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Germany from 1933 to 1945 while under control of the Nazi Party

  • 1,762PODCASTS
  • 2,953EPISODES
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  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Jul 1, 2022LATEST
Nazi Germany

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Best podcasts about Nazi Germany

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Latest podcast episodes about Nazi Germany

The History of the Cold War Podcast
Episode 107 - The STASI - East German Secret Police 1949 - 61

The History of the Cold War Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 50:52


Out of all these Communist regimes the STASI or East German ministry for State Security grew to become the largest and most highly organized secret service in history - even in comparison to the feared KGB. Granted the KGB was larger but the STASI over the course of the Cold War became a much more extensive and elaborate security service. Eclipsing even the feared Gestapo of Nazi Germany. Join us for this episode as we examine The STASI.

North Korea News Podcast by NK News
North Korea's invented histories – NKNews Podcast Ep. 242

North Korea News Podcast by NK News

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 58:10


When the war in Ukraine broke out earlier this year, Russian leader Vladimir Putin justified his country's invasion as an effort to “denazify” its smaller neighbor, a striking claim given that Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy is Jewish. Moscow has also compared its “special military operation” to the fight against Nazi Germany in World War II, […]

Truth Wanted
Truth Wanted 05.25 06-24-2022 with ObjectivelyDan and Jason Sherwood

Truth Wanted

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 102:13


Psst. Hey there. Yeah you. Thanks for joining us for another episode of Truth Wanted! This week, Jason Sherwood emerges from behind the ACA camera like a curmudgeonly grizzly bear in spring to join Objectively Dan!This week's Patron of the Week is Allegedly Dave, but we'll need a citation before we can accept this assertion.John's up first with a silly reductionist argument for why abortion is the termination of human life, which is quickly dismantled by our hosts. Jason discriminates between terminating a life and terminating a pregnancy, and Dan points out that a clump of cells isn't suffering. This is kinda irrelevant John, even if a zygote is a person, bodily autonomy is still paramount, and no, I won't give you my kidney.We have Kaylen calling from the Land of the Rising Sun next, and he doesn't think there's a Biblical justification for theocracy. Both our hosts agree, and offer a few abhorrent examples from the Bible that reinforce Kaylen's perspective.Red's concerned about moving to a state where it's likely she'll be denied healthcare, and our hosts couldn't be more sympathetic. We'll chat about potential solutions for this current crisis, and how this recent decision will disproportionately affect those without the means to travel for healthcare.Loving the international callers tonight, Ricardo's from Italy, and he's struggling with picking your battles when having constructive conversations with theists. Dan thinks we have to examine our own motivations before we even approach using Street Epistemology to build better interactions.Our next caller is concerned about moving to a red state in the current political climate, and we're sympathetic. Fascist policies lead to a brain drain, learn from Nazi Germany folks. We're all better when we're all healthy and free.Nick's wondering how to talk to people who are so staunchly committed to their beliefs that they won't consider changing their mind. How do we get through to these people? Dan throws exposure therapy out there; normalize it, plant the seed, and hope it grows. Jason thinks you oughta ask yourself, “Is it worth it?” No one's required to be the arbiter of progressive policy Nick, but keep fighting the good fight.Finally we have Dylan who suggests replacing our legal system with a poll system where the internet decides what's correct. We've seen this episode of Black Mirror, but if you haven't, loyal TW viewer, check it out. It was a disaster. At this point however, anything might be better than having lifetime appointments to the highest court in the land in a time of a quickly shifting moral landscape.That's the show tonight. It's a dark day in the history of the United States, but activism and hope will see us through. Stay strong, vote, protest, do anything but remain silent. Catch you next week!

レアジョブ英会話 Daily News Article Podcast
France to give queen Republican Guard horse for her jubilee

レアジョブ英会話 Daily News Article Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 1:45


French President Emmanuel Macron said his country would make a present of a horse to Queen Elizabeth II to mark the celebrations of her 70 years on the throne. The Elysee said Macron decided to give the queen, a known horse lover, a 7-year-old grey gelding named Fabuleu de Maucour belonging to the largely ceremonial French Republican Guard. It was delivered to Windsor Castle on June 1. The horse was trained to carry the standard-bearer of the Guard. It paraded on Paris' Champs-Elysees avenue on May 8, ahead of the presidential cortege, for the ceremony marking the anniversary of the victory of the Allied forces over Nazi Germany in World War II. Macron paid a formal homage to the queen on June 2 during a flame rekindling ceremony at the Arc de Triomphe monument. He laid a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, in the presence of British Ambassador to France Menna Rawlings. Both the British and the French national anthems were played, the Elysee said. From June 2 and June 5, the United Kingdom and Commonwealth nations celebrated Elizabeth's 70 years on the throne, an anniversary known as her Platinum Jubilee. Elizabeth, then 25, became queen on Feb. 6, 1952, following the death of her father, King George VI. Her formal coronation took place on June 2, 1953, in Westminster Abbey, but her reign began the moment her father died. Now 96, she is Britain's longest-reigning monarch and the first to reach seven decades on the throne. This article was provided by The Associated Press.

EXOPOLITICS TODAY with Dr. Michael Salla
Did the US use time travel to win World War II?

EXOPOLITICS TODAY with Dr. Michael Salla

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 8:08


According to the legendary Montauk Project whistleblower, Al Bielek, the US first discovered time travel technology in 1936 and was given assistance from the future to win World War II. Bielek's startling information provides an answer to a common question concerning extraterrestrial intervention in human affairs, “how did Nazi Germany lose the war if they were receiving technological assistance from Draco Reptilians”, as claimed by secret space program insiders such as William Tompkins in his Selected by Extraterrestrials book series? --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/exopolitics/support

Kerusso Daily Devotional
Indestructible

Kerusso Daily Devotional

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 1:51


Did you know God's Word is indestructible?   Many ancient books have been lost to history. Others sit still buried under the sands of the Middle East. But after thousands of years, the Bible is more widely read than ever.   Hebrews 4:12 says, “For the word of God is alive and active. Sharper than any double-edged sword, it penetrates even to dividing soul and spirit, joints and marrow; it judges the thoughts and attitudes of the heart.”   There's an interesting story in the Old Testament book of Jeremiah. We are told that the wicked king of Judah didn't like the Word given by God to the prophet, so he threw it in the fire! But God simply had Jeremiah do it again, and today we have the story recorded in our Bibles.   Whenever men decide they want to get rid of the Bible, whether in Nazi Germany or today in countries where dictators hurt their own people, God's Word survives, and it finds its way into the hands of even more people.   A God who can do that is the true God, and the only One worthy of worship!   Let's pray.   Lord, your Word is something that we can't get away from, even when we are rebellious. Thank you for preserving your Word so that we all have access to it. In Jesus' name. Amen.

Intelligent Design the Future
Darwinian Racism vs. Evolutionary Ethics that Devalue All Men Equally

Intelligent Design the Future

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 41:36


Today's ID the Future again features Darwinian Racism author and historian Richard Weikart and radio host Hank Hanegraaff exploring the pernicious impact Charles Darwin and Darwinism have had on modern ethics. Ideas laid out in Darwin's The Origin of Species and The Descent of Man fueled scientific racism in the United States and Nazi Germany, Weikart says, and undergird the ideas of contemporary white nationalists, who tend to be virulently anti-Christian and pro-Darwin. We can take some comfort from the fact that white nationalists are a fringe movement and that most evolutionists today are anti-racist, Weikart says, but he notes that Darwinian materialism has poisoned mainstream ethics in another way, by devaluing humans generally. This is why someone as mainstream Read More › Source

New Books in Biography
Tehmton S. Mistry, "The 24th Mile: An Indian Doctor's Heroism in War-torn Burma" (HarperCollins, 2021)

New Books in Biography

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 39:36


The story of India and Indians in World War II has been overshadowed by other historical events of the 1940s, a busy decade that included such historical watersheds as Indian independence (and the anti-colonial nationalist movement that led to it), as well as the partition of the Indian subcontinent. Indeed, many in Europe and North America, and even many in India, probably know very little about how crucial India was to the outcome of World War II. India and Indians were a very important part of World War II, and it is not an exaggeration to say that the role of India and Indians was indispensable in securing the victory of the British and Allied powers against Nazi Germany and imperial Japan. The stories of Indians in World War II have often been forgotten in popular accounts and memories of the conflict, but that is now changing, as more authors and scholars cover this subject. Through highlighting the remarkable life and career of Jehangir Anklesaria, a heroic Parsi (Indian Zoroastrian) doctor who lived in Rangoon at the outbreak of the conflict, Dr. Tehmton S. Mistry's The 24th Mile: An Indian Doctor's Heroism in War-torn Burma (Harper Collins, 2021) makes a major contribution to our memory of World War II with the unique story of one individual during the most devastating conflict in human history. When the Japanese invaded Burma in December 1941, Jehangir sent his wife and daughter by ship to India, but feeling duty-bound, he decided to stay back in Burma. He joined the war effort and worked tirelessly to quell a cholera epidemic. He then found himself one of thousands on the trek through the treacherous jungle and mountains towards safety in northeastern India. The book reminds us of the difference a single individual's foresight and leadership can make in bringing about better outcomes, even amidst war and disease. The 24th Mile is a work of creative non-fiction, which means that although the storyline abides by the historical narrative of the period and follows historical figures, the author has taken the creative license to create secondary fictional characters, write descriptions, and recreate dialogues among the characters. The author, Tehmton Mistry, is part of the extended family and next generation of the protagonist's family, and he successfully and evocatively recreates the story of Jehangir's grit and heroism in a death-defying journey to safety in a major theater of World War II. Tehmton S. Mistry is a retired obstetrician and gynaecologist who practiced in St. Louis, Missouri. Born and raised in Mumbai (Bombay), Dr. Mistry moved to the United States from India in the early 1970s, together with his wife – whom he met when he studied at St. Xavier's College, Mumbai. The protagonist of The 24th Mile, Dr. Jehangir Anklesaria, was his wife's uncle and a key influence on their early life. Now retired and living in California, Dr. Mistry enjoys writing, among other hobbies. Shatrunjay Mall is a PhD candidate at the Department of History at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He works on transnational Asian history, and his dissertation explores intellectual, political, and cultural intersections and affinities that emerged between Indian anti-colonialism and imperial Japan in the twentieth century. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/biography

New Books in History
Tehmton S. Mistry, "The 24th Mile: An Indian Doctor's Heroism in War-torn Burma" (HarperCollins, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 39:36


The story of India and Indians in World War II has been overshadowed by other historical events of the 1940s, a busy decade that included such historical watersheds as Indian independence (and the anti-colonial nationalist movement that led to it), as well as the partition of the Indian subcontinent. Indeed, many in Europe and North America, and even many in India, probably know very little about how crucial India was to the outcome of World War II. India and Indians were a very important part of World War II, and it is not an exaggeration to say that the role of India and Indians was indispensable in securing the victory of the British and Allied powers against Nazi Germany and imperial Japan. The stories of Indians in World War II have often been forgotten in popular accounts and memories of the conflict, but that is now changing, as more authors and scholars cover this subject. Through highlighting the remarkable life and career of Jehangir Anklesaria, a heroic Parsi (Indian Zoroastrian) doctor who lived in Rangoon at the outbreak of the conflict, Dr. Tehmton S. Mistry's The 24th Mile: An Indian Doctor's Heroism in War-torn Burma (Harper Collins, 2021) makes a major contribution to our memory of World War II with the unique story of one individual during the most devastating conflict in human history. When the Japanese invaded Burma in December 1941, Jehangir sent his wife and daughter by ship to India, but feeling duty-bound, he decided to stay back in Burma. He joined the war effort and worked tirelessly to quell a cholera epidemic. He then found himself one of thousands on the trek through the treacherous jungle and mountains towards safety in northeastern India. The book reminds us of the difference a single individual's foresight and leadership can make in bringing about better outcomes, even amidst war and disease. The 24th Mile is a work of creative non-fiction, which means that although the storyline abides by the historical narrative of the period and follows historical figures, the author has taken the creative license to create secondary fictional characters, write descriptions, and recreate dialogues among the characters. The author, Tehmton Mistry, is part of the extended family and next generation of the protagonist's family, and he successfully and evocatively recreates the story of Jehangir's grit and heroism in a death-defying journey to safety in a major theater of World War II. Tehmton S. Mistry is a retired obstetrician and gynaecologist who practiced in St. Louis, Missouri. Born and raised in Mumbai (Bombay), Dr. Mistry moved to the United States from India in the early 1970s, together with his wife – whom he met when he studied at St. Xavier's College, Mumbai. The protagonist of The 24th Mile, Dr. Jehangir Anklesaria, was his wife's uncle and a key influence on their early life. Now retired and living in California, Dr. Mistry enjoys writing, among other hobbies. Shatrunjay Mall is a PhD candidate at the Department of History at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He works on transnational Asian history, and his dissertation explores intellectual, political, and cultural intersections and affinities that emerged between Indian anti-colonialism and imperial Japan in the twentieth century. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books Network
Tehmton S. Mistry, "The 24th Mile: An Indian Doctor's Heroism in War-torn Burma" (HarperCollins, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 39:36


The story of India and Indians in World War II has been overshadowed by other historical events of the 1940s, a busy decade that included such historical watersheds as Indian independence (and the anti-colonial nationalist movement that led to it), as well as the partition of the Indian subcontinent. Indeed, many in Europe and North America, and even many in India, probably know very little about how crucial India was to the outcome of World War II. India and Indians were a very important part of World War II, and it is not an exaggeration to say that the role of India and Indians was indispensable in securing the victory of the British and Allied powers against Nazi Germany and imperial Japan. The stories of Indians in World War II have often been forgotten in popular accounts and memories of the conflict, but that is now changing, as more authors and scholars cover this subject. Through highlighting the remarkable life and career of Jehangir Anklesaria, a heroic Parsi (Indian Zoroastrian) doctor who lived in Rangoon at the outbreak of the conflict, Dr. Tehmton S. Mistry's The 24th Mile: An Indian Doctor's Heroism in War-torn Burma (Harper Collins, 2021) makes a major contribution to our memory of World War II with the unique story of one individual during the most devastating conflict in human history. When the Japanese invaded Burma in December 1941, Jehangir sent his wife and daughter by ship to India, but feeling duty-bound, he decided to stay back in Burma. He joined the war effort and worked tirelessly to quell a cholera epidemic. He then found himself one of thousands on the trek through the treacherous jungle and mountains towards safety in northeastern India. The book reminds us of the difference a single individual's foresight and leadership can make in bringing about better outcomes, even amidst war and disease. The 24th Mile is a work of creative non-fiction, which means that although the storyline abides by the historical narrative of the period and follows historical figures, the author has taken the creative license to create secondary fictional characters, write descriptions, and recreate dialogues among the characters. The author, Tehmton Mistry, is part of the extended family and next generation of the protagonist's family, and he successfully and evocatively recreates the story of Jehangir's grit and heroism in a death-defying journey to safety in a major theater of World War II. Tehmton S. Mistry is a retired obstetrician and gynaecologist who practiced in St. Louis, Missouri. Born and raised in Mumbai (Bombay), Dr. Mistry moved to the United States from India in the early 1970s, together with his wife – whom he met when he studied at St. Xavier's College, Mumbai. The protagonist of The 24th Mile, Dr. Jehangir Anklesaria, was his wife's uncle and a key influence on their early life. Now retired and living in California, Dr. Mistry enjoys writing, among other hobbies. Shatrunjay Mall is a PhD candidate at the Department of History at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He works on transnational Asian history, and his dissertation explores intellectual, political, and cultural intersections and affinities that emerged between Indian anti-colonialism and imperial Japan in the twentieth century. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Medicine
Tehmton S. Mistry, "The 24th Mile: An Indian Doctor's Heroism in War-torn Burma" (HarperCollins, 2021)

New Books in Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 39:36


The story of India and Indians in World War II has been overshadowed by other historical events of the 1940s, a busy decade that included such historical watersheds as Indian independence (and the anti-colonial nationalist movement that led to it), as well as the partition of the Indian subcontinent. Indeed, many in Europe and North America, and even many in India, probably know very little about how crucial India was to the outcome of World War II. India and Indians were a very important part of World War II, and it is not an exaggeration to say that the role of India and Indians was indispensable in securing the victory of the British and Allied powers against Nazi Germany and imperial Japan. The stories of Indians in World War II have often been forgotten in popular accounts and memories of the conflict, but that is now changing, as more authors and scholars cover this subject. Through highlighting the remarkable life and career of Jehangir Anklesaria, a heroic Parsi (Indian Zoroastrian) doctor who lived in Rangoon at the outbreak of the conflict, Dr. Tehmton S. Mistry's The 24th Mile: An Indian Doctor's Heroism in War-torn Burma (Harper Collins, 2021) makes a major contribution to our memory of World War II with the unique story of one individual during the most devastating conflict in human history. When the Japanese invaded Burma in December 1941, Jehangir sent his wife and daughter by ship to India, but feeling duty-bound, he decided to stay back in Burma. He joined the war effort and worked tirelessly to quell a cholera epidemic. He then found himself one of thousands on the trek through the treacherous jungle and mountains towards safety in northeastern India. The book reminds us of the difference a single individual's foresight and leadership can make in bringing about better outcomes, even amidst war and disease. The 24th Mile is a work of creative non-fiction, which means that although the storyline abides by the historical narrative of the period and follows historical figures, the author has taken the creative license to create secondary fictional characters, write descriptions, and recreate dialogues among the characters. The author, Tehmton Mistry, is part of the extended family and next generation of the protagonist's family, and he successfully and evocatively recreates the story of Jehangir's grit and heroism in a death-defying journey to safety in a major theater of World War II. Tehmton S. Mistry is a retired obstetrician and gynaecologist who practiced in St. Louis, Missouri. Born and raised in Mumbai (Bombay), Dr. Mistry moved to the United States from India in the early 1970s, together with his wife – whom he met when he studied at St. Xavier's College, Mumbai. The protagonist of The 24th Mile, Dr. Jehangir Anklesaria, was his wife's uncle and a key influence on their early life. Now retired and living in California, Dr. Mistry enjoys writing, among other hobbies. Shatrunjay Mall is a PhD candidate at the Department of History at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He works on transnational Asian history, and his dissertation explores intellectual, political, and cultural intersections and affinities that emerged between Indian anti-colonialism and imperial Japan in the twentieth century. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/medicine

New Books in Japanese Studies
Tehmton S. Mistry, "The 24th Mile: An Indian Doctor's Heroism in War-torn Burma" (HarperCollins, 2021)

New Books in Japanese Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 39:36


The story of India and Indians in World War II has been overshadowed by other historical events of the 1940s, a busy decade that included such historical watersheds as Indian independence (and the anti-colonial nationalist movement that led to it), as well as the partition of the Indian subcontinent. Indeed, many in Europe and North America, and even many in India, probably know very little about how crucial India was to the outcome of World War II. India and Indians were a very important part of World War II, and it is not an exaggeration to say that the role of India and Indians was indispensable in securing the victory of the British and Allied powers against Nazi Germany and imperial Japan. The stories of Indians in World War II have often been forgotten in popular accounts and memories of the conflict, but that is now changing, as more authors and scholars cover this subject. Through highlighting the remarkable life and career of Jehangir Anklesaria, a heroic Parsi (Indian Zoroastrian) doctor who lived in Rangoon at the outbreak of the conflict, Dr. Tehmton S. Mistry's The 24th Mile: An Indian Doctor's Heroism in War-torn Burma (Harper Collins, 2021) makes a major contribution to our memory of World War II with the unique story of one individual during the most devastating conflict in human history. When the Japanese invaded Burma in December 1941, Jehangir sent his wife and daughter by ship to India, but feeling duty-bound, he decided to stay back in Burma. He joined the war effort and worked tirelessly to quell a cholera epidemic. He then found himself one of thousands on the trek through the treacherous jungle and mountains towards safety in northeastern India. The book reminds us of the difference a single individual's foresight and leadership can make in bringing about better outcomes, even amidst war and disease. The 24th Mile is a work of creative non-fiction, which means that although the storyline abides by the historical narrative of the period and follows historical figures, the author has taken the creative license to create secondary fictional characters, write descriptions, and recreate dialogues among the characters. The author, Tehmton Mistry, is part of the extended family and next generation of the protagonist's family, and he successfully and evocatively recreates the story of Jehangir's grit and heroism in a death-defying journey to safety in a major theater of World War II. Tehmton S. Mistry is a retired obstetrician and gynaecologist who practiced in St. Louis, Missouri. Born and raised in Mumbai (Bombay), Dr. Mistry moved to the United States from India in the early 1970s, together with his wife – whom he met when he studied at St. Xavier's College, Mumbai. The protagonist of The 24th Mile, Dr. Jehangir Anklesaria, was his wife's uncle and a key influence on their early life. Now retired and living in California, Dr. Mistry enjoys writing, among other hobbies. Shatrunjay Mall is a PhD candidate at the Department of History at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He works on transnational Asian history, and his dissertation explores intellectual, political, and cultural intersections and affinities that emerged between Indian anti-colonialism and imperial Japan in the twentieth century. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/japanese-studies

New Books in Military History
Tehmton S. Mistry, "The 24th Mile: An Indian Doctor's Heroism in War-torn Burma" (HarperCollins, 2021)

New Books in Military History

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 39:36


The story of India and Indians in World War II has been overshadowed by other historical events of the 1940s, a busy decade that included such historical watersheds as Indian independence (and the anti-colonial nationalist movement that led to it), as well as the partition of the Indian subcontinent. Indeed, many in Europe and North America, and even many in India, probably know very little about how crucial India was to the outcome of World War II. India and Indians were a very important part of World War II, and it is not an exaggeration to say that the role of India and Indians was indispensable in securing the victory of the British and Allied powers against Nazi Germany and imperial Japan. The stories of Indians in World War II have often been forgotten in popular accounts and memories of the conflict, but that is now changing, as more authors and scholars cover this subject. Through highlighting the remarkable life and career of Jehangir Anklesaria, a heroic Parsi (Indian Zoroastrian) doctor who lived in Rangoon at the outbreak of the conflict, Dr. Tehmton S. Mistry's The 24th Mile: An Indian Doctor's Heroism in War-torn Burma (Harper Collins, 2021) makes a major contribution to our memory of World War II with the unique story of one individual during the most devastating conflict in human history. When the Japanese invaded Burma in December 1941, Jehangir sent his wife and daughter by ship to India, but feeling duty-bound, he decided to stay back in Burma. He joined the war effort and worked tirelessly to quell a cholera epidemic. He then found himself one of thousands on the trek through the treacherous jungle and mountains towards safety in northeastern India. The book reminds us of the difference a single individual's foresight and leadership can make in bringing about better outcomes, even amidst war and disease. The 24th Mile is a work of creative non-fiction, which means that although the storyline abides by the historical narrative of the period and follows historical figures, the author has taken the creative license to create secondary fictional characters, write descriptions, and recreate dialogues among the characters. The author, Tehmton Mistry, is part of the extended family and next generation of the protagonist's family, and he successfully and evocatively recreates the story of Jehangir's grit and heroism in a death-defying journey to safety in a major theater of World War II. Tehmton S. Mistry is a retired obstetrician and gynaecologist who practiced in St. Louis, Missouri. Born and raised in Mumbai (Bombay), Dr. Mistry moved to the United States from India in the early 1970s, together with his wife – whom he met when he studied at St. Xavier's College, Mumbai. The protagonist of The 24th Mile, Dr. Jehangir Anklesaria, was his wife's uncle and a key influence on their early life. Now retired and living in California, Dr. Mistry enjoys writing, among other hobbies. Shatrunjay Mall is a PhD candidate at the Department of History at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He works on transnational Asian history, and his dissertation explores intellectual, political, and cultural intersections and affinities that emerged between Indian anti-colonialism and imperial Japan in the twentieth century. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/military-history

New Books in Southeast Asian Studies
Tehmton S. Mistry, "The 24th Mile: An Indian Doctor's Heroism in War-torn Burma" (HarperCollins, 2021)

New Books in Southeast Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 39:36


The story of India and Indians in World War II has been overshadowed by other historical events of the 1940s, a busy decade that included such historical watersheds as Indian independence (and the anti-colonial nationalist movement that led to it), as well as the partition of the Indian subcontinent. Indeed, many in Europe and North America, and even many in India, probably know very little about how crucial India was to the outcome of World War II. India and Indians were a very important part of World War II, and it is not an exaggeration to say that the role of India and Indians was indispensable in securing the victory of the British and Allied powers against Nazi Germany and imperial Japan. The stories of Indians in World War II have often been forgotten in popular accounts and memories of the conflict, but that is now changing, as more authors and scholars cover this subject. Through highlighting the remarkable life and career of Jehangir Anklesaria, a heroic Parsi (Indian Zoroastrian) doctor who lived in Rangoon at the outbreak of the conflict, Dr. Tehmton S. Mistry's The 24th Mile: An Indian Doctor's Heroism in War-torn Burma (Harper Collins, 2021) makes a major contribution to our memory of World War II with the unique story of one individual during the most devastating conflict in human history. When the Japanese invaded Burma in December 1941, Jehangir sent his wife and daughter by ship to India, but feeling duty-bound, he decided to stay back in Burma. He joined the war effort and worked tirelessly to quell a cholera epidemic. He then found himself one of thousands on the trek through the treacherous jungle and mountains towards safety in northeastern India. The book reminds us of the difference a single individual's foresight and leadership can make in bringing about better outcomes, even amidst war and disease. The 24th Mile is a work of creative non-fiction, which means that although the storyline abides by the historical narrative of the period and follows historical figures, the author has taken the creative license to create secondary fictional characters, write descriptions, and recreate dialogues among the characters. The author, Tehmton Mistry, is part of the extended family and next generation of the protagonist's family, and he successfully and evocatively recreates the story of Jehangir's grit and heroism in a death-defying journey to safety in a major theater of World War II. Tehmton S. Mistry is a retired obstetrician and gynaecologist who practiced in St. Louis, Missouri. Born and raised in Mumbai (Bombay), Dr. Mistry moved to the United States from India in the early 1970s, together with his wife – whom he met when he studied at St. Xavier's College, Mumbai. The protagonist of The 24th Mile, Dr. Jehangir Anklesaria, was his wife's uncle and a key influence on their early life. Now retired and living in California, Dr. Mistry enjoys writing, among other hobbies. Shatrunjay Mall is a PhD candidate at the Department of History at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He works on transnational Asian history, and his dissertation explores intellectual, political, and cultural intersections and affinities that emerged between Indian anti-colonialism and imperial Japan in the twentieth century. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/southeast-asian-studies

New Books in South Asian Studies
Tehmton S. Mistry, "The 24th Mile: An Indian Doctor's Heroism in War-torn Burma" (HarperCollins, 2021)

New Books in South Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 39:36


The story of India and Indians in World War II has been overshadowed by other historical events of the 1940s, a busy decade that included such historical watersheds as Indian independence (and the anti-colonial nationalist movement that led to it), as well as the partition of the Indian subcontinent. Indeed, many in Europe and North America, and even many in India, probably know very little about how crucial India was to the outcome of World War II. India and Indians were a very important part of World War II, and it is not an exaggeration to say that the role of India and Indians was indispensable in securing the victory of the British and Allied powers against Nazi Germany and imperial Japan. The stories of Indians in World War II have often been forgotten in popular accounts and memories of the conflict, but that is now changing, as more authors and scholars cover this subject. Through highlighting the remarkable life and career of Jehangir Anklesaria, a heroic Parsi (Indian Zoroastrian) doctor who lived in Rangoon at the outbreak of the conflict, Dr. Tehmton S. Mistry's The 24th Mile: An Indian Doctor's Heroism in War-torn Burma (Harper Collins, 2021) makes a major contribution to our memory of World War II with the unique story of one individual during the most devastating conflict in human history. When the Japanese invaded Burma in December 1941, Jehangir sent his wife and daughter by ship to India, but feeling duty-bound, he decided to stay back in Burma. He joined the war effort and worked tirelessly to quell a cholera epidemic. He then found himself one of thousands on the trek through the treacherous jungle and mountains towards safety in northeastern India. The book reminds us of the difference a single individual's foresight and leadership can make in bringing about better outcomes, even amidst war and disease. The 24th Mile is a work of creative non-fiction, which means that although the storyline abides by the historical narrative of the period and follows historical figures, the author has taken the creative license to create secondary fictional characters, write descriptions, and recreate dialogues among the characters. The author, Tehmton Mistry, is part of the extended family and next generation of the protagonist's family, and he successfully and evocatively recreates the story of Jehangir's grit and heroism in a death-defying journey to safety in a major theater of World War II. Tehmton S. Mistry is a retired obstetrician and gynaecologist who practiced in St. Louis, Missouri. Born and raised in Mumbai (Bombay), Dr. Mistry moved to the United States from India in the early 1970s, together with his wife – whom he met when he studied at St. Xavier's College, Mumbai. The protagonist of The 24th Mile, Dr. Jehangir Anklesaria, was his wife's uncle and a key influence on their early life. Now retired and living in California, Dr. Mistry enjoys writing, among other hobbies. Shatrunjay Mall is a PhD candidate at the Department of History at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He works on transnational Asian history, and his dissertation explores intellectual, political, and cultural intersections and affinities that emerged between Indian anti-colonialism and imperial Japan in the twentieth century. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/south-asian-studies

Intelligent Design the Future
Richard Weikart and Hank Hanegraaff Talk Darwinian Racism

Intelligent Design the Future

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 30:25


On today's ID the Future, radio host Hank Hanegraaff interviews historian and Center for Science and Culture senior fellow Richard Weikart about his book, Darwinian Racism: How Darwinism Influenced Hitler, Nazism, and White Nationalism. The two look at how Darwinism fueled scientific racism and an aggressive and frequently racist eugenics movement not just in Nazi Germany but, earlier, in the United States, where many leading, even mainstream voices, including Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger, top business magnates, and some liberal Protestants enamored of evolutionary theory pushed compulsory sterilization laws, which were passed in Indiana, California, and other states. Weikart shows how these laws were fueled and informed by ideas laid out in Darwin's The Descent of Man, ideas that also Read More › Source

Wars of The World
What Was the Post War Career of the Messerschmitt Me 262?

Wars of The World

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 17:23


An often overlooked part of the ME 262's story is that like many weapons from World War II, the Stormbird's life didn't end with the death of Hitler and the surrender of Nazi Germany on May 7th 1945. In this episode we are going to look at the Me262's life in the post-war period and how it impacted the victorious Allies moving forward as they turned on one another in the early days of the Cold War. Welcome to Wars of the World.

Heroes Behind Headlines
Surviving WWII Inside Nazi Germany as a 5-Year-Old American Girl

Heroes Behind Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 83:19


In June of 1939, a five-year-old American girl traveled with her family to Germany to visit her grandfather. The visit was supposed to last three months. However, before they could board a ship back to the USA, the Nazi's seized control of Germany and closed all borders. That little girl would overcome unfathomable odds to survive 7 more years in Nazi Germany, before returning to her native soil. Today, nearly 90 years later, we are honored to be joined by the incredible and inspiring Marlies DiFante. When Marlies' family left for Germany no one knew Adolph Hitler would soon launch a massive invasion of Poland and plunge the world into World War II. For Marlies, the result was a haunting and extraordinary journey through a land controlled by the most notorious dictator in modern history.Marlies DiFante is currently a grandmother living in upstate New York and the author of her amazing autobiography ‘Queen of the Bremen: The True Story of an American Child'.The Impromptu Game PlanPurposeful Pivots of Career AdventurersListen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify Bigfoot ClassifiedA podcast that explores some of the biggest BIGFOOT cover-ups in history.Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify

Think Biblically: Conversations on Faith & Culture
Darwinian Racism (with Richard Weikart)

Think Biblically: Conversations on Faith & Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 29:29


What exactly is the connection between Darwinian evolutionary theory and what is often called “social Darwinism” that emerged out of it—that includes eugenics and race based selection and preferences. Historian Richard Weikart has been with us before on the ideological roots of Naziism, and he extends his past work to connect the philosophy underlying Darwinian evolutionary theory and the race based implications coming out of it, both in Nazi Germany and the current white nationalist movement. Join Scott and Sean for this fascinating historical look at some of the ideas that came out of Darwin's work on evolution.Dr. Weikart's latest book is Darwinian Racism: How Darwinism Influenced Hitler, Nazism, and White Nationalism.Dr. Richard Weikart is Professor Emeritus of History at California State University, Stanislaus. He is also Senior Fellow for the Center for Science and Culture at the Discovery Institute. He is the author of several books including Hitler's Religion.==========Think Biblically: Conversations on Faith and Culture is a podcast from Talbot School of Theology at Biola University, which offers degrees both online and on campus in Southern California.Read a transcript of this episode at: https://www.biola.edu/blogs/think-biblically/2022/darwinian-racismFind all episodes of Think Biblically at: https://www.biola.edu/think-biblicallyWatch video episodes at: https://bit.ly/think-biblically-video

Pat Gray Unleashed
Are Vegetarians Nazis? | 6/16/22

Pat Gray Unleashed

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 94:45


Don Lemon asks Karine Jean-Pierre the questions the American people want answered. The energy secretary tries to redirect on inflation, saying that in Brazil, prices would be similar. John Kerry is still saying that we need to get rid of fossil fuels. Even in 2019, Joe Biden ran on a platform of stopping oil production in America. Eric Adams talks about crystals scattered around New York that provide "special energy." There is a new electric car with a built-in solar panel. The White House is adding another letter to the alphabet soup while addressing the LGBTQI+ community. Nazi Germany had a history of pushing vegetarianism. A librarian in Montana is in trouble for pushing the trans agenda on children. John Hinckley's sold-out show has been canceled. Amber Heard keeps making things worse for herself. People on the street are challenged with the concept of "my body, my choice" when it comes to vaccines. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Dom Giordano Program
Central Bucks SD Bans Sexual Content in Schools

The Dom Giordano Program

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 47:09


Full Hour | In today's third hour, Dom welcomes Pennridge School District President Joan Cullen back onto the Dom Giordano Program, to gather her expertise on the decision by Central Bucks School District to change a school policy allowing the school board to ban books with sexual content. In the media, this decision has been framed as an attack against LGBTQ+ individuals. Giordano asks Cullen for the justification of such a ban, with Cullen telling why she's pushed in her own school district for similar edicts. Giordano and Cullen discuss the intricacies of sexual education, with both stressing the importance of responsibility in what is shown and taught to children. Then, after playing Dom's Money Melody, producer Dan tells about a West Philadelphia café which is facing a forceful takeover on the grounds of wokeness. After that, Giordano returns back to national politics, discussing the stock market for the day and how it ties into the rampant inflation of the Biden administration. Dom then returns to a topic discussed earlier, an appearance by PA gubernatorial candidate Doug Mastriano on Ben Stein's podcast, in which the host drew comparisons to Nazi Germany, which Giordano takes umbrage with. (Photo by Getty Images)

Bill Whittle Network
Show Trial: Is Jan. 6 Hearing a Terrifying Turning Point, or a Comical (Costly) Charade?

Bill Whittle Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 14:05


Bill Whittle thinks the Congressional hearing over the Jan. 6 "insurrection" raises the ominous specter of historical show trials in Nazi Germany, Soviet Russia and Communist China. Is this a terrifying turning point for America, or just a comical, if costly, charade by Democrats to beat Donald Trump in 2024, or his political allies this year. Right Angle is a production of our Members. Join us now at https://BillWhittle.com

Celebrity Book Club with Steven & Lily
Rudolf “Viennese Rascal” Bing

Celebrity Book Club with Steven & Lily

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 52:39


Put on a coat and tails, darling—it's opening night! We're singing the praises of infamous Metropolitan Opera manager Rudolph Bing and his salacious 1972 tell-all “5000 Nights at the Opera.” From Marias Callas's shocking diva requests to snooze-worthy Eisnehower, New York's gossip clowns, getting murdered on stage, inventing Google Calendar and how to find a good mezzo soprano in Nazi Germany, it's a good thing you have season tickets! And, coming Friday in the VIP Lounge—Steven attends an It Girl party with Julia Fox, the power of Bud Light Next, a review of Dimes Square institution Cervos, and Lily parties in Old Baku.Subscribe here: patreon.com/cbcthepodTickets to our live show on June 24th in NYC here:https://www.musichallofwilliamsburg.com/shows/detail/435092-celebrity-book-club See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Conversations
RAF Pilot Frank Dell's story of survival in Nazi occupied Holland

Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 52:12


Frank Dell survived being shot down over Nazi Germany, with the aid of courageous Dutch families and resistance fighters (R)

Reflecting History
Episode 110: The Taiping Civil War Part I-The Pressure Cooker

Reflecting History

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 37:16


From 1850-1864, China was swallowed by a wave of chaos and destruction that was bizarre, unprecedented, and apocalyptic. Some historians estimate that the Taiping Civil War left more than 20 million dead in it's wake. The tale is often told as the strange story of the Taiping leader Hong Xiuquan, who claimed to be the younger brother of Jesus and essentially started his own version of Christianity in China. But there is more to the story, and understanding the Taiping Civil War starts with understanding some of the broader themes at play in 19th century China. Nationalism, economic crises, environmental degradation, western imperialism, cultural syncretism, and other forces combined with the fever dreams of one man to change the world forever.  This episode focuses on a broad overview of the Taiping Civil War and some of the major themes that will be at play in this series. Future episodes will go more in depth as well as focus on the human element of the catastrophe.  Support the podcast:https://www.patreon.com/reflectinghistory Try my audio course: Why do 'good' people support evil leaders? What allure does Fascism hold that enables it to garner popular support? And what lessons can history teach us about today?   My audio course 'A Beginners Guide to Understanding & Resisting Fascism: Nazi Germany and the Battle for the Human Heart' explores these massive questions through the lens of Nazi Germany and the ordinary people who lived, loved, collaborated and even resisted during those times.   Through exploring the past, I hope to unlock lessons that all learners on the course can apply to the present day - from why fascism attracts people to how it can be resisted. I'm donating 20% of the proceeds to Givewell's Maximum Impact Fund, and the course also comes with a 100% money back guarantee. Check it out at https://avid.fm/reflectinghistory

UnAborted
Freedom Night With Seth Gruber | Turning Point Faith at Freedom House

UnAborted

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 88:39


Seth joins Freedom House Church in Charlotte, NC for their Turning Point Faith Freedom Night. Exposing the evil nature of the "abortion-rights" movement, Seth quotes their major leaders who have all admitted that the unborn baby is a human being, but employ the same tactics of dehumanization that nazis and racists did by creating a litmus test for "personhood." Seth then explains how that litmus test for who is and isn't a person ends up destroying human equality for all human beings. Ending with a powerful story from Nazi Germany, Seth calls the Church to ACTION and asks what will happen if we miss this Kairos moment for LIFE and continue in our apathy. Joined by Pastor Troy and Penny Maxwell and former NFL player Frank Garcia for a panel discussion and Q&A, Seth explains the very ancient and dangerous heresy that undergirds both the transgender and pro-abortion movement. The panel then discusses the war on the family as a proxy war against God and what we all can do to stand for TRUTH in this moment! Date: 06/13/22 To help UnAborted create more pro-life content and take our content to the streets, become a Patron of the show at https://www.patreon.com/unaborted To help Seth educate and expose culture to the evil of abortion so that every person has a right to be born, become a monthly supporter at https://unaborted.com/donate

SPYCRAFT 101
Espionage in Nazi-Occupied Czechoslovakia with George Bearfield

SPYCRAFT 101

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 60:28


Today, Justin chats with writer, academic, and engineer George Bearfield. George is the grandson of Jaroslav Bublík, one of the last men to parachute into Bohemia and Moravia (now Czechoslovakia) in World War II. Jaroslav and his cousin Josef conducted espionage operations in the region while it was occupied by Nazi Germany until Josef was famously killed in Prague soon after assassinating German SS officer Reinhard Heydrich. George dives into the details of their dangerous parachute missions, the legacy they left in modern Czechia, and the rest of his grandfather's life.An extended edition of this episode featuring 11 minutes of additional interview content, including more on Operation Anthropoid and Heydrich's assassination, is available now on Patreon.Connect with George:Twitter:  @GeorgeBearfield@TheLastParachutist IG: @TheLastParachutistCheck out George's book, Foursquare: The Last Parachutist, here.https://www.amazon.com/Foursquare-Last-Parachutist-George-Bearfield/dp/1527286568Connect with Spycraft 101:Check out Justin's latest release, Covert Arms, here.spycraft101.comIG: @spycraft101Shop: spycraft-101.myshopify.comPatreon: Spycraft 101Find Justin's first book, Spyshots: Volume One, here.Download the free eBook, The Clandestine Operative's Sidearm of Choice, here.Support the show

MG Show
J6 DNC Show Trial; Know Your History

MG Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 119:08


New York City Times Square billboard, Broadway Billboard for MG Show is LIVE thanks to the generosity of Banners4Freedom.com! The Guy's cover tonight's Show Trial and compare it directly with Nazi Germany history, Reichstag fire and relevance, Kevin McCarthy craw-fishes his answer when asked if Election Fraud was legitimate, Kash Patel on NG at Capital, Jim Jordan on Newsmax, Ingraham on Protests, Tucker on triggered recruiter, and Patriot Games with Gregg Phillips.

PBS NewsHour - World
Vatican documents show secret back channel between Pope Pius XII and Adolph Hitler

PBS NewsHour - World

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 6:43


A series of recently opened Vatican archives are shedding new light on the relationship between Pope Pius XII and Adolph Hitler as he led Nazi Germany during World War II. A new book takes a deeper look at these revelations. Historian David Kertzer, author of "The Pope At War: The Secret History of Pope Pius XII, Mussolini, and Hitler," joins Amna Nawaz to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Vatican documents show secret back channel between Pope Pius XII and Adolph Hitler

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 6:43


A series of recently opened Vatican archives are shedding new light on the relationship between Pope Pius XII and Adolph Hitler as he led Nazi Germany during World War II. A new book takes a deeper look at these revelations. Historian David Kertzer, author of "The Pope At War: The Secret History of Pope Pius XII, Mussolini, and Hitler," joins Amna Nawaz to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Kingdom Cross  Roads Podcast
The Mother of Normandy – Doug Stebleton pt 2

Kingdom Cross Roads Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 25:37


The Mother of Normandy Doug Stebleton pt 2 http://www.motherofnormandy.com/ ()June 6, 1944.  Commonly referred to as D-Day – the Normandy Invasion. Every year, more and more of the heroes of that day are passing away. Soon, there will be none. When that day comes, a page will turn in the history books. But to capture the heart and soul of that day, to keep it forever in the forefront of our memories, became a passion of our guest today. Doug Stebleton decided it was time for the world to know some of the people that turned survival into victory. That turned their fears into courage. That turned the sorrow of over 5,000 dead and buried in one small town into a life-long ministry of compassion and to tell the story of many stories, all in order to honor those who gave their all to keep the world free. Doug Stebleton has been working in the entertainment business since 1987. Born and raised in Glasgow, Montana, he came to Hollywood at age 19 and has lived and worked in southern California since then. His expertise is music publishing for film and television. His company owns a catalog of songs that are licensed to film and television studios and to independent productions. Doug is not only a film producer, but an author as well. But it is his love of history that drives him to make films and documentaries that are inspiring, informative and educational – all at the same time. His love and passion for history led Doug to create and produce the film, http://www.motherofnormandy.com/ (“The Mother of Normandy,”) which he has turned into a hard cover book and, recently, an e-book! Praise God! Doug shares how the cemeteries in this town came to be and how the “mayor” of the town started to receive letters from American families wanting information on their fallen soldiers… Simone Renaud became famous when a photograph of her in “Life Magazine” showed her putting flowers on the grave of Brig. General Teddy Roosevelt, Jr.  How did her life change after that was published? In the book, is it Maurice took over staying in contact with relatives of GI's and things like that after his mother passed away? As the soldiers and families of that era pass away, has he noticed a falling off of interest in visitors and inquiries? There was a US Paratrooper that landed on the church steeple in Sainte Mere Eglise, and that Mayor Alexander Renaud and his son stayed at his house when they visited the United States. I bet that was a great reunion. Amen! How did the making of your film and the research for the book affect your perspective of D-Day? Doug, as June 6th is now upon us again, I believe there is a renewed interest, I pray there is a renewed interest, in learning the behind the scenes activities of the heroes and heroines that supported the liberation of France, Europe and ultimately the defeat of Nazi Germany. How has your film been received? I know, when I was a Cavalry Officer, I studied military history – and that has continued to this day. Especially World War II history. I also believe if we do not learn for the lessons of history then we are doomed to repeat history. In that light, how can someone watch your video and purchase your book on http://www.motherofnormandy.com/ (“The Mother of Normandy?”) CONTACT INFORMATION: http://www.motherofnormandy.com/ ()      http://www.motherofnormandy.com/ (www.motherofnormandy.com)

California Haunts Radio
Author Anna Maria Manalo stops in to talk ghosts and her new Book

California Haunts Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 146:02


Anna Maria Manalo is an author in the genre of fiction and nonfiction supernatural and historical suspense. Her writing is respected for her skilled use of subtext, riveting scenes, and absorbing details.As an amateur travel photographer, she has traveled extensively to more than 27 countries and has compiled accounts of terrifying and uncanny experiences in both her native country of the Philippines and abroad.Manalo starred as "Elisa Simon" in episode two of the pilot, "UFO's Over Earth" while she was a field investigator for MUFON. Her personal experiences with the bizarre has led to a lifetime quest investigating sightings and paranormal events thru eyewitness reports.A screenwriter of science fiction and the supernatural, Manalo has more than 11 screenplays which have placed in prestigious competitions in the United States, pitching screenplays to producers such as Lionsgate, Weinstein and Blumhouse.She has adapted for the screen books by Philip Mantle and Paul Stonehill, who are prominent investigators and authors in the field of UFOlogy.Manalo has been a guest on more than 35 podcasts, including Jim Harold's Darkness Radio, Arcane Radio with Lon Strickler, ParanormalUK Radio with Chris Evers, NightDreams Talk Radio with Gary Anderson, Late Night at the Midlands, a repeat guest with host Paul Bestall of Mysteries and Monsters, Dave Schrader and with host Connie Willis of Coast to Coast AM.“Portal: A Lifetime of Paranormal Experiences” is her first book - a lifetime compilation of eyewitness accounts of paranormal encounters with entities, demonic forces and unclassified UFO phenomena.Her second book “The Way Through The Woods” is a nonfiction novel based on a young girl's escape through the haunted Bavarian forests of Nazi Germany.Her third book, “Haunted Heirlooms: Four Antique Dealers Reveal their Stories” is due for publication this spring by Beyond the Fray Publishers.Manalo is a trained therapist and former school counselor.Follow her on Amazon, Facebook or Instagram for updates.

The Brett Winterble Show
Winterble: D-Day and the Death of the Cities

The Brett Winterble Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 8:15


It is June the sixth 2022. We all recall the almighty sacrifices that were made by our heroes, our brave boys who stormed the beaches on this date in 1944. It's incredible to see how much the world has changed since 1944. Here we are almost 80 years removed from our ascendancy into a true world superpower. And a lot is changing before our very eyes. And so much of that is driven by an inability of our politicians, our elected officials to understand the gravity of the world in which we are currently living. If you go back to 1944, it's coming on the heels of the vicious attack by Imperial Japan, and the the declaration of war by Nazi Germany against the United States. And it was also coming on the heels of the Great Depression. And this is the important lesson that I think we have got to take as it relates to June 6, and the Great Depression: We are never more than a few missteps away from Cataclysm in our country. At the time of World War Two and into the post war era. It was the golden age of American cities. But it would be just two decades later that you would watch those cities descend into chaos, looting, burning crisis, all of it gave way to the malaise of the 1970s the resurrection of the 1980s more malaise in the 1990s. And then of course, what we saw in the aftermath of the World Trade Center and Pentagon attacks, plus this Shanksville, Pennsylvania, crashing of the United Flight there as well. Here's what is so hugely important -- have to understand we're witnessing the death of our cities. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

History Daily
D-Day

History Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 20:50


June 6, 1944. On D-Day, over 150,000 Allied troops storm the beach at Normandy, beginning the liberation of Western Europe from Nazi Germany. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Shaping Opinion
D-Day: God – Family – Country

Shaping Opinion

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 47:58


In this episode, we tell the story of D-Day on its 78th anniversary through a historical narrative where Tim also talks about his family's connection to one of the most pivotal events in our history. The June 6, 1944, allied invasion of Nazi-occupied France through Operation Overlord was one of the biggest military undertakings in world history. This event marked the beginning of the end for Hitler and Nazi Germany. https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/D-Day_-_A_Podcast_Essay_auphonic.mp3 It's June 5th 1944. The night before the most massive military invasion ever mounted in the history of the world. Hundreds of thousands of troops are amassed in Southern England. They are from the United States, Great Britain, France, Canada and other nations. They are about to board boats of all sizes to cross the English Channel and land on the beaches of Normandy in the North of France. It will be the largest armada ever. There are 4,000 ships from America, Britain and Canada.  1,200 planes are fueled and ready to drop paratroopers behind German lines. They are prepared to attack the German anti-aircraft guns and the artillery that will be aimed at landing forces. This massive operation is called Operation Overlord.  The allied commander is U.S. General Dwight David Eisenhower. And all of their focus will be on landing zones in Normandy. They code-named the beaches Utah, Omaha, Gold, Juno, Sword. PFC Francis O'Brien The American troops will land at Utah and Omaha beaches. The British troops will land on Gold and Sword beaches. The Canadian troops will land on Juno beach. Today, we will tell the story of how events unfolded, but before that, you need to get to know Private First Class Francis O'Brien. He was better known to his brothers, his family and friends, and now to you as Fats O'Brien.  That's how I knew him. He was my uncle. Fats is a tough kid from a rough neighborhood in Pittsburgh. He's barely 19 years old. He comes from a big Irish Catholic family that has just struggled through the Great Depression. He and six of his brothers serve in the Army and Navy in both the European and Pacific theaters of World War 2. Fats was assigned to General Omar Bradley's First Army. Company E 38th Infantry Regiment. He was part of the second wave that landed on Omaha Beach. He saw action practically immediately and was awarded a Bronze Star for his efforts. Links D-Day June 6, 1944: The Climactic Battle of World War II, by Stephen Ambrose (Amazon) World War II: D-Day, The Invasion of Normandy, Eisenhower Museum D-Day Timeline, Military History D-Day, June 6, 1944, U.S. Army Band of Brothers, IMDB Normandy American Cemetery, American Battle Monuments Commission Pointe du Hoc Ranger Monument, American Battle Monuments Commission So, what was D-Day? It was officially known as the Battle of Normandy, which lasted from June 6th 1944 through August of that year. It represented the Allied invasion and liberation of Western Europe from German control. Again, it was called Operation Overlord. June 6th would become known as D-Day, the first day of the operation. 156,000 allied forces landed on those five beaches that stretched 50 miles wide. But a lot had to happen for D-Day to happen, and that's what we cover in this episode.

Jack of All Graves
Ep. 91: Meth Nazis and labor pains

Jack of All Graves

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 5, 2022 126:39


Mark is on holiday this week, so our dear comrade Richard Lambert joins Corrigan to talk about Nazi drug use, the fate of the British monarchy, the trouble with ghost movies, violent state responses to labor movements, and the horrors of capitalism! It’s action packed! Highlights: [0:00] Guest Richard Lambert tells CoRri about Nazi methamphetamine use[21:00] We shoot the breeze about our week and have some cultural exchange about the British monarchy[40:10} What we watched![76:48] We discuss the horrors of capitalism, specifically violent things done to people trying to push for labor rights Stuff we referenced: Social Welfare History Project Passaic Textile Strike, 1926 Triangle Fire: Police Brutality against Strikers | PBS LearningMedia Uncovering the History of the Triangle Shirtwaist Fire | History| Smithsonian Magazine POLICE IN SIDECARS CLUB AND CHASE 3,000 IN PASSAIC STRIKE What Made the Battle of Blair Mountain the Largest Labor Uprising in American History | History| Smithsonian Magazine Shooting Up: A History of Drugs in Warfare by Lukasz Kamienski review – what turns soldiers into monsters? | History books | The Guardian Blitzed: Drugs in Nazi Germany by Norman Ohler review – a crass and dangerously inaccurate account | History books | The Guardian The scandal of Orgreave | The miners’ strike 1984-85 | The Guardian

Beyond The Rainbow - True Crimes of the LGBT
S. 9 Ep. 6 Gay Men in Nazi Germany

Beyond The Rainbow - True Crimes of the LGBT

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2022 26:43


To say the treatment of gay men in Nazi Germany at the time of WWII was atrocious...would be an understatement. Gay men were considered the low of the low and oftentimes given the worst jobs in the camp to "toughen" them up. Join C.J. for this historical look back at these war crimes.Promo for: Darkcast Network and Invasion of the RemakeIntro: Black Moons by 126ersOutro: Subtle Betrayal by SYBSResources:https://military-history.fandom.com/wiki/Persecution_of_homosexuals_in_Nazi_Germany_and_the_Holocausthttps://medium.com/lessons-from-history/nazi-homosexuality-d8ab5df5dfbfhttps://remember.org/witness/wit-vic-homohttps://www.peoplesworld.org/article/this-week-in-history-recognizing-the-history-of-the-pink-triangle/https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/experiments-begin-on-homosexuals-at-buchenwaldhttps://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/the-witch-of-buchenwald-is-sentenced-to-prisonhttps://www.haaretz.com/jewish/holocaust-remembrance-day/2021-02-11/ty-article-magazine/.premium/fredy-hirsch-athlete-jewish-wwii-holocaust-auschwitz/0000017f-dfab-d3a5-af7f-ffaf47840000https://pridesource.com/article/64065-2/https://encyclopedia.ushmm.org/content/en/id-card/gad-beckhttps://encyclopedia.ushmm.org/content/en/id-card/willem-arondeus

Convos On The Pedicab
#97 Kristan Harris

Convos On The Pedicab

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 76:20


Kristan Harris is an independent journalist and host of The Rundown Live who covered the Ghislaine Maxwell Trial and whose videos helped identify Kyle Rittenhouse. In this episode, we talked about what went down that night in Kenosha, how non profits and social justice movements have been hijacked by corporations and billionaires, and how the global dynamics today are mirroring the lead up to Nazi Germany. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/alex-strenger/support

Hometown, Alaska – Alaska Public Media
Hometown Alaska: Tiny museum in Chugiak honors Lithuania's fierce independence

Hometown, Alaska – Alaska Public Media

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022


Svaja Worthington was only five years old in 1944 when her family walked away from their Lithuanian home in the face of Russian brutality. During World War II, Lithuania had been occupied first by the Soviet Union and then by Nazi Germany. Towards the end of the war in 1944, as the Germans were retreating, […]

MinddogTV  Your Mind's Best Friend
Meet The Author - Vivianne Knebel - Lessons Learned About Life and Love:

MinddogTV Your Mind's Best Friend

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 63:39


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The Jesse Kelly Show
Hour 2: Strictly History

The Jesse Kelly Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 28, 2022 36:05


An entire hour of some history. The complicated history of the Civil War. The ugliness of a half conquest. The rise of Nazi Germany. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

New Books Network
Maksim Goldenshteyn, "So They Remember: A Jewish Family's Story of Surviving the Holocaust in Soviet Ukraine" (U Oklahoma Press, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 47:11


When we think of Nazi camps, names such as Auschwitz, Bergen-Belsen, and Dachau come instantly to mind. Yet the history of the Holocaust extends beyond those notorious sites. In the former territory of Transnistria, located in occupied Soviet Ukraine and governed by Nazi Germany's Romanian allies, many Jews perished due to disease, starvation, and other horrific conditions. Through an intimate blending of memoir, history, and reportage, So They Remember: A Jewish Family's Story of Surviving the Holocaust in Soviet Ukraine (U Oklahoma Press, 2022) illuminates this oft-overlooked chapter of the Holocaust. In December 1941, with the German-led invasion of the Soviet Union in its sixth month, a twelve-year-old Jewish boy named Motl Braverman, along with family members, was uprooted from his Ukrainian hometown and herded to the remote village of Pechera, the site of a Romanian death camp. Author Maksim Goldenshteyn, the grandson of Motl, first learned of his family's wartime experiences in 2012. Through tireless research, Goldenshteyn spent years unraveling the story of Motl, his family members, and their fellow prisoners. The author here renders their story through the eyes of Motl and other children, who decades later would bear witness to the traumas they suffered. Until now, Romanian historians and survivors have served as almost the only chroniclers of the Holocaust in Transnistria. Goldenshteyn's account, based on interviews with Soviet-born relatives and other survivors, archival documents, and memoirs, is among the first full-length books to spotlight the Pechera camp, ominously known by its prisoners as Mertvaya Petlya, or the “Death Noose.” Unfortunately, as the author explains, the Pechera camp was only one of some two hundred concentration sites spread across Transnistria, where local Ukrainian policemen often conspired with Romanian guards to brutalize the prisoners. In March 1944, the Red Army liberated Motl's family and fellow captives. Yet for decades, according to the author, they were silenced by Soviet policies enacted to erase all memory of Jewish wartime suffering. So They Remember gives voice to this long-repressed history and documents how the events at Pechera and other surrounding camps and ghettos would continue to shape remaining survivors and their descendants. Amber Nickell is Associate Professor of History at Fort Hays State University, Editor at H-Ukraine, and Host at NBN Jewish Studies, Ukrainian Studies, and Eastern Europe. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in History
Maksim Goldenshteyn, "So They Remember: A Jewish Family's Story of Surviving the Holocaust in Soviet Ukraine" (U Oklahoma Press, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 47:11


When we think of Nazi camps, names such as Auschwitz, Bergen-Belsen, and Dachau come instantly to mind. Yet the history of the Holocaust extends beyond those notorious sites. In the former territory of Transnistria, located in occupied Soviet Ukraine and governed by Nazi Germany's Romanian allies, many Jews perished due to disease, starvation, and other horrific conditions. Through an intimate blending of memoir, history, and reportage, So They Remember: A Jewish Family's Story of Surviving the Holocaust in Soviet Ukraine (U Oklahoma Press, 2022) illuminates this oft-overlooked chapter of the Holocaust. In December 1941, with the German-led invasion of the Soviet Union in its sixth month, a twelve-year-old Jewish boy named Motl Braverman, along with family members, was uprooted from his Ukrainian hometown and herded to the remote village of Pechera, the site of a Romanian death camp. Author Maksim Goldenshteyn, the grandson of Motl, first learned of his family's wartime experiences in 2012. Through tireless research, Goldenshteyn spent years unraveling the story of Motl, his family members, and their fellow prisoners. The author here renders their story through the eyes of Motl and other children, who decades later would bear witness to the traumas they suffered. Until now, Romanian historians and survivors have served as almost the only chroniclers of the Holocaust in Transnistria. Goldenshteyn's account, based on interviews with Soviet-born relatives and other survivors, archival documents, and memoirs, is among the first full-length books to spotlight the Pechera camp, ominously known by its prisoners as Mertvaya Petlya, or the “Death Noose.” Unfortunately, as the author explains, the Pechera camp was only one of some two hundred concentration sites spread across Transnistria, where local Ukrainian policemen often conspired with Romanian guards to brutalize the prisoners. In March 1944, the Red Army liberated Motl's family and fellow captives. Yet for decades, according to the author, they were silenced by Soviet policies enacted to erase all memory of Jewish wartime suffering. So They Remember gives voice to this long-repressed history and documents how the events at Pechera and other surrounding camps and ghettos would continue to shape remaining survivors and their descendants. Amber Nickell is Associate Professor of History at Fort Hays State University, Editor at H-Ukraine, and Host at NBN Jewish Studies, Ukrainian Studies, and Eastern Europe. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

Versus History Podcast
Episode 144: The Flame of Resistance: Josephine Baker's Secret War

Versus History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 24:56


In this episode, we catch up with WW2 author and historian Damien Lewis, discussing his brand new book ‘The Flame of Resistance: American Beauty. French Hero. British Spy'.  In December 2021 Josephine Baker, music hall and movie star, and civil rights activist, entered the French Panthéon – the nation's highest honour. Now Damien Lewis reveals her gripping wartime story.It was during WW2 that Josephine Baker, the world's richest and most glamorous Black female entertainer, became an Allied spy. This is the extraordinary story of her heroic personal resistance to Nazi Germany. Prior to the war, Josephine Baker was a music hall diva renowned for her risque song and dance routines, her movie roles and her beauty; she was one of the most photographed female performers in the world. But when Nazi Germany seized her adopted home, Paris, she was banned from the stage, along with all 'negroes and Jews'.  Yet, instead of returning to America, she vowed to stay and to fight. Overnight she went from performer to Resistance hero and spy.Drawing on a plethora of new and unpublished historical material, first-hand interviews and rigorous research, including previously undisclosed letters and journals and newly-released government files, Lewis upends the conventional story of Josephine Baker's war, revealing that her mark on history went far beyond the confines of what she is universally known for – her stardom. For terms of use, please visit www.versushistory.com

The Ezra Klein Show
Anne Applebaum on What Liberals Misunderstand About Authoritarianism

The Ezra Klein Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 62:59


The experience of reading Hannah Arendt's 1951 classic “The Origins of Totalitarianism” in the year 2022 is a disorienting one. Although Arendt is writing primarily about Nazi Germany and Stalinist Russia, her descriptions often capture aspects of our present moment more clearly than those of us living through it can ever hope to.Arendt writes of entire populations who “had reached the point where they would, at the same time, believe everything and nothing, think that everything was possible and that nothing was true.” She describes “the masses' escape from reality” as “a verdict against the world in which they are forced to live and in which they cannot exist.” She points out that in societies riddled with elite hypocrisy, “it seemed revolutionary to admit cruelty, disregard of human values, and general amorality, because this at least destroyed the duplicity upon which the existing society seemed to rest.”It's hard to read statements like these without immediately conjuring up images of Vladimir Putin's Russia or Donald Trump's presidency or the QAnon faithful. But that's exactly the point: The reason Arendt is so relevant today is that her diagnosis doesn't apply just to the Nazi or Soviet regimes she was writing about. It is more fundamentally about the characteristics of liberal societies that make them vulnerable to distinctly illiberal and authoritarian forces — weaknesses that, in many ways, have only become more pronounced in the 70 years since “The Origins of Totalitarianism” was first released.Anne Applebaum is a staff writer for The Atlantic and a Pulitzer Prize-winning historian. Her writing — including her most recent book, “Twilight of Democracy: The Seductive Lure of Authoritarianism” — is focused on the resurgence of autocratic movements and governments around the world, and why members of Western societies have abandoned liberal democratic ideals in favor of strongman leaders, conspiratorial movements and authoritarian regimes. And in the introduction she wrote to a new edition of “The Origins of Totalitarianism,” Applebaum argues that Arendt's insights are more relevant now than ever.So this is a conversation that uses Arendt's analysis as a window into our present. Applebaum and I discuss how “radical loneliness” lays the groundwork for authoritarianism, what Putin and Trump understand about human nature that most liberals miss, the seductive allure of groups like QAnon, the way that modern propaganda feeds off a combination of gullibility and cynicism, whether liberalism's own logic is making societies vulnerable to totalitarian impulses, why efforts by populist politicians to upend conventional morality have held such appeal in Western liberal democracies, how the ideology of “economism” blinds Western liberals to their own societies' deepest vulnerabilities, what liberals need to do differently to counteract the rise of global autocracy and more.Mentioned:“Review of Adolph Hitler's ‘Mein Kampf'” by George OrwellBook Recommendations:Cuba by Ada FerrerThe Lincoln Highway by Amor TowlesThe Origins of Totalitarianism by Hannah ArendtThoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at ezrakleinshow@nytimes.com.You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of “The Ezra Klein Show” at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.“The Ezra Klein Show” is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Michelle Harris, Rollin Hu, Mary Marge Locker and Kate Sinclair; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing by Jeff Geld; audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Our executive producer is Irene Noguchi. Special thanks to Kristin Lin and Kristina Samulewski.