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Latest podcast episodes about Belgium

Working Dog Radio
Episode 156: HITT Tracking with Steve White⁣

Working Dog Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 128:46


Your Working Dog Radio hosts, Eric @vanessk9 & Ted @ted_summers, sit down with former US Army MP MWD Handler, former Washington State Police Canine Association Executive Member, former Vice President of the Certification Council for Pet Dog Trainers (now called the Certification Council for Professional Dog Trainers), former instructor for the K9 Academy for Law Enforcement, and current owner of Pro Active K9, Steve White!⁣ ⁣ ⁣ White has instructed at seminars in the U.S., Australia, Belgium, Canada, China, Finland, Mexico, Japan, Spain, the United Kingdom, and New Zealand. He was a founding instructor at Karen Pryor's ClickerExpo, and has been in law enforcement K9 for decades. White's written various articles which have appeared in police K-9 and dog training publications, and he specializes in teaching behavior modification, urban tracking, and scentwork through the use of positive reinforcement based operant conditioning. Your hosts delve into White's incredible history in K9, and discuss how he uses the HITT method for tracking. ⁣ ⁣ White also provides consultation, training, and audit services to K9 units, and has been recognized as an expert witness by Washington and Federal courts in Police K9 and dog behavior matters. Be sure to hit him up if you're ever in need of his services!⁣ ⁣ You can watch & listen on YouTube, Spotify, Apple & anywhere else you listen to podcasts.⁣

Sunday Vibes: Extra Time
152: Europe's Strangest Title Races

Sunday Vibes: Extra Time

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 46:39


► SUBSCRIBE to FOOTBALL DAILY PODCASTS: https://bit.ly/2W5ICxU ► SPOTIFY: https://spoti.fi/30bG0Q7 ► APPLE: https://apple.co/2KaVq0K This week on the podcast, Henry Hill is joined by his Continental Club buddies Dougie Critchley and Michael McCubbin to cast their eye on some of the less-spoken about title races around Europe. After they kick off the episode with some Everton and Manchester United chat, they ask if Sevilla can mount a title challenge and how long it will be until Inter pull away in Italy. Then there's the more bizarre ones, as newly-promoted Union St. Gilloise lead the way in Belgium, Ajax have conceded just four goals but are second in the Eredivisie, meanwhile none of Turkey's big clubs are anywhere to be seen in that title race. Any more leagues we should be focusing on? Let us know in the comments section!

RealTalk MS
Bonus Episode: MS In the 21st Century -- Challenges of Communicating About MS Progression With Your Healthcare Provider

RealTalk MS

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 13:32


This special episode of RealTalk MS is sponsored by EMD Serono and MS in the 21st Century. In this special episode of RealTalk MS, we're talking with Pieter van Galen and Amanda Montague about that sometimes-challenging conversation with your healthcare provider about MS progression. We're also highlighting My MS Roadmap, a free tool designed to make conversations with your healthcare provider easier by offering clear and easy to understand definitions of the complex language used to describe multiple sclerosis. Amanda Montague is the Chief Mission Officer for the Multiple Sclerosis Association of America and Pieter van Galen is a freelance trainer and consultant based in Belgium. Pieter has been living with MS since being diagnosed in 2006.  Both Amanda and Pieter are active members of the MS in the 21st Century initiative. To learn more about MS in the 21st Century, please visit www.msinthe21stcentury.com.

Drink Beer, Think Beer With John Holl
Ep. 120 - Jean-Claude Tetreault of Trillium Brewing

Drink Beer, Think Beer With John Holl

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 58:18


For a brewery less than a decade old, it's been a hell of a ride for Trillium in Massachusetts. Starting in  a small cramped space near Boston's waterfront, to now boasting a growing roster of locations including restaurants and a farm, the brewery has been celebrated and scrutinized but always focused.  This is most apparent in the beers themselves. Sure, there are hazy IPAs and big imperial stouts but also beers that celebrate agriculture, or play with ingredients like wine grapes and honey.  So that he did a spontaneous blend, in the Belgian tradition shouldn't be a surprise. That they are elegant and fun to drink shouldn't be a surprise either.  These beers, as all of the growth, is deliberate and is a push towards a goal that has been coming more and more into focus over the years. Beers aside, J.C. Tetreault who founded the brewery with his wife Ester, has also been trying to build a better beer community and culture, even recently hosting a symposium on best practices to eliminate the sexist undertones and overtones that have been in and around the beer space.  On this episode he talks about all of that and more.  This Episode is sponsored by:NZ HopsNZ Hops, the co-operative of Master Hop Growers are a passionate collective of farms dedicated to innovation and sustainability. Leading the charge in sustainable farm practices, some NZ Hops farms have over five generations of knowledge that inform their composting program, used by growers to promote healthy regenerative growth of hops year upon year. This creates high quality soil, a critical component of healthy growing conditions. At NZ Hops, they feel that sustainability is not only being a steward for the land, but for our future.Athletic Brewing Co.Athletic Brewing Company's innovative process allows them to brew great-tastingcraft beer without the alcohol. From IPAs to stouts to golden ales and more, they offer a full selection of beers starting at only 50 calories. Now you can keep your head clear and enjoy the refreshing taste of beer anytime, anywhere. Place an order today atathleticbrewing.com and get free shipping on two six packs or more. New customerscan also get 10% off their entire order with code BeerEdge10. Limit one per customer.For more Drink Beer, Think Beer or to check out Beer Edge: The Newsletter for Beer Professionals, follow us on Twitter @thebeeredge and subscribe to our beer industry focused newsletter. There is more information, articles, and engaging content at Beer Edge. Host: John Holl Guest: J.C. Tetreault Sponsors:   NZ Hops, Athletic Brewing, and The Beer Edge Tags: Beer, Bars, COVID-19, Florida, Belgium, Food, Culinary Beers, Special Ingredients 

The Gravel Ride.  A cycling podcast
Chris Schroeder - Gravel Racer and Gravel Team Manager

The Gravel Ride. A cycling podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 46:43


This week we sit down with Dimond Factory Racing's Chris Schroeder. We learn about Chris' transition from professional triathlon to that of a gravel racer. We also look at his decision to start a racing team versus continuing as a privateer. Dimond Factory Racing Instagram Join The Ridership Support the Podcast Automated transcription, please excuse the typos:   Hello and welcome to the gravel ride podcast. I'm your host Craig Dalton. This week on the podcast, we've got Colorado based professional gravel racer, Chris Schroeder. Chris is not only a racer, but he's also the manager of the diamond factory racing team. His path to gravel racing was from that of, uh, as a professional triathlete. Interestingly, I learned that the private tier model, as it's known. It's something that's quite prevalent. In the triathlon world. But Chris didn't really want to take that model forward. He really wanted to build. Uh, professional gravel racing team. So i thought it'd be interesting to get his perspective to hear about his experience in the gravel world thus far and more importantly hear about what his plans are for 2022 with his teammate. Before we jump in, I need to thank this. Week's sponsor athletic greens. Athletic greens is literally a product I use every single day. I've been an athletic greens user for many years prior to actually starting the podcast. I really didn't have the time nor inclination to take a bunch of pills and vitamins. To get some of my nutritional basis covered. So when I found out about ag one, was stoked about how convenient it was going to be for me. So what's in this stuff with one delicious scoop of athletic greens, you're absorbing 75 high quality vitamins minerals, whole food sorts, superfoods, probiotics, and APTA Jens. To help start your day. Right? The special blend of ingredients supports gut health, your nervous system, your immune system, your energy recovery focus and aging. All the things. This is particularly poignant at this moment, as I just got back from two back-to-back 90 mile days. Uh, riding down to Santa Cruz, California, and backup to my home in Marin county. Athletic greens. I brought one of their travel packs with me to take on Sunday morning as I got up and started my second big day. And when I got home, I blasted another one simply because I needed a little bit more. I knew I'd run the battery down pretty darn low with this weekends, riding and athletic greens all is gives me the confidence that I'm at least covering my baselines nutritionally. Build on top of that a healthy diet and you've got yourself a winning combination Athletic greens will cost you less than $3 a day. You're investing in your health and it's cheaper than your cold brew habit. Athletic greens as over 7,505 star reviews. And is recommended by professional athletes. Right now it's time to reclaim your health and arm your immune system with convenient daily nutrition. Especially in the middle of cold and flu season. It's just one scoop in a cup of water every day. That's it. No need for millions of different pills and supplements to look out for your health. To make it easy. Athletic greens is going to give you a free one year supply of immune supporting vitamin D and five free travel packs with your first purchase. All you have to do is visit athletic greens.com/the gravel ride. Again, that's athletic greens.com/the gravel ride to take ownership of your health and pick up the ultimate daily nutritional insurance. Would that business out of the way. Let's jump right in to my interview with Chris. [00:03:15] Craig Dalton: Chris welcome to the show. [00:03:17] Chris Schroeder: Great to be here [00:03:18] Craig Dalton: Yeah, I'm excited when you reached out to me, I think this is going to be a really interesting discussion. The starting point for all my conversations is always to get a little bit of your background as a cyclist, how you came into the sport and how ultimately you started riding. [00:03:31] Chris Schroeder: So it's hard to say how I came into cycling. I came into cycling and triathlon at the same time. About 15 years old, my family relocated from Telluride, Colorado to New York city. And at the time New York city is has a giant cycling presence. Contrarians are a very big thing there. They do a lot of races in central park and the surrounding area. So as a way for me to find something to do when I was there, I started running of those, the local cycling club. It wasn't a race club. It was. A website or a form, or you just go on there and they say, right, we have a group ride every couple of mornings and you know, it was fun. I had a old road bike and then the same exact time I was getting into that, I also equally wanting to get into triathlon. So that was a great like way for me to start training and start preparing. And as that grew, I did a couple of bike races and at the same time training for triathlons eventually just kept going into triathlon and kept doing more of the. And at the same time, I was always a very big fan of cycling. I would always watch the races. I would always follow the riders and that was like a restaurant, but I was a fan of cycling. So I just kept coming up and triathlon. Eventually I went to college at university of Colorado here in Boulder, and Boulder is a great community for pro triathletes and cyclists of all kinds. It's just a Mecca for it. And I ended up eventually becoming a professional in, I believe 20. 15 though, like end of 2015, I went on and raised five years, professional triathlete, you know, I got a lot out of it. I traveled the world. I raised on like six different continents. I met amazing people like throughout the whole way, but at the end of the five years, I just, I wasn't content with where my career was and I wasn't really, I think it plateaued. I just wasn't moving. I wasn't getting the results. I needed to continue doing the sport. And I just stagnated and going into 2020, I had this mindset and I had signed up for, to just a way out. I was like, know, I'm going to finish this sport by dating my first full iron man. So I went to go, the plan was all right, I'm going to go do Ironman, New Zealand. And a couple months before that there was a race in Oklahoma called the Oklahoma gravel Gower at the time. And I kinda knew that I got this sport gravel. I really liked it because it reminded me a lot of the monuments in cycling, like cargo bay, the dynamic just of the just bad-ass like let's get out here and get dirty and strongest man wins kind of mentality. So I knew going into that race. Not really know anything. I was like, didn't have a gravel bag and laid that on my road bike with the biggest tires I could fit. And I ended up having a great race. So early on, I got a new move of Ted king. We went on for a while. Like I eventually got dropped. I got picked up by two guys behind and then ended up beating both of them in the sprint to finish second. So all of a sudden I had this hot iron. What I use then to go on to use, to create this transition to gravel. [00:06:48] Craig Dalton: Interesting. Yeah, for me, it's not super surprising that you had a great cycling experience in New York. It might've been. 10 years ago before I knew a bunch of people from New York and realized like how great the scene is there for a road racing. It's maybe a little surprising that you got into triathlons out of New York, but obviously there's a lot of great road running there and triathlon. There's a few good races in that neck of the woods. [00:07:14] Chris Schroeder: Yeah, we'll come back to that. When we started talking about diamond and stuff like that. But when I, because I had that result in Oklahoma, when I went on to do Ironman New Zealand, you know, the race went, it was a good way to end the closing. On my drunker and made me feel very contented, very like, all right. I did everything I could and I got what I got out of it. And then I'm probably the only person in the world who this positive came from. COVID where the world's shut down. As soon as like, before I even left New Zealand, the world's start shutting down. It's a miraculous, I even got able to leave the country, the roads shut down. All these triathlon races got canceled. All of a sudden the sport that I don't want to do isn't happening anymore. But I have all these sponsors that need me to do something. So when I was able to do with all my current sponsors to say, Hey, I can't race a triathlon because there was no triathlons. I can go do another gravel race where I already had this giant buzz, this giant pop and a good result or this year. So with that, I was able to just start doing gravel races with all my sponsors, still supporting me. They were just supporting me as they were and things just went well. And then. Mid 2020, we just started really committing to, we're just going to start a team. We're not going to have minimums or anything like that. We're just going to work at the end of the January 1st. We're announcing this team and it can be big, small, whatever, wherever we land, we're going to go with. You know, we were very fortunate in having Jared come on, board, our videographer, and he really is the only reason this team was able to exist in 2021. I did Belgium wall fried Cedar city September, 2020. He came out made. What I think still to this day is his best piece of work, which was a video covering my experience. There really just raw showing that experience. I was able to then all these sponsors I was talking to at the time that were like, eh, we don't really know. I was able to send them this video. And it was like talking to a different person. All of a sudden the conversation went my way and we were able to close a couple of deals with at the time Kenda tires and vision components, both of which were huge. I, we desperately needed both of those contracts. Eventually a hybrid clothing and Lin helmets came on board to help us out. And then we had. We had the support. We had the writers, we had a product, which was our video production and assets, and that kind of launched us into 2021. [00:09:48] Craig Dalton: That's a super interesting story about how athletes need to package themselves up in order to be successful in this. I want to go back a little bit to that transition period. And as a quick side note, I also retired as a triathlete from Ironman, New Zealand, not professional, not fast, but it was my last iron man. And I agree. It's something, if you get into the sport of triathlon, regardless of the level, having that iron man experience is just it. I think it is very similar to these epic gravel events. We're just getting across the finish line can be such a magic. Thing in your history that everybody should try to do it. [00:10:24] Chris Schroeder: Yeah, absolutely. I I it's just like in the moment I was just miserable. Like I was. A lot of stuff, like just in my life and where I was my career, but I, because I finished it. I can just, I don't have to look back cause I'm just I'm so much more content than I would be. Had I not done that? [00:10:41] Craig Dalton: Yeah, a hundred percent. I'm also curious, you know, it sounds like the 72.2 distance was a strong suit of yours. Then you moved up to the Ironman distance. When you started going to these long gravel events, what kind of parallels did you see from the endurance and mental strength required to complete an Ironman or a long distance triathlon to what you were seeing at the gravel of. [00:11:04] Chris Schroeder: Well, it's hard. I don't think 70.3 is Ironman. You can draw a lot of parallel parallels, the 70.3 distance. Not as much because those races are dynamic. You are racing. An Ironman is a lot more similar in the sense you. Not raising, you're all just trying to finish. And one of you happens to finish before the others. Definitely the mental attitude that you have in an Ironman of when you're just trying to finish it. I've nothing else to do today. If always I keep putting one foot in front of the other, I will eventually cross the line. That's like the unfortunate gravel mentality for a lot of these 10 plus hour events or. Even the comment, I feel like 125 miles is the common distance for gravel. You're still looking at a seven hour day for the fast guys. Like it's a lot of time out there versus the 71 is really four hours. Most professionals go way under that now. So it's hard to say, like, I think honestly my biggest asset transitioning to gravel was just the amount of time has been being a fan of cycling and why. Professional races and just admiring the tactics. [00:12:09] Craig Dalton: Yeah, I think one of the things that has come up on a number of occasions and in my own personal experience with triathlon was just. Stuff's going to go wrong and you just gotta move forward and get on with it. And the events are long enough that you can have a really bad nutrition or hydration moment and come back around. If you just fuel the system in the right. [00:12:28] Chris Schroeder: absolutely. I think in gravel, The gravel, you can get a little more catastrophic with your failures. You're talking about just breaking everything is breakable on a gravel race tire wheel by Canterbury's yourself. Like it's all up in the air. In a triathlon you can bonk or you can get a flat like those. Those are really the two bad scenarios and the gravel is just, you just don't know what's going to go wrong. There's so many options. [00:12:50] Craig Dalton: Yeah, a hundred [00:12:51] Chris Schroeder: Like for Unbound with, you have to basically be able to rebuild your entire bike is rather than. [00:12:57] Craig Dalton: Speaking of Unbound. So 2020, you sort of get your gravel legs underneath you. You have the good fortune of having sponsors that are willing to pivot with you because gravel was going off more than the triathlon world was you fell in love with it 2021, you register from Unbound. And there's a great video of your experience there. So why don't you talk to us about your experience? What was your. Expectations and goals going in and how did it play? [00:13:22] Chris Schroeder: Unmanned was definitely a little emotional. Like it's a, like, it's a lot that goes into it. It's really very parallel to the Ironman world championships in terms of prestige And just the hype around it. I definitely went into it a little ignorant of just like what's about to happen. I made some just blatant mistakes, but ultimately I just wasn't trained properly for it. And completely just melted in the, it's hard to describe for people that haven't done Unbound it's 200 miles. I think the winter did like 10 hours and 30 minutes this year. So you, would expect this, the race to play out in something in a way that would, you know, relate to someone trying to pace themselves for about long race. In the beginning, like three hours of Unbound are just you're on the pace [00:14:20] Craig Dalton: Did you enter that race thinking I'm going to stick with the lead group? You know, this is going to be my tactic in those first three. [00:14:27] Chris Schroeder: yeah, I just didn't do a couple blatant things. I didn't preview enough of the course. I preview maybe the first like 20 miles and then like mile like 25, we entered this just ridiculous Doubletrack section. Bodies everywhere. And it's like, as a easy tactical error, I was 58 wheels back when we entered that section. And this is probably my biggest advice for anyone racing gravel is it's not ever the effort of being in the front group. That's going to get you. It's the effort of having to chase back onto the front group. That's going to kill you and having to do that twice. Cause there was two Doubletrack sections and both of those sections I wasn't prepared. I was out of. And then leaving them. I had to chase back on. And then those efforts are the ones that really take it out of you where you're doing 10, 15 minutes, just like everything you've got to try and chase back on. That's the effort you can't recover from. And that's also the same effort that you're burning. Very precious fuel. You're brewing your body's heating up, like, you know, the internal temperature and all that's just going up and to ever recover from that. Like you almost have to completely just start going easy to even recover from it. So that's like the thing that kind of like led to the, my, a larger downfall in that race was just those big efforts from just not being prepared with the course that resulted in just like catastrophic kind of blow up that I had. It's hard to say like 200 miles is a lot. It's a lot to train for, to being competitive. And I think that perhaps for 2022, I might actually pivot and race the a hundred mile and Unbound with the thought process of just being like at, in the 200, you know, what's realistic from results standpoint. You know, everything goes well, like my best day, where am I finishing? You know, perhaps on my best day, I'm finishing ninth in the laundry. That's a huge result. I think on an average day I could win the hundred. So from an athlete perspective and a business perspective, I'd have to think, all right, where's the optimal value right now? I'm seeing it in the a hundred, you know, the a hundred got a lot of press still. The winner was on a lot of the magazines are not, he's like the news articles that we came out about it. I think that I might be taking a step back from doing the 200 Unbound this year to refocus and prioritize the a hundred and really go after a result there. [00:17:04] Craig Dalton: Yeah, it is interesting, you know, a hundred is a lot more racing distance than a 200, as you said. I think the top men and women, like they know how to handle that a high-octane three hour, first, three hour of Unbound, and then go back to a more comfortable level and then race, you know, another six hours later. But at least [00:17:23] Chris Schroeder: Absolutely. I think that 200 miles, the thing is this, I think eventually Unbound will suffer from this is that it's not dynamic watching 200 miles race. Ironman has the same problem. It's not interesting watching any of our race because not enough is happening to keep you entertained. Unbound is the same thing. The last five hours of it, or even more boring than the first five we're watching the more boring Bard, because everyone's just dying at that point. And they're just dying in a direction towards the finish line. A hundred mile raising is completely different, you know, it's completely dynamic the whole entire time. You're because it's shorter. People are able to stay together longer and makes for more interesting race. And that's where I think the. I get the gravel has this mindset of like longer is more gravel or something along those lines, but there is a line where you need to just like adding miles for the sake of adding miles is just not like, what's it doing? I had this conversation with Jim Miller at BWR at Cedar city where this year they, it used to end where you do. Like a mile, like 105, you'd go from do like five miles of single track. And then you get on a bike path and it was like three months to finish line and they added like 17 miles of like, you face the thing on track and then just do 17 miles of like nothing gravel and an around like construction sites. Like you're on the road going through like neighborhoods, like you're on the road going through an industrial park. And I was just like, why did you add that? Like, it did nothing for the race. You have this beautiful. You know, you're struggling. You Google, these climbs, you get to the single track, just getting there is such an accomplishment. You've finished this very hard tangled, downhill, single track, and then you're on a bike path to the finish line. And that was like, when you think of a race and you're no, one's saying you have to have a certain distance, so you should just try and have the best race course you can. And by adding those extra miles, you didn't really do. You did the opposite. You made us all finish with the last hour of stuff that we saw. An airplane hanger and a construction site and utility soft. Like I just think that some of these race directors need to not have the mindset of longer is better. [00:19:42] Craig Dalton: Yeah, it's interesting. It's interesting to get your perspective as someone more towards the front end of the race, because I've got the mid pack perspective. And, but I tend to agree with you. Like, for me beyond a hundred miles just is not something I really can ever get fit enough for being, you know, a professional and a family man. Like that's just not happening in my world. So I'm not. Super pro those things and I can in talking to you definitely get it that you're not going to get a very dynamic race with 20 people battling it out. If it's 200 miles, because half of those people are going to drop out from mechanicals. Others are going to drop out through nutrition, and you're going to end up with this battle of attrition that maybe leaves it as we've seen in the last couple of years, two or three people duking out a little bit. Towards the end of the 200. And then maybe if you're lucky it's a sprint finish. [00:20:38] Chris Schroeder: Yeah, I'm the same way. Like I just visit logically like that a hundred mile to like a fast, 125 mile course. That's my sweet spot. And I think that, I don't know if I would say, like, it was a hard lesson to learn that I'm not in this current state of 200 mile racer. I'm a lot better at that a hundred, 1 25 kind of range. Yeah, accepting, like, look, I'm at a couple of these events, like take gravel worlds, for example, like it's just not, it's not great for me. I can do, you know, really well on a faster, less climbing, 125 mile course, but longer than that, I'm just not ready. Like I just don't have the years and miles of this intensity in the legs. Like, even though it triathlon. Obviously still very bike heavy. I don't have the intensity that these races are run out for that long a time. [00:21:29] Craig Dalton: Yeah. Yeah. So speaking of that, What, when you transitioned you talked about this a little bit, but how would you care to characterize your gravel skillset? Are you feeling technically strong or is that still like, you're a horsepower guy from your triathlon days? [00:21:46] Chris Schroeder: it's a hard one. It's definitely something I'm I work really hard to improve. Is my technical skills, not just like Unbound and it's a good example of well early stages. And I would say like the first 30 miles on a mountain, you are in a giant group and you need to be 10. We still don't have to move within that group in a very comfortable way. You need to be really comfortable, bumping elbows and shoulders. And I did a lot to help myself with that. I raised a lot of like criteriums on the local scene. I did a cyclocross this season, all with that in mind. Not only do I want to get better at it. I want to be known as someone who is very proficient at my handling and my positioning, because I think that's one of the biggest gaps in gravel where you can take advantage of is a technical skill, especially for descending. It's very hard. It's not like the road at all. Cause there's so many things going on in any given turn. So just getting better at that skill is something I really wanted to invest in, in the off season. And hopefully that kind of. Pays for itself, this coming season. [00:22:49] Craig Dalton: Yeah, that goes into another one of my sort of desires for the sport. I love when event organizers do throw in technical elements of the course. Cause I do think the best gravel racers that I want to see that I admire. They've got that full bag of tricks, right? They can go well when it's a basic gravel road or pavement, but they also can thrive in the technical elements of the sport. And you definitely see, and it sounds like you're very attuned to. The types of events that are going to suit you well, so maybe you're not going to a super single tracky event today, as you're continuing to build that skillset. [00:23:23] Chris Schroeder: And you're also not going to see me doing like I'm 63 and like 170 pounds. Like I'm not going uphills quick. Like you're not gonna see me a Toshar. I did that race this year and I was like, this is awful. This isn't for the big boys. So like knowing also like, what race am I realistically going to be competitive to that person? What race do I just not like, don't just, don't go do that. Like just don't do that race. You can just skip it. Like there's nothing wrong with skipping a race. So I think it's just a lesson where you have to just sit and go, let's take an honest look at things. This is what I'm good at. This is what I'm horrible at it. So we shouldn't go to races that have a big emphasis on stuff that I'm bad at. I. I definitely agree with you where I think that in gravel, every race should have like one call it feature of just ridiculousness. Like each racing I'll throw in a single track section, throw in some river crossings, you know, something like that. Just to I think it's always fun just to have that one kind of obstacle that race will then become known for. [00:24:20] Craig Dalton: Yeah, it's like a preeminent criteria. It just spices things up. And in this scenario you'd know about it. Right. You know, there's the technical, single track coming up and that it may create a, a. that might be someone's opportunity to take advantage of their particular skillset, knowing full well that, you know, they're less proficient in another discipline. I remember hearing pace and McKelvin talking about the rule of three and racing against the in Boswell. And he's like, you know, Ian's got me in so many different ways, but I did know when, as someone with a mountain bike background, when I hit that single track, it was going to be a huge advantage for me. And I could likely take that to the finish line. And that proved to be. [00:25:01] Chris Schroeder: Yeah, I think that, I think I've even listened to that. Pacing and Ian, where it does, it makes us it up, which keeps gravel interesting. It means that mountain biker has an advantage on the road cyclist. And you know, the flip side of that, of the road psychos has the advantage on the mountain biker and all these different sections. And it just it goes on like BWR, Kansas had like a cyclocross specific section, which favored a bunch of guys from that background. So it just it helps keep grappled fresh. Giving people from all these different disciplines, their chance to shine. [00:25:36] Craig Dalton: A while back, you mentioned your cycling team and the formation of it, the diamond factory racing team. I thought it was interesting as you and I were talking offline. Obviously the director. Professional attitude towards gravel racing is I'm going to become a private tier and I'm going to cobble together my own personal sponsors. And I'm going to overtly take that positioning. You've taken a different approach and you're looking to build a team. And I'm just curious to hear in your own words about that process and why team versus private two year. And what's the vision for the. [00:26:08] Chris Schroeder: That's a hard one to say, like triathlon. It's funny. We talk about private here so much in gravel. All triathlon is private here. That's all you do. So I private tiered for years, five years of private area. I loved it. But the thing when you're a privateer is you have nothing to point at and say like this won't all be gone tomorrow. If you're a privateer, you can wake up the next day. Every single sponsor you have could be gone. It, you know, it sucks to say like, and that's just the business I wanted to. And then when you're done racing, it's all gone completely. It's not coming back. You're if you're not racing, providing them what they want before. Your job's done. So part of the team was I really enjoy the business process of the sport, and I wanted to build something where I can actually transition from being a racer to just being the manager. So the goal was always this long-term vision of, I want to build a program. That's my career. I want my career to be building this team and I want it to be pursued that way. When I talk to people now, I say like the honest truth is I'm in the gravel business. I'm not in the gravel hobby. I'm not in the gravel fitness, I'm in the gravel business and everything I do has somewhat of a business perspective on it. Cause that's just the mindset I have to have for me to ever get this program where I want it to be. And I have, you know, call it a five-year vision board for this team. It's hard to map out because we just don't know what is going to look like every year. It's changing a little bit different regulations that UCI has coming in politics. Drama, it all kind of changes in affects the way that the outcome is going to be. But I know like deep down that I want this program five years from now to be the absolute forefront of this. On the professional scene. I want people entering the sport young age or any aspiration to always be looking to us as that pinnacle of this is what it means to be like a true professional at the same way. Any of us is in cycling or was I guess now it's shuffled a little bit at the. top, but having that team where everyone wants to be on this team means that you've made. [00:28:32] Craig Dalton: So what's step one in that journey. What does 22 look like? [00:28:35] Chris Schroeder: Well, step one was the hardest one. Step one was Brittany and I and Jared coming together and saying, we're just going to start a team. And this was a back in when we first started the program going into 2021, I'm saying we, we decided the biggest thing that we had to put away in our minds was were we had this mindset of rolling to start this team. If we did. Filling the blank. We had to take that away and just say, we're starting a team, no matter what, and we're just going to go with it. So changing that is what led us to step one. And then in 2021, our big gamble, you could say it was, we ended up investing 80, 90% of our budget into content creation. We just said to Jared, and we want the absolute, highest quality possible consistent. I don't care about views. I'm here about likes. We just need consistent high quality content. And that's the investment we're going to make, because we think that's where the value is that we can show it's tangible. We can always point at it and say, here's a product. A sponsor comes, you know, we can show them. This is our asset. A lot of people don't understand when you're talking to sponsors, you need to have definable assets for them to understand for them to latch onto and create value. And that's where the party has been cycling and triathlon where the modern scope of what that is very different than it was five years ago, 10 years ago, simply going to a sponsor saying I raised 20 times a year and I post on Instagram every other week. Do you not really creating value? You're just there. You're just pack fire at that point. [00:30:21] Craig Dalton: Do you have a vision for the type of content that you're aspiring to produce? Is it giving people a closer look at what racing some of these big races is like? Or are you thinking otherwise. [00:30:34] Chris Schroeder: Well, our biggest asset is our series. It's called the equal rod. It's on my YouTube channel and the team's YouTube channel. And that's where we're diverting all of our budget and supporting to creating this series. And we just want it to be a YouTube series. And it's hard to say, like what it shows. We just say that it shows an honest look because you go to these races and everything will go different than you think it will. So we just tell Jared whatever happens, just film it. And it sucks when you're dying on the side of Unbound and you have to DNF and there's a camera in your face and you have to narrate your own misery. It's awful, but that's what we decided to go with it. And it just katelyn Andrew. And you know, there's the flip side of it. I don't know. I had a great race. I'm so happy to talk about it. So we never know what an episode's going to be. We just know it's going to be honest. It's going to be misery. It's going to be glory and everything in [00:31:30] Craig Dalton: gotcha. I'll point people to the YouTube link for that failure in 2021, because I do think it is interesting and it's so real it's truth, right? [00:31:39] Chris Schroeder: Yeah. And that's just the thing is that you have on one of these professionals that will have a bad race and they'll bury it, you know, they'll, they won't post anything about it. Then we'll talk about it. They'll post 10 other things about blah, blah, blah, motivation. And you're like, wait, I saw this build and all of a sudden there's just a gap. And now you're back on this train. Like what happened? Like I want to know, like, I'm following you for a reason. And that's the story. Like I'm not following you. Cause I think you're going to win. I felt like, cause I just want to see your story and your perspective. So we really want to be true to the audience and give them what really happened. [00:32:13] Craig Dalton: that makes sense. So the title sponsor, the team is a company called diamond by. And I wasn't familiar with them. And after doing a little research, I see that they were big in the triathlon world, but they do have a pretty impressive looking gravel bike. Do you want to talk a little bit about the company where it's based and the bike you'll be riding this year? [00:32:35] Chris Schroeder: It's quite the story of how diamond and I came together when I was back living in New York city as a kid at the time before I'd even done my first draft. Ironman hosted iron man, New York city, which was a gimmick. The entire triathlon took place in New Jersey. And then the finish line was in New York city and it was a joke, but I was a kid I volunteered the entire day. I was up at like 3:00 AM. I was just buzzing. I saw all this stuff. It was fantastic. I, you know, it was at the finish line start like, Hey, people that are swim bags and then everywhere I could go, I was, and then at the end of the day, I ended up at the finish line. And if anyone's ever done an Ironman or triathlon, you know that when you cross the finish line, give them more or less just collapse, emotionally, physically, however, they feel like it. So they have volunteers literally there to catch you and you stand in line and they're just young people come in and whoever's first in line catches them one. I was there and you know, this is just 15 year old kid. This pro called TJ Alex and came over in the line. I caught him. I think he finished fifth on the day. One of the coolest experiences of my life. You know, I'm a kid, I just touched a fro. And to me it was just the coolest thing in the world. You know, follow TJ, enjoyed that eventually, you know, a couple of years later I became a pro and then a couple years after that, I went and did a Ironman 70.3 in Argentina. It was in Berlo Chang. One of the prettiest towns I've ever been to. And these races, you know, what they do is they'll put you up and they'll just assign you a hotel room. And I happened to be assigned or hotel room with TJ. So we shared a room in Argentina and we just became friends through that story. And we ended up doing quite a few races together. We raced all over the country. I think TJ, we raised in Argentina, we raised in Peru, we first in the United States and then towards the end, he eventually retired from racing. I went on raised a couple more years, and then eventually I have stepped down from triathlon to gravel and we'd always come in contact. We've always been friends and it was a great relationship. And then he watched what we did in 2021. And then I went to see Otter and I went there pretty much from a business perspective of like, all my sponsors are here. I can sit down and crank out two months worth of emails in two days. Also just a great event, iconic. I highly recommended only considering going, doing that race says any race you want, they have it. And I went there and I saw DJ and it was great. You know, we bumped into there. He showed me the gravel by, we talked, you know, all was good. And we went our separate ways. And then a couple weeks later I kinda got a text from him saying, Hey, I got a idea for you. Let's chat. And six weeks of hardcore negotiating later, we ended with. A multi-year title, sponsorship deal with diamond, and it's become really the linchpin of this team now because of the ability where it guarantees our ability to grow, no matter what happens, we can grow going to 20, 23 now. And that's what this team needs. I need to always have a perspective of what's the next step. If I'm not looking to grow we're stagnating. So closing this deal and being able to have this. Guaranteed to athletes coming on, going to 23, 3, nothing else matters. Everything else can go with that. [00:36:02] Craig Dalton: Yeah, that's pretty unheard of level of security. I imagine for a lot of gravel rates. To put a little bit more color around the brand they're located in Iowa. Is that correct? [00:36:15] Chris Schroeder: Yeah. So this is an American brand, the factories in the morning. I, the bikes are made in Des Moines, Iowa. They're handmade. It's super bespoke, experiencing, if you go on their website, the first thing you're gonna to see is that just like actual diamonds, no, two diamond bikes look the same, every single diamond bike, you get a custom paint job. However you want it funky, traditional everything in between. You work directly with the owner, TJ when you're buying and ordering. And it's just a great experience. I think it's also just unique, you know? You're going to stand out with a diamond. Yeah. They've they launched their gravel and their road bike, their ground bike. The carbide is very new. They launched it mid 2020, and it was a it's interesting. I, when I first saw it, the diamond for the triathletes who are aware of the brand, they made make the fastest triathlon bike on the market. It's non-traditional, it's a beam bike. Pretty much the pioneer for that whole industry of the beam bikes. And when they came to gravel with anything that you said, all right, how can we be the forefront of this? And that's what went into the carbine and just the way that it's laid out the geometry, it's all race focused. Like this bike is a thoroughbred, it's there to win races. And I'm just the thing on top of it pedaling. So That's an interesting perspective. This is probably my first time where it's a lot to say this. I think that we're going to have the fastest bike in gravel. I think the way that our diamonds are built with visioning the mountains, it's weird to say, but I think we are going to have the fastest bike in the sport. [00:38:02] Craig Dalton: That's confidence inspiring. I'm sure. To look down and feel that way. Yeah. It's an interesting bike and I'll make sure to link to it in the notes as well, and fascinating to learn that there's another. Us carbon manufacturing brand out there. Cause there, you know, there's probably only a handful of them in existence in the United States. [00:38:22] Chris Schroeder: Yeah. it's a dynamic that you mainly hear about, like, you always hear like these legendary oh, Italian brands. Five bikes and they cost a million dollars. And I think that was the normal introduction than people think when they think small bear brands, but this one being American, it's just, it's very different. It's very American brand. TJ is American. He tries to be more flamboyant than he is, but he's just a hardcore American and he's a blue collar, hardworking dude. I it's weird. Like he's my boss now, but we've been, we were friends for so many years that it's hard to have. Transitional of like thinking of him as a boss. When I just think of him as like this guy I've traveled the world with, and then he's told me stories about everyone I can think of and you know, we'd sit down and he tells me about his kids and stuff like that. It's just, this guy, when I proposed my fiance and we had a business call and it was like right after I had. We talked, it was like an hour long heritage. We talked five minutes a visit and he, it was like 55 minutes of just mind shattering advice for marriage and life. Like it was these perspectives that just gave me this feeling of someone who really cares about me. He basically talked me into wanting to have a wedding when I really just didn't care. Like he just completely changed my perspective on it. And to have that relationship is really special. [00:39:44] Craig Dalton: Yeah, it sounds like it's going to be an amazing thing to have in your corner this year. And the fact that you guys are building something together confirmed over the next two years, they're just going to be great. It's going to be super interesting to see where it goes. Speaking of this year, what's your, what are your goals this year? Are there big events that you're really thinking about? [00:40:05] Chris Schroeder: It's a little bit up in the air. I just got confirmed for led boat. Like yesterday where I got my Leadville charge on the credit card. Cause that's how they tell you. So that's gonna be a major goal on down. We'll be a major goal in terms of like peak performances, fitness, every race I go to, I'm trying to, when I'm not going to races anymore, that I don't think we're gonna win. I'm gonna win some. Mid-South Unbound SBT, and then a fake sugar and Belgium welfare. I Kansas are all like my main events, but I'm also going to hit a lot of like local grassroots events. I'm starting off my season at gravel, Miami, which is a new event in Miami. And I'm really excited to do that one. It's a flat course, which I'm really excited about a hundred miles. I'm just excited for that race. They're putting us, it's sponsored by Miami brewing company and they rented like three rap video level mansions to house the pros in. [00:41:09] Craig Dalton: Only in [00:41:09] Chris Schroeder: And yeah, it was only in Miami. and it's, you know, it's the treatment that I always dreamed I would get it every race. So I'm going to be a little sad when I come back from it and I realized. Van life and all these events. And I'm really excited for that one. We do, we'll do a couple of other the robot do rendezvous is a hundred mile race in Scottsbluff, just some smaller ones. Like there's something in gravel that is special, that everyone jokes about dying. They call it the spirit of gravel. If you go to these small races, you'll experience that it's special. It's unique and it's weird, but it's still out there, but it's only in these small races. So for me, you know, if I go to Unbound, it feels the same as when I was a professional Ironman. Everyone is, you know, a little tense, a little uptight they're there, everyone's on their peak form. No one really wants to talk and hug and all that. But then you go to these smaller grass root events and it's the opposite of all that. It's, everyone's relaxed. Everyone's just there for the community and the experience and beer. It's great. So I really want to make sure I continue to have those in my schedule to keep me grounded into what I love about the sport. [00:42:23] Craig Dalton: Yeah. Yeah. I think those are there. It's a key thing that's going on in gravel that how races are changing and evolving and no one wants to lose that intimacy and camaraderie, but inevitably like as these races get bigger and more important to people's professional careers. It's undoubted bull that the tenor is going to change at the start line. So yeah, long live the community event. [00:42:48] Chris Schroeder: Yeah. exactly. That's just how it is. And we're actually trying one thing I do. From a business perspective as I try to pull from other sports and it's something, this is unique. And I think that's hopefully going to be a good success that we're going to be trying this year is that at certain races, we're actually going to have a diamond booth in the expo where we're going to have, you know, this year will be a little different cause there's just myself and Brittany and Jared we're in, you know, we're going to be there to try and interact as much as possible. We're going to have team bikes. We're even going to have some demo bikes come by. You can chat with us. And we want to grow that very similar to like motorcross or NASCAR, where people get the experience to come into the pits and they get to look at the garage and see the driver and the mechanics, all working. We wanted to bring that as a way for people to interact more of us on a personal level. And especially in a approachable way, you know, we've all been that fan boy at the expo that sees someone we want to talk to, but you know, they're walking around and they're doing their thing and we don't want to interrupt them. So we thought, how can we. Creative approachable environment that is friendly for the fans. And it's a great way for us to really talk to our fans of our sponsors and say, Hey, you know, this is our bike and you want to here's the demo one, go take it around the block, [00:44:05] Craig Dalton: Yeah. Yeah. [00:44:05] Chris Schroeder: Touch it. [00:44:06] Craig Dalton: I think that'll shine through if you set that intention, which is great. And I think based on this conversation, fans of the sport will have a great way to follow you and your team throughout the year on the video series, and hopefully be able to connect with you at some of these events. So I, Chris, I appreciate all the time today. That's a great conversation. I wish you best of luck and really do look forward to seeing your name up there at the front end of these events. [00:44:31] Chris Schroeder: Yeah, fingers crossed that it eventually gets to that. And for anyone watching, like you're going to see me at an event or two this year, come up, give me a hug. I want to interact with you guys as much as you perhaps wanna interact with me. So just don't be a stranger. [00:44:46] Craig Dalton: Right on. Thanks Chris. So that's going to do it for this week's podcast. I hope you enjoyed the conversation with Chris and I encourage you to follow the diamond factory racing team on social media. I know they've got big plans to show you behind the scenes about what it's like being a professional, gravel racer. In 2022. If you're interested in joining the conversation, I encourage you to visit the ridership. www.theridership.com. It's our free online community. Within the community, you'll find gravel, cyclists of all kinds, whether they be backpackers. Racers commuters, you name it. They're all in there. Everybody in the community shares a common goal and it's just to elevate one another. So, whether you're looking to answer some of those hard questions about what tire to buy or what equipment, what bike to buy, or just need some moral support, the community is there for you. I'm always impressed with the level of interaction and comradery that I see happening that I've got nothing to do with. It is also a great place to get in touch with me. So, if you have any feedback for the show, please just hit me up directly in the ridership. I found inspiration for many, a new episode from the questions that I've received. Through the ridership. So remember that's just www.theridership.com to get started. If you're interested in supporting the podcast. You can visit me at buy me a coffee. Dot com slash the gravel ride. I appreciate any and all support you can provide to my efforts. And hopefully the journey that I've been on as a gravel cyclist has been useful to all of you. Until next time. Here's to finding some dirt onto your wheels

Field Recordings
Mer du Nord, Sunset at Koksijde-Bad, Belgium on Thursday 13th January 2022 – by Sara Maino

Field Recordings

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 1:09


www.saramaino.it

The Equestrian Podcast
[EP 202] International Photography with Raphael Macek

The Equestrian Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 29:47


Raphael Macek is a renowned photographer who specializes in a wide range of equine photographs. In 2007 Raphael graduated with a Masters of Fine Art degree in New York City. In the years that followed, he published his work in countries such as Germany, Belgium, Spain, Brazil, the United Arab Emirates, and the United States of America. In 2009 he photographed on safaris in Africa, particularly in Tanzania and Kenya. Over the course of his career, Macek has become known for his unique ability to capture the beauty of his animal subjects along with their emotions and the essence of their nature. Horses of different breeds from around the world have served as Macek's top models. The artistic view expressed in his work has been recognized worldwide in important art exhibitions, private showings, and publications. When he's not busy running a photoshoot, Raphael is teaching photography workshops around the world sharing his skills and knowledge to those willing to learn. To learn more visit: raphaelmacekworkshops.com

¡Qué Golazo! A Daily CBS Soccer Podcast
Fabrizio Romano: Haaland is unhappy with Dortmund pressure | Transfer News & Notes (Soccer 1/17)

¡Qué Golazo! A Daily CBS Soccer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 22:44


Erling Haaland wants to focus on his game, while Dortmund want to plan for the future. Fabrizio Romano reports on the "strange" war of words between the Norwegian star and the Bundesliga club. Plus, Christian Eriksen has suitors, Everton set their sights on Belgium's manager, and Eden Hazard's time as a Galáctico could soon be over. Qué Golazo' is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Google Podcasts, Castbox and wherever else you listen to podcasts. Follow the Qué Golazo team on  Twitter: @quegolazopod, @lmechegaray, @JimmyConrad, @FabrizioRomano, @Jon_LeGossip, @jamesbenge, @heathpearce, @LRoman32, @PartidoPooper Watch Qué Golazo on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/QueGolazo For more soccer coverage from CBS Sports, visit https://www.cbssports.com/soccer/ To hear more from the CBS Sports Podcast Network, visit https://www.cbssports.com/podcasts/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Enchanting Book Readings
The Snow Queen

Enchanting Book Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 14:56


The Snow Queen by Hans Christian Andersen. PUBLIC DOMAIN Sir Herbert Sneakies interpretation. Your favorite kids podcast ranked top 1% globally! ;) Check out our cool merchandise :) https://enchantedbooks.godaddysites.com/ :) Thank you for listening & supporting the podcast. :) https://www.buymeacoffee.com/sneakies :) https://www.paypal.me/anonymouscontent :)  Please Subscribe to our YouTube:) Channel :) Storytime Fun! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCCNwYcOSlx3rMRBfSuNrzPg?sub_confirmation=1 https://www.youtube.com/user/Fellinijr/videoshttps://www.patreon.com/sneakies #1 Japan, Australia, #1 Canada, #1 UK, #1 Brazil, #1 Belgium, #1 India, #1 South Korea, #1 Bahamas, #3 Italy, #5 Mexico, #4 Germany, #1 Tawian, #4 Kenya, #4 New Zealand, #5 France, #7 Ireland, #10 Sweden, #16 Norway, #1-#26 USA! & #15 South Africa :) Paypal (friends & family) petcarebuddies@gmail.com $ Please support us & enjoy our books at Amazon :) Thank you! Skip Boots Big Safari Adventure by Sir Herbert Sneakies https://www.amazon.com/Skip-Boots-Big-Safari-Adventure/dp/1729091547 * Jack the Bear and Golden Hair by Sir Herbert Sneakies https://www.amazon.com/Jack-Bear-Golden-StorytellerUK2017-Adventures-ebook/dp/B010E479GE Adventures of Mooch the Pooch by Sir Herbert Sneakies https://www.amazon.com/Mooch-Pooch-Adventures-ebook/dp/B01LR86FK2 Blueber Goober the Monster In My Closet! by Sir Herbert Sneakies https://www.amazon.com/Blueber-Goober-Monster-My-Closet-ebook/dp/B01LW1VMPQ/ Margaret Merlin's Journal The Battle of The Black Witch Book 1 a cool wizard seiries. https://www.amazon.com/Margaret-Merlins-Journal-Battle-Black-ebook/dp/B01634G3CK Please Subscribe to our YouTube:) Channel :) Storytime Fun! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCCNwYcOSlx3rMRBfSuNrzPg?sub_confirmation=1 https://www.youtube.com/user/Fellinijr/videos Thank you!!! Public Commons music fair use.

Inventors Helping Inventors
#176 - Prolific IBM inventor - shares his expertise - Clement Decrop

Inventors Helping Inventors

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 39:12


Alan interviews Clement Decrop. Clement Decrop was born in Belgium, then moved to Spain and then the U.S. He graduated from Penn State as an engineer, then began his career with IBM - where he filed 50 patents in 1 year. Now, he shares what he learned in a new book: The Idea Space: Unlocking the Creative Power of Your Mind. Make sure to subscribe to the podcast at Apple Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts, so you won't miss a single episode. Website: www.TheIdeaSpace.io

Growth Mindset Podcast
199: Roeland Decorte, CEO - DFI: Driving the shift from reactive to preventative healthcare , Entrepreneurship Mistakes and Learning, Ancient Code-Breaking Explained,

Growth Mindset Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 57:12


Roeland Decorte Roeland Decorte is the CEO and Founder of Decorte Future Industries (DFI). His doctoral work on code-breaking is cited by world experts in his field. He started DFI inventing and personally engineering the exoskeleton tech. He has also experience in mechanical engineering, prototyping, fundraising, politics, political economics and academia. He was the youngest student from Belgium to have joined the University of Cambridge in its 800-year history. Takeaways * Do the things that really define your life and the problems you want to solve. * It is a mistake if you don't act and learn from it. * Longevity becomes relevant when we start with small baby steps. * You need to have a clear structure of hierarchy and responsibilities of your people to run the business well. * It is good to keep people know with what you are doing. CONNECT WITH ROELAND Decorte Future Industries (https://decorte.co.uk/) LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/in/dr-roeland-p-j-e-decorte-340066185) Twitter (https://twitter.com/decortedr) Connect with Sam: Twitter (https://twitter.com/samjamharris) ReasonFM (https://reason.fm/podcast/growth-mindset-podcast) Support the Show - Patreon (https://www.patreon.com/growthmindset) Subscribe! If you enjoyed the podcast please subscribe and rate it. And of course, share with your friends! Special Guest: Roeland Decorte.

Unorthodox
Family Ties: Ep. 301

Unorthodox

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 86:43


This week on Unorthodox, more Israel-related animal conspiracy theories.   Before she was Liz Lange, our Jewish guest was Liz Steinberg, niece of corporate raider Saul Steinberg. She tells the story of her family's spectacular rise and eventual fall in the new podcast, “The Just Enough Family.”  Our Gentile of the Week is Delvyn Case, a Christian composer who has written a cantata about the binding of Isaac, based on his reading of one rabbi's midrash that suggests that Abraham actually killed Isaac. Plus, more news from Belgium!  Subscribe to our weekly newsletter to get new episodes, photos, and more. Join our Facebook group, and follow Unorthodox on Twitter and Instagram. Get a behind-the-scenes look at our recording sessions on our YouTube channel! Get your Unorthodox T-shirts, mugs, and baby onesies at bit.ly/unorthoshirt. Want to book us for a live show? Email producer Josh Kross at jkross@tabletmag.com. Unorthodox is produced by Tablet Studios. Check out all of our podcasts at tabletmag.com/podcasts. Sponsors Zelikow School of Jewish Nonprofit Management Earn your master's degree in Organizational Leadership and Innovation while you work. Learn more about the Zelikow School of Jewish Nonprofit Management at zschool.huc.edu. Scholarships available. AJWS supports activism in 18 countries around the world, and when you donate to AJWS this holiday season, your gift will be matched to make double the impact. Give today at AJWS.org/unorthodox.  Thirty Six is a new podcast from SoulShop and Bnai Zion hosted by Justin Hayet, who scours Israel to find the 36 most fascinating souls who bring an ancient Jewish tradition to life. Listen here or wherever you get your podcasts.  The Power Of is a new podcast featuring host Noam Weissman and a diverse range of guests discussing how Jewish wisdom can help us find real, practical meaning within our own lives. Listen here or wherever you get your podcasts.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Newshour
Russia talks to Nato

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 49:17


As Russia talks to Nato in Brussels, we hear from Ukraine's ambassador to the UK, from our correspondent in Ukraine's capital Kyiv, and from a Russian perspective. Also in the programme: Britain's Prime Minister apologises for attending a party in Downing Street during Covid lockdown, but is it enough? And how much of the Djokovic controversy is about Serbian nationalism? (Photo: Russian Deputy Defence Minister Colonel General Alexander Fomin, Russian Deputy Foreign Minister Alexander Grushko and Nato Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg are seen during Nato-Russia Council at the Alliance's headquarters in Brussels, Belgium. Credit: Olivier Hoslet/Reuters)

Drink Beer, Think Beer With John Holl
Ep. 119 - Kevin Abbott of Barrel of Monks

Drink Beer, Think Beer With John Holl

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 53:56


Before he started in the brewing industry Kevin Abbott was a wine steward. His time in restaurants helped form his idea behind food and beverage – something that exists to this day. He started as a homebrewer and then jumped into the deep end of the pool, starting as the head brewer for Funky Buddha in Florida back when they were launching into brewpub operations.  He stayed there for nearly four years and then moved to Due South Brewing before becoming a Partner and Head Brewer at Barrel of Monks in 2015. Since then he's become the director of operations.  Abbott oversees most aspects of the brewery including production, distribution and the tap room and this episode covers it all.  This Episode is sponsored by:NZ HopsNZ Hops, the co-operative of Master Hop Growers are a passionate collective of farms dedicated to innovation and sustainability. Leading the charge in sustainable farm practices, some NZ Hops farms have over five generations of knowledge that inform their composting program, used by growers to promote healthy regenerative growth of hops year upon year. This creates high quality soil, a critical component of healthy growing conditions. At NZ Hops, they feel that sustainability is not only being a steward for the land, but for our future.Athletic Brewing Co.Athletic Brewing Company's innovative process allows them to brew great-tastingcraft beer without the alcohol. From IPAs to stouts to golden ales and more, they offer a full selection of beers starting at only 50 calories. Now you can keep your head clear and enjoy the refreshing taste of beer anytime, anywhere. Place an order today atathleticbrewing.com and get free shipping on two six packs or more. New customerscan also get 10% off their entire order with code BeerEdge10. Limit one per customer.For more Drink Beer, Think Beer or to check out Beer Edge: The Newsletter for Beer Professionals, follow us on Twitter @thebeeredge and subscribe to our beer industry focused newsletter. There is more information, articles, and engaging content at Beer Edge. Host: John Holl Guest: Kevin Abbott of Barrel of Monks Sponsors:   NZ Hops, Athletic Brewing, and The Beer Edge Tags: Beer, Bars, COVID-19, Florida, Belgium, Food, Culinary Beers, Special Ingredients 

The Cycling Podcast
S10 Ep1: Meet the World Tour's youngest rider

The Cycling Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 52:28


In our first episode of 2022 we meet the World Tour's youngest rider, Cian Uijtdebroeks. The 18-year-old Belgian has signed for Bora-Hansgrohe and will make his professional debut in Mallorca at the end of the month.  Already dubbed “the next Remco,” Uijtdebroeks came to wide attention when he won the junior edition of Kuurne-Brussels-Kuurne in 2020 with a 50km solo breakaway.  But who is he, and how does an 18-year-old deal with the expectation and hype that comes with being a talented young rider in Belgium? Before Christmas, Richard went to meet him at the Uijtdebroeks family home close to the border between Flanders and Wallonia. The Cycling Podcast is supported by Supersapiens and Science in Sport. Supersapiens is a continuous glucose monitoring system that helps you make the right fuelling choices. See supersapiens.com For 25% off all your SiS products, go to scienceinsport.com and enter the code SISCP25 at the checkout. The Cycling Podcast is on Strava Friends of the Podcast Sign up as a Friend of the Podcast at thecyclingpodcast.com to listen to more than 60 exclusive episodes including the Christmas Selection Box collection.

The Recipe: Celebrity Secrets
Episode 248 - Robbie Felice

The Recipe: Celebrity Secrets

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 41:24


Robbie worked in several other restaurants across the country. Hungry for more, he put in numerous stages at Michelin-Starred restaurants across the globe; including Sergio Herman's 2-Michelin-Star Pure-C in The Netherlands and 2-Michelin-Star the Jane in Belgium. Tune in to see where Robbie's journey took him!

Mark Groves Podcast
Understanding Mass Formation with Mattias Desmet

Mark Groves Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 65:22


Themes: Psychology, Mass Formation, Groupthink, Belonging   Summary:  Mattias Desmet is a Professor of Clinical Psychology at Ghent University in Belgium with a masters degree in statistics. As an academic researcher, Mattias started to study the statistics presented in the mainstream media around COVID-19 in early 2020 and it became clear to him that the dangers of the virus had and continue to be dramatically overestimated. Concerned with the consensus narrative and by the irregularities in the statistical analyses conducted throughout the pandemic, Mattias joined me to share his expertise in a phenomenon known as "mass formation," a kind of collective hypnosis that is necessary in the rise of totalitarian regimes. I hope this episode gives you context for our current situation and makes you a feel less alone as you navigate today's climate.   Discover: The psychological process of "mass formation" and how it relates to current events The four specific conditions in society that when fulfilled simultaneously, lead to groupthink The surprising reason people continue to buy into a consensus narrative The most efficient strategy you can adopt to help shift the narrative   Links: Mattias Desmet's Research Sponsors: Organifi | Use code CREATETHELOVE for 20% off all products at organifi.com/createthelove Faherty Brand | Use code CREATE20 for 20% off your first order at fahertybrand.com/createthelove House of WiseCo. | Use code CREATETHELOVE for 20% off your order at houseofwise.co See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Squawk Ident - An Aviation Podcast
Flight 99 - Buckle-Up, Buttercup

Squawk Ident - An Aviation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2022 83:01


Recorded on 07JAN2022 Welcome aboard Flight 99 of the Squawk Ident Podcast - Buckle-Up, Buttercup. On today's flight Captain Roger, Rob D. and I discuss flying during this season's holidays. We discuss the dangers of riding in hotel vans, a we uncover a real life “Catch Me If You Can” incident. We also explore United's Pilot Developement program at Pheonix's Goodyear Airport. We explain de-icing, the HOT App., what the triangle logo indicates in the cabin, and taking off from a closed airport (with ATC clearance of-course). We also have an update on the progress of 19 year old Belgium pilot Zara Rutherford and her attempt to be the youngest woman to fly solo around the world. So stay with us as the Flight 99 of the Squawk Ident podcast is underway. references: United Airlines Real Life “Catch Me If You Can” Caught After 23 Years United Takes Pilot Development to Greater Heights FlyZolo.com chapters: [7:50] Season 4 of Squawk Ident [12:30] Fatiguing Winter Operations [23:20] Reaching Out to Old Friends [30:08] Buckle Up! [36:34] Catch Me If you Can, in Real Life! [44:56] intermission [45:20] United's Aviate Academy [56:30] HOT App. [1:00:05] @Fly.Zolo Thank You for Listening! Don't forget to Follow, Like, Subscribe, and Share Please visit Av8rtony.com for more show content, audio archives, cover art, Squawk Ident gear, audio feedback, and more. Original music & cover art by Av8rTony and produced at Av8r Sound Studios of Southern California. Facebook, Instagram, Twitter & YouTube user just search Squawk Ident Podcast Copyright © Squawk Ident 2021, All Rights Reserved Copyright © Av8r Sound Studios 2021, All Rights Reserved Squawk Ident by Av8rTony is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - 4.0 International License --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/squawkident/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/squawkident/support

Reveal
Take No Prisoners

Reveal

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022 51:01


In December 1944, Frank Hartzell was a young soldier pressed into fierce fighting during the Battle of the Bulge. He was there battling Nazi soldiers for control of the Belgian town of Chenogne, and he was there afterward when dozens of unarmed German prisoners of war were gunned down in a field.  Reporter Chris Harland-Dunaway travels to Belgium to tour Chenogne with Belgian historian Roger Marquet. Then he sits down with Bill Johnsen, a military historian and former dean of the Army War College in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, to ask why the Patton Papers don't accurately reflect Gen. George S. Patton's diary entries about Chenogne.  The massacre at Chenogne happened soon after the Malmedy massacre, during which Nazi troops killed unarmed American POWs. The German soldiers responsible were tried at Dachau, but the American soldiers who committed the massacre at Chenogne were never held accountable. Harland-Dunaway interviews Ben Ferencz, the last surviving lawyer from the Nuremberg Trials, about why the Americans escaped justice. And finally, Harland-Dunaway returns to Hartzell to explain what he's learned and to press Hartzell for a full accounting of his role that day in Chenogne.  This episode was originally broadcast July 28, 2018.  Don't miss out on the next big story. Get the Weekly Reveal newsletter today.

Low Tide Boyz
Marika Wagner

Low Tide Boyz

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 55:59


Welcome to episode 105 of the Löw Tide Böyz - A Swimrun Podcast!We're kicking off 2022 with an amazing guest. On the show this week we have the uber talented endurance athlete Marika Wagner. We're huge fans of her feats of endurance and we're super stoked to start off the third year of the podcast with her on the show.  But first... Training UpdateIt's back to training this week and somehow we're already only 11 weeks out from ÖTILLÖ Catalina! While it definitely helps to have raced that course before, we also know what's waiting for us so it's game on as we start ramping up the training volume.ShoutoutsThis week we're shouting out the country of Belgium. They recently cracked the top ten in terms of downloads by county and we're stoked on that. Thanks for checking out the show or Hartelijk bedankt!!Feats of EnduranceThis week we have two winners of the Feats of Endurance “award.” First up is Victor Rosario for posting a workout from Puerto Rico. As mentioned before, any workout posted from Puerto Rico is an automatic selection. The other award goes to Bay area local Brian Ramirez for his Headlands run on New Years Day…where he ran by Chris on his Ninja Loop run. Check out and join our Strava Club and join Swimrunners from around the world as they train for Swimruns and life.This Week in SwimrunThis segment is on hiatus for the next few weeks while we give our news department some PTO. If you're missing the segment music, you can check it out here.UpdatesOur first LTBz Patreon meetup is scheduled for Saturday, January 22nd at 4PM Pacific. Got gear questions? Got race questions? Got life questions? Your Swimrun community is here for it. Not in our Patreon Community yet? Head over to patreon.com/lowtideboyz to learn more.Marika WagnerIt was so great to chat with Marika. We've been following her on IG pretty much since we launched the meme account and to call her endurance exploits impressive really doesn't do justice to how versatile of an athlete she is. She calls herself an “Adventure Racer” and honestly, that's probably the best way to describe her athletic exploits. In this interview we chatted with Marika about her endurance background, how she found Swimrun, what keeps her motivated to try new feats of endurance, and the adventures are in her future. We loved her candor and confirmed our long-standing opinion that Swimrunners are some of the best humans. We loved this conversation and know that you will too.You can follow Marika's endurance exploits on Instagram.That's it for this week's show. If you are enjoying the Löw Tide Böyz, be sure to subscribe to the show on your favorite podcast player and leave us a five-star review. You can find us on Apple Podcast, Spotify, Google Podcast, and on YouTube. You can also follow our meme page on Instagram. Email us at lowtideboyz@gmail.com with any feedback and/or suggestions. Finally, you can support our efforts on Patreon…if you feel so inclined.Thanks for listening and see you out there!-  Chip and Chris

Channel History Hit
Democratic Decline

Channel History Hit

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 36:32


The 6th of January marks one year since the United States Capitol attack of 2021, whereby a mob of supporters of Republican President Donald J. Trump stormed the Capitol Building. On today's anniversary, what can we learn from prehistory to the present, about democratic decay, corruption and cronyism?Dr. Brian Klaas, UCL Associate Professor in Global Politics, Washington Post Columnist, and author of ‘Corruptible: Who Gets Power and How it Changes Us' is today's guest on the podcast. So, are tyrants made or born? If you were thrust into a position of power, would new temptations to line your pockets gnaw away at you until you gave in? As one of the world's leading and most effective commentators of democratic decline, Brian joins Dan to answer these questions.They discuss the rise of hierarchy in prehistoric times, how cognitive biases from our Stone Age minds continue to cause us to select the wrong leaders and what we can learn about King Leopold II of Belgium about whether power or systems, corrupt.If you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download the History Hit app please go to the Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dan Snow's History Hit
Democratic Decline

Dan Snow's History Hit

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 36:32


The 6th of January marks one year since the United States Capitol attack of 2021, whereby a mob of supporters of Republican President Donald J. Trump stormed the Capitol Building. On today's anniversary, what can we learn from prehistory to the present, about democratic decay, corruption and cronyism?Dr. Brian Klaas, UCL Associate Professor in Global Politics, Washington Post Columnist, and author of ‘Corruptible: Who Gets Power and How it Changes Us' is today's guest on the podcast. So, are tyrants made or born? If you were thrust into a position of power, would new temptations to line your pockets gnaw away at you until you gave in? As one of the world's leading and most effective commentators of democratic decline, Brian joins Dan to answer these questions.They discuss the rise of hierarchy in prehistoric times, how cognitive biases from our Stone Age minds continue to cause us to select the wrong leaders and what we can learn about King Leopold II of Belgium about whether power or systems, corrupt.If you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download the History Hit app please go to the Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 01.05.22

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 59:04


Most Comprehensive Study To Date: Omega-3 Reduces Heart Risks The most in-depth analysis to date confirms the importance of omega-3 fats for heart health. If fatty fish is not a regular part of your diet, you may need to consider supplementing omega-3 fatty acids to keep your heart happy and healthy. University of Idaho and University of Queensland, December 30. 2021 The most in-depth analysis to date confirms the importance of consuming sufficient quantities of omega-3 fats for preventing cardiovascular disease. The meta-analysis, published in the peer-reviewed journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings, reviewed 40 clinical trials, and the multi-disciplinary team of researchers delivered an authoritative rallying cry for including more EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) omega-3 fats in your diet, citing their significant cardioprotective effects. (NEXT) Honey and Nigella sativa against COVID-19: A multi-center placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial Riphah University (Pakistan), Harvard University, University of Louisville, December 30, 2021 BACKGROUND No definitive treatment exists for Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). Honey and Nigella sativa (HNS) have established antiviral, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties. Hence, we investigated efficacy of HNS against COVID-19. wide Three hundred and thirteen patients - 210 moderate and 103 severe - underwent randomization from April 30 to July 29, 2020. Among these, 107 were assigned to HNS whereas 103 to placebo for moderate cases. For severe cases, 50 were given HNS and 53 were given placebos. HNS resulted in ∼50% reduction in time taken to alleviate symptoms as compared to placebo. HNS also cleared the virus 4 days earlier than placebo group in moderate (6 versus 10 days. HNS further led to hospital discharge in 50% versus 2.8% in severe cases In severe cases, mortality rate was four-fold lower in HNS group than placebo CONCLUSION HNS significantly improved symptoms, viral clearance and mortality in COVID-19 patients. Thus, HNS represents an affordable over the counter therapy and can either be used alone or in combination with other treatments to achieve potentiating effects against COVID-19. (NEXT) Promoting exercise rehabilitation as new and powerful tool for managing symptoms of multiple sclerosis   University of Worcester (UK) and University of Illinois,  December 29, 2021. Citing recent evidence, experts in rehabilitation research advocate for integrating exercise into the care plans of persons with multiple sclerosis. The central role of the neurologist in clinical care offers an opportunity for this provider to promote exercise as fundamental for managing the physical and cognitive symptoms of MS. Mounting evidence supports exercise as an important tool for managing the manifestations of MS, including fatigue, depression, and declines in physical mobility, balance, and cognition. While disease-modifying therapies can slow the progression of disease and disability, they do not alleviate symptoms or functional decline that adversely affect quality of life. Despite the advantages of exercise, physical inactivity is reported by 80 percent of people with MS. (NEXT) Sustainable diet leads to fewer blood clots in the brain Aarhus University (Denmark), January 4, 2022 The risk of bleeding or blood clots in the brain is lower if your diet is sustainable. This is shown by a new research result from Aarhus University. The results have just been published in the scientific journal Stroke. There should be more vegetables and less meat on the plate in front of us. A study from the Department of Public Health shows that a sustainable diet not only benefits the climate, but also benefits your health. "If adult men or women follow a sustainable diet for dietary fibre intake, then we see a lower risk of bleeding or blood clots in the brain," says Christina Dahm, who is behind the study. The seven official Danish climate-friendly dietary guidelines Eat plant-rich, varied and not too much. Eat more vegetables and fruit. Eat less meat – choose legumes and fish. Eat whole grains. Choose vegetable oils and low-fat dairy products. Eat less of the sweet, salty and fatty. Quench your thirst in water. (NEXT) Eating when we are not hungry is bad for our health University of Illinois, December 30, 2021 With the wide availability of convenient foods engineered for maximum tastiness— such as potato chips, chocolates, and bacon double cheeseburgers— in the modern food environment and with widespread advertising, the contemporary consumer is incessantly being bombarded with the temptation to eat. This means that, in contrast to people in traditional societies, people in contemporary societies often eat not on account of hunger but because tasty food is available and beckoning at all hours of the day. New research published in the Journal of the Association for Consumer Research, found that the tendency of today's consumers to eat when they are not hungry might be less advantageous for health than eating when they are hungry. (NEXT) Black raspberries a contender for best antioxidant fruit, says study University of Agriculture (Poland), January 4, 2022 Black raspberries show greater health benefits than its closely related cousins the red raspberry and blackberry, research suggests. The research looked at the content of phenolics and anthocyanins in black raspberries, red raspberries and blackberries, assessing their antioxidant potential and health promoting properties. The study, which took place at the University of Agriculture in Krakow, discovered the amount of antioxidants in black raspberries was three times higher than the other fruits investigated. One discovery of note was the black raspberries' anthocyanines content, which was found to be approximately 1000% more than the raspberry and blackberry. Interestingly, black raspberries also contained a higher content of secondary metabolites, which have been proved equally beneficial for human health. (NEXT) Only 9% of teens meet physical activity guidelines during the pandemic, down from 16% pre-pandemic by  University of Toronto A new national study finds that only 9% of teens met the recommended 60 minutes of physical activity per day during the pandemic—a decline from 16% pre-pandemic. "The pandemic led to the cancelation of in-person physical education classes and organized sports, gym and recreational facility closures, and rises in screen use, which all contributed to lower physical activity for teens," said lead author Jason Nagata, MD, assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of California, San Francisco. The study found that lower physical activity was linked to poorer mental health, greater stress, and more worry about the pandemic. On average, teens reported two hours of physical activity per week during the pandemic. These estimates were lower for teens of color—Black, Latino, and Native American teens reported an average of 90 minutes of physical activity per week. (NEXT) RESPONSE TO COLUMBIA DOCTOR - Cases among fully vaccinated Back in late November in an interview with NBC News reported Fauci had stated that there was a significant increase in ER visits and hospitalizations among fully vaccinated people As usual, Fauci stated that most hospitalizations were among the unvaccinated according to studies – a trope he often repeats without ever mentioning what studies prove that. But for greater transparency we need to look at report overseas by health officials Dr Kristiaan Deckers from the GZA Hospital network in Belgium reported that 100% of ICU admissions were among the vaccinated. In the UK- the government's Public Health Data division reported that during the months of August to early December that persons who were double or triple vaccinated accounted for 6 in every 10 Covid cases, 7 in every 10 hospitalizations and 9 in every 10 Covid-19 deaths In the month of November alone, the fully vaccinated accounted for 62% of cases, 71% o hospitalizations and 85% of deaths And just before Xmas, the UK Office of National Statistics reported that triple vaccinated persons are 4.5 times more likely to test positive for the omicron variant compared to the unvaccinated and partially vaccinated Again last month ,South Korea reported record covid cases. The adult Korean population is almost completely fully vaccinated at 92% In France, the nations top virologist Prof Christian Perrone, and a long time health policy advisor to the French government has called for the lockdown of vaccinated people as being the super spreaders The very recent Danish study showed that the vaccines plus boosters showed a strong NEGATIVE efficacy against omicron – 78% of omicron cases are among the fully vaccinated which represents 77.5% of the Danish population – in other words, the vaccines have zero efficacy against omicron A German study based on the government's data by Prof emeritus Rolf Steyer at Fredrick Schiller University medical school also last month found that the higher the vaccination rate, the higher the excess mortality Recently was the Columbia University study – vaccine induced fatality rates are underreported by a factor of 20. Consequently thee actual number of deaths due to the Covid vaccines is between 146,000 and 187,000 Finally there are increasing reports by doctors and nurses in the field, in hospitals, clinics and emergency rooms who are reported that the large majority of covid cases are among the vaccinated.  In a large Rochester NY hospital – one ER professional reported that 90% of individuals admitted into the hospital are vaccinated (NEXT) VIDEOS Video - POLICE STATE: Australians Mass Protest After Churches Raided, Moms Arrested, Citizen Snitches - 7.5 minutes

Daily Emunah Podcast - Daily Emunah By Rabbi David Ashear

We are pleased to announce that Living Emunah 6 has been released. To order directly from Artscroll and get free shipping, click the link below and add promo code EMUNAHFREE https://www.artscroll.com/Books/9781422630235.html “The Best Book in the Series Yet! Order the NEW Living Emunah Vol. 6 at 10% off + FREE SHIPPING at ArtScroll.com Use code: EMUNAHFREE” There are times when people need immediate salvation. They know already that they need to pray hard but they also want to know if there is something else they could do that could possibly speed up the process. They want to know if there is a segula that could help them with their particular need. In general, prayer and good deeds are always our greatest tools to overturn decrees, and usually the way it works is the more difficult it is to perform the deed, the greater value it has. We need to keep our eyes open for the opportunities that Hashem is presenting us with. He knows which mitzvot could help us the most and sometimes He sets up the circumstance where the answer to our problem is the very deed He puts before us to perform. Most likely, it will not be easy to do and it will appear to have come about through happenstance, but it is up to us to understand that it came from Hashem and He is giving us the exact opportunity we need. Rabbi Elimelech Biderman told a story which recently took place in Israel. There is a hall there which has two places to have a party. One is much bigger and nicer than the other. In early December, two families had booked the nicer hall to make a sheva berachot . The manager accidentally booked both for the same exact night. The caterer set up “Family B” in the smaller, not so nice hall, and he set up “Family A” in the larger, nicer hall. When both families showed up that evening, a dispute erupted. The owner of the hall had to be called down to somehow figure out what to do. When he got there, he heard Family B saying if this wasn't resolved they were going to take their whole party to a restaurant and then sue the hall for the pain and suffering they caused. The owner went over to Family B requesting them to be mevater. He told them their party would be much nicer spiritually if they would be mevater because they would be performing a great mitzvah and it would be something they would never forget. He also offered them a large discount on the regular price of the smaller hall, as well as free hotel rooms in a hotel in Tiberias. But they wouldn't hear of it, they had a large amount of people coming, and they were set on having a beautiful party in beautiful surroundings. When the owner saw he wasn't getting anywhere with Family B, he went to go try to talk to Family A. They said, “We're already set up here, our musicians have set up already, and we don't want to switch.” The owner pleaded with them and said he would give them a major discount. The man of the family said he didn't need a discount and, in fact, if it was up to him, he'd be willing to switch halls. But he told the owner he would first have to convince his wife of it. The owner went over to the wife and said, “You have an opportunity to do a great chesed and acquire an enormous mitzvah which will bring about peace to everyone. Giving in is a great zechut . Don't you want a great zechut for your family?” Those words struck a chord in this woman's heart. Just a week earlier, her father was diagnosed with the machala and he was going to have to travel to Brussels, Belgium for a difficult surgery to remove it. She said, “Okay, I need the zechut for my father. We'll give in in the zechut that it should help him have a refuah shelemah .” The caterer switched everything around and both parties were held that night. That Thursday, four days later, her father went for his first chemotherapy treatment. A CT Scan was done and the doctor was in shock. He told them it looks like he made a mistake, there was only something small there which didn't need chemo or a surgery. A certain medication in the form of a pill would be sufficient to cure it. The family celebrated and thanked Hashem for giving them the opportunity to do a heroic act and thereby bring about the refuah shelemah they were hoping for. Good deeds are wondrous, especially when they are very difficult to perform.

The Radio Vagabond
218 EL SALVADOR: Danger, Intrigue, City Life, Warmth and War

The Radio Vagabond

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 30:55


BIENVENIDO A SAN SALVADOR The first leg of my trip in El Salvador is the capital San Salvador. I take a walking tour and connect with warm Salvadorans, indulging in coffee and pupusa. El Salvador's airport is around 40 minutes from the capital, the biggest city in this incredibly interesting country. I arrive in the country in the afternoon and spend the first night in the airport hotel because I don't want to arrive in the city after dark. This was a mistake. There isn't much to see, and I could have gone directly to the city. I get up bright and early and climb into a “chicken bus”. This is a convenient and cheap way to travel in some countries. Travelling from the airport to San Salvador is only 61 cents.  #DontSkipElSalvador El Salvador is great, and you shouldn't skip it. With fewer tourists than in other Central American countries, you have more space to explore. I considered skipping my visit to San Salvador because this is a country with beautiful nature, which was what I was here to see. I discover there is a lot to see in the capital and decide to go and I am happy I made that decision. Though the adventure and beauty of El Salvador remain in the countryside, you get to explore both the city life El Salvador has to offer as well as the picturesque beaches and villages in more remote areas. When I get to the city, I hail a taxi – and have yet another conversation in broken Spanish. He takes me to the hotel I booked through Hotels25.com. I chose a small, wonderful little place called Hotel Santa Elena. EL SALVADOR SAFETY CONCERNS Many people say El Salvador is a dangerous place, another reason I nearly steered clear of San Salvador. Marked as red on Travel Risk Map.com, El Salvador is the fifty-first most dangerous country in the world. It's all about using common sense, a local, Edwin, tells me. Pickpockets aren't a risk, but dark alleys and isolated areas should be avoided. FREE WALKING TOUR IN SAN SALVADOR As you know, I love embarking on free walking tours when I get to a new city. A walking tour is a great way to get a two- or three-hour overview of a city and bookmark some places you want to go back to and see more of it. Edwin E. Carrillo is the owner and operations manager of EC Tours El Salvador, a company he started six years ago that offers walking tours of San Salvador, volcano tours, hikes, and more. They were the first company to offer free walking tours in Central America. Post-tour, I speak to Edwin and Estefany Hernandez from EC Tours on the third floor of a parking garage. The garage overlooks Plaza Morazan and the big, beautiful building holding the national theatre. What started as an Airbnb for Edwin quickly became a booming business. He noticed that tourists would stay one night and leave the next day. Deciding that the visitors needed to see more of this fascinating part of the world, he started the walking tours to add value to his Airbnb guest's experience. He noticed that they would stay longer. EL SALVADOR IS THE LAND OF VOLCANOES El Salvador lies in the pacific ring of fire, an area with the most seismic and volcanic activity on the planet. There are around 170 volcanoes in this small country alone, 6 of which are still active, the most active being the Chaparrastique stratovolcano. There have been 26 eruptions in the last 500 years. With an eruption that happened in 1976, lava gushed from the volcano. The structure of the city was influenced by volcanic activity. San Salvador itself was built on at least 20 meters of volcanic ash. Due to the unstable foundation skyscrapers cannot be built and wiring can be seen everywhere. No underground building activity can take place. If you find the ground shaking beneath you, Estefany tells us not to be scared. Tremors are registered every day, and earthquakes around once or twice a month. Just another day in El Salvador. The fit and brave can even hike up one of the oldest and highest volcanoes in the country, the Santa Anna volcano which last erupted in 2005. On top of the crater, you overlook a greenish sulphur lagoon. This is something I do later, so stay tuned as I hike up there in a future episode. 6 INTERESTING FACTS ABOUT EL SALVADOR: El Salvador is the smallest country in Central America. It has an area of just over 21,000 sq km which is about the same as Wales and slightly smaller than the state of Massachusetts. Most densely populated With a population of almost 7 million people, El Salvador is the most densely populated country not only in Central America but in all of the Americas. No Caribbean coastline It's the only country in Central America without a Caribbean coastline. The El Salvador weather is tropical. The rainy season is from May to October and the dry season is from November to April. The national dish is the famous pupusa. A pupusa is a thick corn tortilla stuffed with a savory filling, like cheese, refried beans, different meats like pressed pork or chicken... Or a combination of them all. Dollars and Bitcoins The currency used in El Salvador is the United States dollar. But when I was there in June and Juli 2021 the progressive young Salvadoran President Nayib Bukele's experimented in making Bitcoin an official national currency alongside the U.S. dollar. But just about a month ago in December 2021 it was clear that the experiment failed when more than 90% of Salvadorans said that they want dollars, not bitcoins. Bukele who looks more like a rapper than a president with a cap on backwards said in a speech at the Latin America Bitcoin and Blockchain Conference in November, that the answer is more bitcoins. So, we probably haven't heard the end of that.   THE HISTORY OF THE SALVADORAN CIVIL WAR From the late nineteenth to the mid-twentieth century, El Salvador endured chronic political and economic instability characterized by coups, revolts, and a succession of authoritarian rulers. Socioeconomic inequality and civil unrest culminated in the Salvadoran Civil War from 1979 to 1992, fought between the military-led government backed by the United States, and a coalition of left-wing guerrilla groups. There is a lot of history behind this war with many people losing their lives. During the war, it was dangerous to live in El Salvador, particularly on the north side of the country. After many years of unrest, peace prevailed, and El Salvador became a democratic country. THE UNIQUE WARMTH OF SALVADORANS I quickly discovered Salvadorans are extremely friendly and welcoming. Asking Estefany what makes El Salvador unique, she agreed and believes that the people are what makes El Salvador unique. Salvadorans will always try to help you, even if they must try to speak in broken English. A HOSPITAL SENT TO THE WRONG COUNTRY & THE HEART OF JESUS We pass the Rosales Hospital, a big building built more than 100 years ago in Belgium. The metal parts of the building was then sent to be rebuilt in San Salvador. But someone at the office in Belgium made a mistake that probably got them fired. Someone had the building sent to Salvador de Bahia in Brazil. And remember that this was way back in the 1890's – before the Panamá Canal.   Estefany tells us that El Salvador had so much money that they were bringing materials and buildings from other countries. We visit the church, Basílica Sagrado Corazón de Jesús (Sacred Heart of Jesus). This was built in 1913, and again, this basilica was not built in El Salvador but also brought from Belgium. COFFEE IN EL SALVADOR  El Salvador is world-famous for its coffee. Cultivated in the western part of the country, it is made from mixing two different arabica beans. Despite its small size, El Salvador was once the fourth largest coffee producer in the world. Estefany, like many others, claims that El Salvador has the best coffee in the world. The hybrid coffee is made from two different beans, Pacas and Maragogipe. Using the two different beans, they create the Pacamara coffee they're famous for today. What sets this coffee apart? While Estefany highlights the essence of chocolate in its flavour, Edwin explains that coffee grows in altitude. The coffee is grown in mineral-rich volcanoes. Good weather, good soil, and good fruit make for the perfect coffee. I'm not going to decide who makes the best coffee, as I need to keep favour with other famous coffee countries. But I can say, it is amazing. CORA-CORA-CORA The official currency of El Salvador is the US Dollar. Walking through the market we could hear venders shouting “cora-cora-cora”. Estefany explains that this is their way of saying “quarter” (25 cents).   BITE INTO A PUPUSA AND GO TO HEAVEN This is not an exaggeration. People say the food is so good because it comes from techniques and recipes that date back hundreds of years. As I've said, Pupusas are El Salvadore's national dish. Estefany pointed me to a restaurant on the square, and I went and got a few pupusas. As I took the first bite, it was almost like my brain exploded. It was just so good. And then they only costs a few cora-cora-cora. THE BAD SIDE OF EL SALVADOR When I asked Edwin what makes El Salvador bad, he jokes that the pupusas make you fat – and points at his belly. On a serious note, Edwin tells me that there are gangs in El Salvador. But like many other countries, you need to avoid certain areas. You don't hear about anything happening to tourists because Salvadorans protect the tourists. That's all Edwin can say. Estefany's response? It can get very hot during summertime. That's about it. This country is great, so #DontSkipElSalavador My name is Palle Bo, and I gotta keep moving. See you.

Drink Beer, Think Beer With John Holl
Ep. 118 - The World Atlas of Beer

Drink Beer, Think Beer With John Holl

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 61:12


A lot of experiences are lost in the digital age. We get so accustomed to seeing places virtually on a screen, or reading pieces built for short bursts that when a book like the World Atlas of Beer comes along we all should take notice.  This 3rd edition is completely revised and authors Tim Webb and Stephen Beaumont take us on a tour of the world through its beer culture. This isn't a travel book per se, but an examination of what each country has created in the brewing space, what it aspires to be, and what we can expect or look to appreciate when we visit for ourselves.  The authors are proper writers and travelers and their collective knowledge, inquisitive nature, and discerning palates are evident in each page.  Now, about the authors: Tim Webb spent six years on the board of the Campaign for Real Ale (CAMRA) where he ran Britain's national beer festival and co-founded CAMRA's publishing company. He has written Good Beer Guide Belgium continuously since 1992 and has won awards for beer writing in four countries.   Stephen Beaumont is the author or co-author of ten additional books about beer, including The Beer & Food Companion, and two editions of The Pocket Beer Book, and a contributor to many others. He's hosted tastings, dinners, and educational events around the globe.   Get a copy of this book. The World Atlas of Beer should be in your collection and well thumbed through before you put it up on a shelf for later reference. What makes this book special is not just the country entries, but the included maps, the sidebars, photos and graphics. Digital can't compete with that on this scope, and getting lost in the pages for a while is a great vacation for the brain as you plot out your next real trip for beer. This Episode is sponsored by:NZ HopsNZ Hops, the co-operative of Master Hop Growers are a passionate collective of farms dedicated to innovation and sustainability. Leading the charge in sustainable farm practices, some NZ Hops farms have over five generations of knowledge that inform their composting program, used by growers to promote healthy regenerative growth of hops year upon year. This creates high quality soil, a critical component of healthy growing conditions. At NZ Hops, they feel that sustainability is not only being a steward for the land, but for our future.Athletic Brewing Co.Athletic Brewing Company's innovative process allows them to brew great-tastingcraft beer without the alcohol. From IPAs to stouts to golden ales and more, they offer a full selection of beers starting at only 50 calories. Now you can keep your head clear and enjoy the refreshing taste of beer anytime, anywhere. Place an order today atathleticbrewing.com and get free shipping on two six packs or more. New customerscan also get 10% off their entire order with code BeerEdge10. Limit one per customer.For more Drink Beer, Think Beer or to check out Beer Edge: The Newsletter for Beer Professionals, follow us on Twitter @thebeeredge and subscribe to our beer industry focused newsletter. There is more information, articles, and engaging content at Beer Edge. Host: John Holl Guests: Tim Webb and Stephen Beaumont Sponsors:   NZ Hops, Athletic Brewing, and The Beer Edge Tags: Beer, Bars, COVID-19, Travel, South America, France, Canada, United Kingdom, Belgium

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast
1331: 05 Jan 2022 | BMW iX M60 Flagship Revealed With 619bhp

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 22:12


 Show #1331 If you get any value from this podcast please consider supporting my work on Patreon. Plus all Patreon supporters get their own unique ad-free podcast feed. Good morning, good afternoon and good evening wherever you are in the world, welcome to EV News Daily for Wednesday 5th January. It's Martyn Lee here and I go through every EV story so you don't have to. Thank you to MYEV.com for helping make this show, they've built the first marketplace specifically for Electric Vehicles. It's a totally free marketplace that simplifies the buying and selling process, and help you learn about EVs along the way too. Welcome to a new Patreon Executive Producer ROBBIENY. BMW IX M60 REVEALED – 619BHP FLAGSHIP TO RIVAL AUDI E-TRON S - The striking new BMW iX SUV has just been given a high performance flagship in the form of the new M60 range-topper. This bold high performance electric SUV will rival Audi's e-Tron S and Tesla's Model X, while also giving the M Performance sub-brand a second model. - M60 utilises two electric motors with one placed on each axle, but power is raised from the most potent iX 50i's 523bhp to a more robust 619bhp. - Feeding these more potent electric motors is the same 105.2kWh battery pack, giving the M60 a 357-mile range – only slightly down on the lesser iX and way above the Audi e-Tron S's problematic 222-mile quoted range. - The new iX M60 does lack the Audi's tri-motor setup though, explaining why something akin to the Audi's rear axle torque vectoring is missing. - The iX in all forms t hen doubles down on this advantage with an application of carbonfibre reinforced plastics along the roof rails, sills and rear subframe. - That huge weight figure doesn't do much to hurt the M60's acceleration time, mind, hitting 62mph in just 3.9sec, over half a second clear of the Audi – the top speed is limited to 155mph. - Customer cars are expected to be delivered in the summer, with prices starting at £111,905 in the UK Original Source : https://www.evo.co.uk/bmw/204466/bmw-ix-m60-revealed-619bhp-flagship-to-rival-audi-e-tron-s BMW IX M60 STARTS AT €130,200 - BMW specifies torque of 1,015 Nm in Sport Mode, and 1,100 Nm when Launch Control is activated. - The fifth generation of BMW electric drives are current-excited synchronous motors. In addition to efficiency, BMW emphasises that these motors have a consistent power delivery - The high-voltage battery achieves a gross energy content of 111.5 kWh, the same as in the familiar iX xDrive50. The AC charging capacity is 11 kW, with direct current up to 200 kW is possible Original Source : https://www.electrive.com/2022/01/05/bmw-ix-m60-starts-at-e130200/ CHRYSLER PREVIEWS ITS ALL-ELECTRIC FUTURE WITH AIRFLOW CONCEPT SUV - Chrysler, the iconic American brand owned by Stellantis, will only sell electric vehicles by 2028, the company announced at the 2022 Consumer Electronics Show. - the company revealed its latest concept, the Airflow crossover SUV with a similar profile to the Tesla Model Y and Ford Mustang Mach-E. The vehicle unveiled at CES is meant to be just a concept, but it looks very close to production-ready. Chrysler says its first EV will start production in 2025. - Stellantis, the multi-national conglomeration that formed last year when Fiat Chrysler merged with the French PSA Group, intends for Chrysler to serve as the tip of the spear for its electrification strategy. - The concept Airflow comes with all-wheel drive thanks to two 150kW motors, one in each axle. However, the drivetrain can be adjusted to accommodate more powerful motors in the future, Chrysler says. The company didn't provide details on the battery's size or energy capacity, but it did estimate a range of 350-400 miles per charge. - Inside, the vehicle is chock-a-block with screens: four in the front and two for rear passengers. The large central infotainment screen is flanked by smaller screens for the driver and passenger. The instrument cluster screen is set back a ways from the steering wheel, closer to the windshield than the dashboard, making it seem almost like a heads-up display. An additional screen sits below the main infotainment screen for HVAC controls and seating adjustments, among other features. And there are two screens on the seatbacks for rear passengers. Original Source : https://www.theverge.com/2022/1/5/22862387/chrysler-electric-only-2028-airflow-concept-ces-2022 SONY SHOWS OFF SUV, WILL EXPLORE BUILDING ELECTRIC CARS AS ‘SONY MOBILITY INC' - At CES in Las Vegas this evening, Sony's Chairman, President and CEO Kenichiro Yoshida showed off a brand new prototype of its Vision S concept electric car, and announced that the Sony Group is starting a new division — the Sony Mobility Inc – which will start commercializing its electric vehicles. - On the CES stage during the Sony press conference, the company showed off its existing Sony Vision-S sedan, which was revealed at CES last year. This year, it also flexed a new model in the lineup, the Sony Vision-S SUV prototype. - Sony announced that it was establishing a new company (Sony Mobility Inc.) to accelerate the efforts of “exploring the commercial launch of Sony's EV” — hinting that a Sony car may be coming to a lot near you in the none-too-distant future. Original Source : https://techcrunch.com/2022/01/04/sony-mobility/ TESLA RIVAL LUCID PLANS TO LAUNCH IN EUROPE THIS YEAR - Lucid plans to start selling its cars in Europe this year. - The California-headquartered firm, which competes with Tesla, announced the expansion on Tuesday after a Twitter user asked if an image of some new Lucid owners were based in the U.K. - In January 2020, Lucid started taking online reservations in 15 European countries for its flagship Lucid Air sedan but the firm has not specified when the vehicles will be delivered. - Locations included Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Iceland, Italy, Monaco, Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. Original Source : https://www.cnbc.com/2022/01/05/-tesla-rival-lucid-plans-to-launch-in-europe-this-year.html TESLA MODEL S GOES 752 MILES WITH A STARTUP'S PROTOTYPE BATTERY - Imagine an electric car that covers 752 miles on a single charge. You can't buy it today, but a modified Tesla Model S drove that distance across Michigan last month. It was the work of a two-year-old Michigan startup, Our Next Energy (ONE), which says it is aiming to make safer and more sustainable batteries. ONE retrofitted the car with a battery holding twice the energy of Tesla's original—while fitting entirely within the same space. It's a proof of concept for the company's own future battery design. - ONE's project didn't mess with anything to alter the Model S's efficiency, but employed a much higher-capacity battery. "We want to accelerate the adoption of EVs by eliminating range anxiety, which holds back consumers today," said ONE founder and CEO Mujeeb Ijaz. He's a battery engineer with more than 30 years'  experience, including stints at Apple, A123 Systems, Ford, and others. - The original Tesla battery had a capacity of 103.9 kilowatt-hours, while the prototype ONE battery that replaced it in the same space has 207.3 kWh. - ONE's drive took place in mid-December in Michigan—with chilly winter temperatures working against range maximization—where the company drove up and down the length of the mitten state for nearly 14 hours, averaging 55 mph, before winding up back at its Novi headquarters in southeastern Michigan with the trip odometer showing 752.2 miles. - The capacity of more than 200 kilowatt-hours was provided by high-energy cobalt-nickel cells Original Source : https://www.caranddriver.com/news/a38668912/750-mile-ev-battery-michigan-startup-our-next-energy/ TESLA MODEL S PLAID TOP SPEED RAISED TO 175 MPH WITH TRACK MODE UPDATE Original Source : https://www.teslarati.com/tesla-model-s-plaid-new-top-speed-track-mode-update-video/ A NEW TESLA MODEL X WON'T BE AVAILABLE UNTIL LATE 2022 Original Source : https://www.edmunds.com/car-news/no-tesla-model-x-availability-for-months.html GAC AION LX PLUS LAUNCHED WITH 144KWH BATTERY Original Source : https://carnewschina.com/2022/01/06/gac-aion-lx-plus-with-1000km-range-launch-on-jan-6/ GM DELIVERED ONLY 26 EVS IN Q4 2021, INCLUDING JUST 1 ELECTRIC HUMMER   Original Source : https://insideevs.com/news/558804/gm-delivered-26-evs-2021q4/ QUESTION OF THE WEEK WITH EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM This question was suggested by Joshua Pritt: “If you live in an apartment or condo or otherwise can't charge at home, how do you charge? Is it a terrible inconvenience or do you have a simple routine to charge during your shopping trips?” Email me your answer now: hello@evnewsdaily.com It would mean a lot if you could take 2mins to leave a quick review on whichever platform you download the podcast. And  if you have an Amazon Echo, download our Alexa Skill, search for EV News Daily and add it as a flash briefing. Come and say hi on Facebook, LinkedIn or Twitter just search EV News Daily, have a wonderful day, I'll catch you tomorrow and remember…there's no such thing as a self-charging hybrid. PREMIUM PARTNERS PHIL ROBERTS / ELECTRIC FUTURE BRAD CROSBY PORSCHE OF THE VILLAGE CINCINNATI AUDI CINCINNATI EAST VOLVO CARS CINCINNATI EAST NATIONAL CAR CHARGING ON THE US MAINLAND AND ALOHA CHARGE IN HAWAII DEREK REILLY FROM THE EV REVIEW IRELAND YOUTUBE CHANNEL RICHARD AT RSEV.CO.UK – FOR BUYING AND SELLING EVS IN THE UK EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM

Italian Wine Podcast
Ep. 743 Dr. Hoby Wedler | Voices

Italian Wine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 31:50


Episode 743 Cynthia Chaplin interviews Dr. Hoby Wedler in this installment of Voices, on the Italian Wine Podcast. About today's guest: Dr. Hoby Wedler is an insightful, disarming, and passionate thinker who loves to bring people together to help them see new possibilities. With the heart of a teacher, Hoby helps turn your dreams into realities. Hoby has been completely blind since birth. He is a scientist, an entrepreneur, a sensory expert, and is driven by his passion for innovative, creative, and insightful thinking. Hoby is remarkably tuned into his surroundings and has frequently chosen to walk the unbeaten paths in life over known territories. In 2016, Hoby earned his Ph.D. in organic chemistry from UC Davis. His fearlessness is infectious, and he has actively paved the way for others to join him in his quest to follow passions regardless of the challenges that lie ahead. In 2011, Hoby founded a non-profit organization to lead annual chemistry camps for blind and visually impaired students throughout North America. In the same year, he began opening doors to the world of wine aromas by developing Tasting in the Dark, a truly blindfolded wine experience, in collaboration with the Francis Ford Coppola Winery. He has since expanded the program to a global market in a variety of industries and special projects. Over the years, Hoby has become a motivational speaker, a mentor, and an educator. He is also committed to making the world an inclusive, equitable, and accessible place for everyone. In his work, you will find a unique trilogy between sensory awareness, scientific knowledge, and a love for sharing his insights. Numerous people and organizations have recognized Hoby's work over the years. To name a few, President Barack Obama recognized Hoby by naming him a Champion of Change for enhancing employment and education opportunities for people with disabilities. Also, Forbes Media named Hoby as a leader in food and drink in their 30 under 30 annual publication. Hoby's dedicated to impacting everyone he works with by unlocking doors, overcoming challenges, increasing awareness, and expanding their horizons. If you want to learn more about today's guest, you can by visiting: https://www.hobywedler.com/ About today's Host: Cynthia Chaplin is a Vinitaly International Academy certified Italian Wine Ambassador, a professional sommelier with Fondazione Italiana Sommelier, a member of Le Donne del Vino, and a Professor of Italian wine and culture. Born in the USA, Cynthia moved to Europe in 1990 where she has lived in Spain, Belgium, England and Italy. She chose to center her career in Rome and immerse herself in the Italian wine sector, which is her passion. She has taught university students and expats, works with embassies, corporations and private clients, creating and presenting tastings, events, seminars and in-depth courses. Cynthia is a wine writer, translator, and a judge at international wine and sake competitions. She consults with restaurants and enotecas assisting in the development of comprehensive wine lists and excellent food pairings, as well as advising private clients who want to develop a comprehensive Italian wine collection. She lives with her British photographer husband on the shore of Lake Bracciano, north of Rome, where they share their beautiful garden with one massive grapevine, two border collies and an arrogant diva cat. If you want to learn more about today's host, you can by visiting: Facebook: Italian Wines in English Instagram: kiss_my_glassx Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/cynthia-chaplin-190647179/ Let's keep in touch! Follow us on our social media channels: Instagram @italianwinepodcast Facebook @ItalianWinePodcast Twitter @itawinepodast Tiktok @MammaJumboShrimp LinkedIn @ItalianWinePodcast If you feel like helping us, donate here www.italianwinepodcast.com/donate-to-show/ Until next time, Cin Cin!

Places I Remember with Lea Lane
Best Tales And Memories Of '21, To Begin '22!

Places I Remember with Lea Lane

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 43:17


What a fabulous 2021 it's been for Places I Remember!  We've talked with fascinating travelers. We've won awards, and are now heard in 2,000 cities and 101 countries. To celebrate,  we're gifting you with a sampling of our favorite tales, stories and memories, so generously offered this past year.  Here goes:Heidi Sarna, author of Secret Singapore, tells of a discovery there in Ep. 39. In Ep. 2, Millie Ball, former travel editor and Mardi Gras queen, recalls a sweet New Orleans memory.In Ep. 40,  Donna Sandstrom, founder of The Whale Trail, tells a  of an Orca named Springer.  Jason Flesher, expedition leader in Antarctica,  explains "being snotted on by a whale" in Ep. 33.  In Ep. 9,  Norwegian travel expert Harald Hansen describes his surprise encounter with polar bears. In Ep. 26, 'American Idol 'and 'So You Think You Can Dance' producer Simon Fuller tells a memory from when he was filming the documentary Serengeti, in Tanzania.  In Ep. 25, Ahmed Taumi, a top Moroccan guide, talks of of a request we won't forget.  And we talk of Assisi Italy with author  Lori Erickson, in Ep. 30.In Ep. 21, mountaineer/author Jim Davidson, remembers summiting Everest. In Ep. 20, actor Stephen Bishop has a reality check in the Dominican  Republic and South Africa, traveling as a person of color. Travel memories from my much-traveled family: Granddaughter Sabrina remembers being on the border of Israel and Syria, in Ep. 23. Younger son Cary, a history buff and professor, offers a profound take about the WW1 and WW2 battlefields of Belgium and France, in  Ep. 18. In Ep. 15, son Randall, chief content officer of Forbes media, remembers meeting the aged fisherman from Hemingway's novella, The Old Man and the Sea, in Cuba. In Ep. 25, Patricia Schultz, author of 1000 Places to See Before You Die.  describes a special person: a story I especially love. Karen Misuraca, author of Secret Sonoma, tells of a mammoth surprise in Northern California wine country, in Ep. 47.  In Ep. 36, Patrice Henry remembers deep-diving women in Korea.In  Ep. 16, Midgie Moore, co-author of 100 Things to Do in Alaska Before You Die, describes the magic when she first saw the Northern Lights in Alaska. And still looking up, Anne Born describes the Milky Way seen from Northern Spain, in Ep. 4.Food makes memories. Financial guru Jean Chatzky, formerly of NBC's Today show,  shares a special meal with us in Ep. 38.  Patti Eshai, TikTok's popular “Duchess of Decorum” tells of a meal tradition in her homeland of Iran in Ep. 46. In Ep. 42, Deanne Burch, author of Journey Through Fire and Ice, shares  unusual meals  in a remote Arctic village.  Drinks can also stir memories. The first concoction is from Beverly Hills tourism director Karen Wagner in Ep. 16. The other, the strangest I have ever heard, is from Canadian CEO of Tours By Locals, Paul Melhus, in Ep. 46.And we end with a gorgeous Irish ballad straight from Dublin, from singer Joe Kearns, sung just for us in Ep. 7, to celebrate our wondrous year around the world. Even if we never left home, we were able to experience travel through memory._____ Podcast host Lea Lane blogs at forbes.com, has traveled to over 100 countries, and written nine books, including Places I Remember.

Sweet but Fearless Podcast
Podcast #66 - Wall Street to Waffles

Sweet but Fearless Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 28:56


Andrea Polizzi, a renaissance woman extraordinaire, leads us through her journey from Wall Street to Waffletopia and beyond. Her journey began on vacation with her husband Brian, in Belgium and continued onto the Food Network all from her hometown in Pennsylvania.  Andrea shares how she chose this entrepreneurial line of business, what she did to prepare for being her own boss and relying on her business for revenue. No part-time side hustle for them, they were all in. How she maneuvered the ups and downs of their venture, discovering it can be lonely, frustrating, rewarding, and exciting all in the same day. The biggest takeaway will be what you can do, how you can prepare, why you should think through your idea carefully BEFORE you start on your journey. Patience was her superpower.

William Ramsey Investigates
Author and Criminologist Carine Hutsebaut discusses the Dutroux case in Belgium and pedophile networks. 2016

William Ramsey Investigates

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 57:32


Author and Criminologist Carine Hutsebaut discusses the Dutroux case in Belgium and pedophile networks. 2016

William Ramsey Investigates
Author and Criminologist Carine Hutsebaut discusses the Dutroux case in Belgium and pedophile networks (2016)

William Ramsey Investigates

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 57:32


Author and Criminologist Carine Hutsebaut discusses the Dutroux case in Belgium and pedophile networks. (2016)

Daf Yomi by R’ Eli Stefansky
Daf Yomi Megillah Daf 22 by R' Eli Stefansky

Daf Yomi by R’ Eli Stefansky

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 48:27


Unstoppable
211 - Anouck Gotlib - CEO of Belgian Boys

Unstoppable

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 31:52


“We make a living making people happy.” Anouck Gotlib has unlocked the key to happiness with her delicious Belgian treats! Here's how the CEO of Brooklyn-based Belgian Boys made sharing yummy, nostalgic Belgian treats with U.S. consumers a recipe for success. Listen to her story on this episode of #TheKaraGoldinShow    Sponsored by -   Shopify - Go to shopify.com/kara for a FREE fourteen-day trial and get full access to Shopify's entire suite of features. BetterHelp - Get 10% off your first month by visiting our sponsor at BetterHelp dot com slash karagoldin  Wix - Head over to Wix dot com and create your website today. Funjet - Use the promo code – FJ50 – for $50 off your next Funjet Vacation.   Call to Action:   Enjoying this episode of #TheKaraGoldinShow? Let Kara know by clicking on the links below and sending her a quick shout-out on social or reach out to Kara Goldin directly at karagoldin@gmail.com Follow Kara Goldin on Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/karagoldin/  Follow Kara Goldin on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/karagoldin/ Follow Kara Goldin on Twitter: https://twitter.com/karagoldin Follow Kara Goldin on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/KaraGoldin/ Check out our website to view show notes: https://karagoldin.com/podcast   Bullet point list of key topics and the timestamps from the podcast episode:   00:42 - Introducing Anouck Gotlib 4:05 - Anouck's childhood in Belgium, meeting Greg, and the beginning of Belgian Boys 6:28 - Anouck's background in fashion before moving to Belgian Boys 9:47 - The most surprising parts of launching Belgian Boys 15:20 - Getting Belgian Boys into its first stores 18:29 - Troubleshooting with retailers and finding the right ones 19:05 - Launching Belgian Boys Breakfast at Target  20:48 - The new Belgian Boys French Toast 25:08 - Supply Chain issues especially in the pandemic 27:05 - Belgian Boys work with Misfits Market, upcycled Stroopwafel 28:55 - Wrap up and where to find Anouck and Belgian Boys   List of links to resources mentioned in episode, suggested reading & social media handles:   Belgian Boys's Website: https://www.belgianboys.com  Anouck's Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/anouck-gotlib-82b96b2b/  Belgian Boys's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/belgianboys/  Belgian Boys's Twitter: https://twitter.com/belgianboys Anouck's Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/anouck.gotlib

Happy & Holy
Acts 7-8 | Nathan Wheat & Rebecca Carrell

Happy & Holy

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 83:11


You're listening to Happy & Holy, the podcast where Scripture comes to life through a small group discussion. This season we're walking through the birth of the Church in the book of Acts, and you get to be a fly on the wall to see what new things we learn with and from one another as we engage Scripture in community.I'm your host, Kate Boyd. I'm a disciple maker, writer, and speaker who is making space in the church for Christians caught in the messy middle between conservative and progressive. We love Jesus, love people, and work with God and each other for a better world. Welcome to the show.If you're a Messy Middle Christian like me and you're looking for a safe space to explore your faith, then the Messy Middle Christian patreon is the way to go. If you've listened to the show before, you know we like bunny trails and rabbit holes related to the Bible, Christian history, and how faith and life collide in unique ways. In this patreon community, you can get access to weekly bunny trails - curated content to explore something new - and monthly rabbit holes where I or some friends teach you about the many sides you can take on a Christian doctrine, themes and fun facts about books of the Bible, and deep dives into topics or concepts from the Bible or church life today. Plus you get the safety of a community doing the same thing right beside you. You can join for as little as $5/month and get curated adventures to discover more about what it means to follow Jesus in the messy middle. Learn more at patreon.com/messymiddlechristiansToday, I'm joined by Nathan Wheat and Rebecca Carrell, and we talk about the deep theology of Stephen's speech, meet Saul for the first time in a not-so-flattering light, and dig into the movement of the gospel to Ethiopia. Nathan Wheat lives in Colorado, sometimes alone, and sometimes with his adventurous wife and his son. He grew up in Fort Collins, Colorado with a brief intermission in Belgium. Nathan attended Oklahoma Christian University to pursue a career in politics and left with a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering to pursue a life of not working as an engineer. His favorite color is grey and he refuses to throw out socks with holes in them.Website: https://www.followingthefire.com/Twitter: @realNathanWheatRebecca Carrell is, in order of importance, a joyful Jesus follower, wife to Mike, and mother to Caitlyn and Nick. She co-hosts the morning show on 90.9 KCBI, and the Honest Conversations podcast, where she and Liz Rodriguez look at tough topics through a biblical lens. She is currently working toward her ThM at Dallas Theological Seminary and praying about what she wants to do when she grows up.https://www.rebeccacarrell.com/https://www.facebook.com/RebeccaAshbrookCarrellTwitter: @RebeccaACarrell  Instagram: @RebeccaCarrell   

Shut Up Cincinnati
Never Trust a Fart - Ep. 107

Shut Up Cincinnati

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 85:59


Join your local chuckleheads for a talk about nothing and everything all at once.  The guys pretend to know everything about covid.  Romania and Belgium is listening to the podcast so we attempt to hit them where it hurts.  Jason thinks Bill Clinton and Prince Andrew humped kids with Epstein.  Chris finds some blumpin ads and they discuss what exactly "pig play" is.  Chris is willing to snowball for the right girl.  All that and a queef to grow on.  Join us, peckerheads.  

Richard Helppie's Common Bridge
Episode 135- In Search of, and Finding the MIA and POW, with Paul Schwimmer

Richard Helppie's Common Bridge

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 29:12


Rich invites U.S. Army veteran, and executive secretary of The A. Scott Foundation to the Common Bridge, to talk about his incredible efforts traveling around the world in search and recover of the remains of United States WWII missing in action, and prisoner of war soldiers. Since 2009, Mr. Schwimmer volunteers as part of the Florida-based archaeological team, History Flight, Inc., by taking numerous trips to remote islands including Tarawa, Palau and Wake Island.  He's also been on search and discovery trips to the Philippines, France, Belgium, and Germany searching for the MIA and POW.  Since then, he has been part of efforts to find the remains of over 120 MIA and over 20 POWs.Support the show (https://RichardHelppie.com)

Everything Everywhere Daily History Podcast
The Halifax Explosion (Encore)

Everything Everywhere Daily History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 11:18


Subscribe to the podcast!  https://podfollow.com/everythingeverywhere/ On December 6, 1917, one of the greatest tragedies of World War I took place.  In a single instant, 1,782 people, mostly civilians were killed.  However, this tragedy didn't take place on the fields of Belgium or in a trench in France. It took place in the harbor of Halifax, Nova Scotia.  Learn more about the Halifax Explosion, one of the worst disasters of World War I, on this episode of Everything Everywhere Daily. https://Everything-Everywhere.com/CuriosityStream -------------------------------- Associate Producer Thor Thomsen   Become a supporter on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/everythingeverywhere   Discord Server: https://discord.gg/UkRUJFh   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/everythingeverywhere/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/everywheretrip Reddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/EEDailyPodcast/ Website: https://everything-everywhere.com/everything-everywhere-daily-podcast/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Everything Everywhere Daily History Podcast
The Halifax Explosion (Encore)

Everything Everywhere Daily History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 10:57


Subscribe to the podcast!  https://podfollow.com/everythingeverywhere/ On December 6, 1917, one of the greatest tragedies of World War I took place.  In a single instant, 1,782 people, mostly civilians were killed.  However, this tragedy didn't take place on the fields of Belgium or in a trench in France. It took place in the harbor of Halifax, Nova Scotia.  Learn more about the Halifax Explosion, one of the worst disasters of World War I, on this episode of Everything Everywhere Daily. https://Everything-Everywhere.com/CuriosityStream -------------------------------- Associate Producer Thor Thomsen   Become a supporter on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/everythingeverywhere   Discord Server: https://discord.gg/UkRUJFh   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/everythingeverywhere/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/everywheretrip Reddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/EEDailyPodcast/ Website: https://everything-everywhere.com/everything-everywhere-daily-podcast/

Unorthodox
The 300th Episode

Unorthodox

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 72:24


This week, we're celebrating a major milestone: 300 episodes. That's more than 18,000 minutes of tape over six years, featuring thousands of News of the Jews items, hundreds of amazing Jews and Gentiles of the Week, and way too many jokes about Belgium. We've been through a lot together, J-Crew. There was the Saran Wrap vs. tin foil fight, the debate over backing into parking spaces, and endless discussions of what activities might accurately be categorized as “Jewish.” We've shared stories of conversion and atonement and nose jobs, and performed live shows across the country, from St. Louis to San Diego, and Denver to Detroit. Along the way, our team wrote a book, welcomed three human children and six podcast babies, and even got to be part of a proposal and then a wedding. Today, we're celebrating everything that makes Unorthodox the #1 Jewish podcast with a special episode hosted by friend-of-the-show and “Making It” judge Simon Doonan. You'll hear stories from our hosts—about Stephanie finding her voice, Mark learning what happens when an off-hand comment incites an unexpected online mob, and Liel realizing that fighting about politics isn't always worth it — and messages from listeners and some of our favorite former guests. On behalf of the entire Unorthodox team, Shalom friends—and thanks for listening. Unorthodox is produced by Tablet Studios. Please consider making a tax-deductible donation at bit.ly/givetounorthodox. Subscribe to our weekly newsletter to get new episodes, photos, and more. Join our Facebook group, and follow Unorthodox on Twitter and Instagram. Get a behind-the-scenes look at our recording sessions on our YouTube channel! Get your Unorthodox T-shirts, mugs, and baby onesies at bit.ly/unorthoshirt. Want to book us for a live show? Email producer Josh Kross at jkross@tabletmag.com. Check out all of Tablet's podcasts at tabletmag.com/podcasts. Sponsors Zelikow School of Jewish Nonprofit Management - Earn your master's degree in Organizational Leadership and Innovation while you work. Learn more about the Zelikow School of Jewish Nonprofit Management at zschool.huc.edu. Scholarships available. The Power Of is a new podcast featuring host Noam Weissman and a diverse range of guests discussing how Jewish wisdom can help us find real, practical meaning within our own lives. Listen here or wherever you get your podcasts. AJWS supports activism in 18 countries around the world, and when you donate to AJWS this holiday season, your gift will be matched to make double the impact. Give today at AJWS.org/unorthodox. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Dan Snow's History Hit
The 1914 Christmas Truce (Part 2)

Dan Snow's History Hit

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 47:22


Part Two of our episodes on the famous Christmas Truce. On Christmas Eve 1914 many sectors of the Western Front in France and Belgium fell silent. Troops from all sides put down their weapons and sang carols, exchanged gifts and buried their dead in No Man's Land. The following day the truce continued in many, but not all areas, and troops gathered in crowds between the lines. there may even have been a bit of a kick about. In this episode, three distinguished historians, Peter Hart, Taff Gillingham and Rob Schaefer tell us about the events of the truce itself. We also hear extracts of letters and diaries from the men involved, including some broadcast here for the first time in English. This episode was first released on 24th December 2020.Please vote for us! Dan Snow's History Hit has been nominated for a Podbible award in the 'informative' category: https://bit.ly/3pykkdsIf you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download the History Hit app please go to the Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dan Snow's History Hit
The 1914 Christmas Truce (Part 1)

Dan Snow's History Hit

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 38:34


On Christmas Eve 1914 many sectors of the Western Front in France and Belgium fell silent. Troops from all sides put down their weapons and sang carols, exchanged gifts and buried their dead in No Man's Land. The following day the truce continued in many, but not all areas, and troops gathered in crowds between the lines. there may even have been a bit of a kick about. This is part 1 of a two-part Christmas podcast that explores the truce with three distinguished historians, Peter Hart, Taff Gillingham and Rob Schaefer. We also hear extracts of letters and diaries from the men involved, including some broadcast here for the first time in English. This episode was first released on 23rd December 2020.Please vote for us! Dan Snow's History Hit has been nominated for a Podbible award in the 'informative' category: https://bit.ly/3pykkdsIf you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download the History Hit app please go to the Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The John Batchelor Show
8/8: Nick Lloyd, THE WESTERN FRONT

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 6:15


Photo:  8/8: Nick Lloyd, THE WESTERN FRONT Nick Lloyd, The Western Front: A History of the Great War, 1914-1918 – March 30, 2021. Hardcover. https://www.amazon.com/Western-Front-History-Great-1914-1918/dp/B09NS2DT8X A panoramic history of the savage combat on the Western Front between 1914 and 1918 that came to define modern warfare. The Western Front evokes images of mud-spattered men in waterlogged trenches, shielded from artillery blasts and machine-gun fire by a few feet of dirt. This iconic setting was the most critical arena of the Great War, a 400-mile combat zone stretching from Belgium to Switzerland where more than three million Allied and German soldiers struggled during four years of almost continuous combat. It has persisted in our collective memory as a tragic waste of human life and a symbol of the horrors of industrialized warfare. In this epic narrative history, the first volume in a groundbreaking trilogy on the Great War, the acclaimed military historian Nick Lloyd captures the horrific fighting on the Western Front beginning with the surprise German invasion of Belgium in August 1914 and taking us to the Armistice of November 1918. Drawing on French, British, German, and American sources, Lloyd weaves a kaleidoscopic chronicle of the Marne, Passchendaele, the Meuse-Argonne, and other critical battles, which reverberated across Europe and the wider war. From the trenches, where men as young as 17 suffered and died, to the headquarters behind the lines where Generals Haig, Joffre, Hindenburg, and Pershing developed their plans for battle, Lloyd gives us a view of the war both intimate and strategic, putting us amid the mud and smoke while at the same time depicting the larger stakes of every encounter. He shows us a dejected Kaiser Wilhelm II―soon to be eclipsed in power by his own generals―lamenting the botched Schlieffen Plan; French soldiers piling atop one another in the trenches of Verdun; British infantryman wandering through the frozen wilderness in the days after the Battle of the Somme; and General Erich Ludendorff pursuing a ruthless policy of total war, leading an eleventh-hour attack on Reims even as his men succumbed to the Spanish Flu. 35 black-and-white illustrations, 8 maps

The John Batchelor Show
7/8: Nick Lloyd, THE WESTERN FRONT

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 14:25


Photo: 7/8:  Nick Lloyd, THE WESTERN FRONT Nick Lloyd, The Western Front: A History of the Great War, 1914-1918 – March 30, 2021. Hardcover. https://www.amazon.com/Western-Front-History-Great-1914-1918/dp/B09NS2DT8X A panoramic history of the savage combat on the Western Front between 1914 and 1918 that came to define modern warfare. The Western Front evokes images of mud-spattered men in waterlogged trenches, shielded from artillery blasts and machine-gun fire by a few feet of dirt. This iconic setting was the most critical arena of the Great War, a 400-mile combat zone stretching from Belgium to Switzerland where more than three million Allied and German soldiers struggled during four years of almost continuous combat. It has persisted in our collective memory as a tragic waste of human life and a symbol of the horrors of industrialized warfare. In this epic narrative history, the first volume in a groundbreaking trilogy on the Great War, the acclaimed military historian Nick Lloyd captures the horrific fighting on the Western Front beginning with the surprise German invasion of Belgium in August 1914 and taking us to the Armistice of November 1918. Drawing on French, British, German, and American sources, Lloyd weaves a kaleidoscopic chronicle of the Marne, Passchendaele, the Meuse-Argonne, and other critical battles, which reverberated across Europe and the wider war. From the trenches, where men as young as 17 suffered and died, to the headquarters behind the lines where Generals Haig, Joffre, Hindenburg, and Pershing developed their plans for battle, Lloyd gives us a view of the war both intimate and strategic, putting us amid the mud and smoke while at the same time depicting the larger stakes of every encounter. He shows us a dejected Kaiser Wilhelm II―soon to be eclipsed in power by his own generals―lamenting the botched Schlieffen Plan; French soldiers piling atop one another in the trenches of Verdun; British infantryman wandering through the frozen wilderness in the days after the Battle of the Somme; and General Erich Ludendorff pursuing a ruthless policy of total war, leading an eleventh-hour attack on Reims even as his men succumbed to the Spanish Flu. 35 black-and-white illustrations, 8 maps

The John Batchelor Show
6/8: Nick Lloyd, THE WESTERN FRONT

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 6:40


Photo:  Among the frozen trenches, photograph of British 60-pounder Mk I Gun being towed at speed—note blurred wheels, cloud of dust, trotting horses, anxious appearance of crew. The steel traction engine wheels identify this as a Mk II carriage.      The caption in Kaiserschlacht 1918 by Randal Gray correctly describes this scene as occurring during the British retreat forced by the German attack on the Somme of March 1918. The gun is incorrectly described as a Mk II in the book. 6/8: Nick Lloyd, The Western Front: A History of the Great War, 1914-1918 – March 30, 2021. Hardcover. https://www.amazon.com/Western-Front-History-Great-1914-1918/dp/B09NS2DT8X A panoramic history of the savage combat on the Western Front between 1914 and 1918 that came to define modern warfare. The Western Front evokes images of mud-spattered men in waterlogged trenches, shielded from artillery blasts and machine-gun fire by a few feet of dirt. This iconic setting was the most critical arena of the Great War, a 400-mile combat zone stretching from Belgium to Switzerland where more than three million Allied and German soldiers struggled during four years of almost continuous combat. It has persisted in our collective memory as a tragic waste of human life and a symbol of the horrors of industrialized warfare. In this epic narrative history, the first volume in a groundbreaking trilogy on the Great War, the acclaimed military historian Nick Lloyd captures the horrific fighting on the Western Front beginning with the surprise German invasion of Belgium in August 1914 and taking us to the Armistice of November 1918. Drawing on French, British, German, and American sources, Lloyd weaves a kaleidoscopic chronicle of the Marne, Passchendaele, the Meuse-Argonne, and other critical battles, which reverberated across Europe and the wider war. From the trenches, where men as young as 17 suffered and died, to the headquarters behind the lines where Generals Haig, Joffre, Hindenburg, and Pershing developed their plans for battle, Lloyd gives us a view of the war both intimate and strategic, putting us amid the mud and smoke while at the same time depicting the larger stakes of every encounter. He shows us a dejected Kaiser Wilhelm II―soon to be eclipsed in power by his own generals―lamenting the botched Schlieffen Plan; French soldiers piling atop one another in the trenches of Verdun; British infantryman wandering through the frozen wilderness in the days after the Battle of the Somme; and General Erich Ludendorff pursuing a ruthless policy of total war, leading an eleventh-hour attack on Reims even as his men succumbed to the Spanish Flu. 35 black-and-white illustrations, 8 maps

The John Batchelor Show
5/8: Nick Lloyd, THE WESTERN FRONT

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 12:10


Photo:   Schlieffen Plan — A scene from the play The Battle of the Marne performed in Berlin: General von Moltke seated (photo agency Robert Sennecke Internationaler Illustrations Verlag, broadcast in Paris by the Agence Mondial). 5/8:  Nick Lloyd, The Western Front: A History of the Great War, 1914-1918 – March 30, 2021. Hardcover. https://www.amazon.com/Western-Front-History-Great-1914-1918/dp/B09NS2DT8X A panoramic history of the savage combat on the Western Front between 1914 and 1918 that came to define modern warfare. The Western Front evokes images of mud-spattered men in waterlogged trenches, shielded from artillery blasts and machine-gun fire by a few feet of dirt. This iconic setting was the most critical arena of the Great War, a 400-mile combat zone stretching from Belgium to Switzerland where more than three million Allied and German soldiers struggled during four years of almost continuous combat. It has persisted in our collective memory as a tragic waste of human life and a symbol of the horrors of industrialized warfare. In this epic narrative history, the first volume in a groundbreaking trilogy on the Great War, the acclaimed military historian Nick Lloyd captures the horrific fighting on the Western Front beginning with the surprise German invasion of Belgium in August 1914 and taking us to the Armistice of November 1918. Drawing on French, British, German, and American sources, Lloyd weaves a kaleidoscopic chronicle of the Marne, Passchendaele, the Meuse-Argonne, and other critical battles, which reverberated across Europe and the wider war. From the trenches, where men as young as 17 suffered and died, to the headquarters behind the lines where Generals Haig, Joffre, Hindenburg, and Pershing developed their plans for battle, Lloyd gives us a view of the war both intimate and strategic, putting us amid the mud and smoke while at the same time depicting the larger stakes of every encounter. He shows us a dejected Kaiser Wilhelm II―soon to be eclipsed in power by his own generals―lamenting the botched Schlieffen Plan; French soldiers piling atop one another in the trenches of Verdun; British infantryman wandering through the frozen wilderness in the days after the Battle of the Somme; and General Erich Ludendorff pursuing a ruthless policy of total war, leading an eleventh-hour attack on Reims even as his men succumbed to the Spanish Flu. 35 black-and-white illustrations, 8 maps

The John Batchelor Show
4/8: Nick Lloyd, THE WESTERN FRONT

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 7:05


Photo:   War Office  First World War, Official Panoramas Collection, Western Front. FIELD OF VIEW: Passchendaele Ridge, Ypres Salient. DIRECTION OF VIEW: 106 degrees North North East to South East by East. CAMERA LOCATION: Gravenstafel Crossroads 4/8: Nick Lloyd, The Western Front: A History of the Great War, 1914-1918 – March 30, 2021. Hardcover. https://www.amazon.com/Western-Front-History-Great-1914-1918/dp/B09NS2DT8X A panoramic history of the savage combat on the Western Front between 1914 and 1918 that came to define modern warfare. The Western Front evokes images of mud-spattered men in waterlogged trenches, shielded from artillery blasts and machine-gun fire by a few feet of dirt. This iconic setting was the most critical arena of the Great War, a 400-mile combat zone stretching from Belgium to Switzerland where more than three million Allied and German soldiers struggled during four years of almost continuous combat. It has persisted in our collective memory as a tragic waste of human life and a symbol of the horrors of industrialized warfare. In this epic narrative history, the first volume in a groundbreaking trilogy on the Great War, the acclaimed military historian Nick Lloyd captures the horrific fighting on the Western Front beginning with the surprise German invasion of Belgium in August 1914 and taking us to the Armistice of November 1918. Drawing on French, British, German, and American sources, Lloyd weaves a kaleidoscopic chronicle of the Marne, Passchendaele, the Meuse-Argonne, and other critical battles, which reverberated across Europe and the wider war. From the trenches, where men as young as 17 suffered and died, to the headquarters behind the lines where Generals Haig, Joffre, Hindenburg, and Pershing developed their plans for battle, Lloyd gives us a view of the war both intimate and strategic, putting us amid the mud and smoke while at the same time depicting the larger stakes of every encounter. He shows us a dejected Kaiser Wilhelm II―soon to be eclipsed in power by his own generals―lamenting the botched Schlieffen Plan; French soldiers piling atop one another in the trenches of Verdun; British infantryman wandering through the frozen wilderness in the days after the Battle of the Somme; and General Erich Ludendorff pursuing a ruthless policy of total war, leading an eleventh-hour attack on Reims even as his men succumbed to the Spanish Flu. 35 black-and-white illustrations, 8 maps

The John Batchelor Show
3/8: Nick Lloyd, THE WESTERN FRONT

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 13:35


Photo:  The Great War in Images and Pictures: [in 14th issue] / ed. Yves. Lazarevsky. - M .: Publishing D. Ya. Makovsky, 1914-1917 (Partnership of A. I. Mamontov's printing house); [Vol. one]. - November 1914. Pictures:  Peter, Albert,  Emperor _____, Nikolai 3/8:  Nick Lloyd, The Western Front: A History of the Great War, 1914-1918 – March 30, 2021. Hardcover. https://www.amazon.com/Western-Front-History-Great-1914-1918/dp/B09NS2DT8X A panoramic history of the savage combat on the Western Front between 1914 and 1918 that came to define modern warfare. The Western Front evokes images of mud-spattered men in waterlogged trenches, shielded from artillery blasts and machine-gun fire by a few feet of dirt. This iconic setting was the most critical arena of the Great War, a 400-mile combat zone stretching from Belgium to Switzerland where more than three million Allied and German soldiers struggled during four years of almost continuous combat. It has persisted in our collective memory as a tragic waste of human life and a symbol of the horrors of industrialized warfare. In this epic narrative history, the first volume in a groundbreaking trilogy on the Great War, the acclaimed military historian Nick Lloyd captures the horrific fighting on the Western Front beginning with the surprise German invasion of Belgium in August 1914 and taking us to the Armistice of November 1918. Drawing on French, British, German, and American sources, Lloyd weaves a kaleidoscopic chronicle of the Marne, Passchendaele, the Meuse-Argonne, and other critical battles, which reverberated across Europe and the wider war. From the trenches, where men as young as 17 suffered and died, to the headquarters behind the lines where Generals Haig, Joffre, Hindenburg, and Pershing developed their plans for battle, Lloyd gives us a view of the war both intimate and strategic, putting us amid the mud and smoke while at the same time depicting the larger stakes of every encounter. He shows us a dejected Kaiser Wilhelm II―soon to be eclipsed in power by his own generals―lamenting the botched Schlieffen Plan; French soldiers piling atop one another in the trenches of Verdun; British infantryman wandering through the frozen wilderness in the days after the Battle of the Somme; and General Erich Ludendorff pursuing a ruthless policy of total war, leading an eleventh-hour attack on Reims even as his men succumbed to the Spanish Flu. 35 black-and-white illustrations, 8 maps

The John Batchelor Show
2/8 Nick Lloyd, THE WESTERN FRONT

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 9:15


Photo:    Contemporary Belgian depiction of the Battle of Halen 2/8   Nick Lloyd, The Western Front: A History of the Great War, 1914-1918 – March 30, 2021. Hardcover. https://www.amazon.com/Western-Front-History-Great-1914-1918/dp/B09NS2DT8X A panoramic history of the savage combat on the Western Front between 1914 and 1918 that came to define modern warfare. The Western Front evokes images of mud-spattered men in waterlogged trenches, shielded from artillery blasts and machine-gun fire by a few feet of dirt. This iconic setting was the most critical arena of the Great War, a 400-mile combat zone stretching from Belgium to Switzerland where more than three million Allied and German soldiers struggled during four years of almost continuous combat. It has persisted in our collective memory as a tragic waste of human life and a symbol of the horrors of industrialized warfare. In this epic narrative history, the first volume in a groundbreaking trilogy on the Great War, the acclaimed military historian Nick Lloyd captures the horrific fighting on the Western Front beginning with the surprise German invasion of Belgium in August 1914 and taking us to the Armistice of November 1918. Drawing on French, British, German, and American sources, Lloyd weaves a kaleidoscopic chronicle of the Marne, Passchendaele, the Meuse-Argonne, and other critical battles, which reverberated across Europe and the wider war. From the trenches, where men as young as 17 suffered and died, to the headquarters behind the lines where Generals Haig, Joffre, Hindenburg, and Pershing developed their plans for battle, Lloyd gives us a view of the war both intimate and strategic, putting us amid the mud and smoke while at the same time depicting the larger stakes of every encounter. He shows us a dejected Kaiser Wilhelm II―soon to be eclipsed in power by his own generals―lamenting the botched Schlieffen Plan; French soldiers piling atop one another in the trenches of Verdun; British infantryman wandering through the frozen wilderness in the days after the Battle of the Somme; and General Erich Ludendorff pursuing a ruthless policy of total war, leading an eleventh-hour attack on Reims even as his men succumbed to the Spanish Flu. 35 black-and-white illustrations, 8 maps

The John Batchelor Show
1/8 Nick Lloyd, THE WESTERN FRONT

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 9:32


Photo:  "Germany Violates Belgian Neutrality": Headline in Le Soir, 4 August 1914 1/8  Nick Lloyd, The Western Front: A History of the Great War, 1914-1918 – March 30, 2021. Hardcover. https://www.amazon.com/Western-Front-History-Great-1914-1918/dp/B09NS2DT8X A panoramic history of the savage combat on the Western Front between 1914 and 1918 that came to define modern warfare. The Western Front evokes images of mud-spattered men in waterlogged trenches, shielded from artillery blasts and machine-gun fire by a few feet of dirt. This iconic setting was the most critical arena of the Great War, a 400-mile combat zone stretching from Belgium to Switzerland where more than three million Allied and German soldiers struggled during four years of almost continuous combat. It has persisted in our collective memory as a tragic waste of human life and a symbol of the horrors of industrialized warfare. In this epic narrative history, the first volume in a groundbreaking trilogy on the Great War, the acclaimed military historian Nick Lloyd captures the horrific fighting on the Western Front beginning with the surprise German invasion of Belgium in August 1914 and taking us to the Armistice of November 1918. Drawing on French, British, German, and American sources, Lloyd weaves a kaleidoscopic chronicle of the Marne, Passchendaele, the Meuse-Argonne, and other critical battles, which reverberated across Europe and the wider war. From the trenches, where men as young as 17 suffered and died, to the headquarters behind the lines where Generals Haig, Joffre, Hindenburg, and Pershing developed their plans for battle, Lloyd gives us a view of the war both intimate and strategic, putting us amid the mud and smoke while at the same time depicting the larger stakes of every encounter. He shows us a dejected Kaiser Wilhelm II―soon to be eclipsed in power by his own generals―lamenting the botched Schlieffen Plan; French soldiers piling atop one another in the trenches of Verdun; British infantryman wandering through the frozen wilderness in the days after the Battle of the Somme; and General Erich Ludendorff pursuing a ruthless policy of total war, leading an eleventh-hour attack on Reims even as his men succumbed to the Spanish Flu. 35 black-and-white illustrations, 8 maps