel, like for instance, a Facebook pixel. [00:44:06] If you go to Craig peterson.com, I've got this pixel on there from Facebook. And what it allows me to do now is retarget Facebook user. So you go to my site to go to a page on my site, and this is true for, uh, pretty much every website out there. And. I know that you went and you were looking for this, so I can retarget you in an ads. [00:44:28] I'll show you an ad. In other words, on Facebook now I've never actually done that ever. Uh, I I'm like the world's worst marketer, frankly. Uh, and, uh, but I do have that on there because it gives me some other numbers, statistics, and, and really helps you to understand how the website's being used, which I think makes a whole lot of sense. [00:44:49] So there are marketers that are using this for obvious reasons. Now, I think you understand what the pixel is. It is literally a little picture that is one pixel by one pixel, and it tends to blend in, I think even in most cases, now these pixels from different. Places like Facebook are actually transparent. [00:45:09] So you, you don't even see it on the page, but the idea is now they have a foothold on a website that doesn't belong to them. In this case, Facebook now has access to information about a website that you visited that has nothing to do with Facebook. okay. So that's the basics of how these pixels work and they're almost impossible to get rid of because in reality, many websites, mine included will even grab graphics from other websites just because you know, it it's, I'm quoting another article I pull in their graphic. [00:45:50] Of course. I'm gonna point to that other site. Why would I take that picture? Put it on my side. I don't own the rights to it. But if he'll let me that other website will, let me go ahead and show that graphic on my website, cuz there's ways to restrict it. If they don't want me doing that, they could stop me from doing it. [00:46:09] Then I I'm going to just go to the original website so they can get the credit for it's their property still. I'm not violating any copyright laws, et cetera. Does that make sense to. So what's the difference between the Facebook pixel and a picture I'm pulling from another random website? Well, the obvious thing is it's coming from a Facebook domain of some sort. [00:46:31] So, so there are ways to stop it, but there's just as many ways to get around stopping it, frankly. Well, Let's move on to something a little more sensitive. We have had problems that I reported on years ago of people going to an emergency room in a hospital. Now, when you're in that emergency room, your phone has GPS capabilities still. [00:46:57] It knows you went in the emergency entrance to the hospital and you are. Opening it up. Maybe you're looking around, maybe you're reading articles, maybe you're plotting your trip home using Google maps. You are being tracked depending on what apps you have on your phone. If you have an Android versus an iPhone, what you've enabled, what you haven't enabled. [00:47:20] Right? All of that sort of stuff. well, this now has become a problem because as I reported there have been people who went to the hospital, went to the emergency room and started seeing ads from what you might call ambulance, chasing lawyers. Have you been injured? Is it someone else's fault? Call me right now. [00:47:45] Do he cheat him in. if that sort of thing showed up on your phone, would you get a little upset, a little nervous saying, what are they doing, trying to cash in on, on my pain, maybe literal pain. And it's not as though those ads are just showing up while you are in the emergency room, because now they've tagged you. [00:48:06] They know that you are in that emergency room. So off they'll. They will go ahead and track you and send you ads even after you leave. Hey, I wanna remind you if you want to get this, uh, this week's list of articles. I, I put out every week, my insider show notes. It has become very popular. Thousands of people get that every week. [00:48:32] Go right now to Craig peterson.com. I'll also send out a little bit of training. I do that. I have special reports. I send out. I've got more stuff I'm doing, but you gotta be on the email list. Craig peterson.com to get on my free email list now. What's happened here now is markup went ahead and looked at Newsweek's top 100 hospitals in America. [00:48:56] They went to their websites and they found about a third of the hospitals using what's called the Meel. That is the Facebook pixels referring to earlier. So it sends a little bit of data. Whenever someone clicks a button to let's say, schedule a doctor's appoint. Why does it do that? Well, because the Facebook pixel is on the scheduling page. [00:49:24] Let's say there's scheduling page for oncology on the website. I guess who knows that you are going to see an oncologist? Facebook? Why? Well, because the hospital has put a Facebook tracking pixel on that page. So Facebook knows, Hey, he was on the oncologist page. Maybe he has cancer. I should start showing him ads from other hospitals and from cancer medications, et cetera. [00:49:51] Cetera, that is happen. Right now, 33 of these top 100 hospitals in America. Th these are the top 100, according to Newsweek's list. Have that information. Now that data is connected to your internet. Address. So it's kinda like your computer's mailing address and they can link that back to usually to a specific individual or to a household. [00:50:20] So now they have a receipt of the appointment request. that's gone to Facebook now. They don't have everything you filled out on the page or anything, you know, you added in your social security number, maybe other medical information. Facebook didn't get all of that, but they do know that you visited the hospital's website and which pages you visited on that website. [00:50:47] So markup went ahead and contacted these hospital. So, for example, John John's Hopkins hospital, they did find a Facebook pixel tracking on the appointment, scheduling page. They informed John's Hopkins of how that is a leak of personal information. And after being contacted by the markup, they did not remove the track. [00:51:18] also, by the way, when the markup reached out to them, the hospital did not respond UCLA Reagan medical center. They had of course a pixel and they did remove it from the scheduling page. Although they declined to comment, New York Presbyterian hospital, all these hospitals have that pixel and they did not remove it. [00:51:40] Northwestern Memorial hospital. Again, they got the tracking pixel did not remove it after they were informed about the security problems, duke university hospital, same thing. Most of these, by the way, did not respond to them. University of Pennsylvania, Houston Methodist hospital, the university of Chicago medical center. [00:52:02] Uh, the last two of those did remove the pixel. Uh, Scripps Memorial hospital out in LA JOA, California. There are many Brigham and women's Faulkner hospital. They were informed that they had the tracking picture pixel on the, on the, uh, scheduling page. They did not remove it, but you know, the time of this article, a Tufts medical center, same thing did not remove it, uh, out in Sanford in San Diego. [00:52:29] Same problem. John's Hopkins Bayview medical center, John Jefferson health, Thomas Jefferson university, hospitals, Loyola. These are big name hospitals. I'm looking at these that goes on and on sharp Memorial hospital, Henry Ford hospital. Uh, let's see some more, I'm trying to, oh, Massachusetts general hospital. [00:52:51] They did not have the tracking pixel Brigham in women's hospital, no tracking pixel on the scheduling page. So some of these hospitals were already doing it right. They re they recognized that putting this face. Pixel on may help them with some of the marketing and understanding the market a little better, which is what I do, but it's also giving personal information, personal health information to Facebook and Facebook's advertisers. [00:53:23] So they didn't put it on so good for them. Again, mass general Brigham and women's, uh, Sanford Mount Sinai, university of Michigan hospital and, and others, of course. So very good news there in general. Again, don't be worried about a pixel on just a random website because it probably is being used to help with stats to know what's being used on the website. [00:53:49] And maybe, maybe just maybe using it to send a little ad to you on Facebook later. Of course, you're listening to Craig Peter son. You can get my insider show notes for absolutely free. And my little mini trainings. Oh three to five minutes every week@craigpeterson.com. Just sign up on the homepage. [00:54:14] You know, I've got it on my homeowner's policy. I have a special business policy for it. And it's something that you should seriously consider, but you need to understand first. So we're gonna talk about it. What is cyber insurance? Uh, that's what's up now? [00:54:31] Cyber insurance is something that many businesses have looked at, not all businesses have, which is kind of crazy. If you ask me according to the industry statistics right now, less than 1% market penetration for cyber insurance and is expected to. [00:54:52] Into a $20 billion industry by 2025. That is some serious money. So what is this cyber insurance? For instance, there's a rider on my home insurance for, for cyber insurance and I have special cyber insurance from a big company underwritten, but it is for anything that happens. In my business, that's related to cyber security and it also covers my clients because that's what we do for living is cyber security. [00:55:28] If they are following our guidelines. So it's pretty darn cool when you get right down to it, because these risks that we have in the digital world are really every. So if you're a large organization, if you're a small little enterprise, are you going to get hacked? You know, bottom line, anybody could potentially get hacked because the bad guys have gotten pretty good. [00:55:56] And most of us in business have gotten pretty lackadaisical because of all of this, but not everybody understands when we're talking about cyber insurance. What does cyber mean? Well, the idea is that cyber insurance is created to protect organizations and individuals against digital risks. So we're talking about things like ransonware malware fishing campaigns. [00:56:24] So for instance, I got a call just this week from a listener who again, had their operating account, emptied out, hate it. When that happens. And so they lost everything. They lost all of the money in the account and they're trying to get it back. I got an email this week and, uh, from a lady that I, there's not much I can do for her. [00:56:46] I pointed her in the right direction, but her father, I think it was, had his digital wallet of cryptocurrency completely emptied, completely stolen. Can you believe this sort of stuff, right? It's happening every day. You might have insurance that covers that, but you might not. Traditional insurance policies are only looking at physical risks, so they will take the physical risk things like damage to equipment, or maybe you have livestock or you have stock and inventory, a building different locations. [00:57:29] That's your standard stuff. But cyber insurance is to allow businesses to transfer the costs associated with recovery from the losses incurred when there's some form of cybersecurity breach. Now that's a pretty big deal. because the losses can be huge. It isn't just ransomware where maybe it, it costs you a million dollars in ransom payments. [00:57:58] Or if you're an individual, a retiree, maybe it only costs you 25,000 in ransom payments. And I know that's a lot, especially for retiree. But there is loss of reputation. There's loss of business, cuz you couldn't conduct business cuz you couldn't use your computers. Right? All of that sort of stuff. You got people that you have to bring in, you have to bring in a special team to try and recover your data. [00:58:23] Maybe try and figure out what had happened. Right. All of that sort of stuff. So be careful cyber insurance, a lot of people kind of mistake it for policy that pays off. Attackers to retrieve or unlock data. That's not what it's really for cyber insurance is something that allows you to, I guess the term in, in the industry is transfer risk when your online security controls fail and. [00:58:52] Basically all of them could fail. It, it, it depends, right? If you're a huge company, you can hire a bigger team for a security operation center, but at the same time, you also have more employees that are causing more problems. So look at it entirely business interruption, payments to experts to recover the data. [00:59:14] Compensation for bodily injuries, uh, depending obviously on the resulting damage and the particular policy and the rates are gonna vary based on the maturity of your cyber defenses. So this is something that I've been big on for a long time, the cyber security maturity CMMC and what that helps 'em to determine is. [00:59:39] What are your rates gonna be? So if you went out and you're just using the cable modem that they, that the, uh, company, your cable company provided for you, or you go to a big box retailer, and that's where you bought your firewall and switches, and you've got your wonderful little Lenovo PCs or Dows or whatever, and you're running, uh, Norton antivirus. [01:00:04] You are not well covered. You are not very mature from a cybersecurity standpoint. The other thing you need to be able to do is make sure you've got your asset management all in line, that you have policies and procedures in place for when things happen. You gotta have it all put together, but the average cyber insurance policy for a small to mid-size company in 2021 was about $1,600. [01:00:31] For $1 million in cyber liability coverage. Now that's not really bad at all. Now there are limits to what the provider will pay. They will often, if you do get nailed, They'll come in and double check that, everything that you said, all of those boxes that you checked when you were applying for your cyber security insurance, make sure you actually did all of them. [01:00:59] Okay. Yeah. Kind of a big deal. And you not only will they not pay out, if you didn't do everything that you said you were going to be. but the other problem is you might end up getting sued by. Okay. So expect a counter suit if you decide to soothe them. So don't lie on those fors people. Okay. All right. Um, cyber claims, unlike non-technical events, like again, a fire flood storm damage, the cyber insurance claim might be determined by means of attack and your ability or your effort to prevent it. [01:01:40] As I was saying, make sure you've got the checklist and this is something I think I, I should probably put a course together on to help you guys with, or maybe even a little bit of consulting for people. Let me know, just send an email to me, me@craigpeterson.com. And uh, if you're interested in more info about cyber insurance, you can either look at this week's newsletter that you can. [01:02:04] By again, going to Craig peterson.com and a link to this particular article I'm looking at, or you can tell me, Hey, listen, I'd love a little course or little support, a little help. Okay. I think it makes a lot of sense. So does your business qualify for cyber insurance? Well, some do some don't, uh, you might not see yourself as a target. [01:02:27] For the bad guys, but I'll tell you, my 85 year old father was conned by some of these cyber attack guys. Okay. And he doesn't have much money. He, he's not the bank of, uh, England bank of America. None of these big banks or anything. Oh. Is a retiree living at home trying to make ends meet. So the same, thing's true for you as a business, you as an individual. [01:02:57] You are vulnerable most likely to a cyber attack, but you've got to really manage your risk posture. You gotta do things, right. So that's the bottom line there. That's what we try and help you do. But you can find information about this again, you can just email me, me, Craig peterson.com and ask for the info on cyber insurance, or if you're already a subscriber to my newsletter. [01:03:23] That went out Tuesday morning. So just check your mail. Maybe it's in the spam box from Tuesday morning and you'll find a lot more information linked right from there. Craig peterson.com stick around. We'll be right back. [01:03:41] There are a lot of complaints about how some of these cryptocurrencies are very non green using tons of energy. And now the prices are going down. We're seeing a number of really weird things happening. [01:03:57] Cryptocurrency, as you probably have heard, has taken a tumble. Now, some of the cryptocurrencies, particularly of course, someone you might know most is Bitcoin use a lot of computing power. [01:04:11] You see, what they're trying to do is basically solve a very complex mathematical problem. And in order to do that, they need a lot of computing. Now you can certainly run it on your little desktop computer, that program to compute those things. It's called mining. So you're mining for Bitcoin. You're, you're trying to solve these mathematical problems and there's a theoretical limit to how many Bitcoins could actually potentially be mind looking right now. [01:04:45] They're saying that circulating Bitcoin right now. Is about 19 million Bitcoin that are out there. And Bitcoin is worth about $20,000 right now, down from its huge, huge, huge high. That was, uh, more than two and a half times. What it's worth right now. So, how do you mind? Well, if you take that computer and you run the software, it's gonna do some mining and it is probably going to cost you more in electricity nowadays to mine. [01:05:21] One Bitcoin than that Bitcoin is worth. In fact, it certainly will cost you more. Now. That's why the people that are professional Bitcoin minors have taken a different tact and what they've done. Is they found places where they can get cheap electricity. For instance, Finland, where they're using geothermal produced electricity. [01:05:46] They're also using the cold air outside in order to cool down. The computers themselves as they're trying to compute this, but there's another thing that they've been doing. And that is well, how about we buy a coal plant? That's been shut down and that's happened. So they take that coal plant. They bring it back online. [01:06:08] They burn the coal, they produce electricity at a cheaper rate than they could buy it. but behind all of this is the computing power. And what miners found a long time ago is it's better to have thousands of compute units working on solving these problems than it is just having. I don't know how many CPUs are in your computer. [01:06:32] Four. Com, um, CPUs. How many? Well, I, how far can you get with those? Yeah, they're fast, but we need thousands of computers. So what they found is that GPU's graphical processing units. Kind of met their goals. You see a GPU is actually composed of thousands of computers, little compute units. Now they can't do real fancy math. [01:07:01] They can't do anything particularly fancy. They're really designed to move. Pixels around on a screen. In other words, they're designed to help gamers have a nice smooth game while they're playing. They can be used. In fact, they're used all of the time in desktop computers, just for regular display of a webpage, for instance, or if you're watching a video, all of that is part of what they're doing. [01:07:30] With graphic processing units. And if you've been paying attention, you probably have noticed if you particularly, if you're a gamer that the price for GPUs has gone way up, not only has it gone way up and it isn't just due to the lockdown and the supply chain problems. but they're very, very, very hard to get now. [01:07:53] Yeah. Some of that is due to supply chain problems. No doubt about it. But most of these GPUs, according to some of the numbers I've seen, have actually been bought by these professional mining companies. In fact, many of them have gone the next step and they have what called custom silicone. These are completely customized process. [01:08:19] sometimes they're using Asics. Sometimes they're using other things, but these custom processors that are really good at solving that problem that they have to solve in order to mine, a bit Bitcoin or one of these other currencies. So you, you see how that all works. There's a number of GPU manufacturers and something else interesting has happened because of the drop in value of pretty much all of the cryptocurrencies. [01:08:51] And that is these GPS are going byebye. Right. Do does a company that is now no longer trading. That's no longer operating. Uh, we've seen at least two of these crypto mining companies just completely disappear. So now all of their hardware is going up for sale. You'll find it on EBA. So I, I wanna warn you, if you are looking for a GPU of some sort for your computer, maybe if you're a gamer, be very, very careful. [01:09:28] We've got a buyer beware situation here because you're not just buying a GPU. A graphics processing card, uh, that has been lightly used. It was sitting in a terminal. Maybe it's a GPU. Like I use them where, when I'm doing video editing, it does use the GPU, even some of the audio editing. It uses the GPU. [01:09:50] I'm looking at it right now and I've got some, uh, GPU utilization going on. I've got about, uh, 6% of my GPU in use right now on this computer. So. What the problem is is that these minors who are selling their old GPUs have been running them full Bo 24, 7. That's hard on anything. Isn't it. So what, uh, what's happening here is that you are seeing a market getting flooded with GPUs. [01:10:25] You really don't wanna. All right. Does that make sense? Uh, you know, there we've lost more than 50% this year already in some of these, uh, cryptocurrencies that are out there coin base has had an interesting year Celsius, a major cryptocurrency bank, suspended withdrawals, uh, just here in the last few. [01:10:52] Coin based crypto exchange announced a round of layoffs. Also here, they paused their hiring a month or two ago. It it's not going very well and prices for new and used graphic cards are continuing to fall. The peak price was late in 2021, a little bit early in 2022, but now you can go to Amazon new egg, best buy and buy current generation GPUs for prices that really would seem like bargain six months ago. [01:11:26] And pricing for used GPUs has fallen even further, which is the caveat Amour URA thing here that I'm warning everybody about. You need to proceed. With caution. So there's a lot of scams, a lot of bait and switches. You know, that's been kind of normal for some things over the years on eBay. I'm afraid, but I've had pretty good luck with eBay, but any high value eBay purchase CPUs have been mining cryptocurrencies at full tilt for months or years have problems in new GPU. [01:12:02] Would not have had, you know, this heat that they generate, the dust that gets into them, that the heat is messing with can really degrade the performance and degrade the usage of that GPU here over time. Dust can also, uh, cause problems with the thermal paste that's in them could be dried out thermal paste because of the heat and that causes them to crack and causes other problems. [01:12:30] So if you buy a used GP that looks dirty or runs hot, removing and cleaning the fan and heat sink, reapplying, fresh thermal paste. Could potentially restore loss performance, and maybe you can even get that new Sony PlayStation because GPS are becoming available. Again. Visit me online Craig peterson.com and get my weekly insider show notes right there. [01:12:59] Self-driving is relatively new technology. And, uh, our friends at Tesla just fired an employee who posted videos of a full self-driving accident. Uh, he's done it before. [01:13:15] Tesla has a very interesting background. In fact, Elon Musk has gotten more interesting over time. [01:13:23] And particularly lately the stuff he's saying, the stuff he's doing, but his companies have really made some amazing progress. Now, one of the things that Elon did pretty well pretty early on was he decided he was going to start selling. A self-driving feature for his cars. And back in the day, you could buy it. [01:13:49] This was before it was ready at all for, I think it was 5,000 and, uh, it was good for whenever they came out with it. And then it went up to 7,000 and then I think it went to 12,000 and now it's you pay him monthly, but in reality, There are no fully self-driving qualified Teslas on the road today. It will be a little while before that happens. [01:14:19] So this ex Tesla employee by the name of John Burnell is quoted in ours Technica saying that he was fired for posting YouTube videos about Tesla's full self-driving beta. Now this is called F S D. And if you know, Computers, you know what beta is? Beta means, Hey, you know, should work, could work, probably has some problems. [01:14:44] And that's exactly what it is. Now. Tesla told California regulators that the full self-driving beta lacks true autonomous features. And that's probably how they got by getting with putting this car on the road, these cars on the road. So this ex employee. Says that Tesla also cut off access to the full self driving beta in the 2021 Tesla model three that he owns. [01:15:17] Now. He said that he paid for it. He had it legitimately, and yet Tesla cut him off from, and I guess. Anybody can try and sign up for it. I don't know all of the details behind getting that beta code. If you wanted to, you probably could investigate a little bit further, but the video that he posted on February 7th provided a frame by frame analysis of a collision of his Tesla with a Ballard, a a Ballard. [01:15:48] Those are those stanchions, those, uh, cement pillars. They usually have. Plastic on the outside that you'll see, you know, protecting sidewalks or in this case it was protecting a bike lane in San Jose. So he said, no matter how minor this accident was, it was the first full self-driving beta collision caught on camera. [01:16:13] That is irrefutable. And he says I was fired from Tesla in February with my U YouTube being cited as the reason why, even though my uploads are for my personal vehicle off company, time or property with software, I paid for. And he has a, um, channel called AI addict that you can find over there on YouTube if it hasn't been taken down yet. [01:16:38] Right. Uh, he said that he got a notice that his full self-driving beta was disabled be based on his recent driving data, but that didn't seem to fit because the morning I got fired, he says I had zero proper use strikes. On my vehicle. So yeah, I, I can't say as I really would blame him, uh, him being in this case, Elon Musk for firing this guy, but it's an interesting little video to watch. [01:17:08] It's like two and a half minutes. You'll see. And it, the guy has his hand on the steering. Well, and the car is steering. Itself down the roadway and there's no other traffic really on the road. I don't know when this was like a, a Sunday or something, but you can see on the screen, it is detecting things like the, the little, uh, construction pillars that are on the side of the road. [01:17:36] And he's in a left. Turn only lane and his Tesla turns, left the steering. Wheel's kind of going a little back and forth, right? As it tries to make up his mind what it's going to do and he's driving down, he just passed a ups truck. Although I would not have passed personally, the way he passed, which is the. [01:17:56] The car decided it was going to, um, get closer to that ups truck. I, I would've purposely gone further away. And then what happens is he goes around another corner where there's some Ballards. That are in the roadway. And of course the idea behind them is so the cars don't go in and accidentally strike a cyclist. [01:18:20] But around that corner where there is a crosswalk crossing the street, there's no Ballard. So people don't have to kind of get around them. And then the Ballards start off again. So the Tesla got kind of confused by this and looking at the screen, it doesn't show the, these Ballards. Being recognized. So the driver of the car grabs the stern wheel takes over at the very last second, but did actually hit the Ballard. [01:18:52] Uh, no two ways about it here. He hit it and the car is stopped and

People Places Planet Podcast
Independent Research, Aquaculture and Brown Bag Lunches: Insights from ELI's Summer Interns

People Places Planet Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 25:55


In this episode of the People Places Planet Podcast, ELI's six summer interns (Jesse Ferraoili, Rebecca Huang, Fatima Lawan, Priyanka Mahat, Raf Rodriguez, and Jeremy Rubin) join host Georgia Ray to reflect on their time as summer interns, talk a little more about who they are, what they are interested in, and what brought them to ELI. They discuss their independent research work, work done on broader projects at the organization, and things they have learned throughout the summer.A Tufts rising senior will tell you about her fight for maternal health in the Black community, especially as it pertains to air quality. Another will dive into uranium contamination in America's southwest. A third will talk about his work with prison populations and the heat related illnesses that can occur inside the system. All of them will discuss what it was like to work at ELI, how they hope to continue in the environmental space, and the lessons they have learned spending the summer in D.C. You can find Raf and Priyanka on Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/rafjrodriguez & https://www.linkedin.com/in/priyanka-mahat-b16642151/If you are interested in learning more about The Center for Black Maternal Health & Reproductive Justice at Tufts (with whom Fatima worked closely on her project), you can visit their website. ★ Support this podcast ★

Immigration Law for Tech Startups
128: The J-1 Journey with Anthony Pawelski

Immigration Law for Tech Startups

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 42:10


In this week's Immigration Law for Tech Startups podcast, I am joined by Anthony Pawelski, senior international advisor at Mass General Brigham, A Boston-based nonprofit hospital which consists of 16 entities including Harvard and Tufts affiliated teaching hospitals. In his role there, Anthony prepares E-1, H1-B, O-1, TN, and a variety of non-immigrant work visa applications for folks in the ecosystem and he consults with departments for possible Green Card sponsorships.   In this episode, we specifically take a deep dive into understanding the J-1 visa – what it is, how it works, who qualifies, and what happens after you've gotten one. Anthony is a true expert who has seen immigration law and these types of visas from many sides.    Please share this episode with companies, HR and recruiting professionals, startup founders, international talent, or anyone who can benefit from it. Sign up for the Alcorn monthly newsletter to receive the latest immigration news and issues. Reach out to us if we can help you determine the best immigration options for yourself, your company, your employees or prospective employees, or your family whether in the U.S. or abroad. In this episode, you'll hear about: Common immigration situations they encounter The Education Commission for Foreign Exchange Medical Graduates An overview of the J-1 visa: categories, sponsorship, challenges Funding and educational levels The benefits and drawbacks The foreign residence requirement    Don't miss my upcoming conversations with top Silicon Valley venture capitalists, startup founders, professors, futurists, and thought leaders on Immigration Law for Tech Startups. Subscribe to this podcast here or on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, or whatever your favorite platform is. As always, we welcome your rating and review of this podcast. We appreciate your feedback!   Resources: Mass General Brigham   Alcorn Immigration Law: Subscribe to the monthly Alcorn newsletter   Immigration Law for Tech Startups podcast: Episode 33: All About the J-1 Exchange Visa Episode 34: J-1 Two-Year Foreign Residency Requirement Episode 66: Cap-Exempt H-1Bs with Danielle Goldman   Immigration Options for Talent, Investors, and Founders Immigration Law for Tech Startups eBook Extraordinary Ability Bootcamp course for best practices for securing the O-1A visa, EB-1A green card, or the EB-2 NIW (National Interest Waiver) green card—the top options for startup founders. Use promotion code ILTS for 20% off the enrollment fee.

The Dental Festival Podcast
Episode 76: Laura J Nadler - Are You Ready for Your Closeup?

The Dental Festival Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 9:45


You know you need to use video in your marketing, but where do you start? Laura will teach you which videos are essential to your marketing and the best places to use them. Objectives: 1. Identify the key videos every practice must-have.     2. Determine where and how to use them.   About Laura J Nadler  Laura J Nadler is the founder of WorkingCat Marketing which helps dental practices go from found to 5 stars. She speaks internationally including at the ADA, ACP, Tufts, and Boston University. She is the author of Lights! Camera! YOU! – A Practical Guide for Creating and Using Video to Market Your Practice. Visit our website - https://www.thedentalfestival.com/  

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.
How To Upgrade Your Metabolism with Dr. William Li

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 61:25 Very Popular


This episode is brought to you by Rupa Health, Cozy Earth, and InsideTracker.Many people think of metabolism as one specific system in the body, when in fact it's the sum of many different processes that are serving other vital roles for us as well. Our bodies are not closed systems, so our environment, social networks, diet, hormones, microbiome, genetics, and more, all influence how well our metabolism works, or how well we can extract energy from our food. I'm so happy to sit down with my good friend Dr. William Li to talk about what metabolism really means, why the old way of thinking about metabolism hasn't helped us, and how to make positive impacts on our metabolism at any age. Dr. William Li is a world-renowned physician, scientist, speaker, and author of Eat to Beat Disease - The New Science of How Your Body Can Heal Itself. He is best known for leading the Angiogenesis Foundation. His groundbreaking work has impacted more than 70 diseases, including cancer, diabetes, blindness, heart disease, and obesity. An author of over 100 scientific publications in leading journals such as Science, the New England Journal of Medicine, The Lancet, and more, Dr. Li has served on the faculties of Harvard, Tufts, and Dartmouth Medical School.This episode is brought to you by Rupa Health, Cozy Earth, and InsideTracker.You can check out a free, live demo with a Q&A or create an account at RupaHealth.com.Right now, get 40% off your Cozy Earth sheets at cozyearth.com and use code MARK40.InsideTracker is offering my community 20% off at insidetracker.com/drhyman.Here are more details from our interview (audio version / Apple Subscriber version):Shifting away from the idea that eating less and exercising more is the key to weight loss (4:51 / 2:12) How calories affect metabolism (13:14 / 11:25) Research measuring the four phases of metabolism as we age (16:07 / 13:36) What is metabolism? (24:03 / 21:26) Common myths about metabolism (28:35 / 24:37) Supporting the gut microbiome to raise metabolism and promote health (36:18 / 32:03) Foods that mimic caloric restriction (40:27 / 36:10) Our body's ability to reverse disease (52:59 / 46:21) Reducing stress in a doomscrolling society (54:07 / 49:30) How to restore health to your metabolism (56:03/ 51:56) Mentioned in this episodePerspective: Obesity—an unexplained epidemicCompeting paradigms of obesity pathogenesis: energy balance versus carbohydrate-insulin modelsDaily energy expenditure through the human life courseGet a copy of Dr. Li's book, Eat to Beat Disease: The New Science of How Your Body Can Heal Itself, here and check out his Masterclass with Dr. William Li here. Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

Application to Admission
Will Sending Your Child to a Private School Get Them Into a Top College? A Real Talk Conversation with Gina Parker Collins and Samantha Osbourne from RIISE (Resources in Independent School Education)

Application to Admission

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 46:41


We're back! After a few summer weeks off, we're bigger, blacker and better than ever! It's August, and our book drops in less than a month. Are you ready? Have you pre-ordered it? One of the most controversial topics we write about in our book is how the decisions you make about your child's education now matter later. RIISE is the preeminent leader of all things independent schools for Black and Brown people. Founded almost 20 years ago by an independent school parent, Gina Parker Collins, RIISE is an instrumental resource that helps US navigate the challenges and triumphs of sending our children to private schools. Gina has made it her mission to gather information, share and support independent school students and parents. Coincidently, she's an HBCU graduate, and her children now attend Tufts and Brown, respectively. As a product of an NYC private school, UPenn and recent Wharton MBA graduate Samantha Osborne has her own opinions about private school education and if it leads to top colleges. She's been Gina's partner in podcasting - check out @articulating – and get their periodic perspectives about what Black and Brown parents need to be doing now to have independent school success. Hear their stories and confirm that you have similar struggles, questions and reasons to keep pushing forward. This is a fun one!! *** Correction in the podcast we mention the amount of school counselors that identify as White women which was incorrect. Please see the correct data below. https://www.zippia.com/school-guidance-counselor-jobs/demographics/

Phi-Lacrosse-ophy Podcast
Phi - Lacrosse - Ophy Podcast Season 4, Ep. 18 - Tufts Head Coach Casey D'Annolfo

Phi-Lacrosse-ophy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 60:20


In this podcast, recorded Aug 12, 2022, Jamie talks to Tufts Head Coach Casey D'Annolfo about the iconic Tufts program, their culture and philosophies, on and off the field. They also discuss the NESCAC recruiting calendar, recruiting timeline and what Tufts is looking for in recruits.

Powerful and Passionate Healthcare Professionals Podcast
5 Best Tips To Harness The Power Of Metabolic Health Into Current Healthcare Practice Ep 10

Powerful and Passionate Healthcare Professionals Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 33:29


Healthcare should be more focused on the prevention of disease. Rather than the diagnosis of sick problems.  In this episode, we discussed the importance of metabolic health and different aspects of it in your patient's life. Your patient can adapt these to their practices by fixing their vision and with the help of the right information. Our feature guest today is Dr. Philip Ovadia, MD, who has graduated from Jefferson Medical College and then completed a general surgery residency at UMDNJ Robert Wood Johnson medical school, and a cardiothoracic surgery fellowship at Tufts, New England Medical Center. After 15 years of practicing as a cardiac surgeon, he realizes how important metabolic health is! Now he runs a telemedicine practice focused on improving metabolic health and teaching people to stay off the operating table.  He shared his valuable inputs related to metabolic health, myths that we blindly believe are not true, principles of sound health, and insights into the current healthcare system that needed to be addressed.     Subscribe

Tooth or Dare Podcast
#111 - Dr. MaryJane Hanlon: “Tufts As Nails”

Tooth or Dare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 73:22


Dr. MaryJane Hanlon, RDH, DMD, MBA has an extensive and varied background in the field of dentistry.    Dr. Hanlon began her career in dentistry at the young age of just 14 years old, supporting her local orthodontist as the “kid” after school who taught children how to brush, polish models and file records. Falling in love with the profession on her first day, Dr. Hanlon's desire to become a dentist never waned. She finally accomplished her dream in 1997 when I graduated from Tufts University School of Dental Medicine, Boston, MA. Since then, Dr. Hanlon has been active in the dental industry, owning and operating her own practice. Her speaking and coaching programs offer dental students the ability to gain strategies, systems and the mindset that is needed for success.   “I believe that our education begins, but never ends. We owe it to ourselves and our future generations to commit to lifelong learning.” -Dr. Hanlon   Visit her website @ www.drmaryjanehanlon.com   Follow her on Instagram @dr_mj_hanlon and on Facebook @DrMJHanlon   —————————————————   Thank you to Designs for Vision for sponsoring this episode!   Are you tired of slouching? Dealing with back pain? Constantly having to adjust yourself to see clearly? Well, Designs for Vision has just the solution for your neck and back worries.   The new Infinity Vue loupes created by Designs for Vision provide a straightforward approach for ergonomics. Keeping your chin up, neck straight, and free of aches or pains. The loupes come in 3.0x and 3.5x magnification and allows you to keep your eyes forward while viewing the magnified oral cavity. This game-changing technology allows clinicians to prolong their career and improve their quality of life.   Designs for Vision offers a 60-day trial for the Infinity VUE, so that you can see and feel the difference in your posture.   Until August 19th, Designs for Vision is running a Summer Upgrade program that allows customers to trade-in their old loupes towards the purchase of any pair of Designs for Vision Loupes, including the Infinity VUE. They are providing a $200.00 trade-in when a new pair of loupes is purchased and up to $450.00 total discount when a new pair of loupes and new light is purchased together.    https://www.designsforvision.com/SurgHtml/S-Infinity.htm   —————————————————   Our hosts encourage you to leave them a review! LET'S GO!   Find more of our episodes at https://www.toothordare.ca/   Follow us on Instagram! Podcast IG: @toothordare.podcast Irene: @toothlife.irene Katrina: @thedentalwinegenist

The Connected Care Team
Redefining Scheduling and Communication at Tufts Medical Center

The Connected Care Team

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 16:02 Transcription Available


In this episode of The Connected Care Team podcast, Dr. Michael Davis, Director of Inpatient Systems for the Department of Medicine at Tufts Medical Center, shares how Tufts integrates secure messaging and scheduling to improve clinical communication.Closed-Loop CommunicationTufts Medical Center implemented TigerConnect for smoother communication and coordination within the organization. Dr. Davis noted that compared to pagers, secure messaging from TigerConnect providers natural closed-loop communication. With pagers, clinicians have no way of knowing if their page has been received. But with TigerConnect, clinicians know immediately when a message has been read.“So you have those read receipts, you know exactly what state your message is in. You can see whether it was sent or not. You can see whether it was delivered. And then finally you can see whether it's been read and that read receipt is hugely helpful in supporting this natural form of closed-loop communication.” – Dr. Michael DavisA Single Directory for Call SchedulesTufts Medical Center also uses TigerConnect Physician Scheduling to have call schedules feed roles in the app. This allows Tufts to provide a single directory across all departments that is easily accessible. Staff no longer need to know the person inhabiting a role to coordinate patient care. “You don't need to know who the cardiology consultant is at any given time. All you need to do is pick your phone up and search for cardiology consultant, and then you can message them directly.” – Dr. Michael DavisDecentralizing the Scheduling Process for Bidirectional CommunicationDr. Davis was a chief resident of a 76-resident program for internal medicine at Tufts – so he understands the complexity of creating resident and physician schedules. Using TigerConnect Physician Scheduling has enabled Tufts Medical Center to dramatically reduce the amount of work spent on scheduling by executive administrators and program coordinators. “When somebody takes over a role in TigerConnect, that automatically then gets fed back into the [schedule] directory that the rest of the hospital sees to see who's on call. So that bidirectional communication between the messenger app and the call scheduler has been very helpful.” – Dr. Michael Davis Related: Connect with Dr. Michael Davis on LinkedIn.Learn more about the TigerConnect Product suite.Follow TigerConnect on LinkedIn for the latest episodes, news, and announcements. Subscribe to The Connected Care Team on your favorite platform to get notified of new episodes. 

LIVIN THE GOOD LIFE SHOW
DR. CHRIS LEE, ORTHOPEDIC GENIUS (SURGEON) BURBANK, CA

LIVIN THE GOOD LIFE SHOW

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 12:57


LTGLSHOW'S OFFICIAL ORTHOPEDIC SURGEON!Dr. Christopher S. Lee is a board certified orthopaedic surgeon specializing in sports medicine, arthroscopy, joint and cartilage preservation as well as shoulder and knee replacements. He is the team physician for the USA National Indoor Volleyball Team and will be traveling with the team to Tokyo for the 2020 Summer Olympics.Born and raised in Boston, Massachusetts, Dr. Lee attended Tufts University where he received awards for both academic and artistic achievements. While in college, he had the unique opportunity of studying abroad in China where he studied Mandarin Chinese and Chinese Literature at Peking University.​After graduating Tufts, Dr. Lee subsequently attended the Tufts University School of Medicine where he participated in the MD/MBA program. After completing the Tufts Combined Residency in Orthopaedic Surgery, he then received his fellowship training at the San Diego Arthroscopy and Sports Medicine Fellowship where he trained with international pioneers in sports medicine, arthroscopy and shoulder replacement surgery. As a fellow, he served as an assistant team physician for the San Diego State University Aztecs and the San Diego Padres Major League Baseball team. He is presently team physician for the USA National Indoor Volleyball Team, Rock N' Roll Sports Medicine, and Crescenta Valley High School. Dr. Lee has a longtime commitment to running. A track athlete in high school, he transitioned to distance running over the years and completed the Philadelphia Marathon in 2007, the Boston Marathon in 2008 and 2010 and the Chicago Marathon in 2013. As a healthcare provider, he has served as a member of the Rock 'n' Roll Marathon Series Medical Team since 2012. He presently has a passion for running, golf, volleyball, basketball and football.  A violinist since the age of 4, Dr. Lee has traveled internationally to Europe and South America to give both solo and ensemble performances. He attended the Tanglewood Music Institute on scholarship during the summer of 1996 and continued his musical studies while at Tufts, winning the University Concerto Competition in 1998 and 2001. He has been the fortunate recipient of the Jacob Swartz Young Artist Award for solo performance and the Eugene Lehner Chamber Music Award as a member of the Rackwick Quartet.Dr. Lee has several research interests and has published in major orthopaedic journals and presented at national meetings. He currently has active projects in ACL reconstruction, shoulder replacement surgery, shoulder arthroscopy, overhead athletes, post-operative pain management, MRI, meniscus repair and biceps pathology.

Your College Bound Kid | Scholarships, Admission, & Financial Aid Strategies
YCBK 240: Ben Baum helps us to understand St. John's College

Your College Bound Kid | Scholarships, Admission, & Financial Aid Strategies