Podcasts about mammals

Class of animals with milk-producing glands

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Best podcasts about mammals

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Latest podcast episodes about mammals

Rob Has a Podcast | Survivor / Big Brother / Amazing Race - RHAP
Rob and Josh Talk Amazon Prime’s Mammals + TV and Movie Headlines

Rob Has a Podcast | Survivor / Big Brother / Amazing Race - RHAP

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 83:33


Rob Cesternino and Josh Wigler discuss Amazon Prime's Mammals and Movie Headlines. The post Rob and Josh Talk Amazon Prime's Mammals + TV and Movie Headlines appeared first on RobHasAwebsite.com.

Post Show Recaps: LIVE TV & Movie Podcasts with Rob Cesternino
Rob and Josh Talk Amazon Prime's Mammals + TV and Movie Headlines

Post Show Recaps: LIVE TV & Movie Podcasts with Rob Cesternino

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 85:04


In this episode, Rob and Josh talk about Amazon Prime's Mammals. The post Rob and Josh Talk Amazon Prime's Mammals + TV and Movie Headlines appeared first on PostShowRecaps.com.

Katie The Traveling Lactation Consultant

All mammals breathe air, all mammals give live birth.  All mammals breastfeed their young.  Humans are mammals, even tho we tend to forget it.  Breastfeeding should be easy (cats don't worry about breastfeeding).  Katie Oshita and Shaz Tayebi talk about how remembering that we are mammals can deeply change and impact our breastfeeding practices.Podcast guest: Shaz Tayebi, IBCLC, brings her midwifery experience from Iran to her lactation career in Canada. She noticed there were much more breastfeeding challenges in her practice in Canada compared to rural areas of Iran, where they trust babies more than books, apps, instructions, etc. That's why she created the documentary “We're Mammals”!“We're Mammals” helps parents and healthcare providers understand newborn's innate feeding behaviors, acknowledge that the mammalian approach to breastfeeding is a failproof method (the reason we are not extinct) and identify barriers to trusting baby's instincts.As a mother of two, one having special needs, she has first hand experience in what a normal breastfeeding journey looks like.  She's also a craniosacral therapist, a gentle form of body work, which she originally learned for her son and is now corporating  it in helping families too. She mentors doulas and lactation consultants as well.Podcast host: Katie Oshita, RN, BSN, IBCLC has over 22 years of experience working in Maternal-Infant Medicine. Katie is a telehealth lactation consultant believing that clients anywhere in the world deserve the best care possible for their needs. Being an expert on TOTs, Katie helps families everywhere navigate breastfeeding struggles, especially tongue tie and gut/allergy related issues. Email katie@cuddlesandmilk.com or www.cuddlesandmilk.com

The /Filmcast (AKA The Slashfilmcast)

David, Devindra, and Jeff discuss how the old Bob is replacing new Bob at Disney, James Cameron's awesome new GQ profile, and then dive into the history of Pepsi, the final season of Dead To Me, the pleasures of Fleishman is in Trouble, and Mark Mylod's new film The Menu. Also: we're making video versions of our reviews! Be sure to subscribe to us on YouTube at youtube.com/slashfilmcast. Use #slashtag on Twitter to recommend titles. Thanks to Mike C for building the Hashtag Slashtag website. Thanks to our SPONSORS for this episode:  ExpressVPN: Go to expressvpn.com/filmcast to get an extra 3 months of ExpressVPN for free! Storyworth: Go to storyworth.com/filmcast and save $10 on your first purchase Sizzle Pitch: On top of Sizzlepitch's introductory launch pricing,  go to Sizzlepitch.com and use promo code FILMCAST for $100 off one sizzle project. Weekly Plugs David - Decoding TV: The Crown Season 5 Eps 1-3 Review Devindra - Engadget Podcast on our holiday gift guide Jeff - DLC Shownotes (All timestamps are approximate only) What we've been watching  (~30:00) David - Pepsi Where's My Jet, Fire of Love, Devindra - Dead to Me S3, Tár, Cow Jeff - The Simpsons, Strange World, Fleishman is in Trouble, Mammals, Featured Review (~1:20:00) The Menu SPOILERS (~1:33:00) Support David's artistic endeavors at his Patreon. Listen and subscribe to David's interview podcast Culturally Relevant and subscribe to his YouTube channel. Check out Jeff Cannata's podcasts DLC and We Have Concerns. Listen to Devindra's podcast with Engadget on all things tech.   You can always e-mail us at slashfilmcast(AT)gmail(DOT)com, or call and leave a voicemail at 781-583-1993. Also, follow us on Twitter @thefilmcastpod. Credits: Our theme song is by Varsity Blue, the newest project by Tim McEwan from The Midnight. Our Slashfilmcourt music comes from SMHMUSIC.com. Our weekly plugs music comes from Noah Ross. Our spoiler bumper comes from filmmaker Kyle Corwith. If you'd like advertise with us or sponsor us, please e-mail slashfilmcast@gmail.com. You can support the podcast by going to patreon.com/filmpodcast or by leaving a review on Apple Podcasts.

The Happy Brain
Hospital Drama

The Happy Brain

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 65:37


My guest tells us how she brings the inner mammal method into her daily work as a Registered Nurse. (https://RNextdoor.com)If you like The Happy Brain Podcast, please rate and review it to help others make peace with their inner mammal.THE HAPPY BRAIN PODCAST helps you blaze new trails to your dopamine, serotonin, oxytocin, and endorphin. My guests are pioneers in retraining the inner mammal. I love learning from them! Listen in and subscribe so you can turn on your happy chemicals in healthy new ways.Your host, Loretta Breuning PhD, is founder of the Inner Mammal Institute and author of "Habits of a Happy Brain: Retrain your brain to boost your serotonin, dopamine, oxytocin and endorphin levels.” Details at: https://innermammalinstitute.orgLife is more peaceful and satisfying when you understand the brain we've inherited from earlier mammals. Your mammal brain controls the chemicals that make you feel good: dopamine, serotonin, oxytocin, and endorphin. These chemicals are released for reasons that don't make sense to our verbal human brain. When you know what these chemicals do in animals, your ups and downs make sense!Our happy chemicals evolved to reward survival behavior, not to make you feel good all the time. Each happy chemical has a special job. When it turns on, it paves neural pathways that turn it on more easily in the future. That's why we repeat behaviors that we'd rather do without. Fortunately, you can re-wire yourself to stimulate them in sustainable ways.But it's hard. It's like learning a foreign language: it takes a lot of repetition. Yet people do it every day. You can be one of them! You can design a new path to your happy chemicals and repeat it until it's strong enough to turn on easily. The Inner Mammal Institute shows you how.The Inner Mammal Institute has free resources to help you make peace with your inner mammal: videos, blogs, infographics, and podcasts. Dr. Breuning's books explain the big picture and help you plot your course step by step. No matter where you are right now, you can enjoy more happy chemicals in healthy ways. Get the details at https://InnerMammalInstitute.org.Music from Sonatina Soleil by W.M. Sharp. Hear more of it at https://InnerMammalInstitute.org/musicbywmsharp

I Know Dino: The Big Dinosaur Podcast
Steve Brusatte on how mammals survived dinosaurs

I Know Dino: The Big Dinosaur Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 68:55


For links to every news story, all of the details we shared about Bruhathkayosaurus, links from Steve Brusatte, and our fun fact check out https://iknowdino.com/Bruhathkayosaurus-Episode-416/Join us at www.patreon.com/iknowdino for dinosaur requests, bonus content, ad-free episodes, and more.Dinosaur of the day Bruhathkayosaurus, a titanosaur sauropod that lived in Late Cretaceous in what is now India (in the Kallamedu Formation).Interview with Steve Brusatte, a paleontologist, paleontology advisor for Jurassic World, and author of The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs, and more recently The Rise and Reign of the MammalsIn dinosaur news this week:The Dinosaur Technical Session from the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology 2022 annual meeting For 75 years The Folio Society has been turning books into works of art. They currently have special editions of Jurassic Park, The Lost World, and most recently The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs. The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs includes 32 pages of fossil photos, an 8-page full-colour gatefold illustration, and a large two-sided fold-out colour map. Get the perfect gift for the Dino-lover in your life at foliosociety.comSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Front Row
The Crown, Jafar Panahi's No Bears, Jez Butterworth, Goldsmiths Prize

Front Row

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 42:28


The Crown: as series five is with us, we review the next ten part instalment of Netflix's royal drama as it slips into more recent territory - the turmoil of the nineties. Plus jailed Iranian film director Jafar Panahi's new metafiction No Bears, in which he plays himself, forced to direct online from a village near Iran's Turkish border. With Kate Maltby and Larushka Ivan-Zadeh. Jez Butterworth: the playwright and screenwriter on his new show Mammals starring James Corden, airing on Amazon Prime. The Goldsmiths Prize: live from the ceremony, we hear from the winner of this year's £10,000 reward for fiction that, “breaks the mould or extends the possibilities of the novel form.” Presenter: Tom Sutcliffe Producer: Sarah Johnson

TV Tan Podcast
TV Tan 0428: Unverified Coup

TV Tan Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 60:32


Bill Frost (SLUGMag.com & X96 Radio From Hell) and Tommy Milagro (SlamWrestling.net) talk Listener Mailbag, Aqua Teen Forever: Plantasm, The Crown, Falling For Christmas, The English, Mammals, Is That Black Enough For You?, Reginald the Vampire, Mythic Quest, Acapulco, Yellowstone, Tulsa King, R.I.P. Westworld and Stargirl, The Peripheral, Andor, The Watcher, Rasslin' News, Black Adam, Community, and Dave Chappelle on SNL. Drinking: Honey Bourbon and Whiskey Zero from OFFICIAL TV Tan sponsors Outlaw Distillery and Boozetique.* Yell at us (or order a TV Tan T-shirt) @TVTanPodcast on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, or Gmail.* Rate us: Spotify, Stitcher, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, YouTube, Amazon Podcasts, Audible, etc.

Strange Animals Podcast
Episode 301: Hairless Mammals

Strange Animals Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 8:25


Thanks to Liesbet for this week's suggestion, about two mammals that have evolved to be hairless! Happy birthday this week to Declan and Shannon! The hairless bat has a doglike face and a doglike tail but (and this is important) it is not a dog [photos from this site]: The naked mole-rat's mouth is behind its teeth instead of the usual "my teeth are in my mouth" kind of thing: Show transcript: Welcome to Strange Animals Podcast. I'm your host, Kate Shaw. This week we have a suggestion from Liesbet, who asked about furless animals. We're going to learn about two mammals that don't have fur, and they're not ones you may be thinking of. But first, we have two birthday shout-outs! Happy birthday to Declan and Shannon! I hope both your birthdays are so amazing that whatever town you live in finishes off the day by giving you the key to the city. What do you do with the key? I don't know, but it sounds like something to brag about. Mammals are famous for having hair, but not all mammals actually have hair. Cetaceans like whales and dolphins have lost all their hair during their evolution into marine animals, although before a baby whale is born it has a little bit of fuzzy hair on its head. Other mammals, like humans, pigs, walruses, and elephants, have evolved to only have a little hair. There are also domesticated mammals that have been bred to have no hair, like sphynx cats and Chinese crested dogs. There are other domesticated hairless mammals, though, including two types of guinea pig. The skinny pig only has a little bit of fuzzy hair on its face and ears, while the baldwin pig only has a tuft of hair on its nose. But the animals we're going to talk about today are hairless animals you may not have heard of. For instance, the hairless bat, which lives in parts of Southeast Asia. Its dark gray body is almost completely hairless, although it does sometimes have little patches of fuzz on the head and tail, and longer bristles around the neck. It's nocturnal and eats insects, but since it's a fairly large bat, around 6 inches long, or 15 cm, it can eat fairly large insects. It especially likes grasshoppers, termites, and moths. The hairless bat roosts in colonies of up to a thousand individuals, and it lives in caves, hollow trees, or rock crevices. Although it uses echolocation, it doesn't have a nose leaf like many microbats have, but instead has a little doglike snout. Its tail is skinny like a little dog's tail instead of being connected to the hind legs or body by patagia. It has a little throat pouch that secretes strong-smelling oil. It also has a sort of pocket on either side of the body. Originally people thought that mother bats used these pouches to carry their babies, since hairless bats usually have two babies at a time. Instead, it turns out that mother bats leave their babies at home when they go out to hunt, and the pockets are used for something else. The pockets are formed by a fold of skin and the end of the wing fingers and membranes fit into them. The bat uses its hind feet to push the wings into the pockets, sort of like stuffing an umbrella into the little cover that it comes in when you first buy it. This allows the bat to run around on all fours without its wings getting in the way. Since most bats can't walk on all fours at all, this is pretty amazing. Our other hairless animal today is the naked mole-rat, which is not a mole or a rat. It is a type of rodent but it's more closely related to porcupines than to rats. It lives in tropical grasslands in parts of East Africa and spends almost its entire life underground. It lives in colonies of up to 300 individuals, and the colony's tunnels and nesting burrows are extensive, often covering up to 3 miles, or 5 km. It eats roots of plants and the colony carefully only eats part of each root so that they don't kill the plant. The roots continue to grow, providing the colony with lots of food.

Pilot TV Podcast
#211 The English, Mammals, and The Crown. With guests Emily Blunt, Chaske Spencer and Hugo Blick

Pilot TV Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 103:36


Emily Blunt, Chaske Spencer and The English creator Hugo Blick join us on this week's show to talk about their rip-roaring rampage of revenge through the Old West. Plus we unpick some marital strife with James Corden in Mammals on Prime and head off to Balmoral for the long-awaited (and Judi Dench-baiting) fifth season of The Crown on Netflix. Plus, James tries to come to terms with a week which not only saw drama come to his beloved Witcher, but also the demise of Fate: The Winx Saga. It's been a lot!

The Happy Brain
Addiction MD on Political Correctness

The Happy Brain

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 64:26


Dr. Vera Tarman tells me about the changes that have taken place in her 20 years of treating addiction.If you like The Happy Brain Podcast, please rate and review it to help others make peace with their inner mammal.THE HAPPY BRAIN PODCAST helps you blaze new trails to your dopamine, serotonin, oxytocin, and endorphin. My guests are pioneers in retraining the inner mammal. I love learning from them! Listen in and subscribe so you can turn on your happy chemicals in healthy new ways.Your host, Loretta Breuning PhD, is founder of the Inner Mammal Institute and author of "Habits of a Happy Brain: Retrain your brain to boost your serotonin, dopamine, oxytocin and endorphin levels.” Details at: https://innermammalinstitute.orgLife is more peaceful and satisfying when you understand the brain we've inherited from earlier mammals. Your mammal brain controls the chemicals that make you feel good: dopamine, serotonin, oxytocin, and endorphin. These chemicals are released for reasons that don't make sense to our verbal human brain. When you know what these chemicals do in animals, your ups and downs make sense!Our happy chemicals evolved to reward survival behavior, not to make you feel good all the time. Each happy chemical has a special job. When it turns on, it paves neural pathways that turn it on more easily in the future. That's why we repeat behaviors that we'd rather do without. Fortunately, you can re-wire yourself to stimulate them in sustainable ways.But it's hard. It's like learning a foreign language: it takes a lot of repetition. Yet people do it every day. You can be one of them! You can design a new path to your happy chemicals and repeat it until it's strong enough to turn on easily. The Inner Mammal Institute shows you how.The Inner Mammal Institute has free resources to help you make peace with your inner mammal: videos, blogs, infographics, and podcasts. Dr. Breuning's books explain the big picture and help you plot your course step by step. No matter where you are right now, you can enjoy more happy chemicals in healthy ways. Get the details at https://InnerMammalInstitute.org.Music from Sonatina Soleil by W.M. Sharp. Hear more of it at https://InnerMammalInstitute.org/musicbywmsharp

Afternoon Drive with John Maytham
An academic study: Why does a Lemur pick its nose?

Afternoon Drive with John Maytham

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 9:36


Guest: Prof Anne-Claire Fabre, Curator of Mammals at the Museum of Natural History in Bern in Switzerland and Assistant Professor at the University of Bern about her research into the See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Part-Time Rockstar Podcast
Episode 162: Unlucky Mammals (Philadelphia) [Indie Rock]

Part-Time Rockstar Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 49:56


This week's episode features my guest Greg from the Philadelphia based indie rock band Unlucky Mammals. We are playing a show together this Friday in Philly at The Grape Room with some of our mutual friends including Bees!, Dont Pretty, & Wisher. So if you're in the neighborhood definitely feel free to stop by. Greg and I had a fun conversation about all things music as well as all things literature and baseball. By the sound of it Greg is a teacher and author. I featured his songs “Socratic Meathead” & “Engines.” Which you can find on Spotify/iTunes/Bandcamp and I've added the links to the band in the episode notes if you want to give them a follow. Thanks for listening and supporting local music.    https://www.facebook.com/unluckymammals   https://open.spotify.com/artist/7EdtKODoAIMkhAneT67iSw?si=tG3YcbNFR-aS3_K_hV4w0g -- Part-Time Rockstar Productions is available in the DMV for music videos and live filming.  -- The sponsor of this show is @Truly.strings guitar shop on Instagram.   

Becoming Crystalline
Humans = Mammals...We Weren't Designed to Go It Alone

Becoming Crystalline

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 43:50


Let's face it...humans are both the most advanced technology on the planet, and monkeys. The human higher mind is built upon the lower reptilian brain and the slightly more evolved mammalian brain. Our ego, the navigation system for this 3D world, is woven into both of them, and as we awaken our higher brain functions we must honor all parts of the human bio-machine. As mammals, we were designed to thrive in community, which means you cannot do it alone. So as we awaken and connect with the truth of the Law of One, the truth that all is the Creator, we must honor, integrate, and transcend these lower aspects of humanity...together with our fellow brothers and sisters.Even though tech has brought us closer, we are more separated from real human contact than ever before. It's time to reconnect, to heal the illusion of separation, and come together in community in order to make this next leap forward.I am sending out a Call to Action for my brothers out there who are ready to activate their Divine Blueprint and step out of addiction, trauma, and drama. If you have been stuck in addictive patterns, repeating relationship and ancestral trauma loops, then it's time to recognize that you are a CRYSTALLINE MAN ready to be Awakened! The world didn't equip you with the right tools to step into your power. Join me on a 12 week journey of Transformation where I help give you the self-awareness, the tools, and the metaphysical know how in order to step into your next phase of evolution.Email me at connect@becomingcrystalline.com to schedule a call to learn more.

The Science Hour
Seismic events on Mars

The Science Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 54:10 Very Popular


The latest observations from Nasa's InSight Mars Lander and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) have revealed new information on Mars' interior structure. Dr Anna Horleston, Senior Research Associate in Planetary Seismology at the University of Bristol, talks us through the mars-quakes that provided this data. On the 30th of October, Brazilians will head to the polls to elect their next president. Jeff Tollefson, Senior Reporter at Nature, tells Roland what approach the two candidates – Jair Bolsonaro and Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva – might take towards science and the potential local and global impacts this could have. Humans aren't the only animals to pick their noses… it turns out primates engage in this habit too. Anne-Claire Fabre, Curator of Mammals at the Duke Lemur Center, tells reporter Vic Gill about the long-fingered aye-ayes having a dig around their noses, and how more research is needed to unpick the reasons behind this behaviour. And producer Robbie Wojciechowski heads to the National Oceanography Centre in Southampton to capture the launch of the RRS Discovery mission to Ascension Island and St Helena. Science In Action will be following the mission over the next 6 weeks as it uncovers new specimens from the deep ocean, as well as surveying the overall health and wellbeing of the ocean around the British Overseas Territory. Record-breaking heatwaves swept across the Earth's northern hemisphere this summer, with continental Europe, China, the UK and parts of the US all experiencing exceptional temperatures. Listener Geoff in Australia wants to know: Is climate change really responsible or could it just be weather? Marnie Chesterton goes to Kenya, where certain areas of Amboseli have experienced intense drought over the past 5 years. There she meets members of the Masai community who have been farmers for generations. They describe how seasonal rains have successively failed to appear when expected, and explain how this has affected their lives. Marnie asks local people, meteorologists and climate scientists for their take on the year's hottest debate. (Image: Impression of a rover on the surface of Mars. Credit: Getty Images)

Science in Action
Seismic events on Mars

Science in Action

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 26:27 Very Popular


The latest observations from Nasa's InSight Mars Lander and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) have revealed new information on Mars' interior structure. Dr Anna Horleston, Senior Research Associate in Planetary Seismology at the University of Bristol, talks us through the mars-quakes that provided this data. On the 30th of October, Brazilians will head to the polls to elect their next president. Jeff Tollefson, Senior Reporter at Nature, tells Roland what approach the two candidates – Jair Bolsonaro and Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva – might take towards science and the potential local and global impacts this could have. Humans aren't the only animals to pick their noses… it turns out primates engage in this habit too. Anne-Claire Fabre, Curator of Mammals at the Duke Lemur Center, tells reporter Vic Gill about the long-fingered aye-ayes having a dig around their noses, and how more research is needed to unpick the reasons behind this behaviour. And producer Robbie Wojciechowski heads to the National Oceanography Centre in Southampton to capture the launch of the RRS Discovery mission to Ascension Island and St Helena. Science In Action will be following the mission over the next 6 weeks as it uncovers new specimens from the deep ocean, as well as surveying the overall health and wellbeing of the ocean around the British Overseas Territory. Contributors Dr Anna Horleston, Senior Research Associate in Planetary Seismology, University of Bristol Jeff Tollefson, Senior Reporter, Nature Anne-Claire Fabre, Curator of Mammals, Duke Lemur Center (Image: Impression of a rover on the surface of Mars. Credit: Getty Images) Presenter: Roland Pease Assistant Producer: Sophie Ormiston Producer: Robbie Wojciechowski

BeProvided Conservation Radio
Halloween Episode: Northern California Bats with Corky Quirk

BeProvided Conservation Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 38:29


Welcome to our Halloween edition about bats.   But just so you know, bats are not scary! They just make for a great Halloween conversation. So stay tuned to learn why we should all love bats and not fear them. I am Marcia Sivek and this is BeProvided Conservation Radio.   When my guest today is not giving bird talks and nature walks with the Yolo Basin Foundation she is rescuing and rehabilitating bats as well as educating people about bats. Mary Jean Quirk is the founder of Northern California Bats a rescue and rehabilitation organization in Sacramento Valley CA.

Professional Contestants
ProCo 215: Tight Ass, I Punch - Fight of the Living Dead

Professional Contestants

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 63:52


Jared has long preached about his rule that applies not just to haunted houses, but life at large: if someone touches you, you can touch them back. However, those rules may apply more to this game show than any other we've done before. Everyone step back, becasue we're gonna punch doors, we're gonna punch actors, we might even punch a nun! Don't say we didn't warn you. Zach hates most YouTubers, Jared will fight The Pope, and Adam truly misunderstands what a worm is. Talking Points Include: A True Navy Seal, What Even Is a Mammal, Professor Oak Lays Eggs, Even More Apple Orchard Monster Lore, A Relic of YouTube Red, Return of Haunted House Rules, Getting Paddled, We're Gonna Wreck It

We Have Concerns
The Long Trail of Mucus

We Have Concerns

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 59:50


For bonus content, check out our Patreon! patreon.com/wehaveconcernsHey! If you're enjoying the show, please take a moment to rate/review it on whatever service you use to listen.Here's the iTunes link: http://bit.ly/wehaveconcerns And here's the Stitcher link: http://bit.ly/stitcherwhconcernsJeff on Twitter: http://twitter.com/jeffcannataAnthony on Twitter: http://twitter.com/acarboniLink to the story: https://www.sciencealert.com/mucus-is-so-handy-that-we-evolve-it-over-and-over-again-finds-studyIf you've seen a story you think belongs on the show, send it to wehaveconcernsshow@gmail.com or leave it on the subreddit: http://reddit.com/r/wehaveconcerns

Media Monarchy
#MorningMonarchy: October 12, 2022

Media Monarchy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 65:25


The heart of the game, quietly lowering fluoride levels and your friendly neighborhood Pfizer-Man + this day in history w/the first Oktoberfest and our song of the day by The Mammals on your #MorningMonarchy for October 12, 2022.

Earth Wise
Coping With Climate Change | Earth Wise

Earth Wise

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 2:00


Extreme weather events including prolonged drought and heavy rainfall are becoming more common and more severe as global temperatures rise.  As the climate continues to change in the coming decades, how will animals respond?  Researchers from the University of Southern Denmark have examined how different mammals react to climate change. They analyzed data on population […]

Einstein A Go-Go
All Things De-Extinction and Cryopreservation

Einstein A Go-Go

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 51:10


We're wiping out species at a rate not seen in 66 million years, so the Museums Victoria Research Institute have decided to do something about it! Dr Kevin Rowe, Senior Curator of Mammals, joins Dr Jen and Dr Shane to talk genomes, innovation, and how institutions all play a role in managing our past and future ecology. At the other end of the spectrum, RMIT Research Fellow (and Renaissance woman) Dr Saffron Bryant shares the latest in her cryopreservation research. And then, while many of us re-evaluate our plans for the distant future, Dr Lauren Arundell, Research Fellow from the School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences at Deakin University, brings some hard truths about screen time and behaviour in a post lock-down world.Program page: Einstein-A-Go-GoFacebook page: Einstein-A-Go-GoTwitter: Einstein-A-Go-Go

Heredity Podcast
Sociality in mammals

Heredity Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 18:09


Social interactions play an essential role in the lives of many animals. But how do we disentangle the genetic and non-genetic factors influencing sociality? In this episode, Dr Irene Godoy (Bielefeld University) tells us about her research on sociality in capuchin monkeys. This episode explores the recent Heredity paper: “Genetic, maternal, and environmental influences on sociality in a pedigreed primate population” Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Talking Animals
Dr. Eric Eisenman, founder of International Veterinary Outreach (IVO)

Talking Animals

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022


Dr. Eric Eisenman discusses founding International Veterinary Outreach (IVO), which provides veterinary services and training to rural areas in countries sorely lacking both. The post Dr. Eric Eisenman, founder of International Veterinary Outreach (IVO) first appeared on Talking Animals.

Brother from Another
“You Identify as a Mammal”

Brother from Another

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 47:45


00:00      Vinnie Goodwill is the guest co-host today. The NBA GM survey is in!  Luka Doncic was voted to win MVP, and the Bucks were voted to win the NBA Finals this upcoming season.21:20         Mike Jones says the Chiefs and the Bills are the top 2 teams in the AFC.  Can you still listen to Kanye's music?37:11           Dr. Jason Johnson thinks T'Chala should have been re-casted for the upcoming Black Panther sequel. Jason passionately tears Herschel Walker to pieces.  

Mac & Gu
Things to Retire in Movies (385)

Mac & Gu

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 47:33 Very Popular


We discuss all the things in movies that we'd like to see retired.BUT WAIT, THERE'S MORE!!!Mac tries out new bits!Join the conversation on Twitter: @MACandGUpodcast

Converging Dialogues
#165 - Platypus, Echidna, and The Magnificent Mammals of Australia: A Dialogue with Jack Ashby

Converging Dialogues

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2022 113:13


In this episode, Xavier Bonilla has a dialogue with Jack Ashby about the wonderful mammals of Australia. They talk about the distinctions between monotremes, marsupials, and placentals and where they are located around the world. They mention the ways in which the rest of the world discusses Australian mammals. They describe the features of the platypus, along with their mating and reproduction characteristics. They also talk about the features of the echidna including the males four-headed penis. They talk about the features of marsupials and some of the reproductive features of Tasmanian Devils. They mention the extinct Australian animals and the recent discussion of some trying to "resurrect" the thylacine. They talk about working in tandem with various Indigenous people groups in Australia and how to best understand Australian mammals.  Jack Ashby is a scientist and author. Currently, he is the Assistant Director of the University Museum of Zoology at the University of Cambridge. He has his PhD in Zoology from the University of Cambridge and was previously the museum manager at the Grant Museum of Zoology at University College London. He is a trustee of the Natural Sciences Collections Association, an Honorary Research Fellow in UCL Science and Technology Studies, and sits on the Council of the Society for the History of Natural History. He is the author of the latest book, Platypus Matters: The Extraordinary Story of Australian Mammals. You can find his work here. Twitter: @jackdashby

Steve Dale's Other World from WGN Plus
Everything you ever wanted to know about the history of zoos

Steve Dale's Other World from WGN Plus

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2022


Steve Dale is joined by former Curator of Mammals at Lincoln Park Zoo Mark Rosenthal about the Zoo and Aquarium Video Archive. Mark discusses what influenced him to start this and why it is so important to conduct interviews with pioneers of the zoo and aquarium industry. To learn more and/or to watch archived content, […]

The Happy Brain
Using Happy Chemicals To Reach Goals

The Happy Brain

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 34:35


Kartini Ariffin is sharing my work with her clients in Malaysia and brought me a long list of great questions about moving toward goals.f you like The Happy Brain Podcast, please rate and review it to help others make peace with their inner mammal.THE HAPPY BRAIN PODCAST helps you blaze new trails to your dopamine, serotonin, oxytocin, and endorphin. My guests are pioneers in retraining the inner mammal. I love learning from them! Listen in and subscribe so you can turn on your happy chemicals in healthy new ways.Your host, Loretta Breuning PhD, is founder of the Inner Mammal Institute and author of "Habits of a Happy Brain: Retrain your brain to boost your serotonin, dopamine, oxytocin and endorphin levels.” Details at: https://innermammalinstitute.orgLife is more peaceful and satisfying when you understand the brain we've inherited from earlier mammals. Your mammal brain controls the chemicals that make you feel good: dopamine, serotonin, oxytocin, and endorphin. These chemicals are released for reasons that don't make sense to our verbal human brain. When you know what these chemicals do in animals, your ups and downs make sense!Our happy chemicals evolved to reward survival behavior, not to make you feel good all the time. Each happy chemical has a special job. When it turns on, it paves neural pathways that turn it on more easily in the future. That's why we repeat behaviors that we'd rather do without. Fortunately, you can re-wire yourself to stimulate them in sustainable ways.But it's hard. It's like learning a foreign language: it takes a lot of repetition. Yet people do it every day. You can be one of them! You can design a new path to your happy chemicals and repeat it until it's strong enough to turn on easily. The Inner Mammal Institute shows you how.The Inner Mammal Institute has free resources to help you make peace with your inner mammal: videos, blogs, infographics, and podcasts. Dr. Breuning's books explain the big picture and help you plot your course step by step. No matter where you are right now, you can enjoy more happy chemicals in healthy ways. Get the details at https://InnerMammalInstitute.org.Music from Sonatina Soleil by W.M. Sharp. Hear more of it at https://InnerMammalInstitute.org/musicbywmsharp

The Creative Nonfiction Podcast with Brendan O'Meara

Steve Brusatte (@SteveBrusatte) is the author of "The Rise and Reign of the Mammals" and a professor/research/paleontologist at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland. Support: Patreon.com/cnfpod Social: @CNFPod Show notes: brendanomeara.com Beer Discount: athleticbrewing.com, code BRENDANO20

California Haunts Radio
Gut Wrenching Experiences with Bigtoot with guest Discovery Channel Producer Doug Hajicek

California Haunts Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 83:05


According to IMDb, Doug Hajicek has had a very successful Television career spanning more than 35 years. His accomplishments are also many in the Television and scientific worldHis World firsts include building the camera system that filmed the first giant squid well over 54' feet long living in its natural habitat. See (Predators of The Deep) 2 hour History Channel Special 2020.He was also responsible for Filming the first ever birth of wild Black Bears and the first to document wild Mammals of different species co-habituating. He is the Creator and Producer for the hit TV series "MonsterQuest" airing on: The History Channel, 4 seasons. 70 one hour episodes. Doug Hajicek resides in Minneapolis, Minnesota.Other series he produced: Call of the Wild - PBS, House of Babies - Discovery, The Man Who Walks With Bears - Animal Planet, Narrated by Mark Hamill, North Country, NBC, Golf Bound series, Tech Director Survivorman Bigfoot-Les Stroud- Discovery, Consultant In Search Of Series- History, The Proof is Out There - History. Britain's Big Cat Mystery A&E Television 2022 Big Cat Hunters - A&E Television 2022. Giganto- The Real King Kong- film- History Channel.Hajicek also invented interactive and patented Augmented Holographic theaters. He also Hosts the Popular Utold Radio AM live show and Podcast since 2020. Hajicek also has many writing credits along with the creation of a many Book Covers. He has appeared on the Today Show numerous times, along with hundreds of podcasts and Magazine articles including Newsweek.Video Sasquatch: Legend Meets Science

Earth Wise
Resurrecting The Tasmanian Tiger | Earth Wise

Earth Wise

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 2:00


Tasmanian tigers earned their nickname because of the stripes along their back, but they were not felines.  In fact, they were carnivorous marsupials, the type of Australian mammal that raises its young in a pouch. Tasmanian tigers, also known as thylacines, were once native to the Australian mainland, as well as the islands of Tasmania […]

BrainStuff
How Do Muskrats Work?

BrainStuff

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 6:20 Very Popular


Muskrats are clever semi-aquatic rodents with a distinct musky scent. Learn more about them (and, yes, 'Muskrat Love') in this episode of BrainStuff, based on this article: https://animals.howstuffworks.com/mammals/muskrat.htmSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Palaeo After Dark
Podcast 244 - What is This Clade's Time to Mammal?

Palaeo After Dark

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022 100:08


The gang discusses two papers that look at the evolutionary changes occurring in early synapsids. The first paper suggests that some synapsids may have evolved a mammal-like walking gate and respiration earlier than we expected, and the other paper uses the inner ear of synapsids to infer body temperature. Meanwhile, James is adapting to a new environment, Amanda drinks some “tea”, and Curt gives acronym advice.   Up-Goer Five (Curt Edition): Our friends talk about two papers that look at animals which are not the animals today with hair and warm blood but are part of the group that is brother and sister to those animals. These animals were around a long long time ago. These papers show that some of the things we see in animals with hair and warm blood today also happened in some of these other animals too. The first paper looks at a hard part inside the chest of these other animals. Most of these other animals have a hard part that is very different from the one we see in the animals with hair and warm blood. However, on group of these other animals seems to have a hard part that looks a lot like the ones we see today in animals with hair. This hard part is important for how we breathe and also how we move. This means that this group may have walked and breathed like the animals who have hair today, even though animals with hair got this hard part much later. The second paper looks at the ear to see how warm the blood is for these other animals that are not animals with hair but are part of the group. This paper uses the water stuff in the ear to try and figure out how warm these animals would be. They look at the ear for a lot of dead animals from this group, as well as animals around today that we can see how warm they are. When they use what they find today on the very old dead animals, they see that there is a point in the past of these animals where they start to really get warm. This is still earlier in the group than our animals we have around today with hair that are warm.   References: Bendel, Eva-Maria, et al. "The  earliest segmental sternum in a Permian synapsid and its implications  for the evolution of mammalian locomotion and ventilation." Scientific Reports 12.1 (2022): 1-9. Araújo, Ricardo, et al. "Inner ear biomechanics reveals a Late Triassic origin for mammalian endothermy." Nature (2022): 1-6.

Holmberg's Morning Sickness
09-09-22 - BR - FRI - OJ In A Suite At The Rams/Bills Game - Webster's List Of New Words/Phrases - Percentage Of People Who Have Been Stung By Various Things - Sci News Oldest Mammal And Smelling Parkinson's Disease

Holmberg's Morning Sickness

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 40:30


Talking Animals
Allison Argo: Director of Acclaimed Animal Films

Talking Animals

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022


Allison Argo, a writer-director who, over the course of a 25-year career, has specialized in making often-acclaimed films about animals. The post Allison Argo: Director of Acclaimed Animal Films first appeared on Talking Animals.

Learn Arabic | ArabicPod101.com
Egyptian Arabic Words of the Week with Peryhan for Beginners S1 #3 - Mammals

Learn Arabic | ArabicPod101.com

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 2:10


Science Weekly
How did mammals come to rule the world?

Science Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 14:41 Very Popular


About 325 million years ago, when Britain sat near the equator as part of the supercontinent Pangaea, two populations of a small, scaly, swamp-dwelling creature separated from each other. One of these lineages, over millions and millions of years, evolved into mammals. Our ancestors shared the planet with dinosaurs, survived an asteroid and made it through an ice age. This fascinating history is documented in The Rise and Reign of the Mammals, a new book by the palaeontologist Prof Steve Brusatte. The Guardian science correspondent Nicola Davis talks to Madeleine Finlay about her visit with Brusatte and what she learned about the strange mammals that once walked the Earth. What might their past reveal about their future in a rapidly changing world?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

StarTalk Radio
Cosmic Queries – Dinosaur Discoveries with Kimberly Chapelle

StarTalk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 46:18 Very Popular


What did dinosaurs really look like? On this episode, Neil deGrasse Tyson and comic co-host Marcia Belsky explore questions we all have about dinosaurs, fossils, feathers, and asteroids with paleontologist Kimberly Chapelle. Is Jurassic Park accurate?NOTE: StarTalk+ Patrons can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free.Photo Credit: Copyright © 2005 David Monniaux, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

i want what SHE has
237 "Rewinding to January 2018" with Gail Ann Dorsey and Ruth Ungar

i want what SHE has

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 96:32


I'm still in newborn land so playing an oldie but goodie in honor of Olivia Newton John and this weekend's Summer Hoot with Olivia super fan and musician Gail Ann Dorsey and Hoot founder and musician Ruth Ungar Merenda. These interviews originally aired in January 2018 when Shana and I were hosting together. It was our second episode! I could listen to these women speak for days...P.S. Gail says to see the movie Network! And here's such a profound example of her talent.We also heard these songs today: My Baby Drinks Water by the Mammals, 2Gether by Naiika Sings, Good Things by Olivia K and the Parkers, La Belleza by Lau Noah, Magic Powers by Liana Gabel, If You Could Hear Me Know by the Mammals. Check out the playlist to listen!Our show music is from Shana Falana!Feel free to email me, say hello: she@iwantwhatshehas.orgLeave me a voicemail with your thoughts or a few words about who has what you want and why! (845) 481-3429** Please: SUBSCRIBE to the pod and leave a REVIEW wherever you are listening, it helps other users FIND IThttp://iwantwhatshehas.org/podcastITUNES | SPOTIFY | STITCHERITUNES: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/i-want-what-she-has/id1451648361?mt=2SPOTIFY:https://open.spotify.com/show/77pmJwS2q9vTywz7Uhiyff?si=G2eYCjLjT3KltgdfA6XXCASTITCHER: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/she-wants/i-want-what-she-has?refid=stpr'Follow:INSTAGRAM * https://www.instagram.com/iwantwhatshehaspodcast/FACEBOOK * https://www.facebook.com/iwantwhatshehaspodcastTWITTER * https://twitter.com/wantwhatshehas

Montana Untamed
Dental data: What teeth can tell us about how Montana mammals age

Montana Untamed

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 18:48


When we talk about wildlife data, age is one of the first things biologists look to for understanding the health of animal populations and how management actions may affect trends. Age is also often the subject of debate among hunters, who look at things like body size, antler growth or teeth wear to estimate how many winters a harvested animal has been on the mountain. This week, we're going to do things a little differently and talk about a story Tom Kuglin worked on back in the spring. In March we went down to Manhattan and spent some time at Mattson's Laboratory. Not only did we learn some new science, but with hunting season around the corner those heading to the field might be interested in what the lab has to offer. This podcast  is created in partnership across five newsrooms – the Billings Gazette, the Helena Independent Record, the Missoulian, the Montana Standard and the Ravalli-Republic. You can support this podcast and our efforts by subscribing. Visit any of these newspapers' websites, and click on the Become a Member button at the top of the home page. We appreciate your support of local journalism.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Common Denominator
What zoos get right… and wrong

Common Denominator

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 25:36


Animal and conservation expert Ron Magill shares his strong opinions on zoos, the circus, and the future of conservation. Plus, he explains why people are afraid of snakes, offers a mind-blowing factoid about dolphins, and reveals his unusual favorite animal. If you enjoy this episode, please consider leaving a rating and a review. It makes a huge difference in helping us spread the word about the show. Thanks for listening! To join our #POSITIVITY community or to learn more about Moshe, visit https://linktr.ee/moshepopack

Amazing Wildlife: A San Diego Zoo Podcast
Platypus: A Duck-billed, Egg-laying Mammal

Amazing Wildlife: A San Diego Zoo Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 22:24 Very Popular


The animal explored in this episode is so unusual that when it was first discovered by European explorers, they had a hard time convincing scientists it was real! We’re talking about the one and only platypus. Hosts Rick and Ebone reveal some cool facts about this egg-laying mammal and detail the journey on how the San Diego Zoo became the only zoo outside Australia to house platypuses. Luis Ochoa, a Lead Wildlife Care Specialist, joins the show to discuss what makes this species so unique and what goes into caring for them. If you have a question for Amazing Wildlife you can send them to wildlife@iheartmedia.com for your chance to hear it on the show!See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

News from the Crabby Coffee Shop
Animals and mammals are coming for us!

News from the Crabby Coffee Shop

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 50:31


Oh boy is Kenny crabby today! Facebook Marketplace, animals and mammals are all on his anger radar. FROM THE POD Monkey goes after kid! Mo Ostin passes away

Garage Logic
News from the Crabby Coffee Shop: Animals and mammals are coming for us!

Garage Logic

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 50:31


Oh boy is Kenny crabby today! Facebook Marketplace, animals and mammals are all on his anger radar. FROM THE POD Monkey goes after kid! Mo Ostin passes away

Life, Death, and Taxonomy
Episode 237 – Japanese Macaque: Pink Parka People

Life, Death, and Taxonomy

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 40:06


“…and today we're talking about petite pink primates in plush parkas. But more on that later.” In the highlands of Japan, one tufty monkey likes to season its food, play in the snow, and waylay unsuspecting people in its free time. It uses all of its simian smarts to quickly learn new behaviors and then […]

Nature Podcast
How researchers have pinpointed the origin of 'warm-blooded' mammals

Nature Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 29:16 Very Popular


00:46 When did mammals start to regulate their temperature?The evolution of ‘warm bloodedness' allowed mammals to live in a more diverse range of habitats, but working out when this occurred has been difficult. To try and pin down a date, researchers have studied the fossilised remains of ancient mammals' inner ears, which suggest that this key evolutionary leap appeared around 230 million years ago.Research Article: Araujo et al.News and Views: Evolution of thermoregulation as told by ear07:14 Research HighlightsA new surgical glue that's both strong and easy to remove, and southern fin whales return to Antarctica after being hunted to near extinction.Research Highlight: This adhesive bandage sticks strongly — even to hairy skinResearch Highlight: A feeding frenzy of 150 whales marks a species' comeback09:47 Structure of an enzyme reveals how its so efficientHydrogen dependent CO2 reductase is an enzyme that can convert CO2 from the air into formic acid that can be used as fuel. It also does this extremely efficiently, but nobody has been quite sure how. Now researchers have an idea based on a detailed structural analysis.Research Article: Dietrich et al.17:51 Briefing ChatWe discuss some highlights from the Nature Briefing. This time, the findings of some big biodiversity reports, and how woodpeckers don't end up with headaches from their pecking.Nature News: More than dollars: mega-review finds 50 ways to value natureNature News: Major wildlife report struggles to tally humanity's exploitation of speciesScience: Contrary to popular belief, woodpeckers don't protect their brains when headbanging treesSubscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Factually! with Adam Conover
The Rise and Reign of the Mammals with Stephen Brusatte

Factually! with Adam Conover

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 63:59


In times of turmoil, it can be useful to take a longer view of history. Like, a LOT longer. Paleontologist and author of “The Rise and Reign of the Mammals” Stephen Brusatte joins Adam to explain how mammals took over the Earth hundreds of millions of years ago, and why we survived and achieve sentience when dinosaurs died out. Stephen goes on to discuss why taking a deep look at our history can help prepare us for the crises of the near future. You can purchase Stephen's book at http://factuallypod.com/books

Science Friday
The Rise Of Mammals And A Cephalopod Celebration. June 17, 2022, Part 2

Science Friday

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 47:32 Very Popular


The Wild and Wonderful World of Mammals Mammals may be the most diverse group of vertebrates that have ever lived. (Don't tell the mollusk enthusiasts over at Cephalopod Week.) Many people share their homes with another mammal as a pet, like a dog or cat. The largest creatures on earth are mammals: Ocean-dwelling blue whales are the biggest animals that have ever lived, and African elephants are the biggest animals on land. And lest we forget, humans, too, are mammals. The history and diversity of mammalians is the subject of a new book by paleontologist Steve Brusatte, “The Rise and Reign of the Mammals.” Steve joins Ira to talk about why mammals have been so successful over the years, and why extinct mammals deserve as much love as the beloved dinosaurs.  A Squid-tastic Night Out  How do you fossilize a squishy squid? Do octopuses see in color, and do they have arms or tentacles? Which came first, the hard-shelled nautilus or the soft-bodied octopus, squid, or cuttlefish? And what does ‘cephalopod' mean, anyhow?   This week, Ira ventured to the Maritime Aquarium in Norwalk, Connecticut for a special Cephalopod Week celebration. He was joined by experts Barrett Christie, the director of animal husbandry for the Maritime Aquarium, and Christopher Whalen, a postdoctoral researcher and invertebrate paleontologist at the American Museum of Natural History in New York.  They also discussed the challenges of caring for cephalopods in an aquarium environment, some of the amazing abilities of these animals, and what it's like to discover a previously unknown cephalopod genus and species in fossilized material stored in museum archives. Together, they tackled audience cephalopod questions large, small, and multi-armed.   Transcripts for each segment will be available the week after the show airs on sciencefriday.com.

Newt's World
Episode 421: The Rise of Mammals

Newt's World

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2022 42:21 Very Popular


How did mammals survive the massive asteroid strike 66 million years ago that led to the extinction of the dinosaurs?  Newt is joined by “one of the stars of modern paleontology” according to National Geographic and he is also the Paleontology Advisor on the new film “Jurassic World: Dominion” in theaters now. Newt's guest is Dr. Steve Brusatte, his new book, “The Rise and Reign of the Mammals” vividly imagines lost worlds, and introduces us to a sweeping and revelatory new history of mammals. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.