Podcasts about Northern Ireland

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Part of the United Kingdom situated in the north-east of the island of Ireland, created 1921

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Northern Ireland

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Best podcasts about Northern Ireland

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Latest podcast episodes about Northern Ireland

Sarah and Vinnie Full Show
December 2nd, 2021 6am Alice Celebrity Trash

Sarah and Vinnie Full Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 14:52


 Alec Baldwin says he ‘didn't pull the trigger' in the fatal ‘Rust' movie set shooting, ‘Game Of Thrones' studio tour announces February opening date in Northern Ireland, and Anne Rice's ‘Mayfair Witches' series is set to film at AMC! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

TFB Behind the Gun Podcast
TFB B-Side Podcast: What It's Like Being a Gun Owner in Northern Ireland

TFB Behind the Gun Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 66:14


Today on the TFB B-Side Podcast we're talking with TFB/TFB Supporter and Patreon member Paul from Northern Ireland. Northern Ireland has a long history involving firearms some of which are shrouded in a lot of political opinions we won't get into. However, our guest today has a few opinions on how periods like The Troubles influenced the gun laws and gun culture in the country and how such events set Northern Ireland apart from the rest of the United Kingdom. 

FactSet U.S. Daily Market Preview
Financial Market Preview - Thursday 2-Dec

FactSet U.S. Daily Market Preview

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 5:25


US futures are indicating a higher open as of 05:00 ET. European equity markets are lower, following mixed Asian trade. The market's primary focus remains on the Omicron Covid variant. The low South African hospitalization rate suggests the Omicron variant may not be as severe as feared. The Omicron variant is fueling debate about its implications for inflation. There are concerns over Northern Ireland hampering the US-UK deal on metal tariffs. Companies mentioned: Amphenol, Apple

RedHanded
224: Episode 224 - The Guildford Four & The Maguire Seven

RedHanded

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 79:42


On the 5th of October 1974, the Provisional Irish Republican Army blew up a military pub in Guildford, killing four soldiers, one civilian and injuring sixty-five others. The responsibility for the heinous act of terror was quickly thrown at three young Irish men and a seventeen-year-old English girl. On top of this, accusations of running a  "bomb factory" was soon being shouldered by a middle-aged Irish woman who'd lived in England for twenty years. The British justice system had no evidence to prove the Guildford Four or Maguire Seven were connected to any bombings, but a large helping of police brutality and a bit of systemic corruption would soon sort that out. Sources: Armed Struggle: The History of the IRA by Richard English Making Sense of the Troubles: A history of conflict in Northern Ireland by David McKittrick and David McVea In The Name of the Son: The Gerald Conlan Story by Ricard O'Rawe https://www.irishpost.com/life-style/infamous-no-irish-no-blacks-no-dogs-signs-may-never-have-existed-148416 https://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/oct/28/no-reason-to-doubt-no-irish-no-blacks-signs https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AlmgQDluhk4 https://www.thejournal.ie/paddy-armstrong-documentary-1792119-Nov2014/ https://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/2018/nov/25/british-injustice-maguire-story-review-family https://www.thejusticegap.com/guildford-four-how-the-innocent-were-framed-and-the-truth-buried https://magill.ie/archive/guildford-four-and-one-law-irish https://everything.explained.today/Gerry_Conlon/ https://www.thecanary.co/uk/analysis/2019/03/23/special-branch-knew-who-the-real-birmingham-bombers-were-from-1975/ https://www.nytimes.com/1994/03/12/opinion/l-sins-of-the-guildford-four-prosecution-447099.html https://innocenceproject.org/how-the-uk-police-interview-suspects/ https://education.niassembly.gov.uk/post_16/snapshots_of_devolution/gfa https://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/news/northern-ireland/gerry-conlon-hadnt-an-ounce-of-republicanism-in-him-says-biographer-and-boyhood-pal-36201704.html https://www.irishtimes.com/news/blair-apology-to-guilford-four-and-maguire-six-1.1174017 https://group.irishecho.com/2011/02/a-view-north-of-bin-lids-and-head-bangers-in-northern-ireland/ https://stairnaheireann.net/2020/10/19/otd-in-1989-after-serving-15-years-in-prison-the-guildford-four-are-released-in-what-is-considered-to-be-one-of-the-biggest-ever-miscarriages-of-justice-in-britain-3/

Farming Today
02/12/21 New farm payment scheme revealed, insects for hen feed, Christmas turkey workers

Farming Today

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 13:37


The Defra Secretary of State will announce the new post-Brexit support payments for farmers in England today. Will they like what they hear? It's the biggest change to the way farmers are supported by the Government in nearly 50 years, so it is a big deal. Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland will be implementing their own systems. Morrisons supermarket has announced that it's installing ‘mini insect farms' with ten of its egg producers to provide climate friendly feed for the hens. The aim is to reduce the amount of imported soya used as feed. All this week we've been looking into the issues around farm labour. December is the busy month for turkey farms and this year they've been landed with the double whammy of finding enough seasonal workers and coping with avian flu outbreaks. Presented by Caz Graham and produced by Beatrice Fenton.

Your Brain on Facts
This Land is Our Land (ep 173)

Your Brain on Facts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 40:51


In 1492, Columbus sailed the ocean blue, and it's been downhill for New World peoples ever since.  Today we look at residential schools, the occupation of Alcatraz by Indians of All Tribes, the Oka crisis (aka the Mohawk resistance), and Sacheen Littlefeather's Oscar speech. YBOF Book; Audiobook (basically everywhere but Audible); Merch! Hang out with your fellow Brainiacs  .Reach out and touch Moxie on Facebook, Twitter,  or Instagram. Support the show Music by Kevin MacLeod, Steve Oxen, David Fesliyan.   Links to all the research resources are on our website. Late summer, 1990.  The protest had been going on for two months; tensions were escalating.  Soldiers had been dispatched to enforce the government's will, but the Kahnawake Mohawk weren't going to give up another inch of their land.  14 year old Waneek and her 4 year old sister Kaniehtiio were there with their activist mother when the violence started.  Waneek tried to get little Tio to safety when she saw a soldier who had taken her school books from her weeks prior...and he stabbed her in the chest.  My name's...   One of my goals with this podcast is to tell the stories that don't get told, the stories of people of color and women.  It's not always easy.  Pick a topic to research and it's white men all the way down.  But, even when I haven't been struggling with my chronic idiopathic pulmonary conditions, as I've been for the past three acute months, I've dropped the ball.  Mea culpa.  So let me try to catch up a little bit here as we close out November and Native American Heritage month.  And since the lungs are still playing up a bit, I'm tagging past Moxie in to help, though I've done with I can to polish her audio, even though I lost more than 100 episodes worth of work files when I changed computers and deleted the hard drive on my right rather than the hard drive on my left.     Today's episode isn't going to be a knee-slapping snark fest, but the severity of the stories is the precise reason we need to tell them, especially the ones that happened relatively recently but are treated like a vague paragraph in an elementary school textbook.  Come with me now, to the 1960's and the edge of California, to a rocky island in San Francisco bay.  Yes, that one, Alcatraz, the Rock.     After the American Indian Center in San Francisco was destroyed in a fire in October 1969, an activist group called “Indians of All Tribes” turned its attention to Alcatraz island and the prison which had closed six years earlier.  I'm going to abbreviate Indians of All Tribes to IAT, rather than shorten it to Indians, just so you know.  A small party, led by Mohawk college student Richard Oakes, went out to the island on Nov 9, but were only there one night before the authorities removed them.  That didn't disappoint Oakes, who told the SF Chronicle, “If a one day occupation by white men on Indian land years ago established squatter's rights, then the one day occupation of Alcatraz should establish Indian rights to the island.”   11 days later, a much larger group of Indians of All Tribes members, a veritable occupation force of 89 men, women and children, sailed to the island in the dead of night and claimed Alcatraz for all North America natives.  Despite warnings from authorities, the IAT set up house in the old guards' quarters and began liberally, vibrantly redecorating, spray-painting the forboding gray walls with flowers and slogans like “Red Power” and “Custer Had It Coming.”  The water tower read “Peace and Freedom. Welcome. Home of the Free Indian Land.”  And of course I put pictures of that in the Vodacast app.  Have you checked it out?  I'm still getting the hang of it...  The IAT not only had a plan, they had a manifesto, addressed to “The Great White Father and All His People,” in which they declared their intentions to use the island for a school, cultural center and museum.  Alcatraz was theirs, they claimed, “by right of discovery,” though the manifesto did offer to buy the island for “$24 in glass beads and red cloth”—the price supposedly paid for the island of Manhattan.     Rather than risk a PR fall-out, the Nixon administration opted to leave the occupiers alone as long as things remained peaceful and just kinda wait the situation out.  The island didn't even have potable water; how long could the IAT stay there?  Jokes on you, politicians of 50 years ago, because many of the occupiers lived in conditions as bad on reservations.  They'd unknowingly been training for this their entire lives.  Native American college students and activists veritably swarmed the island and the population ballooned to more than 600 people, twice the official capacity of the prison.  They formed a governing body and set up school for the kids, a communal kitchen, clinic, and a security detail called “Bureau of Caucasian Affairs.”  Other activists helped move people and supplies to the island and supportive well-wishers send money, clothes and canned food.    Government officials would travel to the island repeatedly to try, and fail, to negotiate.  The IAT would settle for nothing less than the deed to Alcatraz Island, and the government maintained such a property transfer would be impossible.  The occupation was going better than anyone expected, at least for the first few months.  Then, many of the initial wave of residents had to go back to college and their places were taken by people more interested in no rent and free food than in any cause.  Drugs and alcohol, which were banned, were soon prevalent.  Oakes and his wife left Alcatraz after his stepdaughter died in a fall, and things began to unravel even more quickly.  By May, the sixth month of the occupation, the government dispensed with diplomatic efforts and cut all remaining power to Alcatraz.  Only a few weeks later, a fire tore across the island and destroyed several of Alcatraz's historic buildings.  Federal marshals removed the last occupiers in June of the second year, an impressive 19 months after they first arrived, six men, five women and four children.  This time, when laws were passed after an act of rebellion, they were *for the rebels, which many states enacting laws for tribal self rule.  When Alcatraz opened as a national park in 1973, not only had the graffiti from the occupation not been removed, it was preserved as part of the island's history.   People gather at Alcatraz every November for an “Un-Thanksgiving Day” celebrating Native culture and activism. RESIDENTIAL SCHOOL   The American government took tens of thousands of children from Native families and placed them in boarding schools with strict assimilation practices.  Their philosophy - kill the Indian to save the man.  That was the mindset under which the U.S. government Native children to attend boarding schools, beginning in the late 19th century, when the government was still fighting “Indian wars.”   There had been day and boarding schools on reservations prior to 1870, when U.S. cavalry captain, Richard Henry Pratt established the Carlisle Indian School in Pennsylvania.  This school was not on a reservation, so as to further remove indigenous influences.  The Carlisle school and other boarding schools were part of a long history of U.S. attempts to either kill, remove, or assimilate Native Americans.  “As white population grew in the United States and people settled further west towards the Mississippi in the late 1800s, there was increasing pressure on the recently removed groups to give up some of their new land,” according to the Minnesota Historical Society. Since there was no more Western territory to push them towards, the U.S. decided to remove Native Americans by assimilating them. In 1885, Commissioner of Indian Affairs Hiram Price explained the logic: “it is cheaper to give them education than to fight them.”   Off-reservation schools began their assault on Native cultural identity as soon as students arrived, by first doing away with all outward signs of tribal life that the children brought with them.  The long braids worn by boys were cut off.  Native clothes were replaced with uniforms.  The children were given new Anglicized names, including new surnames.  Traditional Native foods were abandoned, as were things like sharing from communal dishes,  forcing students to use the table manners of white society, complete with silverware, napkins and tablecloths.  The strictest prohibition arguably fell on their native languages.  Students were forbidden to speak their tribal language, even to each other.  Some school rewarded children who spoke only English, but most schools chose the stick over the carrot and relied on punishment to achieve this aim.  This is especially cruel when you consider that many of the words the children were being forced to learn and use had no equivalent in their mother tongue.   The Indian boarding schools taught history with a definite white bias.  Columbus Day was heralded as a banner day in history and a beneficial event for Native people, as it was only after discovery did Native Americans become part of history.  Thanksgiving was a holiday to celebrate “good” Indians having aided the brave Pilgrim Fathers.  On Memorial Day, some students at off-reservation schools were made to decorate the graves of soldiers sent to kill their fathers.   Half of each school day was spent on industrial training. Girls learned to cook, clean, sew, care for poultry and do laundry for the entire institution.  Boys learned industrial skills such as blacksmithing, shoemaking or performed manual labor such as farming.  Not receiving much funding from the government, the schools were required to be as self-sufficient as possible, so students did the majority of the work.  By 1900, school curriculums tilted even further toward industrial training while academics were neglected.   The Carlisle school developed a “placing out system,” which put Native students in the mainstream community for summer or a year at a time, with the official goal of exposing them to more job skills.  A number of these programs were out-right exploitive.  At the Phoenix Indian School, girls became the major source of domestic labor for white families in the area, while boys were placed in seasonal harvest or other jobs that no one else wanted.   Conversion to Christianity was also deemed essential to the cause.  Curriculums included heavy emphasis of religious instruction, such as the Ten Commandments, the Beatitudes and Psalms.  Sunday school meant lectures on sin and guilt.  Christianity governed gender relations at the schools and most schools invested their energy in keeping the sexes apart, in some cases endangering the lives of the students by locking girls in their dormitories at night.     Discipline within the Indian boarding schools was severe and generally consisted of confinement, corporal punishment, or restriction of food.  In addition to coping with the severe discipline, students were ravaged by disease exacerbated by crowded conditions at the boarding schools. Tuberculosis, influenza, and trachoma (“sore eyes”) were the greatest threats.  In December of 1899, measles broke out at the Phoenix Indian School, reaching epidemic proportions by January.  In its wake, 325 cases of measles, 60 cases of pneumonia, and 9 deaths were recorded in a 10-day period.  During Carlisle's operation, from 1879 and 1918, nearly 200 children died and were buried near the school.   Naturally, Indian people resisted the schools in various ways. Sometimes entire villages refused to enroll their children in white schools.  Native parents also banded together to withdraw their children en masse, encouraging runaways, and undermining the schools' influence during summer break.  In some cases, police were sent onto the reservations to seize children from their parents.  The police would continue to take children until the school was filled, so sometimes orphans were offered up or families would negotiate a family quota. Navajo police officers would take children assumed to be less intelligent, those not well cared for, or those physically impaired.  This was their attempt to protect the long-term survival of their tribe by keeping healthy, intelligent children at home.     It was not until 1978, within the lifetime of many of my gentle listeners. that the passing of the Indian Child Welfare Act that Native American parents gained the legal right to deny their children's placement in off-reservation schools.   Though the schools left a devastating legacy, they failed to eradicate Native American cultures as they'd hoped. Later, the Navajo Code Talkers who helped the U.S. win World War II would reflect on the strange irony this forced assimilation had played in their lives.  “As adults, [the Code Talkers] found it puzzling that the same government that had tried to take away their languages in schools later gave them a critical role speaking their languages in military service,” recounts the National Museum of the American Indian.   In addition to documentaries, I'd like to recommend the movie The Education of Little Tree, starring James Cromwell, Tantu Cardinal and Graham Green, about a part-Charokee boy who goes to live with his grandparents in the Tennessee mountains, but is then sent to an Indian school.   There are a number of off-reservation boarding schools in operation today.  Life in the schools is still quite strict, but now includes teaching Native culture and language rather than erasing it.  Though they cannot be separated from their legacy of oppression and cultural violence, for many modern children, they're a step to a better life.  Poverty is endemic to many reservations, which also see much higher than average rates of alcoholism, drug use, and suicide.    For the students, these schools are a chance to escape.   OKA   Some words are visceral reminders of collective historic trauma. “Selma” or “Kent State” recall the civil rights movement and the use of military force against U.S. citizens. “Bloody Sunday” evokes “the Troubles” of Northern Ireland. Within Indigenous communities in North America, the word is “Oka.”  That word reminds us of the overwhelming Canadian response to a small demonstration in a dispute over Mohawk land in Quebec, Canada, in 1990. Over the course of three months, the Canadian government sent 2,000 police and 4,500 soldiers (an entire brigade), backed by armored vehicles, helicopters, jet fighters and even the Navy, to subdue several small Mohawk communities.  What was at stake?  What was worth all this to the government?  A golf course and some condos.   The Kanesetake had been fighting for their land for centuries, trying to do it in accordance with the white man's laws, as far back as appeals to the British government in 1761. In 1851, the governor general of Canada refused to recognize their right to their land.  8 years later, the land was given to the Sulpicians, a Catholic diocese.  In 1868, the government of the nascent Dominion of Canada denied that the Mohawk's original land grant had even reserved land for them, so it wasn't covered under the Indian Act. In the 1910's, the he Mohawks of Kanesatake's appealed all the way to the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council, Canada's highest appeals court at the time, who ruled that official title to the land was held by the Sulpicians.  By the end of the Second World War, the Sulpicians had sold all of their remaining land and had left the area. Surely the Mohawk could have their land back now!  Nope.  The Mohawk of Kanesatake were now confined to about 2.3mi sq/6 km sq, known as The Pines, less than 1/10th of the land they once held.  The Mohawk people of Kahnawake, Kanesetake and Akwesasne asserted Aboriginal title to their ancestral lands in 1975, but their claim was rejected on the most BS possible reason -- that they had not held the land continuously from time immemorial.  And on and on.   So you can understand why they'd be a little miffed when plans were announced to expand a golf course that had been built in 1961, expanding onto land that was used for sacred and ceremonial purposes and included a graveyard.  Again, the Mohawk tried to use the proper legal channels and again they got royally fucked over.  That March, their protests and petitions were ignored by the City Council in Oka.  They had to do something the city couldn't ignore.  They began a blockade of a small dirt road in The Pines and they maintained it for a few months.  The township of Oka tried to get a court injunction to order its removal.  On July 11, 1990, the Quebec provincial police sent in a large heavily armed force of tactical officers armed with m16s and tear gas and such-like to dismantle this blockade.  The Mohawks met this show of force with a show of their own.  Behind the peaceful protestors, warriors stood armed and ready.     Let me try to give this story some of the air time it deserves.  April 1, 1989, 300 Kanesatake Mohawks marched through Oka to protest against Mayor Jean Ouellette's plan to expand the town's golf course.  On March 10, 1990, --hey, that's my birthday!  the day, not the year-- After Oka's municipal council voted to proceed with the golf course expansion project, a small group of Mohawks barricades the access road.  With a building.  They drug a fishing shack into the Pines and topped it with a banner that read “Are you aware that this is Mohawk territory?” and the same again in French, because Quebec.  There's a picture on the Vodacast app, naturally, as well as a photo called Face to Face is a photograph of Canadian Pte. Patrick Cloutier and Anishinaabe warrior Brad Larocque staring each other down during the Oka Crisis. It was taken on September 1, 1990 by Shaney Komulainen, and has become one of Canada's most famous images.  It really should be more famous outside of Canada, like the lone protestor blocking tanks in Tiananmen Square or 1968 Summer Olympics, Tommie Smith and John Carlos staged a protest and displayed a symbol of Black power during their medal ceremony.  Check it out on Vodacast and let me know if you agree, soc. med.   during the summer of 1990 the Mohawk warrior society engaged in the 78 day armed standoff with the s.q Provincial Police and the Canadian Armed Forces in order to protect an area of their territory from development known as the pines near the town of oka.   This area was used as a tribal cemetery along with other tribal activities important to the Mohawks.  The oka crisis or also known as the Mohawk resistance was a defensive action that gained international attention,  taken by Mohawks of the Kanna Satake reserve along with other Mohawks from the nearby communities of Kanna waka as well as the Aquosasne on a reservation on the American side of the u.s. Canadian colonial border.  It was one of the most recent examples of Native armed resistance that was successful in stopping construction and development on to tribal lands.  So what was being developed that led to this armed confrontation leading to the death of an sq SWAT officer during that hot summer?  Golf.  The town of oka and investors wanted to expand a nine-hole golf course at the Open Golf Club into an 18-hole course as well as build around 60 condominiums into Mohawk territory.  Since 1989 the Mohawks had been protesting these plans for development by the town of oka and investors of the Golf Course expansion.  Seeing that the local courts were not of any help in recognizing Mohawk claims of the land under development, Mohawk protesters and community members held marches rallies and signed petitions.   Eventually the Mohawks set up a barricade blocking access to the development site on a gravel road.  Later on it was occupied mainly by Mohawk women and children OCA's mayor jean wallet one of the nine hole golf course expanded and filed the injunction against the Mohawks. He went into hiding during the oka crisis. [sfx clip] I will occupy this land for what it takes he has to prove it to me that it's his and I will prove it to him that's mine.  Oak is mayor had stated the land in question actually belonged to the town of oka and did not back down from the issue, but instead filed an injunction one of many that had been issued prior to remove the Mohawks from the area and take down the barricades by force if necessary.  if I have to die for Mohawk territory I will but I ain't going alone are you armed no the Creator will provide in anticipation of the raid by the sq mohawks of knesset Aki sent out a distress call to surrounding communiti.  In the Mohawk warrior society from the Aquos austenite reservation and the American side of the Mohawk reserve as well as kana waka have begun filtering into the barricade area with camping gear communications equipment food and weapons.  It's difficult to pin down just who makes up the Warriors society. the leaders an organization you each depending on the circumstances.  the member roles are  treated like a military secret, which is fitting since many or most of the Warriors were veterans, with a particular persistance of Vietnam Marines.   why the Warriors exist is easier to answer   mohawk have closed off the Mercier bridge sparking a traffic nightmare.  Provincial police arrived at dawn secure position in case of Mohawk until 8:00 to clear out.  The natives stood their ground the battle for the barricade started just before nine o'clock on one side heavily armed provincial police bob tear gas and stun grenade power [sfx reporter] a 20-minute gun battle ensued dozens of rounds of ammunition were shot off and then the inevitable someone was hit a police officer took a bullet in the face which proved fatal that seems to turn the tide the police has been advancing until then turned tail and fled leaving six of their vehicles behind.  The Mohawk celebrated when the police left celebrated what they called a victory over the qpm.  Most of the Mohawks each shot that the raid had taken place they said they were angry - angry that a dispute over a small piece of land had ended in violence.  [sfx this clip but earlier] I mean the non-indians that initiated this project of a golf course and then and then trying to take the land away because it's Mohawk clan it's our land there's a little bit left they're sucking the marrow out of our bones.  [sfx this clip, little earlier] we've kept talking in and saying you know what kind of people are you there's children here and you're shooting tear gas at us we're not we're on armed and you're aiming your weapons at us what kind of people are you.     The police retreated, abandoning squad cars and a front-end loader, basically a bulldozer.  They use the loader to crash the vehicles and they push them down the road, creating two new barricades, blocking highway 344.  The Mohawk braced for a counterattack and vowed to fire back with three bullets for every bullet fired at them.  due to the inability of the SQ to deal with the heavily armed Mohawks   The Canadian government called in the Royal Canadian Armed Forces to deal with the Mohawks. As the army pushed further into the Mohawk stronghold there was a lot of tension with Mohawk warriors staring down soldiers getting in their faces taunting them challenging them to put down their weapons and engage in hand-to-hand combat.   this is how the remainder of the siege would play out between the Warriors and Army as there were thankfully no more gun battles. [Music] as the seige wore on and came to an end most of the remaining Warriors as well as some women and children took refuge in a residential treatment center.   instead of an orderly surrender as the army anticipated warriors simply walked out of the area where they were assaulted by waiting soldiers and the police.  50 people taken away from the warrior camp including 23 warriors, but that means right over half the people taken into custody were non-combatants.   by 9:30 that night the army began to pull out, at the end of their two and a half months seige  a number of warriors were later charged by the sq.  5 warriors were convicted of crimes included assault and theft although only one served jail time.  during the standoff the Canadian federal government purchased the pines in order to prevent further development, officially canceling the expansion of the golf course and condominiums.  Although the government bought additional parcels of land for connoisseur taka there has been no organized transfer of the land to the Mohawk people. investigations were held after the crisis was over and revealed problems with the way in which the SQ handled the situation which involved command failures and racism among sq members.   Ronald (Lasagna) Cross and another high-profile warrior, Gordon (Noriega) Lazore of Akwesasne, are arraigned in Saint-Jérôme the day after the last Mohawks ended their standoff. In all, about 150 Mohawks and 15 non-Mohawks were charged with various crimes. Most were granted bail, and most were acquitted. Cross and Lazore were held for nearly six months before being released on $50,000 bail. They were later convicted of assault and other charges. After a community meeting, it was the women who decided that they would walk out peacefully, ending the siege. With military helicopters flying low, spotlights glaring down and soldiers pointing guns at them, Horn-Miller carried her young sister alongside other women and children as they walked to what they thought was the safety of the media barricades.  They didn't make it far before violence broke out. People started running, soldiers tackled warriors, fights broke out and everyone scrambled to get to safety. Up until that point Horn-Miller said she was able to keep her older sister calm by singing a traditional song to her.   LITTLEFEATHER on the night of 27 March 1973. This was when she took the stage at the 45th Academy Awards to speak on behalf of Marlon Brando, who had been awarded best actor for his performance in The Godfather. It is still a striking scene to watch.  Amid the gaudy 70s evening wear, 26-year-old Littlefeather's tasselled buckskin dress, moccasins, long, straight black hair and handsome face set in an expression of almost sorrowful composure, make a jarring contrast.  Such a contrast, that is beggered belief.   Liv Ullman read the name of the winner and Roger Moore made to hand Littlefeather Brando's Oscar, but she held out a politely forbidding hand.  She explained that Brando would not accept the award because of “the treatment of American Indians today by the film industry.”  Some people in the audience applauded; a lot of them booed her, but she kept her calm.  Here, you can listen for yourself.  [sfx clip]  At the time, Wounded Knee, in South Dakota, was the site of a month-long standoff between Native American activists and US authorities, sparked by the murder of a Lakota man.  We're used to this sort of thing now, but on the night, nobody knew what to make of a heartfelt plea in the middle of a night of movie industry mutual masturbation.  Was it art, a prank?  People said Littlefeather was a hired actress, that she was Mexican rather than Apache, or, because people suck on several levels at once, that she was a stripper.  How did this remarkable moment come to pass?   Littlefeather's life was no cake-walk.  Her father was Native American and her mother was white, but both struggled with mental health.  Littlefeather had to be removed from their care at age three, suffering from tuberculosis of the lungs that required her to be kept in an oxygen tent at the hospital.  She was raised by her maternal grandparents, but saw her parents regularly.  That may sound like a positive, but it exposed her to domestic violence.  She once tried to defend her mother from a beating by hitting her father with a broom.  He chased her out of the house and tried to run her down with his truck.  The young girl escaped into a grove of trees and spent the night up in the branches, crying herself to sleep. r   She did not fit in at the white, Catholic school her grandparents sent her to.  At age 12, she and her grandfather visited the historic Roman Catholic church Carmel Mission, where she was horrified to see the bones of a Native American person on display in the museum. “I said: ‘This is wrong. This is not an object; this is a human being.' So I went to the priest and I told him God would never approve of this, and he called me heretic. I had no idea what that was.”  An adolescence of depression and a struggle for identity followed.   Fortunately, in the late 1960s and early 70s Native Americans were beginning to reclaim their identities and reassert their rights.  After her father died, when she was 17, Littlefeather began visiting reservations and even visited Alcatraz during the Indians of all Tribes occupation.  She travelled around the country, learning traditions and dances, and meeting other what she called “urban Indian people” also reconnecting with your heritage.  “The old people who came from different reservations taught us young people how to be Indian again. It was wonderful.”  By her early 20s Littlefeather was head of the local affirmative action committee for Native Americans, studying representation in film, television and sports.  They successfully campaigned for Stanford University to remove their offensive “Indian” mascot, 50 years before pro sports teams like the Cleveland Indians got wise.  At the same time, white celebrities like Burt Lancaster began taking a public interest in Native American affairs.  Littlefeather lived near director Francis Ford Coppola, but she only knew him to say hello.  Nonetheless, after hearing Marlon Brando speaking about Native American rights, as she walked past Coppola's house to find him sitting on his porch, drinking ice tea.  She yelled up the walk, “Hey! You directed Marlon Brando in The Godfather” and she asked him for Brando's address so she could write him a letter.  It took some convincing, but Coppola gave up the address.   Then, nothing.  But months later, the phone rang at the radio station where Littlefeather worked.  He said: ‘I bet you don't know who this is.'  She said, “Sure I do.  It sure as hell took you long enough to call.”  They talked for about an hour, then called each other regularly.  Before long he was inviting her for the first of several visits and they became friends.  That was how Brando came to appoint her to carry his message to the Oscars, but it was hastily planned.  Half an hour before her speech, she had been at Brando's house on Mulholland Drive, waiting for him to finish typing an eight-page speech.  She arrived at the ceremony with Brando's assistant, just minutes before best actor was announced.  The producer of the awards show immediately informed her that she would be removed from the stage after 60 seconds.  “And then it all happened so fast when it was announced that he had won.  I had promised Marlon that I would not touch that statue if he won. And I had promised [the producer] that I would not go over 60 seconds. So there were two promises I had to keep.”  As a result, she had to improvise.   I don't have a lot of good things to say about Marlon Brando --he really could have had a place in the Mixed Bags of History chapter of the YBOF book; audiobook available most places now-- but he had Hollywood dead to rights on its Native Americans stereotypes and treatment, as savages and nameless canon fodder, often played by white people in red face.  This was a message not everyone was willing to hear.  John Wayne, who killed uncountable fictional Natives in his movies, was standing in the wings at that fateful moment, and had to be bodily restrained by security to stop him from charing Littlefeather.  For more on Wayne's views of people of color, google his 1971 Playboy interview.  Clint Eastwood, who presented the best picture Oscar, which also went to The Godfather, “I don't know if I should present this award on behalf of all the cowboys shot in all the John Ford westerns over the years.” In case you thought fussing out an empty chair was the worst we got from him.  When Littlefeather got backstage, people made stereotypical war cries and tomahawk motions at her.  After talking to the press --and I can't say I'm not surprised that event organizers didn't spirit her away immediately -- she went straight back to Brando's house where they sat together and watched the reactions to the event on television, the ‘compulsively refreshing your social media feed' of the 70's.   But Littlefeather is proud of the trail she blazed. She was the first woman of colour, and the first indigenous woman, to use the Academy Awards platform to make a political statement. “I didn't use my fist. I didn't use swear words. I didn't raise my voice. But I prayed that my ancestors would help me. I went up there like a warrior woman. I went up there with the grace and the beauty and the courage and the humility of my people. I spoke from my heart.”  Her speech drew international attention to Wounded Knee, where the US authorities had essentially imposed a media blackout.  Sachee Littlefeather went on to get a degree in holistic health and nutrition, became a health consultant to Native American communities across the country, worked with Mother Teresa caring for Aids patients in hospices, and led the San Francisco Kateri Circle, a Catholic group named after Kateri Tekakwitha, the first Native American saint, canonized in 2012.  Now she is one of the elders transmitting knowledge down generations, though sadly probably not for much longer.  She has breast cancer that metastasized to her lung.  “When I go to the spirit world, I'm going to take all these stories with me. But hopefully I can share some of these things while I'm here.  I'm going to the world of my ancestors. I'm saying goodbye to you … I've earned the right to be my true self.”   And that's...Rather than being taken to the hospital for the stab wound a centimeter from her heart, Waneek and the other protesters were taken into custody.  Thankfully, she would heal just fine and even went on to become an Olympic athlete and continued her activism.  And little Tio?  She grew up to be an award-winning actress, best known in our house for playing Tanis on Letterkenny.  Season 10 premier watch party at my house.  Remember….Thanks...       Sources: https://www.history.com/news/how-boarding-schools-tried-to-kill-the-indian-through-assimilation http://www.nativepartnership.org/site/PageServer?pagename=airc_hist_boardingschools https://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=17645287 https://hairstylecamp.com/native-american-beard/ https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2021/jun/03/i-promised-brando-i-would-not-touch-his-oscar-secret-life-sacheen-littlefeather https://www.cbc.ca/radio/unreserved/reflections-of-oka-stories-of-the-mohawk-standoff-25-years-later-1.3232368/sisters-recall-the-brutal-last-day-of-oka-crisis-1.3234550 https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/oka-crisis https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ArOIdwcj2w8 https://www.history.com/news/native-american-activists-occupy-alcatraz-island-45-years-ago  

western canada canadian playboy pr students california american music audible black indian god home world war ii freedom english oscars history french nope boys north america hollywood army city council british rock aids poverty san francisco peace girls land brainiac united states manhattan federal tennessee warriors government education drugs clint eastwood academy awards pennsylvania new world mississippi native americans native thanksgiving natives memorial day navajo alcatraz reach roger moore francis ford coppola hang jokes indians mexican soldiers aboriginal creator cross golf john wayne navy dominion quebec stanford university national museum pines columbus christianity catholic oak oca northern ireland bs olympic games brando south dakota apache godfather american indian psalms surely roman catholic bureau swat john ford marlon brando tio tribes john carlos naturally coppola troubles discipline mercier anishinaabe moxie carlisle summer olympics graham green judicial committee privy council mea mulholland drive conversion mother teresa columbus day cleveland indians beatitudes provincial lakota amid ten commandments storyid golf courses tanis tuberculosis mohawk burt lancaster wounded knee oka sq kanna letterkenny alcatraz island code talkers bloody sunday tiananmen square iat mohawks liv ullman american indian center james cromwell residential schools carlisle indian school commissioners aki little tree akwesasne oakes kent state canadian armed forces red power kahnawake oka crisis tommie smith sf chronicle saint j native american heritage pageserver anglicized indian act sacheen littlefeather pilgrim fathers minnesota historical society indian child welfare act curriculums navajo code talkers richard henry pratt kanesatake richard oakes
Danger Close with Jack Carr
Toby Harnden: Avenging 9/11

Danger Close with Jack Carr

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 150:56


Today's guest on Danger Close is Toby Harnden. Toby Harnden is an accomplished author, editor and journalist, known for in-depth reporting, and fearless approach to writing. In fact, he was once even imprisoned in Zimbabwe for his reporting and has also faced prosecution in Northern Ireland related to his work. Toby reported from more than 30 countries during his time as a foreign correspondent for The Daily Telegraph and The Sunday Times of London.  He served as an officer in the Royal Navy and holds dual U.S. and British citizenship. Toby's first book, Bandit Country, is a must read for those interested in understanding The Troubles in Northern Ireland.  His book Dead Men Risen: An Epic Story of War and Heroism in Afghanistan was awarded the prestigious Orwell Prize. He recently released his latest work, First Casualty: The Untold Story of the CIA Mission to Avenge 9/11.  You can learn more at TobyHarnden.com Sponsors Today's episode is presented by SIG Sauer.   Featured Gear SIG CROSS Rifle SIG BDX System  CIVIVI Blade  Alpine Distilling Bourbon

Farming Today
01/12/21 Gene-edited farm animals, uncertainty over new subsidy payments, shortage of farm workers in Northern Ireland

Farming Today

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 13:16


A paper from the Nuffield Council on Bioethics calls for a new international agreement to be reached around welfare in any future gene-edited farm animals - to ensure it doesn't cause them harm, or lead to farming methods with lower welfare standards. Later this week the Government will announce details about the new support payments for farmers, the Sustainable Farming Incentive. At an online conference yesterday for tenant farmers, run by the National Farmers' Union, the Farming Minister Victoria Prentis surprised delegates by saying that the details of subsidies in England "will change from year to year". And a Northern Ireland charity says that a lack of farm workers is causing a spike in calls to its helpline, with farmers there leaving the dairy industry because a lack of staff is making the job impossible. Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Beatrice Fenton.

The Doctor's Kitchen Podcast
#129 Lessons from the Edge with Aldo Kane

The Doctor's Kitchen Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 90:03


What can we learn that's relatable from a modern day action man, who trained as a marine commando and sniper, who runs into active volcanoes, risks his life interviewing Mexican Narcos, survived Ebola and broke the Guiness World record for rowing across the Atlantic Ocean?Well it turns out quite an incredible amount!Aldo Kane is an Adventurer, Explorer, a Fellow at the Royal Geographic Society, Producer, Author & TV Presenter with a penchant for the world's most dangerous, extreme and remote locations. Aldo was recently the on-screen Expedition Leader for National Geographic's latest flag-ship feature length Natural History series One Strange Rock, hosted by Hollywood star, Will Smith. This saw Aldo lead a prominent American Scientist deep inside one of Africa's most dangerous volcanoes whilst it was erupting and the description of this in his book “Lessons on the Edge” is absolutely riveting! Over the last 7 years Aldo has worked on many ground-breaking (and as he describes them “fairly tasty”) TV shows! He's been held at gunpoint, charged by black Rhino, abseiled into an active volcano, escaped Ebola and dived on Captain Kidd's pirate ship, and that's just the last year or two. Aldo has appeared with Hollywood A-Listers like Tom Hardy, Adrien Brody & Henry Cavill in some of the most extreme environments on earth. We talk about so many themes today:Mental fitnessCompartmentalisingFlow statesConsistency over Skill as the secret to successStoicismGroundingA bit of background if you haven't seen him on one of his many TV shows. Aldo joined the Royal Marine Commandos at the age of just 16 and went on to become one of the youngest Elite Commando Reconnaissance Snipers in the UK armed forces. No mean feat with the hardest, and longest infantry training in the world. Aldo saw active military service from Northern Ireland to the Middle East and became a survival expert in many environments.As you will hear today, he's probably one of the humblest and nicest people I've ever had the pleasure of interviewing. Calm, collected, jovial, chatty and altogether ‘grounded', as I would describe it. I could have chatted to him easily for hours, but instead I recommend you either read or listen to his book “Lessons from the Edge” that you can find in all good bookstores. A fantastic book for Christmas, it is perfect escapism. Just a bit of warning, the language is a bit salty on this episode. So just take care if any kids are listening in. And remember check out thedoctorskitchen.com newsletter where I share weekly mindset tips, many of which Aldo puts into practice when he's in extreme environments, such as breathwork and reframing. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Talkback
Northern Ireland is stepping up its vaccination programme

Talkback

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 39:17


All people aged 18 and over are going to be offered a Covid 19 booster vaccine.

Hot Tag Hooligans Pro Wrestling Podcast Show
Interview with Skye James

Hot Tag Hooligans Pro Wrestling Podcast Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 21:24


On this episode the "Rainbow Rebel" Skye James joined the Hooligans. The Northern Ireland star talks about her career, being an advocate for the LGBTQ community, British Strongstyle, dream matches and more.

19Stories
19Stories: Full Episode 37 Leah Marks & Nic Redman

19Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 59:55


Nic Redman and Leah Marks are the co-hosts and creators of the Longest running, most listened to and reviewed podcast in the UK, ‘The Voiceover Social',  which won the Inspiration Award at this years One Voice Awards, and was also was Runner up in the 2021 International Women's Podcast Awards, a 2021 British Podcasts Awards Nominee, a Finalist in the 2021 'Podcasting for Business Awards' and a SOVAS Arts Awards Nominee. Separately, they are a treasure trove of talent as well. Originally hailing from Manchester, England, Leah Marks has amassed quite the voiceover career including appearances in several Radio 4 plays,TV commercials,  news reporter on BBC Radio Manchester, and is the voice of the BBC Civilisations augmented reality app, which has been downloaded a quarter of a million times. Nic Redman, is a native of Northern Ireland and an internationally successful VoiceOver artist, podcaster and voice/accent coach. She has taught voice, accents and VO at many of the major drama schools in the UK. She is the founder of Voice & Accent Hub group on Facebook, created to offer tailored voice & accent coaching to specific groups of voice users and writes/hosts The Voice Coach Podcast offering even more in spoken voice training. To reach Leah Marks directly: Business email Address: leah@leahmarks.co.uk  or listen@thevosocial (the podcast) Business website(s): www.leahmarks.co.uk (me) or www.thevosocial.com (the podcast) Twitter: @thevosocial To reach Nic Redman directly: Business website(s): https://nicolaredman.com/ https://nicolaredman.com/the-voice-coach-podcast/   or www.thevosocial.com (the podcast) Twitter: @thevosocial

QPR Podcast
A song for Jimmy still not Dunne

QPR Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 63:25


Paul Finney is joined by Paul Stokes, Conor Lustard and special guest Jimmy Dunne To talk about the art of defending Jaffa Cakes and music. Warning. This podcast may have references to Northern Ireland and other Finney Bingo catchphrases

Pluto Press: Radicals in Conversation
Repealed: Ireland‘s Unfinished Fight for Reproductive Rights

Pluto Press: Radicals in Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 68:06


Content warning: rape, suicide On 25 May 2018, the Irish people voted to remove the Eighth Amendment from the constitution. This amendment, which had been introduced in 1983, not only made abortion illegal in Ireland, but equated the life of a pregnant woman to the life of a fertilised embryo. Despite this criminalisation, the ban on abortion was always resisted and circumvented. In the years leading up to the 2018 referendum, a grassroots movement pushing for repeal emerged on an unprecedented scale, sending tens of thousands of people out canvassing in villages, towns and cities around the country.  This victory for the Irish Repeal movement set the country alight with euphoria. But, for some, the celebrations were short-lived – the new legislation turned out to be one of the most conservative in Europe. People still travel overseas for abortions and services are not yet commissioned in Northern Ireland. This month Pluto published a new book, Repealed: Ireland's Unfinished Fight for Reproductive Rights, by Camilla Fitzsimons, with Sinéad Kennedy, and a foreword by Ruth Coppinger. We are joined on the show by Camilla, Sinéad and Ruth to discuss the history of the Catholic Church and women's oppression in Ireland, the introduction of the Eighth amendment in 1983, and the qualitative turning points in the long road to repeal. We also consider the lessons from the campaign, and the challenges that still remain, more than three years later.

The New Statesman Podcast
The catch-22 for migrants crossing the Channel

The New Statesman Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 32:30


In what was an avoidable tragedy, at least 27 people have died trying to reach the UK after their boat capsized in the English Channel. Anoosh Chakelian, Ailbhe Rea and Stephen Bush discuss the political context that allowed this to happen, and its implications for the government. Then, in You Ask Us, a listener wonders whether the Northern Ireland shadow secretary Louise Haigh made a gaffe by saying Labour would remain neutral in a poll on Irish unification. If you have a question for You Ask Us, send an email or a voice note to podcasts@newstatesman.co.uk See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Front Row
House of Gucci, Adele's 30 and The Every by Dave Eggers

Front Row

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 42:13


The designer Henry Holland and writers Stephanie Merritt and Tahmima Anam review House of Gucci, The Every by Dave Eggers and Adele's new album 30. In the run up to the Turner Prize, Front Row is hearing from the artists' collectives nominated for the award. Tonight, we hear from Array, a Belfast based collective who use their art to draw attention to social and political issues in Northern Ireland. Array tell Marie-Louise Muir what the nomination means to them. Sound and music from Array Collective's Turner Prize installation The Druthaib's Ball including 'The Hard Border' Poem by Seamus O' Rourke and music by Cleamairí Feirste, activist storyteller Richard O'Leary and performance of The Mother Within by Dani Larkin. Presenter: Tom Sutcliffe Producer: Laura Northedge

Farming Today
25/11/21 - Farming for the Future Award winner, wildlife crime, bird flu lockdown and electrical weed control

Farming Today

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 13:40


Last year saw a marked increase in wildlife crime, but a decrease in convictions. A report out today from Wildlife and Countryside LINK says reports of likely crimes against badgers were up 36% on 2019 and those against raptors doubled. All poultry in the UK must be kept indoors from Monday to limit the spread of bird flu. The Governments in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland have agreed that flocks must be confined and strict biosecurity measures followed. Wild birds migrating to the UK from Europe during the winter can carry the disease and spread it to birds kept outside. And Charlotte Smith announces the winner of the Farming for the Future Award at the BBC Food and Farming Awards. Presented by Charlotte Smith Produced for BBC Audio in Bristol by Heather Simons

Dragonfly Tales
Episode 6 - Antrim Special with Liz Weir

Dragonfly Tales

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 38:17


Welcome to Season 3 of Dragonfly Tales, a story podcast for children (and grown ups) of all ages.This episode is brought to you from County Antrim in Northern Ireland.  We stayed at the wonderful Ballyeamon Barn and explored all the magical sites of the Glens of Antrim.  We saw the Fairy Thorn tree from Season1 Episode 5 and The Giant's Causeway from our very first episode.  Leo even sang the song on the actual Causeway - you can see it in our Facebook Group.The Barn is home to master storyteller Liz Weir MBE.  Liz is the storyteller in residence for Northern Ireland's libraries.  She has been telling tales for over forty years and there isn't much she doesn't know about stories!  Liz is a wonderful host and was kind enough to do a little interview with Leo and tell a story from her fabulous book 'Here There and Everywhere'. If you would like to find out more about Liz, you can check out her website HERE.You can also find out more about the wonderful place Liz lives in this TV show HERE.Our story is an old Celtic folktale about a very brave girl - The Lass who went out at the Cry of Dawn.  We absolutely love the version by Sorche Nic Leodhas, and you can find it in this brilliant book 'Womenfolk and Fairy Tales'.If you would like a SHOUT OUT this season, then you can get in touch with us HERE or in our Dragonfly Tales Podcast Group, telling us your first name, your age and your town.And if you like our podcast, please leave us a review (Apple is great).If you would like to donate a little something towards our second season, we would be so grateful.  You can donate to Dragonfly Tales Podcast by clicking here: DONATEYou can also follow us on:InstagramFacebook andTwitterThanks for listening! Theme Music by Leo Grazebrook on GarageBandStorytelling by Emily Hanna-Grazebrook at Dragonfly Tales Produced by Andy GrazebrookArt by Light CreativeSound effects by Zapsplat

Wake Up to Money
Are Businesses braced for a covid crackdown?

Wake Up to Money

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 47:30


In Northern Ireland people are once again being asked to work from home, Felicity finds out what that means for business and what is the ultimate computer game of all time?

One for the road.
Dean McCullough.

One for the road.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 46:16


Thanks for joining me for this weeks episode of One For The Road.This week I am joined by TV and BBC Radio1 presenter Dean McCullough.Originally from Belfast in Northern Ireland, Dean shares with us his life and career progression that led him to his more recent decision to embark on the path of sobriety. We discuss the tipping point that led to that choice, and all of the positive benefits that have followed with this life style change.If you enjoy One For The Road, then click follow to be notified of the release of our next episode.You can also access further content and shows on my Patreon account by clicking the link below.https://www.patreon.com/user?u=62824759&fan_landing=trueIf you want to connect with me via Instagram, you can find me on the instahandle @Soberdave https://www.instagram.com/soberdave/or via my website https://davidwilsoncoaching.com/Provided below are links for services offering additional help and advice, and links for Dean.https://www.instagram.com/thedeanlife/https://www.wearewithyou.org.uk/https://www.drinkaware.co.uk/advice/alcohol-support-serviceshttps://nacoa.org.uk/https://alcoholchange.org.uk/Show producer- Daniella Attanasio-Martinezhttps://www.grownuphustle.com/Instagram - @GrownupHustle See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Citizens' Climate Lobby
CCR 66 Hospitality in a Time of Climate Change

Citizens' Climate Lobby

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 30:00


We live in a world with stronger and more frequent extreme weather events. As a result, giving and receiving hospitality is becoming the new normal for humans. Citizens' Climate Radio host Peterson Toscano speaks with public theologian Jayme R. Reaves and public health expert Dr. Natasha DeJarnett. What are the risks leading to more displacement? What are the dilemmas and challenges of housing, feeding, and creating more space for people uprooted from homes during extreme weather? And what are some of the creative ways communities provide protection to those temporarily or permanently unhoused?  Jayme R. Reaves is the director of academic development at Sarum College in Salisbury, England. She teaches in areas such as biblical studies, and feminist and liberation theology. Over the last 20 years, she has worked as a consultant, researcher, lecturer, and facilitator in the U.S., former Yugoslavia, Northern Ireland, and Great Britain. Her focus internationally has been on the intersections between theology and public issues such as peace, conflict, hospitality, memory, and gender.  Jayme discusses the roles that scarcity and abundance play in making sure that those most impacted by the environment in the community around us are cared for. She calls on churches to work in their own communities to make congregations aware of sharing with those who don't have as much.  Jayme regularly speaks, leads retreats, conducts workshops, and acts as “theologian in residence” with communities who wish to dive deeper into understanding theological frameworks for social justice activism. She's the author of Safeguarding the Stranger: An Abrahamic Theology & Ethic of Protective Hospitality (Wipf & Stock, 2016) and co-editor of When Did We See You Naked?: Jesus as a Victim of Sexual Abuse (SCM, 2021).  Additionally, she co-hosts the podcast Outlander Soul, which looks at the Outlander series by Diana Gabaldon with a theological, religious, and spiritual lens and takes seriously the role fiction plays in fans' lives as a sacred text. Jayme lives in Dorset, England with her partner and two dogs. Dr. Natasha DeJarnett is an assistant professor in the Christina Lee Brown Environment Institute at the University of Louisville Division of Environmental Medicine, researching the health impacts of extreme heat exposure and environmental health disparities. Additionally, she is a professorial lecturer in Environmental and Occupational Health at the George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health. Previously, Dr. DeJarnett was the interim associate director of Program and Partnership Development at the National Environmental Health Association, leading research, climate and health, and children's environmental health.  She also previously served as a policy analyst at the American Public Health Association (APHA), where she led the Natural Environment portfolio, including air and water exposures along with climate change. Dr. DeJarnett is a member of the EPA's Children's Health Protection Advisory Committee, is chair of the Governing Board of Citizens' Climate Education, a member of the Board of Directors of Physicians for Social Responsibility, chair-elect for APHA's Environment Section, member of the Advisory Board of APHA's Center for Climate, Health and Equity, a member of the Board of Trustees for the BTS Center, special advisor to the Environmental Health and Equity Collaborative, and the Steering Committee of the International Transformational Resilience Coalition. Dr. DeJarnett emphasizes that more than ever before, people are being displaced as a result of severe weather phenomena caused by climate change. In 2018, 16 million people were displaced due to climate, 1.2 million of which were American. She points out that in 2020, more hurricanes and tropical storms made landfall than ever before, to the point where letters in the Greek alphabet were being used to name them, as the list of hurricane names had been used up. Dr. DeJarnett says that church communities are presented with the opportunity to provide hospitality more than ever by turning churches into cooling centers, and by educating the community about staying safe through weather phenomena. To learn more about building community resilience see the US Climate Resilience Toolkit or see how you can get involved with establishing a local or regional Climate Resilience Hub.  The Art House Joining us in the Art House is Dr. Krista Hiser with The Ultimate Cli-Fi Book Club. The purpose of the book club is to look at climate-themed literature and consider how it can help us engage differently with interdisciplinary topics and existential threats related to the planetary predicament of climate change.  In this episode, Krista reflects on Deena Metzger's novel A Rain of Night Birds.  Dr. Krista Hiser is Professor at Kapiʻolani Community College. Her Ph.D. is in Educational Administration from the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. She has published works on community engagement, service-learning, organizational change, post-apocalyptic and cli-fi literature.  In this month's episode, Krista tells us that the protagonist of “A Rain of Night Birds” is a scientist that also relies on feeling to gauge the environmental phenomena around her. With themes of spiritualism and indigenous culture, this “literature of restoration” focuses on the concept of doing no harm, based on the importance of the world around us. You can read a written version of Krista's essay at The Ultimate Cli-Fi Book Club for Sustainability in Higher Education on Medium. You can hear standalone versions of The Art House at Artists and Climate Change. Good News Report Our good news comes from Anthony Leiserowitz at Yale Climate Connections. In tune with the theme of hospitality, Anthony discusses a disaster resiliency program geared toward Spanish-speaking residents in Sonoma County, California. Whether people lose power or work as a result of climate and weather disasters, many nonprofits are developing plans and guides to help Spanish speakers in the west prepare. These programs help residents sign up for emergency alerts, prepare for emergencies, and make financial arrangements needed to safely leave during severe weather. We always welcome your thoughts, questions, suggestions, good news, and recommendations for the show. Leave a voicemail at (518) 595-9414 (+1 if calling from outside the U.S.). You can email your answers to radio @ citizensclimate.org   You can hear Citizens' Climate Radio on iTunes, Spotify, Stitcher Radio, SoundCloud, Podbean, Northern Spirit Radio, Google Play, PlayerFM, and TuneIn Radio. Also, feel free to connect with other listeners, suggest program ideas, and respond to programs in the Citizens' Climate Radio Facebook group or on Twitter at @CitizensCRadio. Photo by furkanfdemir from Pexels

Today with Claire Byrne
Davy Tweed abuse case follow-up

Today with Claire Byrne

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 9:35


Elaine Crory of ‘Raise Your Voice' which is a project that tackles sexual violence and abuse across Northern Ireland.

The Open Podcasts
Darren Clarke - Tales of The Open

The Open Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 66:47


Some players have seemed destined to win The Open as they emerged onto the golfing scene. And many, including Tiger Woods, Seve Ballesteros, Jack Nicklaus and Gary Player, did so early in their careers.Darren Clarke, one of the most talented prospects in Irish golfing history, appeared to be another of those players. But into his 40s, he had yet to claim the title, and his chances to do so were running out. That was until a fairy-tale victory in 2011 warmed the hearts of the golfing world, and completed Clarke's lifelong goal.With narration from Shane O'Donoghue, commentary and audio from The Open across three decades, and the words of Clarke himself, immerse yourself in this original documentary from The Open, and enjoy the astonishing story of one of Northern Ireland's favourite sons.

The Rough Cut
Belfast

The Rough Cut

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 49:03


Editor - Úna Ní Dhonghaíle ACE, BFE BELFAST editor, Úna Ní Dhonghaíle joins director Kenneth Branagh once again for their third feature together; having previously collaborated on ALL IS TRUE (2018) and the upcoming DEATH ON THE NILE (2022).  Branagh describes BELFAST as his "most personal film" about a young boy's childhood amidst the tumult in Belfast, Northern Ireland in the late 1960's. ÚNA NÍ DHONGAÍLE BELFAST editor, Úna Ní Dhonghaíle is also well known for her work on THE CROWN, MISBEHAVIOUR, THREE GIRLS and STAN AND OLLIE. She has worked on the leading lights of British drama in what some are calling "The Golden Age of Television". Having completed a degree in Film and Media Studies in her native Dublin, Úna specialized in film editing at the National Film and Television School (NFTS) from 1995-1998. Úna earned her first of four BAFTA nominations in 2009 for the Abi Morgan's TV feature WHITE GIRL.  Over a five year period, she co-directed and edited a documentary INVISIBLE MAN, for which she won the 2016 IFTA for Best Editing in Television. Úna has also received much recognition for her editing of the highly acclaimed BBC drama THREE GIRLS, for which she won the BAFTA award for Best Fiction Editing, the Technicolor Craft Award from Women In Film UK, the IFTA for Best Editing, the RTS Award for Best Editing of Fiction, the RTS West of England Award for Editing and the Televisual British Bulldog Award for Editing. Editing BELFAST In our discussion with BELFAST editor, Úna Ní Dhonghaíle, we talk about: Finding the film's narrator in Van Morrison's music Aligning the audience with a child character Establishing a scene through sound design Collaborating with director Kenneth Branagh Leveraging the inherent tension from a historical event The Credits Get your free 100GB of media transfer at MASV Visit ExtremeMusic for all your production audio needs Check out the free trial of Media Composer | Ultimate Subscribe to The Rough Cut podcast and never miss an episode Visit The Rough Cut on YouTube

Best Of Belfast: Stories of local legends from Northern Ireland
#233 Nadia Sayers: Miss Universe, Comic Books & Mental Health

Best Of Belfast: Stories of local legends from Northern Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 64:25


Nadia Sayers is a professional model and Miss Universe Ireland 2020. She's also a passionate mental health advocate, speaker and educator with a Masters in Psychology.   After facing her own battles with depression and anxiety, Nadia went on to work in suicide prevention for six years before taking on her current role as Youth Development Manager at Hope 4 Life NI.   Her day job now involves going into schools across Northern Ireland with the Uberheroes Programme: an initiative that uses comic books to empower young people with the tools they need to take control of their mental health.   (P.S. These comics are based on real-life stories of kids from NI and are co-created with Marvel and DC illustrators!)   In today's episode we talk about: Reconnecting with your inner-child The difference between anxiety and depression Nadia's own encounter with suicide Her unexpected beauty pageant journey And the incredible results Uberheroes comic books have had on the lives of kids right here on our doorstep. Check it out! P.S. Here's a pageant podcast Nadia recommends :)   //   https://bestofbelfast.org/stories/nadia-sayers-uberheroes  

Irish Stew Podcast
S3E6: Colin Broderick - Searing Storyteller of the Irish

Irish Stew Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 64:49


Colin Broderick likes to tell stories, needs to tell them, be they dark, dank, and dangerous, be they bright, affirming, and knowing. It's all there in his new film A Bend in the River, his highly personal tale of a writer returning to his native County Tyrone still in the shadows of “The Troubles,” confronting the life and loves he left behind and writing as if his life depended on it, with boxer-turned-actor John Duddy in the title role, and featuring Kathy Kiera Clarke of Derry Girls fame.After Tyrone came New York, where Colin says he felt free for the first time, including the freedom to let alcohol and drugs take him to the dark side, unflinchingly related when we discuss his memoir of a drinker's life, Orangutan, a story thankfully very much in Colin's past.And he got others to tell their Irish-American stories in The Writing Irish of New York, his just re-released curation of essays on the rise of Irish American writers with contributions from Irish Stew guest Peter Quinn, Colum McCann, Larry Kirwan, Malachy McCourt, Mary Pat Kelly, Dan Barry, Seamus Scanlon, John Kearns, Honor Molloy and more. Join us for Colin's very global Irish story, with its origins in England, it's Northern Ireland narrative, and it's tale of downfall and redemption in NYC. Links: Website: https://www.colinbroderick.comTwitter: https://twitter.com/colin_broderickFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/Colin-Broderick-372018999547166Film: A Bend in the River Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=11C9W2inJQIAvailable on several platforms including Amazon Prime: https://www.amazon.com/Bend-River-John-Duddy/dp/B09FS14ZG8 Film: Emerald City: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6yLtp6W9M0k&t=42

Sunday
Rumi: The Musical, Asylum seeker conversions, Mother-and-baby homes in Northern Ireland

Sunday

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 43:49


In the wake of last weekend's bomb attack in Liverpool, carried out by an apparent convert to Christianity, Emily Buchanan and guests explore the role of religious conversion in the lives of those seeking asylum in the UK. The Stormont executive has agreed to accept all the recommendations of a panel set up to investigate institutions for unmarried mothers in Northern Ireland. We consider the implications and hear the testimony of one survivor, Adele Johnstone. While sayings of the 13th century Sufi poet Rumi are hugely popular on social media, this week ‘Rumi: The Musical' premieres in London's West End with the aim of getting to the human and spiritual heart of the Muslim mystic. Producers: Dan Tierney Olive Clancy Editor: Helen Grady.

RTÉ - Morning Ireland
Northern Ireland Protocol continues to cause tensions between EU and UK

RTÉ - Morning Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 6:16


Sean Whelan, London correspondent, on an upcoming meeting between the UK's Brexit Minister Lord Frost and the EU Commission Vice-President Maros Sefcovic in Brussels in relation to the Northern Ireland Protocol.

Seeing and Believing with Wade Bearden & Kevin McLenithan
Episode 313 | Kenneth Branagh's "Belfast"

Seeing and Believing with Wade Bearden & Kevin McLenithan

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 44:05


How do you imprint a memory onto celluloid? Kenneth Branagh attempts to answer that question with his latest film, Belfast, based on his own memories of growing up as a young boy during the Troubles in 1960s Northern Ireland. Kevin is joined once again by Chris Williams of We're Watching Here to examine whether Branagh succeeds. Together they discuss the performances from heavyweights like Judy Dench and Ciaran Hinds, the black-and-white cinematography, and the religious undercurrents of the film's conflict. Are the Oscar aspirations for Belfast justified? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Weekly Dartscast
#222: Richie Howson, Kevin Burness, World Seniors Qualifiers Special

The Weekly Dartscast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 24:30


Alex Moss is back with a special bonus episode as we chat to the two winners from last weekend's qualifiers for the World Seniors Darts Championship. Richie Howson (1:07) calls in after winning the first qualifier on Saturday to book his spot at the Circus Tavern next year, talks through his career so far, starting his playing career in his 40s, fishing with James Wade, winning a tour card at Q-School in 2012 and much more. Kevin Burness (15:09) joins us to reflect on winning the final qualifier on Sunday, his return to darts after a long break, progressing through the ranks in Northern Ireland and winning a tour card at Q-School in 2018, his two years on the tour and playing in two PDC World Championships and lots more. *** Sponsorship available! Want your business advertised on the show? Email weeklydartscast@gmail.com for more details and a free copy of our new sponsor brochure! *** Enjoy our podcast? Make a one-off donation on our new Ko-Fi page here: ko-fi.com/weeklydartscast Support us on Patreon from just $2(+VAT): patreon.com/WeeklyDartscast Thank you to our Patreon members: Phil Moss, Gordon Skinner, Jan Echtermann, Thomas Page, Terence Harrison, Bill Richards, Craig Weight

Wake Up to Money
Rising rates and restrictions

Wake Up to Money

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 52:04


As European Covid rates rise and Northern Ireland brings in new restrictions we look at the impact for business. Felicity Hannah also catches up with the first afro hair brand to advertise on UK TV. Plus fallout from the Government's decision to cut part of the HS2 line, why Metro Bank's suitor has pulled out of takeover talks and we run through the numbers as Adele releases her latest album.

Heart and Soul
The hidden faiths of Northern Ireland

Heart and Soul

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 27:12


This year marks the centenary of Northern Ireland. Since its inception it has been divided between those who want to be Irish, who are mostly Catholic, and those who want to remain British, who are mostly Protestant. But what about the people of faith outside the sectarian divide – or those of no faith? Reporter Julia Paul meets Joseph Nawaz, whose father was a Muslim from Pakistan and whose mother a white Catholic from Northern Ireland. His parents were married in the 1970s, at a time when most NI churches wouldn't even marry a Catholic and Protestant. Joseph talks about his journey to embrace his mixed heritage and the two very different religions in his childhood. Esther Chong was born in Malaysia to Chinese parents and moved to Northern Ireland for a better life. The day after she arrived she attended a service at the Chinese Christian Church in Belfast and she says God began to show her her path forward in Northern Ireland. Both her children are autistic and she now runs support groups at her church for other Chinese families, especially those who struggle with the language barrier. Dr Satyavir Singhal is a consultant at the Royal Hospital in Belfast and a Hindu. He moved to Northern Ireland from India with his family in 2000. The more people in Northern Ireland asked him about his faith and his country of birth, the more he was drawn closer to his faith. In 2014, he became more involved in the Indian Community Centre and Hindu Temple in Belfast, and now he teaches society about Hinduism. (Photo: Dr Satyavir Singhal. Credit: Julia Paul)

Brexitcast
Mind the Gap

Brexitcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 30:25


There are accusations of betrayal as the HS2 rail extension to Leeds is scrapped. Train enthusiast, David Brewer, who has visited all the railway stations in the UK, shares his thoughts about how the money should be spent. Ireland's Taoiseach, Micheál Martin, admits to Laura K that he's frustrated over the situation with trade and Northern Ireland. And Adam, Laura and Chris explain changes to the cap on the cost of social care. Today's Newscast was made by Danny Wittenberg and Sally Abrahams. The assistant editor was Alison Gee and the editor was Jonathan Aspinwall.

The Opperman Report
The Abuse of Power: A true story of sex and scandal at the heart of London's elite

The Opperman Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 60:01


Chilling. Candid. Controversial. This is the voice of one man from within a dark scandal that nestled in the heart of London's Soho in the 1970s. Travelling to the big city to escape The Troubles in his native Northern Ireland, Anthony Daly accepted a job in Foyles Bookshop and began a new life in England. However, his naivety saw him quickly fall foul of predators, looking for young men to blackmail and sexually exploit. After years of hiding the secret of his abuse at the hands of some of the most influential men in the country, Anthony's trauma became harder to contain, as he witnessed revelations of historic abuse coming to light on TV and in newspapers. Then, finally, his lost voice ripped through the safe family life he had built over 40 years. With parallels to Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness, this is stylishly written and politically explosive. It is the haunting true story of a young man's decent into a hell designed to satisfy the powerful. A world that destroyed the lives of everyone involved. ***Previously published as Playland (2018)*** 'Tony Daly's story goes to the very heart of a corrupt and perverted establishment.' Derry Journal 'Explosive' Belfast Telegraph, Ivan Little 'An extremely powerful and honest read that I just couldn't put down.' Waterstones staff review 'A shattering memoir' Robin Jarossi, author of The Hunt for the 60s Ripper

The Opperman Report'
The Abuse of Power: A true story of sex and scandal at the heart of London's elite

The Opperman Report'

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 60:01


Chilling. Candid. Controversial.This is the voice of one man from within a dark scandal that nestled in the heart of London's Soho in the 1970s.Travelling to the big city to escape The Troubles in his native Northern Ireland, Anthony Daly accepted a job in Foyles Bookshop and began a new life in England. However, his naivety saw him quickly fall foul of predators, looking for young men to blackmail and sexually exploit.After years of hiding the secret of his abuse at the hands of some of the most influential men in the country, Anthony's trauma became harder to contain, as he witnessed revelations of historic abuse coming to light on TV and in newspapers.Then, finally, his lost voice ripped through the safe family life he had built over 40 years.With parallels to Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness, this is stylishly written and politically explosive. It is the haunting true story of a young man's decent into a hell designed to satisfy the powerful. A world that destroyed the lives of everyone involved.***Previously published as Playland (2018)***'Tony Daly's story goes to the very heart of a corrupt and perverted establishment.' Derry Journal'Explosive' Belfast Telegraph, Ivan Little'An extremely powerful and honest read that I just couldn't put down.' Waterstones staff review'A shattering memoir' Robin Jarossi, author of The Hunt for the 60s Ripper

Crime World
Crime World Extra: 20 Years Of The PSNI in Northern Ireland

Crime World

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 36:03


A vision for a new police force in Northern Ireland 20 years after Chris Patten's ground-breaking report identified a need for a 50-50 recruitment policy for Catholics and Protestants has failed to live up to expectations. Last year, of the 193 new recruits just 24 per cent were Catholic, blamed in no small part to dissident republicans deliberately targeting officers and their families from working class nationalist communities. Nicola Tallant talks to Allison Morris of the Belfast Telegraph about plans for a new recruitment drive to coincide with the 20th anniversary of the PSNI and the continued efforts to create a more inclusive force.

The Big Rab Show Podcast
The Big Rab Show Podcast. Episode 253 PM David Wilson

The Big Rab Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 99:35


Welcome to the Big Rab Show Podcast. In this our 253rd Episode we chat to the new Pipe Major of Grade 1 Fife Police, Pipe Major David Wilton.  We also have a chat with Finlay MacDonald and Steven Blake from the National Piping Centre on their visit to Northern Ireland.  We also have a special announcement from Gary Smyth, as we hear the full line up for the 2022 Kids With Cancer Charity Event. We would love to know your thoughts.  Email – bigrabshow@gmail.com Support us  www.patreon.com/BigRabShow We have lots of amazing backstage videos, and audio recordings, exclusive interviews, episodes of Big Rab Show Plus! and loads more to share with you on there, so click support and get your hands on all this extra stuff!! We are the show for the piping folk, reflecting everything to do with the bag piping world. Feel free to message us on Facebook and on Twitter and let us know what you would like to hear on the show, as well just to let us know that you're listening. Our live show continues to broadcast live every week on Fuse FM Ballymoney on Tuesday nights 7pm-9pm (uk time) be sure to check it out.   Thank you to our very kind sponsors, G1 Reeds. If you would be interested in sponsoring the show, please do get in touch.  Or help support us via our Patreon page.   www.thebigrabshow.com www.facebook.com/TheBigRabShow www.twitter.com/bigrabshow bigrabshow@gmail.com

Across the Movie Aisle
84: Are NFTs a Scam, the Future, or Both? Plus: 'Belfast' Reviewed!

Across the Movie Aisle

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 38:11


On this week's episode Sonny Bunch, Peter Suderman, and Chris Orr talk about non-fungible tokens, and the scarcity and value of art. They also review Belfast, Kenneth Branagh's semi-autobiographical look at growing up in Northern Ireland during The Troubles. And on the bonus episode they consider the most disposable—and, possibly, most-watched—movie of the year, Red Notice. If you enjoyed the episode share it with a friend! 

Some Like It Scott
Ep. 166 - Rapid Fire Reviews: Spencer, The Harder They Fall, The French Dispatch, & Belfast

Some Like It Scott

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 80:27


Welcome to an all new episode of Some Like It Scott! On this week's episode, the two Scotts try something a little different and give their thoughts on 4 different movies in one episode, offering their general impressions for 4 of the most recent releases, including Pablo Larrain's Princess Diana biopic, SPENCER; Jeymes Samuel's Netflix ensemble western, THE HARDER THEY FALL; Wes Anderson's latest, anthology homage to journalism, THE FRENCH DISPATCH; and Kenneth Branagh's semi-autobiographical coming-of-age comedy-drama about his childhood during "The Troubles" in Northern Ireland in 1969, BELFAST. Enjoy! See times codes below:   9:13 - Spencer 21:31 - The Harder They Fall 36:27 - The French Dispatch 56:28 - Belfast 1:12:31 - Red (Taylor's Version)   Patreon: www.patreon.com/MediaPlugPods

La Vie Creative
Ep 164: Sarah Donnelly, an American stand-up comedian, writer and actress who performs in English and in French.

La Vie Creative

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 38:50


Sarah Donnelly is an American stand-up comedian, writer and actress who performs in English and in French.Sarah is the co-creator and writer of the Audible Original series God Save My English with Paul Taylor, now in its second season and one of the best sellers on Audible France.Sarah is also the co-creator of Becoming Maman, a comedy show and podcast about raising French kids in Paris when you are not French.In 2018, she toured with Gad Elmaleh as his opener for the European leg of his international Dream Tour. She has also opened for Louis CK, Ted Alexandro, Brody Stevens, Tom Rhodes, and Keith Alberstadt.In 2016 she wrote and performed her sold-out, one-hour stand-up comedy show called Help! I Married a Frenchman, which received runner-up for the Best English Comedy Show in Paris by Expatriates Magazine. In 2017 Sarah was a writer and actress for the first-ever English language comedy show produced by the French network Canal+ starring Paul Taylor called “What the Fuck France ”.Sarah has worked on scripts for 2P2L and BlackPills productions, including an English Kev Adams series called “Super High”.Originally from Washington, D.C., Sarah has performed comedy at venues all over the U.S., Europe, and Asia, including shows at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival, New York City's Upright Citizens Brigade Theater, the Olympia, and at comedy clubs and theatres in the UK and Northern Ireland, France, Luxembourg, Belgium, Denmark, Germany, The Netherlands, and Hong Kong.Finally, she's got two French kids and a French husband, who give her all the comedic material she could ever need.Anyone in Paris can see Sarah LIVE  in her new one hour stand-up comedy show “The Only American in Paris” at the Jardin Sauvage Sunday November 21st at 7pm or 8:30pm. You can reserve tickets here: https://www.billetweb.fr/sarah-donellyFollow her on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sarahdcomedy/TikTok: https://vm.tiktok.com/ZM8CYqs7t/Facebook: https://m.facebook.com/sarahdcomedyGo to her website to learn about show dates and other news: www.sarahdcomedy.comSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/join/Laviecreative)

Soccer Cards United
64. Dani Alves, Northern Ireland, Panini Premier League.

Soccer Cards United

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 63:44


Welcome to Episode 64 of SC Utd. This week: International football roundup, managerial changes, birthdays galore. You can get in touch on Twitter @SoccerCardsUtd, follow us on Instagram @SoccerCardsUnited, or email us soccercardsunited@gmail.com. Your questions, comments and suggestions could and probably will be featured on the show if you reach out to us! Please rate and review the podcast on Apple Podcasts or out loud on the street to passers-by. The music for the show is: Modern Jazz Samba by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4063-modern-jazz-samba License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses

Football Weekly
Ten of the best for England but World Cup jeopardy for Italy – Football Weekly

Football Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 52:14


Max Rushden is joined by Jonathan Wilson, Lars Sivertsen and Ed Aarons as England beat San Marino 10-0, Scotland and Northern Ireland record impressive results and Italy are left facing a play-off. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/footballweeklypod

The Football Ramble
44 buttocks chase a ball around and eventually Che Adams scores

The Football Ramble

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 43:42


England's marching band stuck ten past San Marino in the final round of Now That's What I Call Competitive, meaning they can turn their attention to the dark cloud coming over the hill. Kate, Luke and Pete give that a once-over, remind everyone that Scotland invented the passing game after their Danish delight and see Northern Ireland throw the cat among the piccione. We also delve into the ongoing issues around Qatar 2022 and what can be expected of the players and federations heading their next year.Search ‘Football Ramble' on social media to find us, and email us here: show@footballramble.com.***Please take the time to rate and review us on Apple Podcasts or wherever you get your pods. It means a great deal to the show and will make it easier for other potential listeners to find us. Thanks!*** See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Serie A Chronicles
Italy Taking the Scenic Route to the World Cup

Serie A Chronicles

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 49:21


The Euro 2020 honeymoon... and Italy's sensational summer of sport... is well and truly over as Roberto Mancini's men failed to qualify directly for the 2022 World Cup. Draws with Switzerland and Northern Ireland saw the Swiss qualify as group winners, leaving Gli Azzurri needing the dreaded play-off pathway in March to get to Qatar.Nicky and Mina break it down for us. What are the problems? What about Jorginho's penalty woes? What are Mancini's options? Where will the goals come from in the play-offs? What has happened to the element of surprise that they had at the Euros?Plus... Poetry chaos, and the Christmas run-in report card. Which managers will get to eat their panettone?And stick in to the end as we end with a good World Cup Qualification play-off memory featuring one Pierluigi Casiraghi (can he make a comeback???), coincidentally also from November 15th, all the way back in 1997.00:00 Italy's road to Qatar29:40 Mina's limerick33:20 The Serie A Christmas run-inDon't forget our ChroniclesQ&A mailbag show on Friday.Tweet us your questions to @serieAchronpod with the hashtag #ChroniclesQandAFor sponsorship opportunities with Serie A Chronicles podcast email marketing@mediachronicles.com.au.Find Serie A Chronicles on social media (all the links here) and at our website serieachronicles.com.Please give us a rating and review on Apple Podcasts.You can also become a Chronicles Tifoso by supporting the podcast to help keep us running, at serieachronicles.com/supporter.Serie A Chronicles is a Media Chronicles production.Digital content and social media by Calido Media.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/serie-a-chronicles. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

We're Not F***ing Historians
A love letter to Rathlin Island

We're Not F***ing Historians

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 32:59


Today, Shane whisks Hazel away to his second favourite island in the world.They discuss their treasured holiday spots across the Emerald Isle before diving into the storied past of Northern Ireland's finest hidden gem: Rathlin Island. Featuring Robert the Bruce, the ghost of Richard Branson and an incredibly unsatisfactory puffin tour, there's fun for all the family on Rathlin. Some monks do get slaughtered though, obviously.Find us on social media @thehazelhayes and @shanetodd or @shanetoddcomedy. Or offer us a chippy and we'll come running.***Please take the time to rate and review us on Apple Podcasts or wherever you get your pods. It means a great deal to the show and will make it easier for other potential listeners to find us. Thanks!*** See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

ESPN FC
History Repeating for Italy?

ESPN FC

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 49:59


The FC crew discuss Italy's disappointing performance against Northern Ireland which sent the Azzurri to the playoffs for the second campaign in a row in order to qualify for the World Cup. Plus, England book their ticket to the World Cup in a dominant performance, and the panel previews the USMNT's challenge against Jamaica.

Football Daily
England score ten as Scotland win again

Football Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 33:31


Mark Chapman is joined by John Murray, Rob Green, Ian Dennis, Roddy Forsyth and Pat Nevin to reflect on memorable nights for England and Scotland. Gareth Southgate's side qualified for the 2022 World Cup with a 10-0 win away to San Marino that saw Harry Kane score four goals to move level with Gary Lineker on the all-time scoring charts. You'll hear from both of them as well as Tyrone Mings before Steve Clarke gives his thoughts on another memorable night at Hampden Park as his Scotland team guarantee a home play-off spot for Qatar by beating Denmark 2-0. James Horncastle then drops by to explain what has gone wrong for European Champions Italy, who drew 0-0 with Northern Ireland and missed out on automatic qualification. Finally Pat and Rob give their thoughts on Dean Smith becoming the new Norwich manager as Steven Gerrard takes his first Aston Villa training session. TOPICS: 01:00 – England's 10-0 win over San Marino. 06:00 – Harry Kane Interview 08:20 – Gareth Southgate Interview 11:30 – Tyrone Mings interview 16:00 – Scotland's 2-0 win over Denmark 20:15 – Steve Clarke 21:00 – Italy's goalless draw with Northern Ireland 25:30 – Dean Smith at Norwich and Steven Gerrard at Aston Villa.

Fresh Air
Dawn Turner On Race, Fate & Sisterhood

Fresh Air

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 45:30


How do two sisters, just 3 years apart, take extremely divergent paths in life? That's the story Dawn Turner tells in her new memoir, 'Three Girls of Bronzeville.' Turner grew up to be an author and a columnist at The 'Chicago Tribune.' Her sister Kim died of chronic alcoholism at age 24. Turner's childhood best friend Debra was convicted of murder and served over 20 years in prison. Film critic Justin Chang reviews 'Belfast,' Kenneth Branagh's semi-autobiographical film about growing up in Northern Ireland during the Troubles.

The Red Agenda - A show about Liverpool FC
'Proud To Wear The Shirt'

The Red Agenda - A show about Liverpool FC

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 36:38


Focus turns to the Liverpool women's team as midfielder Rachel Furness joins Steve Hothersall and The Athletic's Caoimhe O'Neill following victory at Durham which saw the side go top of the Championship. The Northern Ireland star also looks ahead to next summer's European Championship and discusses the growth of the women's game.

The Totally Football Show with James Richardson

In an international week full of drama, Jimbo welcomes Julien Laurens, Matt Davies-Adams and Sasha Goryunov into the pod. Serbia strike late to win in Lisbon and secure their World Cup qualification and push Portugal into the play-offs. Pressure grows on Fernando Santos after underachieving with one of the most talented squads in the whole world. It's all to play for for Italy as they head to Northern Ireland on Monday. England are almost there as we give Gareth credit for getting a tune out of players who aren't performing for their clubs. Dean Smith is the new Norwich manager as Michael Bailey tells us whether this is a situation the hierarchy at Carrow Road lucked into. But don't get your hopes up of seeing Zizou and his interpreter rock up at Old Trafford any time soon. Plus the investigation rocking PSG women, John Portsmouth Football Club Westwood and the longest away trip in world football. RUNNING ORDER:    • PART 1: The PSG women debacle (01m 00s) • PART 2a: Portugal 1-2 Serbia (05m 30s)  • PART 2b: Croatia 1-0 Russia (12m 00s)  • PART 2c: England 5-0 Albania (17m 30s) • PART 2d: France 8-0 Kazakhstan (22m 00s) • PART 3: Norwich appoint Dean Smith, with The Athletic's Michael Bailey (29m 00s) • PART 4: World Cup qualifier previews (45m 00s) • PART 5: The odds with Paddy Power (53m 00s) • PART 6: Women's Football Weekend (55m 00s) SIGN UP TO THE ATHLETIC TODAY FOR 33% OFF THE PRICE OF AN ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION • theathletic.com/totally   GET IN TOUCH: • follow us on Instagram • find us on Facebook • send us a tweet: @TheTotallyShow   READ STUFF ON OUR WEBSITE: • check out thetotallyfootballshow.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices