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The latest news from the team behind BBC History Magazine - a popular History magazine. To find out more, visit www.historyextra.com

Immediate Media

  • Publisher Podcast Awards
    2020 Best Specialist Podcast


  • Jan 19, 2022 LATEST EPISODE
  • daily NEW EPISODES
  • 42m AVG DURATION
  • 1,254 EPISODES

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Latest episodes from History Extra podcast

The Gothic: from Dracula to The Shining

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 41:11

Roger Luckhurst speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about how the idea of the Gothic has evolved and mutated over time, from medieval-inspired architecture and 19th-century vampire fiction to politicised horror films. He also reveals how the genre has been used as a vehicle to explore society's anxieties over time, from sex and gender to race and colonialism. (Ad) Roger Luckhurst is the author of Gothic: An Illustrated History (Thames & Hudson, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-viewingguide&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fgothic%2Froger-luckhurst%2F9780500252512 See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Women of the Rothschild dynasty

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 33:37

Historian Natalie Livingstone chronicles the unexplored lives of the women who shaped the famous Rothschild banking dynasty. She speaks to Elinor Evans about how – though often excluded in a patriarchal society – they forged their own paths, from influential hostesses to pioneering scientists. (Ad) Natalie Livingstone is the author of The Women of Rothschild: The Untold Story of the World's Most Famous Dynasty (John Murray, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:https://www.amazon.co.uk/Women-Rothschild-Untold-Worlds-Dynasty/dp/1529366712#:~:text=From%20the%20East%20End%20of,dawn%20of%20the%20nineteenth%20century/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-Histboty See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Queen Victoria's spy network

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 43:41

Richard J Aldrich and Rory Cormac discuss Queen Victoria's love of espionage and her network of royal intelligence agents Historians Richard J Aldrich and Rory Cormac speak to Emma Slattery Williams about their book The Secret Royals, which explores the connections between espionage and the British monarchy, revealing how Queen Victoria utilised a large covert network of international spies. (Ad) Richard J Aldrich and Rory Cormac are the authors of The Secret Royals: Spying and the Crown, from Victoria to Diana (Atlantic Books, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones: https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-secret-royals%2Frichard-aldrich%2Frory-cormac%2F9781786499127 See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mao's Cultural Revolution: everything you wanted to know

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 44:06

In the latest episode in our series on history's biggest topics, Professor Rana Mitter answers your questions about one of the defining events of modern Chinese history. Speaking to Rob Attar, he explores the role of Chairman Mao in the Cultural Revolution, its impact on China's population and its legacy today. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

How the Beatles were in tune with 60s Britain

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 38:46

Dominic Sandbrook explains how the Beatles reflected 1960s Britain, from the globalisation of pop culture to a fascination with mysticism The 1960s was a time of transformation, as the grey of postwar Britain gave way to a technicolour youth culture, with screaming teenage fans, an outpouring of merchandise and a deep obsession with pop music. Dominic Sandbrook speaks to Rhiannon Davies about how the Beatles provided the soundtrack to a rapidly changing society. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Shining new light on medieval Europe

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 46:46

Matthew Gabriele and David M Perry speak to David Musgrove about their book The Bright Ages, which tackles the big themes of the Middle Ages and challenges some widely held views about the history of medieval Europe.(Ad) Matthew Gabriele and David M Perry are the authors of The Bright Ages: A New History of Medieval Europe (HarperCollins, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-Histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-bright-ages%2Fmatthew-gabriele%2Fdavid-m-perry%2F9780062980892 See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

A murder mystery in 19th-century Dublin

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 32:13

Thomas Morris speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about his book The Dublin Railway Murder, which reconstructs a strange historical cold case from 1856, revolving around a body discovered in a railway station office that was locked from the inside. (Ad) Thomas Morris is the author of The Dublin Railway Murder: The Sensational True Story of a Victorian Murder Mystery (Harvill Secker, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:https://www.amazon.co.uk/Dublin-Railway-Murder-Thomas-Morris/dp/1787302393/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-Histboty See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Trading and crusading in the Middle Ages

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 29:24

Mike Carr speaks to David Musgrove about Muslim-Christian relations in the medieval era, revealing how Papal-sanctioned trade was going on despite the background of the Crusades. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Demerara slave uprising

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 42:18

Thomas Harding discusses a little-known uprising by enslaved people in the British colony of Demerara in 1823 Thomas Harding speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about his new book, White Debt, which recounts the little-known uprising by enslaved people in the British colony of Demerara in 1823, as told through the experiences of four eyewitnesses. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Age of Sail: everything you wanted to know

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2022 50:03

Naval historian Kate Jamieson tackles listener questions on the Age of Sail, when sailing ships dominated global trade and warfare In the latest episode in our series on history's biggest topics, naval historian Kate Jamieson tackles listener questions on the Age of Sail. Speaking to Kev Lochun, she covers subjects ranging from ghost ships and sea monsters to the rigours of life at sea. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Ancient Greek scientific thinking

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022 16:59

Curator Jane Desborough talks to Ellie Cawthorne about a new Science Museum exhibition, Ancient Greeks: Science and Wisdom, which explores the ways in which Greek thinkers sought to understand the world around them – from the oceans and animals, to the cosmos and the human body. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Hells, heavens and afterworlds: a traveller's guide

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 29:35

Edward Brooke-Hitching explores the many heavens, hells and lands of the dead from civilisations across global history Edward Brooke-Hitching speaks to Charlotte Hodgman about his latest book, The Devil's Atlas: An Explorer's Guide to Heavens, Hells and Afterworlds, exploring visions of the afterlife as imagined throughout history by cultures and religions around the world. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Women who served in WW2

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 58:56

In commemoration of the 80th anniversary of conscription for women, historian Tessa Dunlop has written a new book capturing the remarkable lives of the last surviving women who served in Britain's armed forces during the Second World War. Speaking to Emma Slattery Williams, Tessa draws on individual stories to paint a picture of what it was like to be young, female and at war. (Ad) Tessa Dunlop is the author of Army Girls: The secrets and stories of military service from the final few women who fought in World War II (Headline, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones: https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-viewingguide&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Farmy-girls%2Ftessa-dunlop%2F9781472282088 See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

A forgotten witch hunt in New England

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022

Malcolm Gaskill speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about his book The Ruin of All Witches, which chronicles a little-known 1651 witchcraft case from Springfield, Massachusetts, revealing how an irascible brickmaker and his wife found themselves accused of diabolical activity. (Ad) Malcolm Gaskill is the author of The Ruin of All Witches: Life and Death in the New World (Allen Lane, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:https://www.amazon.co.uk/Ruin-All-Witches-Death-World/dp/0241413389/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-viewingguide See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Goods & globalisation: merchants in Tudor & Stuart England

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 32:55

Between 1550 and 1650, English trade flourished as thousands of merchants sought out trading ventures across the globe. In conversation with Emily Briffett, Edmond Smith tracks the experiences of England's merchants and explores how their efforts as a community shaped England's relationship with the rest of the world.(Ad) Edmond Smith is the author of Merchants: The Community that Shaped England's Trade and Empire, 1550-1650 (Yale University Press, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:https://www.amazon.co.uk/Merchants-Community-Shaped-Englands-1550-1650/dp/0300257953/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-viewingguide See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Jacobites: everything you wanted to know

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 42:51

Murray Pittock answers listener questions about the Jacobites, and their attempts to restore the Stuart dynasty to the throne. Speaking to Emma Slattery Williams, he discusses who the Jacobites were, why their risings failed, and how realistic the hit show Outlander is in its portrayal of the Jacobite cause. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

History's greatest mysteries: what caused the medieval ‘dancing plague'?

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 21:38

On several occasions from the 14th to 16th centuries, hundreds of people in central Europe began moving their bodies in a strange uncontrollable fashion – often for days on end. What was behind this unusual behaviour? In the final episode of this series of History's Greatest Mysteries, medieval historian Helen Carr describes the events of the ‘dancing plagues' and considers the various explanations that have been put forward so far. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

History's greatest mysteries: why did Mao's chosen successor flee China?

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 37:22

Fifty years ago, in September 1971, Lin Biao boarded a flight out of the country, only to crash in the Mongolian desert shortly afterwards. Was this the result of an aborted coup on Lin's part? And where exactly was his plane heading? In the latest in our series on history's biggest conundrums, historian Rana Mitter answers these questions and more about the mysterious “Lin Biao incident”. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

History's greatest mysteries: was the Trojan War fact or fiction?

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 28:16

Thanks largely to Homer's Iliad, the Trojan War is one of the most famous events in Greek mythology. But how much – if any – of the legend is actually true? In the latest in our series on history's biggest conundrums, the author and classicist Daisy Dunn revisits the literary and archaeological sources to seek out evidence for the clash between the Greeks and the city of Troy. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

History's greatest mysteries: what happened to the Roman Ninth Legion?

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 32:33

The Ninth Legion of the Roman army was last recorded in York in around AD 107. After that it simply vanished from history. To this day no-one knows what caused the destruction of this elite army unit, although many theories have been put forward. As we continue our series on history's most puzzling events, Miles Russell explores the various possibilities and explains what he think is the most likely reason for the legion's disappearance. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

History's greatest mysteries: Agatha Christie disappears

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 30:34

In December 1926, crime writer Agatha Christie left her home and vanished without a trace. When she was discovered 11 days later, Christie claimed to have no memory of what had happened. As part of our series on history's greatest mysteries, Dominic Sandbrook discusses the case that baffled the British public and triggered one of the largest manhunts ever mounted. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The state of history in 2021

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 32:36

Anna Whitelock looks back on some key moments and trends that made the historical headlines in 2021. Speaking to Ellie Cawthorne, she covers topics including the “history wars”, cuts to university history courses and the best books published this year. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Christmas feasts: WW2 rationing & postwar absurdity

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 27:03

Annie Gray looks back on festive food in the 20th century – from suspect dishes made under WW2 rationing to joyful postwar creations pickled in aspic and coated in piped green mayonnaise. Speaking to Ellie Cawthorne, for the final episode in our mini-series on Christmas food through history, she also touches on the best wartime cake recipes, Fanny Craddock, and putting bananas in Christmas pudding. (Ad) Annie Gray is the author of At Christmas We Feast: Festive Food through the Ages (Profile Books, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-viewingguide&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fat-christmas-we-feast%2Fannie-gray%2F9781788168199%23%3A~%3Atext%3DAt%20Christmas%20We%20Feast%3A%20Festive%20Food%20Through%20the%20Ages%20(Hardback)%26text%3D'A%20joy%20to%20immerse%20oneself%2Ctrimmings%2C%20pudding%20and%20brandy%20butter. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Thomas Kendrick: MI6 spymaster who helped win WW2

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 37:29

Helen Fry speaks to Jon Bauckham about the remarkable life and career of Thomas Kendrick, an elusive MI6 intelligence officer who helped thousands of Jews escape Nazi-controlled Austria, before going on to mastermind the biggest Allied bugging operation of the Second World War. (Ad) Helen Fry is the author of Spymaster: The Man Who Saved MI6 (Yale University Press, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Spymaster-Man-Who-Saved-MI6/dp/0300255950/ref=asc_df_0300255950/?tag=googshopuk-21&linkCode=df0&hvadid=499174488919&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=13204997830046097313&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=1006715&hvtargid=pla-1244937888688&psc=1&th=1&psc=1&tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-Histboty See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Pearl Harbor episode 5: Chaos unleashed

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 37:02

In the final episode in our new series on the raid on Pearl Harbor, Ellie Cawthorne speaks to Robert Lyman about the attack's immediate aftermath and long term legacy, charting the chaos the Japanese offensive unleashed and tracing events through to the present day. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Stuart princess who could have deposed Charles I

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 35:32

Elizabeth Stuart was beloved by Protestants and Catholics, English and Scots alike. Many clamoured for her to replace her brother, Charles I, on the throne, and one admirer even commissioned a treasonous painting of her wearing the Tudor crown. Nadine Akkerman speaks to Rhiannon Davies about this fascinating and now largely forgotten figure. (Ad) Nadine Akkerman is the author of Elizabeth Stuart, Queen of Hearts (Oxford University Press, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:https://www.amazon.co.uk/Elizabeth-Stuart-Hearts-Nadine-Akkerman/dp/0199668302/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-Histboty See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Fascism: everything you wanted to know

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 37:44

Richard Bosworth answers listener questions on the authoritarian ideology that emerged in Italy a century ago How was Mussolini able to seize control in Italy a century ago? What differentiated Italian Fascism from Nazism? And is the term “fascist” bandied around too much today? In the latest in our series answering your questions on history's biggest subjects, Richard Bosworth speaks to Spencer Mizen about the history of the rightwing ideology. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Yugoslavia: the beginning of the end

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2021 65:31

Dejan Djokic reflects on the brief 1991 war that saw Slovenia secure independence and helped set in motion the bloody collapse of Yugoslavia. In conversation with Rob Attar, he explores the events both as a historian and through his own memories of being a Yugoslav conscript based in Slovenia at the time. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Christmas feasts: Victorian merrymaking

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021

From Twelfth cakes to creepy greetings cards and booze-soaked desserts, Annie Gray guides us through festive feasting in the Victorian era. Speaking to Ellie Cawthorne, for the third episode in our mini-series on Christmas food through history, she also touches on turkey, trifle and whether the Victorians really did “invent Christmas”. (Ad) Annie Gray is the author of At Christmas We Feast: Festive Food through the Ages (Profile Books, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-viewingguide&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fat-christmas-we-feast%2Fannie-gray%2F9781788168199%23%3A~%3Atext%3DAt%20Christmas%20We%20Feast%3A%20Festive%20Food%20Through%20the%20Ages%20(Hardback)%26text%3D'A%20joy%20to%20immerse%20oneself%2Ctrimmings%2C%20pudding%20and%20brandy%20butter. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Triumph against the odds: the 1821 Greek Revolution

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 34:44

Historian Mark Mazower explains how the Greeks secured an unlikely victory against the Ottoman empire in their 1820s fight for freedom. Speaking to Rob Attar, he also reveals how the dramatic events of two centuries ago would have a profound impact on the future of the European continent.(Ad) Mark Mazower is the author of The Greek Revolution: 1821 and the Making of Modern Europe (Allen Lane, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Greek-Revolution-Making-Modern-Europe-ebook/dp/B08W1TZMG9/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-Histboty See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Pearl Harbor episode 4: The day of the attack

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 32:01

In the latest episode in our new series on the raid on Pearl Harbor, Ellie Cawthorne and Gavin Mortimer chart how the attack unfolded on 7 December 1941, sharing the stories and eyewitness accounts of those involved, from Japanese pilots and US navy personnel to army nurses and top commanders. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

England's last witches

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 49:38

John Callow discusses the tragic case of the Bideford witches, the last women in England to be executed for the crime of witchcraftIn 1682, three women – Temperance Lloyd, Susannah Edwards and Mary Trembles – became the last in England to be hanged for the crime of witchcraft. John Callow speaks to Kev Lochun about how circumstance and ill-fortune led the so-called “Bideford witches” to the gallows, and how history has rehabilitated them.(Ad) John Callow is the author of The Last Witches of England: A Tragedy of Sorcery and Superstition (Bloomsbury, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-Histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-last-witches-of-england%2Fjohn-callow%2F9781788314398 See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Hadrian's Wall: everything you wanted to know

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 61:04

As we approach the 1900th anniversary of the building of Hadrian's Wall, Rob Collins answers listener questions on Britain's most famous Roman fortification. Speaking to David Musgrove, he tackles the big issues about the boundary's creation and purpose, as well as looking at everyday life on the wall. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Animals in space: from Laika to jellyfish & tortoises

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2021 46:13

Stephen Walker tells Rhiannon Davies about the history of animals in space, from fruit flies and monkeys to Laika the Soviet space dog Thousands of animals paved the way for human space travel. But for many of them, it was an incredibly painful – or deadly – experience. Stephen Walker tells Rhiannon Davies about this overlooked chapter of space exploration, from Soviet space dogs strapped to rockets and chimpanzees sent up by NASA, to two tortoises who orbited the moon. (Ad) Stephen Walker is the author of Beyond: The Astonishing Story of the First Human to Leave Our Planet and Journey into Space(HarperCollins, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-Histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fbeyond%2Fstephen-walker%2F9780008372507 See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Christmas feasts: Georgian elegance

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 23:48

Taking in glamorous dinner parties and decadent “wine-chocolate”, Annie Graytransports us back to a festive feast from the Georgian era. Speaking to Ellie Cawthorne, for the second episode in our mini-series on Christmas food through history, she also touches on dangerous parlour games and complaints about Christmas being “too commercial”.(Ad) Annie Gray is the author of At Christmas We Feast: Festive Food through the Ages (Profile Books, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-viewingguide&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fat-christmas-we-feast%2Fannie-gray%2F9781788168199%23%3A~%3Atext%3DAt Christmas We Feast%3A Festive Food Through the Ages (Hardback)%26text%3D'A joy to immerse oneself%2Ctrimmings%2C pudding and brandy butter. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

How US-Russian relations fractured in the 1990s

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 36:50

Mary Sarotte tells Spencer Mizen about her new book Not One Inch, which reveals how diplomatic missteps after the fall of the Berlin Wall soured US-Russian relations and fuelled the rise of Vladimir Putin.(Ad) Mary Sarotte is the author of Not One Inch: America, Russia and the Making of Post-Cold War Stalemate (Yale University Press, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon:​​https://www.amazon.co.uk/Not-One-Inch-Post-Cold-Stalemate/dp/030025993X/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-Histboty See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Pearl Harbor episode 3: Countdown to the raid

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 41:17

In the latest episode in our new series on the raid on Pearl Harbor, Steve Twomey speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about the immediate run-up to the attack, revealing how inch-perfect Japanese planning and complacent oversights by American military figures combined to leave Pearl Harbor naval base a sitting duck for Japanese bombers. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Pearl Harbor episode 2: America on the eve of war

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 36:08

In the latest episode in our new series on the raid on Pearl Harbor, Dayna Barnes speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about the United States in the years and months leading up to the attack. They discuss the American perspective on the disintegrating relationship with Japan, get to grips with US thinking on the eve of the attack, and ask: why was the American public blindsided by the Japanese raid? See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sex lives of medieval people

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 24:10

Were medieval attitudes to sex really that different from our own? Historian Katherine Harvey speaks to Elinor Evans about the sex lives of ordinary people in the Middle Ages – from how sexuality was governed by ideas about sin, to the “love magic” that was thought to trick people into bed.(Ad) Katherine Harvey is the author of The Fires of Lust: Sex in the Middle Ages (Reaktion Books, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-Histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-fires-of-lust%2Fkatherine-harvey%2F9781789144895 See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Great Depression: everything you wanted to know

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 50:36

Historian David M Kennedy answers listener questions and online search queries about the Great Depression, the economic crash that devastated the United States and other countries across the globe in the 1930s. In discussion with Rhiannon Davies, he covers topics ranging from the fate of minorities to the staggering unemployment statistics of the time. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Searching for WW1's fallen soldiers

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 41:02

Robert Sackville-West describes attempts to identify the bodies of the dead after the devastating battles of the First World War Historian Robert Sackville-West describes the searches to identify – and in some cases, return – bodies of the dead after the devastating battles of the First World War: a service that provided important closure for many bereaved families. Speaking with Elinor Evans, he also explores how commemoration of the war dead has changed over the last century. (Ad) Robert Sackville-West is the author of The Searchers: The Quest for the Lost of the First World War(Bloomsbury, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:https://www.amazon.co.uk/Searchers-Quest-Lost-First-World/dp/1526613158/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-viewingguide See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Christmas feasts: Medieval & Tudor revelry

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 26:42

From brawn to plum pottage, Annie Gray takes us back to the raucous world of festive feasting in the medieval and Tudor eras. Speaking to Ellie Cawthorne, for the first episode in our new mini-series on Christmas food through history, she also touches on subversive merrymaking, spectacular dinnertime entertainments and hefty meat pies.(Ad) Annie Gray is the author of At Christmas We Feast: Festive Food through the Ages (Profile Books, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-viewingguide&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fat-christmas-we-feast%2Fannie-gray%2F9781788168199%23%3A~%3Atext%3DAt%20Christmas%20We%20Feast%3A%20Festive%20Food%20Through%20the%20Ages%20(Hardback)%26text%3D'A%20joy%20to%20immerse%20oneself%2Ctrimmings%2C%20pudding%20and%20brandy%20butter. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Pearl Harbor episode 1: A gathering storm in Japan

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 42:47

In the first episode in our new series on the raid on Pearl Harbor, Chris Harding speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about Japan in the years running up to December 1941. They discuss the long-running historical factors that edged the country ever closer to war with the United States, and ask: what led Japan to embark on such a risky gamble? See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Colour: a human history

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 47:53

Colour has been hugely important to humans through history, with different cultures attaching their own meanings to all the hues of the rainbow. From the ancient societies who venerated purple to the modern political radicals who chose red as the colour of revolution, James Fox speaks to Rhiannon Davies about these fascinating associations. (Ad) James Fox is the author The World According to Colour: A Cultural History (Allen Lane, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:​​https://www.amazon.co.uk/World-According-Colour-Cultural-History/dp/1846148243/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-viewingguide See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Stranger danger? Xenophobia's unexpected history

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 38:01

Psychiatrist and historian George Makari speaks to Jon Bauckham about the origins of the term “xenophobia”, and the ways in which western thinkers have interpreted people's fear of strangers, from the 19th century to the present day. (Ad) George Makari is the author of Of Fear and Strangers: A History of Xenophobia (Yale University Press, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:https://www.amazon.co.uk/Fear-Strangers-History-Xenophobia/dp/0300259735/ref=asc_df_0300259735/?tag=googshopuk-21&linkCode=df0&hvadid=534924812094&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=12591081103742328032&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=1006715&hvtargid=pla-1420993758651&psc=1&th=1&psc=1&tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-viewingguide See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Irish famine: everything you wanted to know

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 50:43

Christine Kinealy answers listener questions on the devastating famine that struck Ireland in the mid-19th centuryChristine Kinealy answers listener questions on the causes and consequences of the devastating famine that struck Ireland in the mid-19th century. Speaking to Ellie Cawthorne, she also discusses whether we should call it a “famine”, the role of aid and migration in the crisis, and if the British government can be blamed for what happened. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

How Shakespeare inspired terrorists

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 39:06

Shakespeare has been an obsession of extremist groups across the globe over the centuries. The Nazi Party held him up as a hero, while Osama Bin Laden condemned him as the ultimate symbol of the depraved west. Islam Issa speaks to Rhiannon Davies about the playwright's tangled relationship with terror.(Ad) Islam Issa is the author of Shakespeare and Terrorism (Routledge, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:https://www.amazon.co.uk/Shakespeare-Terrorism-Spotlight-Islam-Issa/dp/0367334836/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-viewingguide See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

How the Greeks changed the world

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 50:06

Historian Roderick Beaton ranges over 4,000 years of Greek history, from the glories of Mycenae to the life of a modern European nation. In discussion with Rob Attar, he picks out some of the key moments in this journey, including the triumphs of ancient Greece, the conquests of Alexander the Great and the 1820s battle for independence. (Ad) Roderick Beaton is the author of The Greeks: A Global History (Faber, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-viewingguide&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-greeks%2Fprofessor-prof-roderick-beaton%2F9780571353569 See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

What can churches tell us?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 49:52

Peter Stanford speaks to Emily Briffett about his new book, If These Stones Could Talk, which chronicles his journeys around Britain and Ireland's churches, abbeys, chapels and cathedrals in a quest to understand how religion has defined our past and continues to shape our present. (Ad) Peter Stanford is the author of If These Stones Could Talk: The History of Christianity in Britain and Ireland through Twenty Buildings (Hodder & Stoughton, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones: https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-viewingguide&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fif-these-stones-could-talk%2Fpeter-stanford%2F9781529396423 See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sex work: a brief history

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 31:00

From the courtesans of Edo Japan and ancient Greece to the mollyhouses of Regency London, Kate Lister speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about her new book Harlots, Whores and Hackabouts, which charts the long, diverse and colourful history of sex work. (Ad) Kate Lister is the author of Harlots, Whores & Hackabouts: A History of Sex for Sale (Thames & Hudson, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-viewingguide&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fharlots-whores-and-hackabouts%2Fkate-lister%2Fwellcome-collection%2F9780500252444 See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Ottoman “Age of Discovery”

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 29:58

The “Age of Discovery” is traditionally known as a period between the 15th and 16th centuries, when European Christian powers sailed west and encountered lands and peoples previously unknown to them. However, speaking to David Musgrove, Professor Marc David Baer contends that this narrative overlooks the influential role of the Ottoman empire. (Ad) Marc David Baer is the author of The Ottomans: Khans, Caesars and Caliphs (Basic Books, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:https://www.amazon.co.uk/Ottomans-Khans-Caesars-Caliphs/dp/1473695708/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-viewingguide See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

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