Podcasts about Sicily

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Island in the Mediterranean and region of Italy

  • 1,203PODCASTS
  • 1,960EPISODES
  • 39mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Jan 21, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about Sicily

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Latest podcast episodes about Sicily

Untold Italy travel podcast
The Unmissable Tastes of Sicily

Untold Italy travel podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 48:26


Sicilian food is one of life's great pleasures. Drawing on the layers of history and occupants of the island over many centuries, it has character, nuance and flavor that sets it apart from dishes from the Italian mainland.Sicily expert Karen La Rosa joins us to discuss the mouthwatering tastes you can expect to enjoy when you visit the island - from the important local produce, cheese and pasta dishes to its iconic favorite sweet - cannoli!Discover the tastes of Sicily on our inaugural Untold Italy tour of Sicily in collaboration with La Rosa Works Sicily > detailed tour itinerary. You'll find full episode show notes, including the details of the dishes to try in Sicily here > untolditaly.com/107Want a deeper connection with Italy and help to plan your travels? Join the friends of the podcast here > untolditaly.com/amici Support the show (https://untolditaly.com/amici)

Tough Girl Podcast
Helen Dainty - Full time global hobo cycling the world on AU$100/week. 5 years in and 58,000 km cycled so far…

Tough Girl Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 38:53


Helen in her own words:   “Full time global hobo cycling the world on AU$100/week creating vlogs, blogs, and photo's as I go.   On the road in one form or another since 2004. I left the UK with a round-the-world ticket on what should have been my ‘year out' but never properly returned.    Living out of a backpack ever since, I taught English in South Korea, travelling back overland along the Silk Road before emigrating to Australia in 2007 where a travel fundraising job meant I continued to move from place to place every week or two.   In Australia I took up bicycle touring and in 2016 set out on an ambitious first bike tour through the outback along the Gibb River Road, Tanami, and Oodnadata tracks.    In 2017 I returned to work for a year while training for and running the New York Marathon, before returning to full-time bicycle touring.   In spring 2018 I set out into The Beast From The East to ride a loop of the UK coast and down to Sicily and back.   In 2019 I rode up the Norwegian coast to the North Cape and back through the Baltic states.    In early spring of 2020 I set out to Istanbul getting caught in lockdown in Germany, waiting and changing course as borders closed and reopened, finally arriving in Istanbul a year late in September 2021.   Totalling 58,000kms over 5 years so far..    From here the plan is to continue on riding to Africa, via the the Middle East (pandemic & borders permitting!)"   New episodes of the Tough Girl Podcast go live every Tuesday at 7am UK time - Hit the subscribe button so you don't miss out.    The Tough Girl Podcast is sponsorship and ad free thanks to the monthly financial support of patrons.    Support the mission to increase the amount of female role models in the media. Visit www.patreon.com/toughgirlpodcast and subscribe - super quick and easy to do and it makes a massive difference. Thank you.   Show notes Being a full time global hobo Where she is at the moment Her childhood and growing up in the UK Living in Australia for 10 years Going on a round the world gap year at 26 years  Why she's never stopped travelling Taking up cycling over the past 4/5 years Taking the train from Asia back to Europe Finding a job teaching English in Korea Travelling back to the UK along the Silk Road Making the move to Sydney, Australia  Not being into sports or fitness at a young age Getting into running in her early 30s Living on her bike since 2018 What are the realities of travelling on the road full time Her day to day routine while riding Cycling in the desert in Australia  Enjoying her own company  Magical moments from her trip Enjoying the type 2 fun Interacting with people from different countries  Using Warmshowers  Safety while travelling Using a spot tracker in Australia but not in Europe Getting robbed while in Greece The lessons learned from the experience  Insurance…and the challenges of getting it while bike touring Bike gear and equipment  Learning bike maintenance  Wanting to spend time in Africa How covid impacted Hels while travelling  Starting up Youtube and how it's going  Travelling on AU $100 per week Living off savings and earnings from Patreon and Paypal Keeping costs down and budgeting Staying in her tent or Warmshowers hosts How she's uses her mobile phone and the power of free wifi Sharing her story on social media  Being supported and encouraged by people online Thoughts while cycling  Quick Fire Questions What to remember when things are getting hard Advice for wanting to be a full time Hobo and travelling full time Why you should start of small How to follow along with Hels and be kept upto date with what she's up to   Social Media   Instagram: @hels.on.wheels    Facebook: @Helsonwheelswithmlt    Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/helsonwheels?fan_landing=true   Youtube: https://youtube.com/channel/UChGPMqRpwEtIHsDWR50pGZA  

Late Night Live - ABC RN
East meets West during the Ottoman Empire and in Sicily

Late Night Live - ABC RN

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 53:57


Marc David Baer explains why the history of the Ottoman Empire should be considered part of European history and Jamie Mackay takes us through the many empires that left a mark on the island of Sicily

The History of WWII Podcast - by Ray Harris Jr
Episode 352-Interview with Ray Boomhower about his book: Richard Tregaskis-Reporting Under Fire From Guadalcanal to Vietnam

The History of WWII Podcast - by Ray Harris Jr

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 59:44


Ray Boomhower has written about 3 important war correspondents, Richard Tregaskis, Ernie Pyle and Robert L. Sherrod. Today we discuss the young Tregaskis as he covers events like Midway, Guadalcanal, and the invasion of Sicily. Tregaskis will almost die in Italy, but will return to the Pacific to cover the approach to the Japanese home islands.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Shaping Opinion
Author Mark Seal on the Making of “The Godfather”

Shaping Opinion

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 61:22


Author Mark Seal joins Tim to talk with Mark about the subject of his popular new book about the making of The Godfather movie. The book is called, “Leave the Gun, Take the Cannoli.” Mark has is a contributing editor at Vanity Fair where he's covered scandals, history makers and pop culture icons. https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/The_Making_of_The_Godfather_auphonic.mp3 The Godfather was the first of three motion pictures directed by Francis Ford Coppola about the fictional Corleone crime family. The box office hit was released in 1972, and was followed by sequels in 1974 and 1990. The original Godfather film was inspired by the novel of the same name that was written by Mario Puzo and published in 1969. All of the films were distributed by Paramount Pictures and generated roughly $512 million worldwide. The film franchise won nine Academy Awards. This coming March will mark the 50th anniversary of when the Godfather first hit the big screens. The movie centers on Don Vito Corleone and his family. Marlon Brando plays the Don. The Don declines an offer to get into the narcotics business with another crime family, which is led by Virgil Sollozzo. This creates problems. Don Corleone becomes a marked man. Don Corleone's oldest boy is Sonny Corleone. He's played by James Caan. Sonny takes over the crime family while his father recovers. Meanwhile, Sonny's little brother Michael – who is played by Al Pacino – is recruited to exact revenge on Sollozzo. As the gang wars heat up, Michael is sent to Sicily to lay low for a while. That's where he meets his first wife. The violence follows him there when his young bride is killed. Back in New York, Michael's older brother Sonny is killed in an ambush attack. By now, Don Vito Corleone has recovered from the assassination attempt on his life, but he decides to turn over the control of the family business to Michael. There are plots and sub-plots, but through it all, Michael emerges as a force to be reckoned with, and Al Pacino goes from a relative unknown to a Hollywood super star. Mark Seal first wrote about the making of The Godfather years ago in his work for Vanity Fair Magazine. Eventually, that work would lead to his new book entitled, “Leave the Gun, Take the Cannoli.” Links Mark Seal (website) Leave the Gun, Take the Cannoli, by Mark Seal (Barnes & Noble) About this Episode's Guest Mark Seal Veteran author and journalist Mark Seal joined Vanity Fair as a contributing editor in 2003, covering stories as varied as the Bernie Madoff scandal, Ghislaine Maxwell, Tiger Woods, the fall of Olympian Oscar Pistorius, the making of classic films such as Pulp Fiction, and many more. He has twice been a National Magazine Awards finalist. His 2016 Vanity Fair article “The Over the Hill Gang,” about a gang of retired thieves who pulled off the biggest jewel heist in British history, was the basis of the 2018 film, King of Thieves, starring Michael Caine. In addition to Leave the Gun, Take the Cannoli. he is the author of the books Wildflower, about the incredible life and brutal murder of Kenyan naturalist and filmmaker Joan Root, and The Man in the Rockefeller Suit, about the serial con artist Clark Rockefeller.

Italian Wine Podcast
Ep. 742 Natalia Ravidà | Wine, Food & Travel With Marc Millon

Italian Wine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 27:19


Episode 742 Marc Millon interviews Natalia Ravidà, in this episode of Italian Food & Wine with Marc Millon on the Italian Wine Podcast. About today's guest: With an established career in journalism based in London, in 1991 Natalia Ravidà began promoting RAVIDA Extra Virgin Olive Oil around the world. As the business picked up and the oils won world recognition ‘best olive oil in the world', she left journalism to work full time in the family business in Sicily. A love for food inherited from her family was at the source of her quest to record her favorite Sicilian dishes in Seasons of Sicily highlighting daily use of extra virgin olive oil in everyday Mediterranean cooking. RAVIDA olive oils are a small family run business based in Menfi, south west Sicily. The range includes Extra Virgin Olive oils and 2020 Great Taste Award winning lemon and Mandarin olive oils. A Vinegar and a range of sea salts. RAVIDA is available in selected stores around the world including Harrods, Waitrose, Selfridges in the Uk, Williams Sonoma in the US, Isetan in Japan, City Super in Hong Kong. It is a medium grassy olive poil produced to high standards from a natural blend of Biancolilla, Cerasuola and Nocellara olives. If you want to learn more about today's guest and her Oliva Oil company, you can by visiting: Website: www.ravida.it Instagram: ravida_evoo Facebook: @ravidaoliveoil More about the host Marc Millon: Marc Millon, VIA Italian Wine Ambassador 2021, has been travelling, eating, drinking, learning and writing about wine, food and travel for nearly 40 years. Born in Mexico, with a mother from Hawaii via Korea and an anthropologist father from New York via Paris, he was weaned on exotic and delicious foods. Marc and his photographer wife Kim are the authors of 14 books including a pioneering series of illustrated wine-food-travel books: The Wine Roads of Europe, The Wine Roads of France, The Wine Roads of Italy (Premio Barbi Colombini), and The Wine Roads of Spain. Other titles include The Wine and Food of Europe, The Food Lovers' Companion Italy, The Food Lovers' Companion France, Wine, a global history. Marc regularly lectures and hosts gastronomic cultural tours to Italy and France with Martin Randall Travel, the UK's leading cultural travel specialist. He is soon to begin a regular series on Italian Wine Podcast, ‘Wine, food and travel with Marc Millon'. When not on the road Marc lives on the River Exe in Devon, England If you want to learn more about Marc, you can by visiting: quaypress.uk/ marcmillon.co.uk vino.co.uk quaypress.com LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/marc-millon-50868624 Twitter: @Marc_Millon Let's keep in touch! Follow us on our social media channels: Instagram @italianwinepodcast Facebook @ItalianWinePodcast Twitter @itawinepodast Tiktok @MammaJumboShrimp LinkedIn @ItalianWinePodcast If you feel like helping us, donate here www.italianwinepodcast.com/donate-to-show/ We also want to give a shout out to our sponsor Ferrowine. The largest alcoholic beverage shop in Italy since 1920! They have generously provided us with our brand new Italian Wine Podcast T-shirts, and we love them! Check out Ferrowine's site, they have great wines, food pairings and so much more! https://www.ferrowine.it/ Until next time, Cin Cin!

The WW2 Podcast
157 - General Patton

The WW2 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 52:34


George S Patton Junior starred as an Olympic athlete in the 1912 Stockholm games. In 1916 under John J. Pershing Patton joined the Mexican Expedition against the paramilitary forces of Mexican revolutionary Francisco "Pancho" Villa. When the US entered the First World War Patton joined the new Tank Corps and commanded the U.S. tank school in France. Leading tanks into combat he would be wounded near the end of the war. But Patton is best remembered for his exploits on the battlefields of WWII, and this is what what we are looking at in this episode, from Morocco, through Sicily to D-Day.  Joining me is Kevin Hymel. Kevin has worked as a historian for the US army and is currently doing work for the Arlington National Cemetery. He is also a tour guide for Stephen Ambrose Historical Tours. He is the author of Patton's Photographs: War as He Saw It and his new book is Patton's War: An American General's Combat Leadership, Volume I: November 1942 - July 1944. Patreon: patreon.com/ww2podcast

That's The Tea with Alessandra G
S2 Ep40: Friday Features with Sicily Rose

That's The Tea with Alessandra G

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 21:23


On this episode of That's The Tea with Alessandra G, influencer, singer and actress, Sicily Rose, joins Alessandra for an exclusive segment of Friday Features. She's opening up about her music career, goals for next year and so much more. DISTROKID DISCOUNT To follow Sicily Rose, CLICK HERE.    To keep up with Alessandra, click here! 

Saint of the Day
Our Holy Mother Melania the Younger of Rome (439)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 3:23


She was born in 383 in Rome, to a very wealthy family with large estates in Italy, Africa, Spain and even Britain. She was the grand- daughter of St Melania the Elder (June 8) and a pious disciple of Christ from a young age. She was married against her will at the age of fourteen, to a relative named Apinianus. They had two children, both of whom died in early childhood. Henceforth Melania and her husband dedicated themselves entirely to God. They had both dreamed of a high wall that they would have to climb before they could pass through the narrow gate that leads to life, and soon began to take measures to dispose of their wealth. This aroused opposition from some of the Senate, who were concerned that the selling off of such huge holdings would disrupt the economy of the State itself.   With the support of the Empress, though, Melania was able to free 8000 of her slaves and give each a gift of three gold pieces to begin life as freedmen. She employed agents to help fund the establishment of churches and monasteries throughout the Empire, donated many estates to the Church, and sold many more, giving the proceeds as alms. When Rome fell to the Goths under Alaric in 410, Melania and Apinianus moved to Sicily, then to Africa, where they completed the sale of their propery, donating the proceeds to monasteries and to aiding victims of the barbarians.   In Africa Melania, now aged about thirty, took up a life of the strictest asceticism: she kept a total fast on weekdays, only eating on Saturday and Sunday; she slept two hours a night, giving the rest of the night to vigil and prayer. Her days were spent in charitable works, using the remainder of her wealth to relieve the poor and benefit the Church. After seven years in Africa, Melania, her mother and her husband left on pilgrimage to the Holy Land. There they founded a monastery on the Mount of Olives, which grew to a community of ninety nuns. Melania's mother died in 431, then her husband and spiritual brother Apinianus ; she buried them side by side.   Save for one visit to Constantinople, Melania continued to live in reclusion in a small cave on the Mount of Olives; she became an advisor to the Empress Eudocia, who sought her expert counsel on her gifts to churches and monasteries.   Melania fell ill keeping the Vigil of Nativity in 439, and fell asleep in the Lord six days later; her last words were 'As it has pleased the Lord, so it has come to pass.' Her monastery was destroyed in 614 by the Persians, but her cave hermitage on the Mount of Olives is still a place of pilgrimage and veneration.

The Cinematography Podcast
Seamus McGarvey ASC, BSC on the musical adaptation of Cyrano, shooting in Sicily during the pandemic and on an active volcano

The Cinematography Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 45:22


Cinematographer Seamus McGarvey is very happy about being a DP, and his love of the job always takes him through the difficult times. When he sees a movie that actually works beautifully on screen, it makes everything worthwhile. The new musical Cyrano is based on the stage play by Erica Schmidt, which caught the attention of director Joe Wright, who knew he wanted to adapt it into a film. Stars Peter Dinklage and Haley Bennett also reprise their roles in the movie as Cyrano de Bergerac and Roxanne. Wright used the stage play as a guide for what the film should look like, and hired his frequent collaborator, Seamus McGarvey as the cinematographer. The two have now worked on five films together. Seamus wanted the film to feel more intimate than a play, so he chose close up portraiture of the actor's faces, capturing sensitive performances. Because of the pandemic, Wright felt even more strongly about the story of Cyrano being an outsider, craving love and human connection. They began shooting in the fall of 2020, creating a bubble of performers in the town of Noto, Sicily, with many background actors playing a few different parts. Since Sicily was still locked down for COVID with no tourism and few people out and about, most of the town became the entire set- the locations were all real houses and buildings. The crew was able to shoot with little distraction or interference, and with no bars or restaurants open, they became a tight-knit group. In his adaptation of Cyrano, Wright was guided by the musical and wanted the dialog to roll naturally into song, which were recorded live during the shoot. Playback had to be done through earpieces for all of the performers so they knew when to sing and dance. Fortunately, all of the actors were such good singers that they didn't have to do a lot of takes, and they had time to focus on rehearsals and blocking first. Seamus had previously shot the musical The Greatest Showman, and he enjoyed the experience on Cyrano of playing with the rhythm of photography with song, creating a beat to the pictures themselves. The “Every Letter” song sequence in Cyrano reminded him of working on music videos in his early career, and he and the crew had fun creating lens flares with flashlights throughout the scene. They worked with lots of candles and torches, with some LED torches with CGI flames for a nighttime staircase fight scene in the film. The filming of Cyrano literally ended with a bang. Mount Etna is an active volcano, and Wright chose to film the final battle sequences up the side of it. The weather had turned unseasonably cold and it started snowing, creating a real problem for the set which had to be relocated. The snow would start to melt because the earth beneath was hot with molten lava. Finally, within days of completing shooting and beginning to wrap out of the location, Mt. Etna erupted and the sets were covered in ash. The entire crew quickly evacuated. Find Seamus McGarvey: Instagram @seamiemc Twitter: @mcseamus You can see Cyrano opening in theaters December 31. Find out even more about this episode, with extensive show notes and links: http://camnoir.com//ep153/ Sponsored by Hot Rod Cameras: www.hotrodcameras.com Sponsored by Assemble: Assemble has amazing production management software. Use the code cinepod to try a month for free! https://www.assemble.tv/ Be sure to watch our YouTube video of Nate Watkin showing how Assemble works! https://youtu.be/IlpismVjab8 The Cinematography Podcast website: www.camnoir.com YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheCinematographyPodcast Facebook: @cinepod Instagram: @thecinepod Twitter: @ShortEndz

TODAY
TODAY 3rd Hour: Al Roker boards a zero gravity flight. CC Sabathia on battle with alcohol. Cooking with Cal — family meatball recipe.

TODAY

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 37:16


Al Roker gets a taste of space onboard a flight into zero gravity. Plus, baseball legend CC Sabathia opens up to Craig Melvin about his personal battle with alcohol and turning his life around. Also, Dylan Dreyer and her son Cal are sharing a family meatball recipe straight from Sicily.

Shine
Purposeful Leadership with Leticia Van Splunteren

Shine

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 50:16


Welcome to the final episode of the SHINE podcast for 2021. This podcast always focuses on the science, spiritual perspective and application of conscious, inclusive leadership, the recipe for high performing teams, and awareness practices that you can cultivate to be the kind of leader our world needs now. In this last episode of 2021 we are going out with fireworks. Our topic for today is purposeful leadership with my friend and colleague Leticia Van Splunteren. In this interview Leticia speaks vulnerably about how she navigated 2020 & 2021 as a CEO and mother, how she took on the priority of motherhood and well being first so that she could bring a strong, passionate and purpose to her leadership and life. She also shares some of the important mindsets and inner game tools she relies on to be a conscious inclusive leader at work and in the world. Lastly, there is a very special invitation that Leticia has for you. This interview has many valuable tips for you to bring your best and whole self to your life. Thank you for listening.   SHINE Links:   Leading from Wholeness Executive Coaching Leading from Wholeness Learning and Development Resources Shine: Ignite Your Inner Game to Lead Consciously at Work and in the World by Carley Hauck Contact Carley Hauck Book Carley for speaking Sign up for the Podcast! Carley on LinkedIn   BACK2BASICS Experience Leticia Latino Leticia on LinkedIn   The Imperfect Shownotes   0:01 Carley Hauck   Hi, welcome to the SHINE podcast. My name is Carley Hauck and I am your host. This podcast focuses on the science, spiritual perspective and application of conscious, inclusive leadership, the recipe for high performing teams, and awareness practices that you can cultivate to be the kind of leader our world needs now. I facilitate two to three episodes a month.   And before I tell you about our topic today, please go over to Apple podcasts, hit the subscribe button so you don't miss any future episodes as we move into 2022 and if you love this episode, or any of our previous SHINE episodes, please write a positive review and share with folks. It helps so much. Thank you.   This is the last episode of the season, season five, the last episode of 2021 and we are going out with a big light fireworks. Our topic for today is purposeful leadership, with my friend and colleague Leticia Van Splunteren. In this interview Leticia speaks vulnerably with me about how she navigated 2020 as a CEO and mother, how she took on the priority of motherhood and well being first so that she could bring a strong, passionate and purpose to her leadership and life.   She also shares some of the important mindsets and inner game tools she relies on to be a conscious inclusive leader at work and in the world. Lastly, there is a very special invitation that Leticia has for you. So you want to definitely listen to the end of the episode.   Leticia is the CEO of Neptuno, USA. Neptuno is a worldwide telecommunications infrastructure with several patented tower designs of applied three dimensional technology to site surveys and tower mapping. This is a family owned business. And in the midst of the pandemic, so many small businesses had to close their doors, but this particular business was able to stay afloat and you're gonna want to learn how they did that. The company has created telecom assets, virtual libraries, has helped develop telecom management software and is taking an active role in the Smart Cities movement. Leticia is an author, a mom, a sister, a wife, a CEO, a podcaster. I have been so grateful to meet this amazing human, and I can't wait to share her story of conscious inclusive leadership with you.   3:13 Carley Hauck   Hello, Leticia. I am so excited to have you on the SHINE podcast today. Thank you for joining.   3:21 Leticia Van Splunteren   Thank you, Carley . Thanks so much for having me.   3:23 Carley Hauck   You're so welcome. Well, I wanted to start off with the question. What does conscious and inclusive leadership and business mean to you?   3:38 Leticia Van Splunteren   That's a rich question. There's so much there. But you know, the first thing that comes to mind is, of course, conscious business. For me, being conscious means being present, being in the moment of what I do, but also doing what's best for the greater good and doing things and engaging in things and in business that, you know, has a positive impact in the world. And, you know, being given everybody the same opportunities, not even noticing who is doing what, that to me is being inclusive.   4:16 Carley Hauck   Mm hmm. Wonderful answer and why is that important to you as a leader as a CEO yourself?   4:24 Leticia Van Splunteren   Well, you know, I currently work for the family business. I worked in it for 20 years now. So I think that when you work in the family business, it gives you a consciousness level that maybe harder to achieve when you work for a big corporation because the soul of the company, it's almost like the soul of your family. And that's how I see our company. So, you know, treating everybody with humanity, being compassionate, being generous in your work and in your company. That's, you know, to me, it's part of what we call consciousness because this creates ripple effects. And that's why it's important to me.   5:07 Carley Hauck Right back care, the soul of the family. Yeah, I like some of the terms that you just used. And being that we've been in this pandemic, you know, world where so many of us are still working from home. Worldwide, it's been over a year and a half now, what have been some of the bigger challenges for you, as a leader, as the CEO of this company? Love to hear.   5:40 Leticia Van Splunteren   Yeah, well, it definitely has been challenging. I joked around with my friends. And they know, I'm not someone that overwhelms easily. But I remember at the very beginning of the pandemic, I was very, very overwhelmed. And mostly, I have still young kids, 11, and seven. And so to have to manage, you know, the company and the impact you will have in the company, and we're in the telecommunications industry. So that's something that I think by now, we can all agree if we hadn't had the infrastructure and the networks, and I'm not going to get very technical, but everybody can relate. If we couldn't have that Zoom session open for our kids and for work, we would have lived through a very different pandemic. So the telecommunications workforce was deemed essential for the very first time in March last year, which I consider we've always been an essential workforce.   But this really made the point. And that means also that in terms of our companies, companies providing telecommunications in general, you know, we were under a lot of stress to deliver, you know, the services and infrastructure that can keep the world connected. And so that poses a lot of challenges. And then, of course, making sure that your employees understood, at least our employees understood that to us safety was first and we weren't going to get anybody in harm's way. And so we have a lot of international traveling for our crews that do work abroad. So of course, we had projects that stopped people not being able to travel. So it was hard. But I think just going, as I say back to basics, and making sure that everybody knew that the basics to us was being healthy, keeping everybody safe, and doing whatever we could do with the resources and situation we were given. So I was trying to do that both at work, and in my personal life. And but yeah, it was very challenging.   7:48 Carley Hauck   And so, you know, it sounds like what was most difficult was just the feelings of overwhelm, and not potentially knowing how to navigate this very uncertain, complex, ambiguous time. And was there anything more specifically that like, maybe you could even point to that has been more challenging for you to navigate in 2021.   8:17 Leticia Van Splunteren   During this year, well, in 2020, just in case I wasn't specific enough, mostly was put in also the kids in front, everything else, because you understood that once they couldn't go back to school, they were at the biggest, you know, we had the biggest uncertainty there and they had to adapt. I had a six year old at the time that had to learn to use the Zoom, and the computer and they had sessions, and you had to be on top of that. Otherwise, you couldn't get them through the school day. Although that was very challenging. And as a CEO, of course, I was staying late and doing everything I could for the company as well. But I had to consciously say, the most important role right now that I have is as a mom. I really felt that and I felt of course communicating with the teams and the company, you know, but the human aspect definitely was the biggest one in 2021. Because we transitioned, you know, the school, the kids slowly returned to school, we got into different patterns and rhythm and pace. I could focus more on the company again, and then started moving because we have as you know, you know, a few months there that compared to our normal pace, it was extremely slow. So you could really kind of pick and choose where you were going to put the attention because we were on emergency mode and this year has been more about okay, now you have different components of how your business did and of course not many businesses achieved their goals or executed their business plans as designed. So it's been a lot of pivoting and just being creative into how to tackle post pandemic world scenario.   10:04 Carley Hauck   Thank you. So what I heard was that in 2020, you know, being a mom was the first priority for you. And as a woman leader, you probably know that in 2020, we had such a huge number, almost 3 million women that had to leave the workforce. Many that were in leadership positions like yourself, because they couldn't navigate work at home, because of the experience, you were just sharing of really needing to make the family and the children that priority. And we need to have women at the top to really create more equity and to make sure that all voices are being heard, and very important decisions for our workplace in our world. And so what allowed you to really be able to straddle both of those in the midst of 2020, that you were able to continue to lead in the way that you were, but you were also able to prioritize motherhood and your children?   11:14 Leticia Van Splunteren   Well, that's an excellent question. And it's kind of a sad answer that I'm going to give. But the truth is, that's where owning your own business makes a difference, you're not going to get fired by doing what you feel is right, the company's gonna take a hit for sure, because you are not, you know, going at the same pace. But at the same time, I think leaders and managers, sometimes they hold very unrealistic expectations. So I think last year, a lot of leaders that thought the business was going to grow substantially unless you sold, you know, hand sanitizer, or anything that is related to COVID is extremely hard.   So there's two options, you can either keep working extremely hard and almost inefficiently, because expecting a certain type of result is almost very unrealistic. Or you say, Yes, we're going to take a hit. This is what I can expect out of this situation, but I'm going to put my attention into, you know, what I think deserves it more. So when you own your own company, you get the benefit to make those decisions. If you work for the same corporate American, you have a boss or a type of leadership that doesn't understand that. That's very difficult to do. And that's unfortunately, why we lost so much ground. And I say we because I'm a big diversity and inclusion advocate. That, you know, it is very sad to see that when it boils down and you have to choose between family and work, I think it is just, you know, human nature, especially for the mother that eats you know, the nurturer eats. You know, this is no secret when one of the two in a couple has to take and make a sacrifice on behalf of the kids. I would say there's extraordinary men out there, but it's usually the woman that's gonna make the sacrifice.   13:08 Carley Hauck   Nope, Agreed. Agreed. Thank you. So, in 2021, I heard you say that it's, it's been a little easier to navigate, because you're not in emergency mode. And yet, I know that there are likely qualities and skills that you possess on the inside what we often refer to as the inner game skills on this podcast, since that's been a big part of the book that I wrote and came out this year SHINE and also is a larger part of the body of work that I've been bringing to leaders and companies. But the inner game really directs our outer game.   And so what were some of the internal resources, quality skills that supported you to be the kind of leader mom and person you want to be in these times?   14:05 Leticia Van Splunteren   That's a great question. And I'll take a moment to say I've read your book. And I think it's fantastic. You did a great, great job there. There's so many important points that I enjoyed and resonated with me in your book.   14:25 Carley Hauck   Thank you.   14:27 Leticia Van Splunteren   Yeah. And so one of the things and I know you're a meditator, I have to say in terms of inner game, I think the ingredients have been there in me, I've been on a personal growth path for quite so many years now. And I'm an avid reader, I'm always reading a book and it's usually about self development. But meditation is something I had been, you know, romancing with for a long time. And I have to say, I owe it to the pandemic that provided me with a more, let's say, a predictable schedule because I travel a lot for work.   And so by being home all the time I could really fit it in, and it was my lifeline to find a, you know, 15 minutes to meditate. And it really helped me put my mind at peace, trust in the situation because as, as we say, it's very, very scary to go through what we went through all of us went through last year not knowing, you know, what's gonna happen and what the, you know, the well being of our families, etc. So I guess I use meditation a lot to kind of channel all the things that were important to me and get to that realization of, you know, we're gonna be okay, we have food, we are at home, we are lucky to be together. And so just keeping the focus into what's important was very key to me. And everything else, you know, the company, the projects that are not happening, the money you're not making, you know, that's the outer game, as you say, in your book, that sold things you can, you know, live without, but the most basic needs were being covered. So I tried to focus on those. And we were in a lucky position that both my husband and I were, you know, able to work from home.   And, you know, I have a lot of sympathy for those people whose job depends on being out and about. And, you know, we paid our nanny for the entire time that the pandemic happened without her having to come because they say, you know, we still have a job, it's not like we lost our jobs. So to take away that income from her because she's not coming to work. And she's not guilty that she cannot come to work, I just didn't feel good with that. And so it was hard, because no one likes to pay money, when you're not receiving the service, I was cooking, cleaning, I was having all the extra work, but just, you know, doing with what makes you feel good in your heart that I think is the key to the to my own inner game, if there's something that, you know, if I do it, and it creates those bad butterflies, what I call in my heart in my stomach, then I know I'm not aligned with my inner game.   17:08 Carley Hauck   Hmm, wonderful answer, I loved hearing that. So really cultivating more self awareness and presence through your meditation practice, that sounds like there was a deeper motivation to do during this time, but also, because you didn't have to get on a plane and travel as much. So there was more regularity in your schedule, to be able to really say this is important. And that enabled you to stay in the moment to stay in gratitude. And to be able to pivot and shift as things always are changing, but in this time, maybe changing more quickly than what we're accustomed to.   And then I also heard that what also came through was the inner game of love. So really cultivating, you know, being loving and caring towards yourself, which then extends outward to everyone that you engage with, and unique and Leticia you and I've only known each other for a little while, but your care and your warmth, and your heart really comes through. And I felt that immediately when we connected. And I said she's got an inner game of love going on here.   18:28 Leticia Van Splunteren   Thank you Carley, I'm happy to hear that. Because you know, it's that and I and I cannot take credit because it's not something I purposely do. But I think yes, that if you nurture yourself it is very hard to do, because you almost feel a little bit selfish, and a little bit guilty of should I be doing something else, something more productive, you know, productive in the way that the world measures it. And when you work in your inner game, it's almost like you don't measure it until you hear a nice comment, like the one you just gave me that if that if that, you know, shines through, then I say okay, then I invested in something that now it's been measured somehow she feels a lot. I feel good about it. But you know, in most cases, you don't get measured on that. And that's the hard part.   19:17 Carley Hauck   Well, and I think that's what's also shifting in corporate culture, and we can talk you know more about this, but the real skills, which in some terms have been called the soft skills, but are really the ways that we lead and collaborate and find, you know, effective communication to innovate to find resolution. Those are not technical skills, you can't necessarily measure them, you know, and, and they do directly lead to business outcomes and organizational goals. And because business is all about relationships, if you don't have that strong inner game, you're not smart. fording a more human centered workforce that is going to be able to really navigate difficult times, like what we're going through.   And so, I mean, I am personally and professionally, maybe a little biased, but I've just seen it again. And again, those are the skills that really matter at the end of the day. And but I hear you that, historically, it's been about what we're doing versus how we're being.   20:31 Leticia Van Splunteren   Yeah, absolutely, couldn't agree more.   20:35 Carley Hauck   Mm hmm. Well, talking about another inner game skill that is often spoken to in the podcast and with many leaders, is the inner game of authenticity. So when we are really cultivating what matters to us, what's really true, and then we're able to bring that out into our actions into our words, I know that authenticity is a big value of yours. And it's something also that I've noticed about you right from our first conversation. So how do you step in the arena first, so to speak, you know, get vulnerable, be more authentic? And how does that support you to lead your team and especially in the midst of healthy or healthy conflict, but some people might just say, conflict, but, but I believe that conflict can be healthy. So that was kind of a big question. But how would you answer that?   21:35 Leticia Van Splunteren   Well, I think that, for whatever reason, being authentic is always a little bit misunderstood. You know, especially if you're a woman, it's especially felt like weakness, but also for men, I think when they're authentic, they're perceived as a little bit soft. So I think that's something that needs to change. And that's a shift that I'm hoping that it's also starting to happen.   But my approach has always been, you know, being authentic, I don't know if it's 17 years of all girls Catholic school there, add something to the women, but, but just, you know, I was also raised with that, you know, just be upfront, and show who you are. And what I've learned is when you are authentic, and also vulnerable. So when you say how it is, people get surprised, because they are not expecting you to say listen, you know, business is not good. I need help. And then you get a very different response that when you put, you know, a strong, you know, facade, saying, oh, everything's good, we're doing this, and we're doing that. And yeah, you can, you can have that and do it. But then you don't realize you're doing yourself a disservice. Because if you're having challenges, no one's gonna connect with your challenges and offer help.   So I lead like that. So I show that vulnerability, I show my team that, you know, I also get issues, I also get problems. I don't expect others to do something that I don't do. For example, for example, you know, I know a lot of leaders and bosses, you know, a very particular kind of boss micromanager. He doesn't like it or she doesn't like it when she isn't here, so he has a doctor's appointment, or he has these and they had to leave the office. And I say, don't you have a doctor's appointment from time to time, and they give you a time in a day that it's in the middle of the day.   And I think we don't put on each other's shoes often enough. And so I tried to lead from that perspective and be authentic also to myself, like, really, if that was me in that situation? Why would I expect, you know, from it. And so that has taken me down a good path, because I find that people are more authentic with me in return. And they open up about things and sometimes, you know, I say I get to hear things and stories that I know that are not shared, you know, with many people, and sometimes man, those around me are surprised by how they tell you that? Or why did they share that with you? And I say because I also share, you know what I'm going through and I was also open.   And so I think that being authentic is really a great quality and, and you practice Be generous with your authenticity first, and you'll see that it's gonna return back somehow to you.   24:26 Carley Hauck   I completely agree. And, you know, one of the other things that I've been learning about authenticity and speaking our truth is there's actually a couple distinctions. So authenticity is really just knowing the truth of who you are, what really matters and conveying that. And then there's transparency and transparency is just allowing people to really hear and see all the details. It's not leaving anything out. And then vulnerability is that personal quality that you're bringing in of- I need support right now, or, you know, just allowing your feelings to come through in the authenticity.   And so for me having those three distinctions supports me to understand, is this a time to be vulnerable? Is this a time to be transparent? Is this a time to be authentic? Or is it time for all three?   25:23 Leticia Van Splunteren   That's why you're the expert. I love that, you know, that this? That distinction is very powerful. Absolutely. And yeah, you know, those of us who are not like you have Masters on the subject. You know, you do it intuitively, you know, that, you know, in business, also, there's a time to be vulnerable, but there's also time to bluff a little bit. And learning to deal with that, I think it's important.   And, you know, if we go back to healthy conflict, and in the team environment, I would have, to my answer that, you know, when I put when I've been transparent, I think that's where this distinction becomes important. When you let the person know, what you're going through in the decision, your decision making, trail of thought, and I something I've done many, many times is say, you know, if I have to say with someone, and I've had great relationships with all my team members throughout my career, and I say, Listen, on the personal level, I consider you a friend, if that has evolved into a friendship with with a colleague, I consider you a friend, and nothing will, I will say in this conversation will affect that, you know, will affect the fact that I consider you a dear friend, and we have a relationship outside the office, and I love to keep that intact.   Now on the you know, professionally, there are certain expectations from the work we are doing. And you know, and then I will go into what maybe I'm not happy about or anything that will create that conflict that we're discussing, but I usually try to create a positive ground where the person feels safe, that the different interactions that we have are not going to be affected by this one conversation.   27:06 Carley Hauck   Well, that's a really helpful example. And then there might even be a piece of vulnerability that you add in there, too, depending on the circumstance, depending on the situation.   All right, well, let's talk about boundaries. You know, being that, again, you're navigating a lot, you're holding a lot from the role of mother to CEO, to wife, and then you also have this podcast. And you're also going to be offering up this incredible experience in Italy in April that we'll share a little bit more about. How are you able to put all of those in buckets, and have time for yourself? And for the things that matter?   27:57 Leticia Van Splunteren   You know, Carley, I think that's a question I get asked the most all the time, but not only in podcasts, like by my friends is like how on earth? Are you doing all this? And it's funny, because, you know, I, I think I'm very realistic, one of the things is, in terms of what boundaries I set families first. And you know, I been a mother, I think it's the biggest job that anybody, I parent, any job that anybody can have, because you realize that you are raising someone else that that is going to be, you know, the is going to model basically, who you are and who you and your spouse or your partner are in terms of bringing this world to this child to the world, and how they show up in the world. So I consider that my biggest responsibility.   And but, you know, I had a great example at home because my father and the company he founded 50 years ago. So I was always, you know, in an intrapreneurship environment, and my dad is a great father, and he's 87. And he still works every single day of his life. So he's still my boss. And, but he gave us the best example in terms of boundaries. And when he would come home from the office, you know, work talk was forbidden. And it was very little, you know, almost no workout. And he say, well, in those times it was easier because it was only me, but now, me, my two siblings, my sister in law, and my dad all work in the same company. So imagine our Christmas events or holidays are usually interesting. But you know, we are all very respectful of that. We all know that we work together and it's very easy to, you know, at a family event to talk about work. And we make a conscious effort and that's where the whole mindfulness and being present and, and you know, you know, be 100% where you are, if I'm in the office, I'm 100% here, if I'm at home, I'm 100% here.   And, you know, I was always very good with my email, even over the weekend since I became a mom, people that interact with me, they know, you know, I'm trying not to check email on the weekend, because otherwise my mind cannot be with my family 100%. And so, you know, you establish the boundaries that you think are important to you. And so for me, families, number one, of course, the business is important, but I always tried to put those first and then I don't take on things I know I cannot fulfill. I'm super realistic with that, like, there's initiatives that I love. And I know I will get to at some point, my book was one of those that you know, I always wanted to write a book but I knew I didn't have the time and then the right opportunity came and it got done.   And then I feel sometimes people are not realistic with their own time. And what they can tackle and setting up having a structure where you say, Okay, I'm going to delegate this delegate that and then you could really come fit so much more by delegating, but also by being honest with what you can tackle and what you cannot tackle.   31:25 Carley Hauck   Fabulous. And so wonderful to hear about the family run business and the components of that, and the people involved, because so many small businesses had to, you know, close their doors in the midst of the pandemic. And then we have these big monopolies like Walmart, and Costco and Amazon, and, you know, that have just really taken on so much more power, because the small business just couldn't compete. And so I'm feeling really happy to hear that Neptuno has continued to really thrive.   And I would also imagine that there's maybe a little bit more camaraderie in working with the family, you know, of saying, hey, this just came up personally, can you take this right? Where I wonder if that's a little bit easier in the context of a family business, versus a non-family business?   32:25 Leticia Van Splunteren   Absolutely. And I think that's how we should all run our business because it goes back to my point to the doctor's appointment, right? If it's your brother or your sister that has an important appointment, you want them to be good, you want to give them peace of mind to go to that appointment and not having to think about work. And the you know, I work for corporate America, my share of the years and thank God that I work for a very good company, Canadian, Nortel and I also work at Merrill Lynch, but you see how we dehumanize work, and it shouldn't be separate.   Work is a huge part of who we are. We spend most of our days in our offices, and it's not separate from our lives. And so I think COVID has allowed us to see that, that we can still be very efficient, we can still run our businesses and do our jobs, you know, sometimes by not being in an office just by being home. I think that's part of what the great resignation is, is that people realize that they can have a different life and that they were going through the motions in having traditional jobs, but they were not happy at the end of the day.   33:34 Carley Hauck   Definitely, yes, we bring our whole selves to work and to home no matter what and I think it's become definitely something that we can't pretend isn't happening and hasn't always happened.   33:50 Leticia Van Splunteren   It's been so challenging, you know, to your point that you know that we are thriving we are thank God and we you know, by we have had to do so many pivots and even my father says he pains me to see what you guys are going through because in his time integrity, your worth, not lying to a customer to get business those were were qualities that were appreciated by the customers. And now we are living unfortunately in a time that the customer wants you to tell them what they want to hear. And there's people out there that will tell them anything just to get a purchase order even knowing it's a lie but you know when you work for the family business, I cannot lie. I always tell people I have 50 years of my father's legacy on our shoulders.   34:40 Carley Hauck   Yeah, the brand reputation, yeah, wonderful.   34:45 Leticia Van Splunteren   I will destroy you much more than you're just a project or a bad deal if I did that. But then you know, to the point of something my husband always tells me he's a very philosophical guy. He says How is good gonna win when evil plays by different rules? And we've been in that position so many times where you, you know, you know that the customer is being lied to is not being treated fairly, it's because you lose the deal, because the others don't play fair. So you have to make a commitment, who do you want to be as a company and as a person?   35:25 Carley Hauck   Definitely, I really appreciate that example. So Neptuno is this family business that you are the CEO of? It's in the telecommunications industry. And tell me why this is so important right now, as we have 5G, and what are the obstacles around having this worldwide network where we're just able to really connect with one another? And then what are also the possibilities?   35:57 Leticia Van Splunteren   I thank you for that question. Currently, because you know, I've done many podcasts, initially, it's all technology driven, or all, you know, self development, kind of this kind of conversation. And it's so important to intersect our worlds and to share with each other what we all do, because it's all definitely intertwined.   So our company started building the telecom towers that you see by the road, so be the big tower towers that really enable the first cell phone calls. So I'm very proud that, you know, throughout the 50 years, we've installed over 10,000, in the Americas, many, many of them are in the islands, where they were the first, you know, tower and means of communication for small towns, so to see, you know, someone being able to call home because now they have a tower, and they have the infrastructure available to make that phone call has always been something I've been very proud of.   And I think that unfortunately, we have lost respect for what's behind our cell phones. There's so many people and so much technology that goes behind being able to make that phone call, or to stay connected or to do WhatsApp. So that's just to say, you know, that I'm very passionate about raising awareness about what the telecom industry does, because he has become a commodity in a way.   And is there something everybody has these days is a cell phone is a smartphone. And so the 5G, what is this? Why is it important? You know, when when the first technology that enable that cellular phone call came about was very revolutionary, right, we get the opportunity to do a phone call from the car for the very first time, 5G, you know, all the technologies in between one G while the what is called Zero G, or one G. And then 5G, you know, has brought us a step closer, where you couldn't text, you know, that 2G technology gave you that, and then you couldn't stream 4G technology gave you that. So there's a lot of, you know, progress that we made.   5G, what it's gonna give us is almost like that real time ability to do things like robotics. We couldn't do robotics, you know, for the longest time, and now, this is the technology that is gonna enable that. And it's always basically always connected. Streaming. You know, it's very exciting. And I will take three hours to explain it, but I'm very, very lucky to be in this industry and be enabling that communication.   38:45 Carley Hauck   Well, thank you, because it just taught me a lot about that industry, because it's not one that I have supported, and the companies and leaders, so thank you for sharing that. And thank you for being in service.   39:02 Leticia Van Splunteren   Thank you. And we are in a workforce shortage. So if anybody you know is interested, this is the perfect time. It's a very exciting industry to join in.   39:10 Carley Hauck   Hmm. Well, we will leave links to how folks can get in touch with you after the podcast. So awesome. People that are interested, reach out to Leticia.   So I want to move us into this incredible new venture and experience that you clearly have been thinking about visioning for a while, where you're bringing leaders together for an incredible, transformational time, at the beginning of April, in Sicily, Italy. And I feel grateful and delighted that you have invited me to come and support the facilitation in co-creation of this event, and what inspired you to want to bring folks together in this way at this time.   39:57 Leticia Van Splunteren   Thank you, Carley . And we're so excited that you're joining us. That's really one of the best things of the whole Back to Basics experience. But what inspired me is, three years ago, I started a podcast called Back to Basics, Reconnecting to the Essence of You, moved by the intuition that, you know, while I enabled telecommunications and coming in connections in what I do, I also realized we are losing human connection, we are not talking to each other, we're not having enough inspiring conversations such as this one.   And so I started the podcast as a side gig. And, you know, you've been on it. So I'm very honored as well. But you know, it just has spun off into all these opportunities and interesting people. And so my husband and I had the idea- what if we do something in a place that will be so beautiful, but also will create like a cohort of, you know, people that are open to just go through a transformational experience.   And so we decide the the whole week, which will happen April 2 to the eighth in Sicily, where my parents are from, and it's, you know, in the town, my dad's down, we're going to have a beautiful castle, all to ourselves, which is our boutique hotel owned by very good friends. And we will have, you know, daily sessions facilitated by you. And by professor, Paul McGee, who's going to be a special speaker for two days.   And we'll talk about you know, all things that we're talking here, you know, your book is going to be, you know, base basis will serve as a great basis of conversations. And also, we realize that people want to have fun, people want to explore other places. And so we're gonna have some beautiful, beautiful day tours to the city of Armenian, Siracusa and Noto. We have three world UNESCO World Heritage towns that will will visit but we are embedding you know, the program, the program that you will facilitate, into these experiences so that it's not like we're going to be, you know, in a classroom all day we're going to be experiencing and that's why, you know, being embodied, yes, yes. That's why it's called the Back to Basics experience, because life doesn't happen. In a classroom. In a conference room, life happens while you're talking while you're having a great meal. Why not have a great Prosecco, you know, I want it to be, you know, more real to what we go through in our daily lives.   42:41 Carley Hauck   Wonderful. Well, for those of you that are listening, and you're thinking Sicily in April, and being with other leaders and learning and growing and connecting, and learning how to bring our best to work in the world. We would love to have you and there will be links in the show notes on how you can come and join us.   43:08 Leticia Van Splunteren   I love it. Yeah, the whole purpose is to have inspired connections, just as what I feel I'm having with you right now and inspired connection. That's really what we are envisioning in this one week to be inspired connections in the most beautiful place you can imagine.   43:22 Carley Hauck   Can't wait   43:23 Leticia Van Splunteren   Me either. So I hope that your audience gets excited to look it up. And we still have a few rooms left. So I encourage everybody to just check it out.   43:37 Carley Hauck   Yeah. Well, Leticia, I'm loving this conversation. And I could talk to you all day. And I'll get an opportunity to do that when we're in Italy. But for now, as we wrap up, I have two last questions for you. Because you are the last interview and guest of 2021. And because we are at the end of the year, I always love the ritual of letting go and bringing in and in my experience, when we let something go, we really give room for the new.   And the letting go could be a person that's not serving you. Right. It could be a client, it could be a pattern or a narrative that you have that's keeping you stuck. It could be an unhealthy habit, you know, anything that you're thinking, you know, I don't want to bring this with me into 2022 because it's keeping me stuck in some way. And then what is it that you're calling in that you're bringing in it's going to replace that? I feel so curious to hear.   44:46 Leticia Van Splunteren   Okay, well, that's a yeah, it's a good question. So what I want to leave out it's something I've been working for since the beginning of the year. It's, you know, I realized somehow human beings we got wired in to having to create a story to everything that happens to us. And I'm very good at that. So let's say a customer doesn't respond to an email, and I'm already thinking they're not gonna buy from me, they're talking to my competitor. And I just create this narrative. And the story in my head that I realize, you know, is fantasy is science fiction, because it's my head, saying something that he may or may not be. But he creates so much suffering for me when I create these stories that are just things that I'm imagining. And so what I'm leaving out is that need to attach a story to something that happened. And just to accept the fact of what happened for what it is, is just the customer didn't respond to the email, and just let it be.   48:47 Carley Hauck   I love that just yeah, just just staying with what is. Oh, so this just happened? Got it. Okay, letting go until more information comes in.   48:50 Leticia Van Splunteren   Yeah, exactly, exactly. And so then with that, what I bring into it is just hope and a deep trust that whatever just happened happened for the greater good.   And just to sit in that deep trust that, you know, and I don't have to know the explanation, I don't have to know why. You know, I think that's why the biggest way of saying it is I don't have to know the why of things and why this happened. And what's the purpose of these and really creates a lot of suffering. And I've been practicing it as we enter the new year. And it's really liberating to just let it be.   46:35 Carley Hauck   And I also want to acknowledge that that's not always so easy.   46:39 Leticia Van Splunteren   No it's not that's why I said I've been working on it for a long time. It's not something that I've just taken because it takes practice.   46:47 Carley Hauck   It does. It does. I think that I'm going to join you in that. Let's be accountability buddies. I love it. 46:54 Leticia Van Splunteren   Let's do it.   46:56 Carley Hauck   Okay, well, we have had such an incredible conversation. You've left me and everyone with so many wonderful, real tips from your own experience. And I'm just really thankful for you taking time today with me and the SHINE podcast. Is there anything you'd like to leave before we end?   47:15 Leticia Van Splunteren   Just, you know, gratitude, Carley, for giving me the space to share my thoughts with you. I know, I mean, I'm a follower. I am a subscriber of your podcast. And I know you have very, very high caliber individuals in this podcast. So I'm very humbled that you asked me to join and I'm humbled that you are co creating Back to Basics with with us. So I'm just very grateful to have met you this year.   47:40 Carley Hauck   Ah, likewise, I'm very excited to continue this journey with you. And you're such a beautiful embodiment of so many of the other leaders. So you're, you're, you know, totally in line with everyone else that I've interviewed. So thank you again.   48:00 Leticia Van Splunteren   Well, thank you for that. And you know, best of luck to anybody listening since I'm the last episode, let's make 2022 a great year and you know, there's going to be ups and there's going to be down, that's a certainty to expect that everything is only up, it's unrealistic. So let's just make the best of what comes our way.   48:19 Carley Hauck   Definitely. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you Leticia for your time and for your commitment to being a conscious inclusive leader.   If you have questions or want to connect with Leticia her LinkedIn handle and other links will be available for you in the show notes. If you enjoyed this episode, please share it with friends, family or colleagues. We're all in this together. And the more that you share, the more that we can support one another.   And as we spoke about this incredible experience in Sicily, Italy, April 2 through eighth, we would love to have you join us. And you can go to the link in the show notes. Or you can also go to leticialatino.com/backtobasics-experience. You can reach out to Leticia or I to learn more information about this incredible week of transformation connection purpose.   If you have any questions, comments or topics that you would like me to address on the podcast, email me at support@carleyhauck.com. As always, I love hearing from you. Thank you so much for tuning in and being part of this community. What a year and I have incredible speakers and interviews lined up starting at the beginning of 2022. You do not want to miss out so if you have not, hit the subscribe button, go and subscribe to the shine podcast. Be safe, be healthy. Take time to nurture your well being, reflect and let go.   And until we meet again in 2022 to be the light and shine the light my friend.  

What the heck with Richard Dweck

Mike knows how to handle difficult people because he was one! Surviving a traumatic brain injury, he overcame his own addiction to drugs. He then went on to devote over 20 years of his professional life as a clinical social worker servicing the needs of the mentally ill and chemically addicted. As an expert in treating patients with borderline personalities, he has delivered keynotes internationally, including speaking at the European Association of Gestalt Therapy in Sicily. Besides his career as a clinical social worker, Mike has also achieved acclaim as a stand up comedian where he discovered the power of humor to heal. He has headlined at The Laugh Factory in New York City, as well as Binghamton University, Columbia University and Kansas State University. His special on PPV , Roku and Amazon Fire TV

Fortune's Wheel: A Podcast History of the Late Middle Ages

Today's Episode: Today, we are beginning some “prep work”...a little bit of “world-building,” if you will…to prepare the scene for BOTH sides of one of the most enduring (for better or for worse) events in the Middle Ages: The First Crusade. There are intense goings-on during the 11th century out west though - waaaay out west - that will have a direct impact on the thinking that kicked off the First Crusade. In my opinion, leaving out the history of medieval Iberia is a gross miscalculation in the modern understanding of the Middle Ages as a whole, therefore, this season of the podcast will focus quite a bit (but not entirely, of course) on Iberia, Western Africa, the Maghreb, Sicily, and pretty much the Mediterranean region and the major moves happening throughout the 11th century leading up to the aforementioned crusades. Man, am I excited about this season, which I have planned to be quite a big one, so buckle up! Members-Only Series on Patreon: Don't forget to head over to Patreon, as well, to hear an entirely new series on the rise of Poland during the 10th and 11th centuries, as well! For only a few bucks per month, you can hear this fascinating telling of how a small group of Slavs transformed into the formidable Polish people who will one day direct European politics for over a century! Every dime donated will be put directly back into the show, so I hope you consider becoming a Patreon member! Just follow this link to our Patreon page to peruse the right “donation plan” for you: https://www.patreon.com/FortunesWheelPodcast. ***** And a huge shout out to Amanda K for becoming Fortune's Wheel's first Patreon supporting listener! I am humbled and appreciative beyond measure. Thank you. Social Media: Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/fortunes.wheel.3 Twitter Page: https://twitter.com/WheelPodcast Music: Music for this episode is called “Al Andalus” by the incredibly talented (as you'll hear) Shane Ivers. Check him out at https://www.silvermansound.com.

Focus on Europe | Video Podcast | Deutsche Welle
Italy: Vaccination where Cinema Paradiso was filmed

Focus on Europe | Video Podcast | Deutsche Welle

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 4:39


The film location of "Cinema Paradiso", in Sicily, has a vaccination rate of 104 percent. Mayor Palazzo Adriano's idea has been effective, and he feels prepared for Omicron.

逐工一幅天文圖 APOD Taigi
309. 彩色 ê 月光 ft. 阿錕 (20211204)

逐工一幅天文圖 APOD Taigi

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 1:46


這張 11 月 18 ê 速翕,月娘 to̍h 敢若去予地球 ê 烏影閘著仝款。這是 tī Sicily ê 暗暝,原本足光 ê 月娘去予烏雲閘著矣。月光煞變暗去,這个時陣月娘去予較懸 ê 薄雲邊仔一寡差不多細粒 ê 水滴產生繞射。結果月光變做彩色 ê,看起來 to̍h 親像是月娘 ê 日冕,月冕,仝款。這暝,月娘嘛 tī 彩色 ê 雲倒爿下跤 ê 昴宿星團出現。昴宿星團嘛叫做七姊妹仔。月娘出現 tī 遐 ê 時陣,就是發生月食 ê 時陣,天色變暗,月娘嘛變做紅色 ê。 ——— 這是 NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day ê 台語文 podcast 原文版:https://apod.nasa.gov/ 台文版:https://apod.tw/ 今仔日 ê 文章: https://apod.tw/daily/20211204/ 影像:Marcella Giulia Pace 音樂:PiSCO - 鼎鼎 聲優:阿錕 翻譯:An-Li Tsai (NCU) 原文:https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap211204.html Powered by Firstory Hosting

Madame Perry's Salon
Filmmaker Doug Bremner, MD On Film "Inheritance, Italian Style."

Madame Perry's Salon

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 57:00


Filmmaker Doug Bremner, MD On Film Inheritance, Italian Style.Five sisters return to their home in Sicily to divide the family art and furniture.

Italian Roots and Genealogy
Researching Limina Sicily

Italian Roots and Genealogy

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 39:03


Actor/Writer/Director Michael Cavalieri talks about finding his roots in Limina Sicily and the production of his award winning film "Ritornato The Movie". Michael Cavalieri is an Actor and first time Writer/Director originally from New York. His Directorial Debut “Ritornato” which he also stars in was awarded a special grant by the Russo Brothers, the Directors of Avengers: Endgame (the highest grossing film of all time), the National Italian American Foundation and the Italian Sons and Daughters of America.  It was shot in four and a half days for less than eight thousand dollars and has gone on to win several film fesitvals worldwide.  "Ritornato" was the only Sicilian-American film chosen for the prestigious Taormina Film Festival in Sicily.Michael made his Acting Debut starring opposite Academy Award-winner Hilary Swank in Columbia Pictures, “The Next Karate Kid.” Since that debut, he has had supporting roles in numerous features including acclaimed Director Walter Hill's “Last Man Standing,” starring Bruce Willis and Christopher Walken.Cavalieri has received critical acclaim for starring roles in many Award-Winning Festival films such as “The Stonecutter,” Winner of The Santa Barbara Film Festival. “The Kingdom of the Blind.” Directed by the Writer of the Academy Award Winning film “Green Book”. “My Brother Jack”, Winner of The Naples Film Festival and The Hamptons Film Festival starring opposite Marco Leonardi from “Cinema Paradiso”. “West of Brooklyn” opposite Joe Mantegna and “The Streetsweeper” which won The Salento Film Festival and The Los Angeles Italian Film Festival. Amici magazine reviewed Michael's performance in “The Streetsweeper” as “a brilliant display of emotional range.” LA Times Critic Kevin Thomas hailed Michael's performance in “The Stonecutter” as “outstanding…he has terrific presence and focus.  His performance lures us into this increasingly complex and provocative drama.” Don Franken, Director of The Method Film Festival said, “Michael's performance lights up the screen, fills the screen larger than life. He's an exciting talent to watch.” Michael has also Guest Starred on numerous hit T.V. shows including SOPRANO‘S, ER and NYPD BLUE.Italian Marketplace LLC Online tee shirts, hoodies and more for ItaliansGrowing Up Italian American-Visco Wonderful book the chronicles two Italian Americans over several decades.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/bePatron?u=30519446)

The Scathing Atheist
461: Maine Squeeze Edition

The Scathing Atheist

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 60:00


In this week's episode, Fox news finds a flash of persecution on their Christmas tree, the Christian Right is so inept they can't even hate Dr. Oz correctly, and Andrew Torrez will be here to talk about the terrifying religious people in robes that aren't clergy. --- To make a per episode donation at Patreon.com, click here: http://www.patreon.com/ScathingAtheist To buy our book, click there: https://www.amazon.com/Outbreak-Crisis-Religion-Ruined-Pandemic/dp/B08L2HSVS8/ To check out our sister show, The Skepticrat, click here: https://audioboom.com/channel/the-skepticrat To check out our sister show's hot friend, God Awful Movies, click here: https://audioboom.com/channel/god-awful-movies To check out our half-sister show, Citation Needed, click here: http://citationpod.com/ To check out our sister show's sister show, D and D minus, click here: https://danddminus.libsyn.com/ To hear more from our intrepid audio engineer Morgan Clarke, click here: https://www.morganclarkemusic.com/ --- Guest Links: Hear more from Andrew Torrez on the Opening Arguments podcast: https://openargs.com/ Check out the Not Your Grandmother's Book Club podcast here: https://open.spotify.com/show/1NPkwUfUnoFqTrVncNIisw?si=FdM4AahrRqmI0GuRKbXB4w&dl_branch=1 --- Headlines: Survey: Record Number of Americans Have No Religion: https://www.pewforum.org/2021/12/14/about-three-in-ten-u-s-adults-are-now-religiously-unaffiliated/ Canada's Government Finally Passes Bill Banning Anti-LGBTQ Conversion Torture: https://friendlyatheist.patheos.com/2021/12/08/canadas-government-finally-passes-bill-banning-anti-lgbtq-conversion-torture/ Christian mom whines after library includes bible in banned books display: https://friendlyatheist.patheos.com/2021/12/11/christian-mom-whines-after-library-includes-bible-in-banned-books-display/ Fox News freaks the fuck out about their damn tree getting set on fire: https://www.washingtonpost.com/media/2021/12/09/fox-christmas-tree-coverage/ Christian Website Warns Readers to Be “Leery” of Dr. Oz: https://friendlyatheist.patheos.com/2021/12/08/christian-website-warns-readers-to-be-leery-of-dr-oz-because-hes-muslim-born/ Catholic diocese in Sicily apologizes after bishop tells kids Santa isn't real: https://friendlyatheist.patheos.com/2021/12/13/catholic-diocese-in-sicily-apologizes-after-bishop-tells-kids-santa-isnt-real/

Cooking with an Italian accent
2x05 - All about the traditional Tuscan sweet treats [Christmas Special]

Cooking with an Italian accent

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 30:39


The best way to understand the Tuscan pastry art is to have a walk in Siena with an open mind, following the trail of spices, paying attention to the colours and to the ingredients of the baked goods arranged in the shop windows of bakeries, cafés, and pastry shops.The Tuscan pastry art isn't show stopping, elegant, refined or elaborate, as you would say of the French patisserie or oven of the Southern Italian pastry art of Sicily and Naples.In this episode, we will delve into the Tuscan pastry art, discovering how seasonal it is, how strongly related to Cucina Povera, and how it shows a lasting influence of Medieval and Renaissance ingredients, spices, and traditions.Find me online at www.julskitchen.com or on Instagram https://instagram.com/julskitchen/ Podcast realized by https://instagram.com/tommyonweb

Riding Shotgun With Charlie
RSWC #133 Jerah Hutchins

Riding Shotgun With Charlie

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 48:54


Riding Shotgun With Charlie #133 Jerah Hutchins Clearing The Chamber Instructor, Entrepreneur, Cigar Smoker, & Bourbon Drinker   Jerah Hutchins is always on the go.  And she's doing so many good things to help people.  We've been friends on Facebook for awhile and I reached out when I was heading to Dallas for AMMcon.  I knew she lived in the area. Tony Simon (RSWC #041) said she is one of his favorite people.  That's a great recommendation so I knew I had to ask her to hop in the stagecoach.  Jerah's grandfather was an immigrant from Sicily who loved the Second Amendment and was adamant about it and ‘about that freedom life'. During her college years, she had a shotgun where she lived, but a stalker changed things and she needed to get a handgun. She felt safe at home, but being out of her apartment which had layers of defense, she needed to have the ability to protect herself. There weren't a lot of women getting into firearms at the time so things were different and there weren't a lot of items that were geared towards women. She started going to the range by herself.  Her friends started asking her to take them to the range to show them how to get started. That's how and why she started becoming a trainer and advocate for women to learn to shoot and carry a firearm. She had a natural market to start a business with her friends and their friends.  She made a change in careers and hasn't looked back.    What I really like about Jerah is that her approach to teaching women about firearms, safety, and shooting is different from how men see things, particularly how a husband would teach his wife. The husband has a tie to the outcome of a gunfight his wife may get in, but Jerah's isn't at the same level and that means she's willing to be patient and help more.  Jerah's family has a tradition of serving the country in some form or another. She found this out in a book that her grandfather wrote about the family history. When she realized that there wasn't anyone in her generation serving, she needed to find out what she could do.  After aging out of the military branches, she found out she was a great fit for the Texas State Guard.  They work for the state of Texas and not the federal government.    Besides everything else, Jerah is a serial entrepreneur. She's a partial owner of a cigar bar as well as everything else.  She says that she collects bourbons and has never had an uncivilized conversation while having a cigar. While enjoying a cigar and bourbon is when she's most creative.  I love that we get into so many things. Self defense attitudes, raising children, helping others. Jerah has an amazing look at life and business. She lives and breathes this every day, everywhere, to everybody.   This episode is DEFINITELY worth a second and even a third listen to! Jerah's approach to life is much different than many other people's approach. Listening to her is inspiring to make positive changes to life and business. This is a jam packed show for sure!   Favorite quotes: “You fail and fail and fail, until you just get it.” “In 2018, I went full time with guns…I went full time and didn't want to do anything else. And I have not looked back.” “Our parents tell use to be careful, but they never tell us how” “Everybody has a why when it comes to the Second Amendment… (one of my reasons) is getting this message out to women and especially mothers that you got a duty” “The freedom that comes with the money, that's what I'm after” “Chase wealth so that government can't control you”   Clearing The Chamber Facebook https://www.facebook.com/clearingthechamber   Clearing The Chamber Instagram https://www.instagram.com/clearingthechamber/   Clearing The Chamber Pinterest https://www.pinterest.com/jerahhutchins/_created/   Clearing The Chamber https://clearingthechamber.com/   Gun Freedom Radio (Thanks to Cheryl Todd for the use of her ‘stagecoach'!) https://gunfreedomradio.com/ Second Amendment Foundation http://saf.org/   Citizens Committee for the Right to Keep and Bear Arms https://www.ccrkba.org/     Please support the Riding Shotgun With Charlie sponsors and supporters.    Buy RSWC & GunGram shirts & hoodies, stickers & patches, and mugs at the store! http://ridingshotgunwithcharlie.com/rswc-shop/   Keyhole Holsters  Veteran Owned, American Made http://www.keyholeholsters.com/   Dennis McCurdy Author, Speaker, Firewalker http://www.find-away.com/   Self Defense Radio Network http://sdrn.us/

Way of the Fathers with Mike Aquilina
53—Gregory and His Greatness

Way of the Fathers with Mike Aquilina

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 19:42


His name retains its greatness, even in modern times—even for Christians who don't know much history. They know Gregorian Chant, and maybe Gregorian Masses. Who was the Gregory behind those monuments? Born into nobility, he held vast estates in Italy and Sicily, but gave them up to be a monk. Then he gave up being a monk so that he could serve the Church. Elected pope, he recast the papacy as a full-time exercise of servitude. He was “servant of the servants of God,” and as such he reformed the clergy, and the liturgy. He directed foreign missions and set lasting standards for inculturation of the faith. He did all this while he was very ill and often combined to bed. His greatness was manifest to his contemporaries and to every age after. LINKS Gregory the Great, Morals on the Book of Job http://www.lectionarycentral.com/gregorymoraliaindex.html Gregory the Great, Dialogues https://www.tertullian.org/fathers/gregory_00_dialogues_eintro.htm Gregory the Great, The Book of Pastoral Rule https://www.catholicculture.org/culture/library/fathers/view.cfm?recnum=2223 Epistle XII: to John, Bishop of Syracuse (on reform of the liturgy) https://www.catholicculture.org/culture/library/fathers/view.cfm?recnum=3719 Mike Aquilina's website https://fathersofthechurch.com Mike Aquilina's books https://catholicbooksdirect.com/writer/mike-aquilina/ Theme music: Gaudeamus (Introit for the Feast of All Saints), sung by Jeff Ostrowski. Courtesy of Corpus Christi Watershed http://www.ccwatershed.org Donate today! https://www.catholicculture.org/users/donate/audio

Drink With Rick
DWR-141 – L’Auratae Nero d’Avola 2020 Tasting and Review

Drink With Rick

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 84:55


I open, taste and review a L'Auratae Nero d'Avola 2020 red wine from Sicily purchased from Total Wine in Charlotte, NC. We also toast birthdays, anniversaries and national days. Plus, Disney stories and an open chat!

Italian Wine Podcast
Ep. 724 Natalia Simeti | Wine, Food & Travel With Marc Millon

Italian Wine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 25:03


Episode 724 Marc Millon interviews Natalia Simeti of Bosco Falconeria, in this episode of Italian Food & Wine with Marc Millon on the Italian Wine Podcast. About today's guest: The farm at Bosco Falconeria, located some 40 miles west of Palermo in the hills overlooking the Gulf of Castellammare has belonged to the Simeti family since 1933, when it was a 25-acre farm dedicated mainly to vineyards, with a cellar in which there were seven platforms for treading the grapes, and where as many as 30 people worked during the grape harvest. Family problems, the agricultural crisis and the 1968 earthquake resulted in a period of abandonment, until in the early ‘seventies the farmhouse was restored as a vacation home. From then on summers and weekends became busier and busier. The passionate involvement of Antonio Simeti, agronomist, married the curiosity of his wife, Mary Taylor Simeti, who in the early ‘80's - while exporting Sicily to the States through books and articles - began to bring back information about organic agriculture. Thus the vacation house returned to productivity, the property grew from the original 25 acres to over 35, the crops became diversified. In 1989, with Bosco Falconeria as its trademark, the farm obtained official organic certification. The following year the Simetis made the farm their permanent residence. For the last ten years Bosco Falconeria has bottled its own organic extra virgin olive oil, has furnished fresh organic fruit and vegetables to speciality stores in Palermo, and has often bottled its own organic wine. The family has grown as well: Natalia Simeti and her Finnish husband Rami Salo, a Tai Chi Chuan instructor, have decided to make Bosco their home and to take over the management of the farm. If you want to learn more about today's guest & winery, you can by visiting: http://www.boscofalconeria.it/en/index.html More about the host Marc Millon: Marc Millon, VIA Italian Wine Ambassador 2021, has been travelling, eating, drinking, learning and writing about wine, food and travel for nearly 40 years. Born in Mexico, with a mother from Hawaii via Korea and an anthropologist father from New York via Paris, he was weaned on exotic and delicious foods. Marc and his photographer wife Kim are the authors of 14 books including a pioneering series of illustrated wine-food-travel books: The Wine Roads of Europe, The Wine Roads of France, The Wine Roads of Italy (Premio Barbi Colombini), and The Wine Roads of Spain. Other titles include The Wine and Food of Europe, The Food Lovers' Companion Italy, The Food Lovers' Companion France, Wine, a global history. Marc regularly lectures and hosts gastronomic cultural tours to Italy and France with Martin Randall Travel, the UK's leading cultural travel specialist. He is soon to begin a regular series on Italian Wine Podcast, ‘Wine, food and travel with Marc Millon'. When not on the road Marc lives on the River Exe in Devon, England If you want to learn more about today's guest, you can by visiting: quaypress.uk/ marcmillon.co.uk vino.co.uk quaypress.com LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/marc-millon-50868624 Twitter: @Marc_Millon Let's keep in touch! Follow us on our social media channels: Instagram @italianwinepodcast Facebook @ItalianWinePodcast Twitter @itawinepodast Tiktok @MammaJumboShrimp LinkedIn @ItalianWinePodcast If you feel like helping us, donate here www.italianwinepodcast.com/donate-to-show/ We also want to give a shout out to our sponsor Ferrowine. The largest alcoholic beverage shop in Italy since 1920! They have generously provided us with our brand new Italian Wine Podcast T-shirts, and we love them! Check out Ferrowine's site, they have great wines, food pairings and so much more! https://www.ferrowine.it/ Until next time, Cin Cin!

Daybreak
Daybreak for December 13, 2021

Daybreak

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021


Monday of the Third Week of Advent Memorial of St. Lucy, virgin and martyr, 283-304; a disappointed suitor accused Lucy of being a Christian, and she was executed in Syracuse, Sicily; Lucy is the patroness of eyesight Office of Readings and Morning Prayer for 12/13/21 Gospel: Matthew 21:23-27

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Monday, December 13, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsMemorial of Saint Lucy, Virgin and Martyr Lectionary: 187All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint LucyEvery little girl named Lucy must bite her tongue in disappointment when she first tries to find out what there is to know about her patron saint. The older books will have a lengthy paragraph detailing a small number of traditions. Newer books will have a lengthy paragraph showing that there is little basis in history for these traditions. The single fact survives that a disappointed suitor accused Lucy of being a Christian, and she was executed in Syracuse, Sicily, in the year 304. But it is also true that her name is mentioned in the First Eucharistic Prayer, geographical places are named after her, a popular song has her name as its title, and down through the centuries many thousands of little girls have been proud of the name Lucy. One can easily imagine what a young Christian woman had to contend with in pagan Sicily in the year 300. If you have trouble imagining, just glance at today's pleasure-at-all-costs world and the barriers it presents against leading a good Christian life. Her friends must have wondered aloud about this hero of Lucy's, an obscure itinerant preacher in a far-off captive nation that had been destroyed more than 200 years before. Once a carpenter, he had been crucified by the Romans after his own people turned him over to their authority. Lucy believed with her whole soul that this man had risen from the dead. Heaven had put a stamp on all he said and did. To give witness to her faith she had made a vow of virginity. What a hubbub this caused among her pagan friends! The kindlier ones just thought her a little strange. To be pure before marriage was an ancient Roman ideal, rarely found, but not to be condemned. To exclude marriage altogether, however, was too much. She must have something sinister to hide, the tongues wagged. Lucy knew of the heroism of earlier virgin martyrs. She remained faithful to their example and to the example of the carpenter, whom she knew to be the Son of God. She is the patroness of eyesight. Reflection If you are a little girl named Lucy, you need not bite your tongue in disappointment. Your patron is a genuine authentic heroine, first class, an abiding inspiration for you and for all Christians. The moral courage of the young Sicilian martyr shines forth as a guiding light, just as bright for today's youth as it was in A.D. 304. Saint Lucy is the Patron Saint of: The Blind Eye Disorders Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Sunday, December 12, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsThird Sunday of Advent Lectionary: 92All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint LucyEvery little girl named Lucy must bite her tongue in disappointment when she first tries to find out what there is to know about her patron saint. The older books will have a lengthy paragraph detailing a small number of traditions. Newer books will have a lengthy paragraph showing that there is little basis in history for these traditions. The single fact survives that a disappointed suitor accused Lucy of being a Christian, and she was executed in Syracuse, Sicily, in the year 304. But it is also true that her name is mentioned in the First Eucharistic Prayer, geographical places are named after her, a popular song has her name as its title, and down through the centuries many thousands of little girls have been proud of the name Lucy. One can easily imagine what a young Christian woman had to contend with in pagan Sicily in the year 300. If you have trouble imagining, just glance at today's pleasure-at-all-costs world and the barriers it presents against leading a good Christian life. Her friends must have wondered aloud about this hero of Lucy's, an obscure itinerant preacher in a far-off captive nation that had been destroyed more than 200 years before. Once a carpenter, he had been crucified by the Romans after his own people turned him over to their authority. Lucy believed with her whole soul that this man had risen from the dead. Heaven had put a stamp on all he said and did. To give witness to her faith she had made a vow of virginity. What a hubbub this caused among her pagan friends! The kindlier ones just thought her a little strange. To be pure before marriage was an ancient Roman ideal, rarely found, but not to be condemned. To exclude marriage altogether, however, was too much. She must have something sinister to hide, the tongues wagged. Lucy knew of the heroism of earlier virgin martyrs. She remained faithful to their example and to the example of the carpenter, whom she knew to be the Son of God. She is the patroness of eyesight. Reflection If you are a little girl named Lucy, you need not bite your tongue in disappointment. Your patron is a genuine authentic heroine, first class, an abiding inspiration for you and for all Christians. The moral courage of the young Sicilian martyr shines forth as a guiding light, just as bright for today's youth as it was in A.D. 304. Saint Lucy is the Patron Saint of: The Blind Eye Disorders Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

Super Saints Podcast
Saint Lucy and the Saints of Sicily

Super Saints Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 18:48


We travel with Bob and Penny to Sicily, to share in the lives of two powerful Saints of Sicily, Santa Rosalia, patron Saint of Palermo, and the famed Santa Lucy, patron Saint of eyes and Breasts, and slo Patron Saint of Siracusa, Sicily.We go with Bob and Penny to the top of Monte Pellegrino, where St. Rosalia lives her final days, and where she appeared to a hunter and saved the city of Palermo from the Plague.We travel to Venice and Siracusa, where the story of the life of St. Lucy unfolds. Listen to Bob and Penny's eyewitness testimony about the day the body of St. Lucy was stolen from the Church in Venice, and then returned. The life of both Saints is fascinating.See the celebrations which take place each year in honor of the Saints.Browse our Sicily Collection Journeys of Faith Bob and Penny Lord's StoreJourneys of Faith Blog Subscribe to our Free Blog Easy PeasyBob and Penny Lord TV Channel Miracles of the Eucharist, Apparitions of Mary, and lives of the Saints videos on demand.Support the show (https://bobandpennylord.store/pages/we-need-your-help)

The Reality Revolution Podcast
The Mysteries Of Bilocation

The Reality Revolution Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 55:46


Bilocation is a classic phenomenon documented in a variety of texts and discussed in many spiritual accounts. Bilocation, or sometimes multilocation, is an alleged psychic or miraculous ability wherein an individual or object is located (or appears to be located) in two distinct places at the same time. Reports of bilocational phenomena have been made in a wide variety of historical and religious contexts, ranging from ancient Greek legends and Christian traditions to modern occultism.   The ancient Greek philosopher Pythagoras is said to have been capable of bilocation. According to Porphyry (writing several centuries after Pythagoras):    Almost unanimous is the report that on one and the same day he was present at Metapontum in Italy, and at Tauromenium in Sicily, in each place conversing with his friends, though the places are separated by many miles, both at sea and land, demanding many days' journey. A similar story is told of Apollonius of Tyana, who was supposedly present simultaneously in Smyrna and Ephesus. Can we become conscious in bodies at a time. Here I discuss this phenomenon and whether it is reality. Alternate Universe Reality Activation  get full access to new meditations, new lectures, recordings from the reality con and the 90 day AURA meditation schedulehttps://realityrevolutionlive.com/aura45338118 BUY MY BOOK! https://www.amazon.com/Reality-Revolution-Mind-Blowing-Movement-Hack/dp/154450618X/ Listen my book on audible https://www.audible.com/pd/The-Reality-Revolution-Audiobook/B087LV1R5V Music By Mettaverseinner worldssolsticeinto the omniversenocturnejourney through the multiversefield of onenesslight quotienttravel lightdream flowbloom ➤ Listen to them on Soundcloud: http://bit.ly/2KjGlLI➤ Follow them on Instagram: http://bit.ly/2JW8BU2➤ Join them on Facebook: http://bit.ly/2G1j7G6➤ Support their Work at Patreon: http://bit.ly/2TXQhu3➤ Subscribe to their channel here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyvjffON2NoUvX5q_TgvVkw The Home Study Course playlist https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLKv1KCSKwOo9SxrM97CZ40xTvWXh1zGPj All my Walter Russell videos - https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLKv1KCSKwOo-9Oguc4o0PlZVfpKD-H2Kz All My Lao Russell Videos - https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLKv1KCSKwOo9kB-BKSGP3KLc8p5dlfUwY The law of One Playlist - https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLKv1KCSKwOo9YW0EjSjbVh94EFlOU_Czw How To Meditate - https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLKv1KCSKwOo_W8G0bCs1qSdQni9oOvX2N For all episodes of the Reality Revolution – https://www.therealityrevolution.com All My Neville Goddard Videos In One Playlist - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLKv1KCSKwOo8kBZsJpp3xvkRwhbXuhg0M All my videos about Dr. Joseph Murphy - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLKv1KCSKwOo_OtBhXg2s85UuZBT-OihF_ Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/The-Reality-Revolution-Podcast-Hosted-By-Brian-Scott-102555575116999 Join our facebook group The Reality Revolution https://www.facebook.com/groups/523814491927119 Subscribe to my Youtube channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCOgXHr5S3oF0qetPfqxJfSw Contact us at media@advancedsuccessinsitute.com#youareafield #newearth #transformation

Wine for Normal People
Ep 403: Sardinia, Italy -- an Overview of Italy's Island with it's Own Accent

Wine for Normal People

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 39:53


Sardinia is the second-largest island in the Mediterranean, and lies off the west coast of mainland Italy. Much larger than Corsica, the wines here have a distinctly Spanish influence, with some Italian and French to boot. The wines are unlike any other you'll encounter (although many you can only encounter them if you visit!). In this show we try try to sort through the grapes and regions of this island to get to the heart of what's here (Grenache, Vermentino) and what to look for in the future.   Sardinia is 150 miles (240km) off the west coast of mainland Italy. Across the Tyrrhenian Sea from Lazio (the province where Rome is located), Sardegna is sandwiched between French Corsica in the north and Sicily in the south at 38˚N and 41˚N latitude. The island is almost three times the size of Corsica with a population of 1.64 million people, with the largest city of Cagliari in the south. Known by the jet setters for the fancy Costa Smeralda in northeast tip, this big island is making more and better wines every year. Photo: Getty Images/Canva Here are the show notes: After some facts and history, I get the hardest part of Sardegna out of the way: the fact that it feels like there are a million appellations: 1 DOCG, 17 DOCs, 15 IGPs  and two-thirds is DOP level. It seems nonsensical – too many “line extensions” of the Sardinia brand!! There are more DOC and IGT titles than Basilicata and Calabria combined but has lowest production per hectare. This is especially confusing when you consider that there are just 25,000 ha/61,776 acres under vine, and 31,000 growers, who own tiny plots (and often form co-ops to economics work).  To try to clear up the DOC confusion, I break it down into the three big buckets: “di Sardegna” Appellations: Cannonau di Sardegna Monica di Sardegna Moscato di Sardegna Vermentino di Sardegna Sardegna Semidano   Cagliari Appellations Malvasia di Cagliari Monica di Cagliari Moscato di Cagliari Nasco di Cagliari Nuragus di Cagliari   Other important DOC/Gs: Carignano del Sulcis Vermentino di Gallura DOCG Vernaccia di Oristano For Bovale: Mandrolisai, Campidano di Terralba   Then we discuss the basics on this large island…   The climate of Sardinia is dry and hot with some maritime influences to cool down the vineyards. The rolling hills and different elevations mean there are many mesoclimates, so growers have to pay attention to their particular area.   Sardinia is made up of hills, plains, coast, and inland areas with varied soils – granite (Gallura), limestone (Cagliari), sandstone, marl, mineral rich clay, sands, gravel. The land tends to be undulating but there are also very high altitudes at which grapes can be planted.   Grapes… The top five varietals are nearly 70% of land under vine, and the area is home to 120 native grape varieties. Old vines (70+ years) are common in Sardinia The top 5 grapes are: Cannonau/Grenache Vermentino Carignano Monica Nuragus   The reds… Cannonau is about 20% of the output of Sardinia. Although it is identical to Grenache, some natives think the grape originated here, and are trying to prove that. These best wines come from a triangle that covers the eastern interior areas within the Cannonau di Sardegna DOC (these names will be on the label): Oliena (Nepente di Oliena)  Capo Ferrato Jerzu   Cannonau is known to have thin skin, medium acidity, a medium body with soft tannins, and high alcohol. It often tastes and smells like peppery spice, red berry, red flowers, and earth and generally has low or no oak aging. Cannonau di Sardegna is required to be 90-100% Cannonau, with other non aromatic, local red grapes permitted. There are a few styles of this wine: Rossoor classico (a little higher alcohol, more yield restrictions), which are often in one of two styles… Strong and tannic with lower acidity and higher alcohol – a steakhouse wine, as MC Ice called it Dry, fewer tannins and slightly fruity, with red berry, cherry, floral, spicy anise/herbal notes, earth, and strong acidity. This is a wine that improves with age Riserva is generally made with riper fruit, and is required to age at least two years with time in a barrel and a minimum alcoholic strength of 12.5% Rosato is a light to full rosé The fortified liquorosowines are made as dolce with a high residual sugar content, or secco,  dry with a higher alcohol content.  Passito styles are made, where grapes are dried on straw mats and then pressed. The resulting wines have similar sweetness toliquoroso dolce. *Many of the other red grapes are made in all of these styles as well Photo: Getty Images/Canva   Other reds… Carignano del Sulcis DOC is for red and rosato wines made from Carignano in the southwest corner of the island. These vines are quite old, and the flavors are like sweet spice, smoke, and dark fruit. The wines tend to be full bodied with high alcohol. Similar to Cannonau, the are made as rosso, riserva, rosato, and passito. There is also a nouveau, or novello style for this wine.     Bovale has 24 different names in Sardininan dialects but the idea that it is Bobal from Spain has been debunked. The two common versions of Bovale are Bovale Grande, which is Carignan, and Bovale Sardo, Rioja's Graciano grape (also called Cagnulari). Mandrolisai and Campidano di Terralba focus on Bovale   The Monica grape is -- grown almost nowhere else in the world, and is definitely from Spain. It is either light and fruity or more intense. There is potential for the grape but now the yields under the Monica di Sardegna and Monica di Cagliari DOCs are so high that it's hard to glean the true potential of the wine.   Pascale di Cagliari is originally from Tuscany and now mostly used to blend with other varieties, like Carignano.    The whites… Vermentino is a sun-loving grape, which works well in Sardinia's hot, dry climate. The styles range from light and fresh to fuller-bodied, with lower acidity and higher alcohol. Good versions taste and smell either like citrus, white flowers, herbs with salinity/minerality or for the fuller styles, almonds, peach, apricot, ripe tropical fruit, with a fat body. Vermentino di Sardegna covers the entire island of Sardinia, so quality is highly variable. Often it is dry, slightly bitter, herbal, and light to neutral in flavor. It can be dry, off-dry, slightly sparkling or Spumante (dry or sweet). Vermentino di Gallura is Sardinia's only DOCG. Located in the island's northeastern corner, the area has sharp diurnals, strong winds from the Mistral and vineyards are on weathered granite soil. The result is a wine that is flavorful, with white flowers, lemon, peach, almond, minerals, and especially a salinity to it.  The wine is dry with a slight bitterness on the finish, good acidity, and high alcohol (14%+ is common). The wine is made as Superiore (higher alcohol requirement, riper grapes), frizzante, spumante, passito, late harvest, and off-dry versions. Winemakers are experimenting with skin contact, amphora, lees stirring (battonage), oak aging, and other techniques to spice things up for Vermentino. Photo: Getty Images/Canva Other white grapes include Nuragus, which was  planted by the Phoenicians, and is light-bodied, dry, acidic, with citrus, green apple, pear, and melon notes. It can be high in alcohol.   Nasco is grown around Cagliari, and is used for passito and liquoroso, with some dry styles.   Torbato is an acidic, minerally white with pear notes that can be creamy with some age. It is also made as a sparkling wine.   Malvasia, dry or sweet is made here, as is Moscato (Muscat) – both are floral, aromatic, and generally lighter in style, although Moscato is bolder than Malvasia   Vernaccia di Oristano is made from a grape that is unique to this area, and the wines, which range from dry to sweet, but are most famed when made in a sherry-like fortified wine, are rarely seen outside Sardinia.   Photo: Getty Images/Canva Here is the list of top producers we mention: Argiolas,  Antonella Corda, Capichera, Contini, Ferruccio Deiana, Cantina Santadi, Sella & Mosca (Campari owns), Siddura, Vigne Surrau, Pietro Mancini   Some sources I used for this show: Strictly Sardinia Ian D'Agata for Vinous, Sardinia's Wines: High Quality, Low Visibility, March 2018 Wine-Searcher, Sardinia Italian Wine Central:Sardegna   Thanks for our sponsors this week: Wine Access: Access to the best wines for the best prices! For 15% off your next order, go to www.wineaccess.com/normal If you think our podcast is worth the price of a bottle or two of wine a year, please become a member of Patreon... you'll get even more great content, live interactions and classes!  www.patreon.com/winefornormalpeople To register for an AWESOME, LIVE WFNP class with Elizabeth go to: www.winefornormalpeople.com/classes

Italian Wine Podcast
Ep. 716 The Three Musketeers Tasting | On The Road Special Edition

Italian Wine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 12:40


Welcome to episode 716, another on the Road Edition With Stevie Kim, today she is in Illasi Veneto at a wine tasting hosted by the so-called 3 Musketeers. Andrea Lonardi, Pietro Russo & Gabriele Gorelli. These 3 wanted to share their Master of Wine collection with a handful of people and talk about “How Many Wines Do You Have to Taste to successfully pass the Master of Wine Exam" Gabriele passed his MA exam in February and the other two are hot on his heels to do the same! Read all about this momentous day on https://italianwinepodcast.com/blog/ About today's 3 Muskateers: Andrea Lonardi is COO at Bertani Domains. He was born in Valpolicella in 1974 (5th generation family making Valpolicella), but he did not remain in the region. He attended University in Bologna, receiving a degree in Agriculture, and thereafter, he obtained his Master's degree from the Grande Ecole di Montpellier, in control and management. He then started to work at Washington State University, completing internships in Languedoc and Sonoma. By 2012 he was ready for an important change and assumed the role of Chief Operating Officer within the newly formed Bertani Domains. He has been a Master of Wine student since 2014. Learn more: https://bertanidomains.com/it Pietro Russo was born in 1985 in Marsala. He is from a family dedicated to winemaking, Pietro Russo graduated in viticulture and winemaking in Conegliano Veneto and got a Masters degree in Bordeaux. His career has included working in Bordeaux and Languedoc, Andalusia, New Zealand and Piedmont, where he developed his winemaking skills and an insatiable passion for wine. Pietro now works for Donnafugata as of 2010, where he has the chance to produce wines from the most compelling appellations across Sicily such as Etna, Pantelleria, Vittoria and Contessa Entellina. In 2020 he revised the Italian chapter for the New Sotheby's Wine Encyclopedia together with Gabriele Gorelli MW and Andrea Lonardi, and he takes part in several international wine competitions as a judge. In the meantime, Pietro is busy with the Master of Wine program, having passed the tasting part of the exam in 2019 his studies continue. Learn more: Instagram: pietrusso85 Facebook: Pietro Russo Linkedin: linkedin.com/in/pietro-russo-4a03a6129 e-mail: Pietro.russo@donnafugata.it Gabriele Gorelli is the first Master of Wine of Italy. He was born in Montalcino in 1984. His grandfather used to be the smallest Brunello di Montalcino producer, accounting for a mere 0,46ha's. That's where he developed a real passion for wine. After completing his studies in Languages in 2004 he co-founded a wine-oriented advertising agency, Brookshaw&Gorelli. Over the years, he has had the opportunity to consult for many Italian wineries and Consortiums. In 2015, Gabriele started his studies at the ‘Institute of Masters of Wine'. He is now the sole Italian Master of Wine. During the same year, he co-founded KH Wines S.r.l., a company that helps European wineries in export markets. Learn more: linkedin.com/in/gabrielegorelli instagram.com/gabriele.gorelli Twitter: @gabrielegorelli More about the host Stevie Kim: Stevie hosts Clubhouse sessions each week (visit Italian Wine Club & Wine Business on Clubhouse), these recorded sessions are then released on the podcast to immortalize them! She often also joins Professor Scienza in his shows to lend a hand keeping our Professor in check! You can also find her taking a hit for the team when she goes “On the Road”, all over the Italian countryside, visiting wineries and interviewing producers, enjoying their best food and wine! To find out more: Facebook: @steviekim222 Instagram: @steviekim222 Website: https://vinitalyinternational.com/wordpress/ Follow us on our social media channels: Instagram @italianwinepodcast Facebook @ItalianWinePodcast Twitter @itawinepodast LinkedIn @ItalianWinePodcast If you feel like helping us, donate here www.italianwinepodcast.com/donate-to-show/

Walking With Dante
The Rant To End All Rants (Also, The World): Inferno, Canto XIX, Lines 88 - 117

Walking With Dante

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 36:46


Our pilgrim, Dante, has been talking to Pope Nicholas III, stuck upside-down in a hole in the third evil pocket of the eighth circle of Inferno, the vast landscape of the fraudulent. He's learned that Nicholas III was a master of nepotism and is eagerly awaiting the arrival of other popes, even ones from Avignon. And our pilgrim can take it no more! Join me, Mark Scarbrough, as we explore the longest speech from our pilgrim yet, a diatribe about church corruption that sees the end of the world in the offing. The popes go whoring and the world just might go smash. Here are the segments of this episode of the podcast WALKING WITH DANTE: [01:45] My English translation of the passage: INFERNO, Canto XIX, lines 88 - 117. If you'd like to read along, you can find this translation on my website, markscarbrough.com. [03:44] Some introductory remarks about this podcast episode. [05:15] The Biblical references in the pilgrim Dante's rant: the keys to the kingdom (Matthew 16: 13 - 20), the apostles' choosing Matthias after Judas Iscariot dies (The Acts Of The Apostles 1: 21 - 26), and the whore of Babylon (The Apocalypse of St. John [aka "Revelations"] 17: 1 - 5). [16:38] The historical references in the rant: Charles of Anjou, King of Sicily and Naples; and Emperor Constantine The Great with his infamous "donation." [24:23] The thematic echoes in the rant: back to the fourth circle of avarice in INFERNO, Canto VII; and even further back to the question of "folly" from INFERNO, Canto II. [30:37] The folly of the rant: There are all sorts of garbled bits in this passage, including corrupted passages from the Bible's New Testament. Is this the folly of the pilgrim or of the poet? [34:17] Reading the passage one more time, now that you know the details. Support this podcast

New Books in Biography
Sean Brennan, "The Priest Who Put Europe Back Together: The Life of Rev. Fabian Flynn, CP" (Catholic U of America Press, 2018)

New Books in Biography

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 61:35


Philp Fabian Flynn led a remarkable life, bearing witness to some of the most pivotal events of the twentieth century. Flynn took part in the invasions of Sicily and Normandy, the Battle of Aachen, and the Battle of the Hürtgen Forest. He acted as confessor to Nazi War Criminals during the International Military Tribunal at Nuremberg, assisted Hungarian Revolutionaries on the streets of Budapest, and assisted the waves of refugees arriving in Austria feeling the effects of ethnic and political persecution during the Cold War. The Priest Who Put Europe Back Together: The Life of Rev. Fabian Flynn, CP (Catholic U of America Press, 2018) tells the story of this fascinating life. From solidly middle-class beginnings in Dorchester, Massachusetts, Flynn interacted with and occasionally advised some of the major political, military, and religious leaders of his era. His legacy as a Passionist priest, a chaplain in the US Army, and an official in the Catholic Relief Services was both vast and enormously beneficial. His life and career symbolized the "coming of age" of the United States as a global superpower, and the corresponding growth of the American Catholic Church as an international institution. Both helped liberate half of Europe from Fascist rule, and then helped to rebuild its political, economic, and social foundations, which led to an unprecedented period of peace and prosperity. His efforts on behalf of both his country and his Church to contain Communist influence, and to assist the refugees of its tyranny, contributed to its collapse. Flynn was one of the hundreds of Americans who put Europe back together after a period of horrendous self-destruction. In a twentieth century filled with villains and despots, Flynn played a heroic and vital role in extraordinary times. Carlos Ruiz Martinez is a PhD student in the Department of Religious Studies at the University of Iowa. He is also the Communications Assistant for the American Catholic Historical Association (ACHA). His general interest is in American religious history, especially American Catholicism. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/biography

New Books Network
Sean Brennan, "The Priest Who Put Europe Back Together: The Life of Rev. Fabian Flynn, CP" (Catholic U of America Press, 2018)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 61:35


Philp Fabian Flynn led a remarkable life, bearing witness to some of the most pivotal events of the twentieth century. Flynn took part in the invasions of Sicily and Normandy, the Battle of Aachen, and the Battle of the Hürtgen Forest. He acted as confessor to Nazi War Criminals during the International Military Tribunal at Nuremberg, assisted Hungarian Revolutionaries on the streets of Budapest, and assisted the waves of refugees arriving in Austria feeling the effects of ethnic and political persecution during the Cold War. The Priest Who Put Europe Back Together: The Life of Rev. Fabian Flynn, CP (Catholic U of America Press, 2018) tells the story of this fascinating life. From solidly middle-class beginnings in Dorchester, Massachusetts, Flynn interacted with and occasionally advised some of the major political, military, and religious leaders of his era. His legacy as a Passionist priest, a chaplain in the US Army, and an official in the Catholic Relief Services was both vast and enormously beneficial. His life and career symbolized the "coming of age" of the United States as a global superpower, and the corresponding growth of the American Catholic Church as an international institution. Both helped liberate half of Europe from Fascist rule, and then helped to rebuild its political, economic, and social foundations, which led to an unprecedented period of peace and prosperity. His efforts on behalf of both his country and his Church to contain Communist influence, and to assist the refugees of its tyranny, contributed to its collapse. Flynn was one of the hundreds of Americans who put Europe back together after a period of horrendous self-destruction. In a twentieth century filled with villains and despots, Flynn played a heroic and vital role in extraordinary times. Carlos Ruiz Martinez is a PhD student in the Department of Religious Studies at the University of Iowa. He is also the Communications Assistant for the American Catholic Historical Association (ACHA). His general interest is in American religious history, especially American Catholicism. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Military History
Sean Brennan, "The Priest Who Put Europe Back Together: The Life of Rev. Fabian Flynn, CP" (Catholic U of America Press, 2018)

New Books in Military History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 61:35


Philp Fabian Flynn led a remarkable life, bearing witness to some of the most pivotal events of the twentieth century. Flynn took part in the invasions of Sicily and Normandy, the Battle of Aachen, and the Battle of the Hürtgen Forest. He acted as confessor to Nazi War Criminals during the International Military Tribunal at Nuremberg, assisted Hungarian Revolutionaries on the streets of Budapest, and assisted the waves of refugees arriving in Austria feeling the effects of ethnic and political persecution during the Cold War. The Priest Who Put Europe Back Together: The Life of Rev. Fabian Flynn, CP (Catholic U of America Press, 2018) tells the story of this fascinating life. From solidly middle-class beginnings in Dorchester, Massachusetts, Flynn interacted with and occasionally advised some of the major political, military, and religious leaders of his era. His legacy as a Passionist priest, a chaplain in the US Army, and an official in the Catholic Relief Services was both vast and enormously beneficial. His life and career symbolized the "coming of age" of the United States as a global superpower, and the corresponding growth of the American Catholic Church as an international institution. Both helped liberate half of Europe from Fascist rule, and then helped to rebuild its political, economic, and social foundations, which led to an unprecedented period of peace and prosperity. His efforts on behalf of both his country and his Church to contain Communist influence, and to assist the refugees of its tyranny, contributed to its collapse. Flynn was one of the hundreds of Americans who put Europe back together after a period of horrendous self-destruction. In a twentieth century filled with villains and despots, Flynn played a heroic and vital role in extraordinary times. Carlos Ruiz Martinez is a PhD student in the Department of Religious Studies at the University of Iowa. He is also the Communications Assistant for the American Catholic Historical Association (ACHA). His general interest is in American religious history, especially American Catholicism. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/military-history

New Books in American Studies
Sean Brennan, "The Priest Who Put Europe Back Together: The Life of Rev. Fabian Flynn, CP" (Catholic U of America Press, 2018)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 61:35


Philp Fabian Flynn led a remarkable life, bearing witness to some of the most pivotal events of the twentieth century. Flynn took part in the invasions of Sicily and Normandy, the Battle of Aachen, and the Battle of the Hürtgen Forest. He acted as confessor to Nazi War Criminals during the International Military Tribunal at Nuremberg, assisted Hungarian Revolutionaries on the streets of Budapest, and assisted the waves of refugees arriving in Austria feeling the effects of ethnic and political persecution during the Cold War. The Priest Who Put Europe Back Together: The Life of Rev. Fabian Flynn, CP (Catholic U of America Press, 2018) tells the story of this fascinating life. From solidly middle-class beginnings in Dorchester, Massachusetts, Flynn interacted with and occasionally advised some of the major political, military, and religious leaders of his era. His legacy as a Passionist priest, a chaplain in the US Army, and an official in the Catholic Relief Services was both vast and enormously beneficial. His life and career symbolized the "coming of age" of the United States as a global superpower, and the corresponding growth of the American Catholic Church as an international institution. Both helped liberate half of Europe from Fascist rule, and then helped to rebuild its political, economic, and social foundations, which led to an unprecedented period of peace and prosperity. His efforts on behalf of both his country and his Church to contain Communist influence, and to assist the refugees of its tyranny, contributed to its collapse. Flynn was one of the hundreds of Americans who put Europe back together after a period of horrendous self-destruction. In a twentieth century filled with villains and despots, Flynn played a heroic and vital role in extraordinary times. Carlos Ruiz Martinez is a PhD student in the Department of Religious Studies at the University of Iowa. He is also the Communications Assistant for the American Catholic Historical Association (ACHA). His general interest is in American religious history, especially American Catholicism. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books in History
Sean Brennan, "The Priest Who Put Europe Back Together: The Life of Rev. Fabian Flynn, CP" (Catholic U of America Press, 2018)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 61:35


Philp Fabian Flynn led a remarkable life, bearing witness to some of the most pivotal events of the twentieth century. Flynn took part in the invasions of Sicily and Normandy, the Battle of Aachen, and the Battle of the Hürtgen Forest. He acted as confessor to Nazi War Criminals during the International Military Tribunal at Nuremberg, assisted Hungarian Revolutionaries on the streets of Budapest, and assisted the waves of refugees arriving in Austria feeling the effects of ethnic and political persecution during the Cold War. The Priest Who Put Europe Back Together: The Life of Rev. Fabian Flynn, CP (Catholic U of America Press, 2018) tells the story of this fascinating life. From solidly middle-class beginnings in Dorchester, Massachusetts, Flynn interacted with and occasionally advised some of the major political, military, and religious leaders of his era. His legacy as a Passionist priest, a chaplain in the US Army, and an official in the Catholic Relief Services was both vast and enormously beneficial. His life and career symbolized the "coming of age" of the United States as a global superpower, and the corresponding growth of the American Catholic Church as an international institution. Both helped liberate half of Europe from Fascist rule, and then helped to rebuild its political, economic, and social foundations, which led to an unprecedented period of peace and prosperity. His efforts on behalf of both his country and his Church to contain Communist influence, and to assist the refugees of its tyranny, contributed to its collapse. Flynn was one of the hundreds of Americans who put Europe back together after a period of horrendous self-destruction. In a twentieth century filled with villains and despots, Flynn played a heroic and vital role in extraordinary times. Carlos Ruiz Martinez is a PhD student in the Department of Religious Studies at the University of Iowa. He is also the Communications Assistant for the American Catholic Historical Association (ACHA). His general interest is in American religious history, especially American Catholicism. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

Fr Louis Scurti
ST ANDREW AN ADVENT SAINT Homily

Fr Louis Scurti

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 11:52


St Andrew is well loved for his strong devotion and missionary zeal. According to Wikipedia he is the patron saint for the following: Scotland, Barbados, Georgia, Ukraine, Russia, Sicily, Greece, Cyprus, Romania, Patras, San Andrés (Tenerife), Diocese of Parañaque, Telhado (pt), Amalfi, Luqa (Malta) and Prussia; Diocese of Victoria; fishermen, fishmongers and rope-makers, textile workers, singers, miners, pregnant women, butchers, farm workers, protection against sore throats, protection against convulsions, protection against fever, protection against whooping cough Check out our website: https://www.friendsoftheword.org Join our community on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/www.Friendso... Donate and support FRIENDS OF THE WORD, INC.: PAYPAL.ME/FRIENDSOFTHEWORD

Travels Through Time
Jamie Mackay: Garibaldi and the Birth of Italy (1860)

Travels Through Time

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 49:45


This week we are sweeping through Sicily and Southern Italy in the company of the original revolutionary hero, Giuseppe Maria Garibaldi.   In the mid nineteenth century, change was in the air as new political movements began questioning the status quo. Powerful ideas like socialism, republicanism, liberalism and nationalism were spreading through Europe, harnessed by charismatic leaders determined to bring about dramatic social change. None were more charismatic than Giuseppe Garibaldi.   Our guide on this epoch-making trip is Jamie Mackay, a writer who is based in the beautiful town of Fiesole just north of Florence. This episode relates to his book The Invention of Sicily which tells the story of this fascinating island, fought over and coveted by almost every civilisation in history, a romantic melting pot where cruelty and disaster were never far away.   As ever, maps, images and much more about this episode is to be found at our website tttpodcast.com.   Click here to order Jamie MacKay's book from John Sandoe's who, we are delighted to say, are supplying books for the podcast.  

Lore OlymPOD
93: Hades Daddy, Esq.

Lore OlymPOD

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 51:36


Covering Lore Olympus chapters 180 & 181, featuring:  The newborn god of irrelevant testimony Impending doom for Sicily courtesy of Ares Niobe being 100% right that her family is better than Leto's & more!

GrowingUpItalian
Angelo Venuto

GrowingUpItalian

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 27:57


EPISODE 189. Sabino and Rocco have the honor of sitting down with an Italian-American Icon in the music industry, Angelo Venuto. Angelo talks how it all began, transition from Sicily to Bensonhurst, his new Freestyle Album and so much more. Be sure to follow Angelo Venuto here https://www.instagram.com/angelovoicesvenuto/ To shop our merchandise, visit https://www.paninishoppe.com/growingupitalian Be sure to check our our Instagram https://www.instagram.com/growingupitalian As always, if you enjoyed this video, be sure to drop a Like, Comment and please SUBSCRIBE. Grazie a tutti!

The Black Wine Guy Experience
Dan In Real Life. Dan Petroski's Massican Mission to Create Meaningful Impact in the World

The Black Wine Guy Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 91:54


MJ's guest is a winemaker and the founder of Massican Wines, Dan Petroski. Born and raised in Brooklyn, NY where he went on to play football at Columbia. He went on to work for Time Inc. while also studying for his MBA at NYU, both ingredients for a promising future in magazine publishing. Dan began his wine education literally winning and dining clients around Manhattan's best restaurants. He set off for Sicily, where he interned at Valle dell'Acate for a year. Dan originally intended to return to NYC to sell wine, but later received a harvest invitation in 2006 in Napa Valley. Not long after that, Petroski was hired as cellar master, ultimately claiming the Larkmead winemaker title in 2012. In 2009, Dan launched his own wine business called Massican, which specializes in Italian inspired white wines. Massican is a one-man operation where Dan manages all winemaking, sales and marketing. In July of 2020 Dan went back to his digital media roots launching Massican Magazine online. Petroski's approach and ability to craft wines as diverse as Cabernet Sauvignon and Tocai Friulano has earned him the recognition as San Francisco Chronicle's Winemaker of the Year in 2017On this episode, MJ and Dan enjoy a beautiful bottle of Fiorano Boncampagni Ludovisi, while discussing Dan's unlikely start to a decorated and fulfilling career in wine, his once in a lifetime winemaking education in Sicily, his time at Larkmead, starting his own business at Massican, and fighting climate change on the front lines! Period. Cheers! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Legion Podcasts
Cinema_PSYOPS_EP327: Demonia 1990 (Main Feed)

Legion Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 99:31


Cinema_PSYOPS_EP327: Demonia 1990 (Main Feed) A Canadian archaeological team in Sicily accidentally unleashes vengeful ghosts of five demonic nuns who were murdered 500 years earlier, and the ghosts now set out to kill the group and townspeople alike. Legion Patreon:  https://www.patreon.com/LegionPodcasts/posts Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0PhshKRtKhh4ESfKhrer6s?si=7M_fLKDsRomBgiowA0WWOA Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/cinema-psyops/id1037574921?mt=2&ls=1 Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/cinema-psyops Android: https://subscribeonandroid.com/www.legionpodcasts.com/category/cinema-psyops/feed/ Google Podcasts: https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cHM6Ly93d3cubGVnaW9ucG9kY2FzdHMuY29tL2NhdGVnb3J5L2NpbmVtYS1wc3lvcHMvZmVlZC8 iHeartRADIO: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/269-cinema-psyops-77894788/ Pandora: https://www.pandora.com/podcast/cinema-psyops/PC:60333 Podchaser: https://www.podchaser.com/podcasts/cinema-psyops-24413 Subscribe By Email: https://subscribebyemail.com/www.legionpodcasts.com/category/cinema-psyops/feed/ Cinema PSYOPS Main page: http://www.legionpodcasts.com/cinema-psyops/ RSS: https://www.legionpodcasts.com/category/cinema-psyops/feed/ Email feedback to  Matt: psyopmatt@gmail.com  Cort : cinemapsyopscort@gmail.com  Find on twitter Cort:  @Cort_PSYOP Matt: @psyopmatt Join the FaceBook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1616282625298374/   Instagram: cinema_psyops The post Cinema_PSYOPS_EP327: Demonia 1990 (Main Feed) first appeared on Legion.

Cinema PSYOPS
Cinema_PSYOPS_EP327: Demonia 1990 (Main Feed)

Cinema PSYOPS

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 99:31


Cinema_PSYOPS_EP327: Demonia 1990 (Main Feed) A Canadian archaeological team in Sicily accidentally unleashes vengeful ghosts of five demonic nuns who were murdered 500 years earlier, and the ghosts now set out to kill the group and townspeople alike. Legion Patreon:  https://www.patreon.com/LegionPodcasts/posts Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0PhshKRtKhh4ESfKhrer6s?si=7M_fLKDsRomBgiowA0WWOA Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/cinema-psyops/id1037574921?mt=2&ls=1 Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/cinema-psyops Android: https://subscribeonandroid.com/www.legionpodcasts.com/category/cinema-psyops/feed/ Google Podcasts: https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cHM6Ly93d3cubGVnaW9ucG9kY2FzdHMuY29tL2NhdGVnb3J5L2NpbmVtYS1wc3lvcHMvZmVlZC8 iHeartRADIO: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/269-cinema-psyops-77894788/ Pandora: https://www.pandora.com/podcast/cinema-psyops/PC:60333 Podchaser: https://www.podchaser.com/podcasts/cinema-psyops-24413 Subscribe By Email: https://subscribebyemail.com/www.legionpodcasts.com/category/cinema-psyops/feed/ Cinema PSYOPS Main page: http://www.legionpodcasts.com/cinema-psyops/ RSS: https://www.legionpodcasts.com/category/cinema-psyops/feed/ Email feedback to  Matt: psyopmatt@gmail.com  Cort : cinemapsyopscort@gmail.com  Find on twitter Cort:  @Cort_PSYOP Matt: @psyopmatt Join the FaceBook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1616282625298374/   Instagram: cinema_psyops The post Cinema_PSYOPS_EP327: Demonia 1990 (Main Feed) first appeared on Legion.

The Podcast of the Lotus Eaters
PREVIEW: Epochs #29 | Belisarius Part II

The Podcast of the Lotus Eaters

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 16:59


‘Beau and Carl chat about the Byzantine efforts to reconquer the classical Western Roman empire during the reign of Justinian the first. The legendary general Belisarius smashes his way across North Africa, puts down rebellions, bests Sicily, invades Italy and retakes Rome itself in the name of Justinian. Cracking stuff.'

Irish and Celtic Music Podcast
Love at Dawn #533

Irish and Celtic Music Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 70:28


The sun rises warm on a cold day. Love rises with and warms the dawn with the Irish & Celtic Music Podcast. House of Hamil, Jon Pilatzke, Muireann Nic Amhlaoibh, Brad Reid, We Banjo 3, Songs For Ceilidh, Steve Gibb, Matthew Young, Ed Miller, Gaelynn Lea, Plunk Murray, Bang On The Ear, Eireann's Call Steel City Rovers, Coast, Gerry O'Connor I hope you enjoyed this week's show. If you did, please share the show on social or with a friend. The Irish & Celtic Music Podcast is here to build our diverse Celtic community and help the incredible artists who so generously share their music with you. If a song or tune inspires you, please support the musicians. You can buy their CDs, digital downloads, shirts, pins, stickers and songbooks. You can follow them on streaming or see their shows. You can support more and more Celtic musicians on Patreon. And of course, I always appreciate it when you drop them an email to let them know you heard them on the Irish and Celtic Music Podcast. Every week, you can get Celtic music news in your inbox. The Celtic Music Magazine is a quick and easy way to plug yourself into more great Celtic culture. Subscribe and get 34 Celtic MP3s for Free. VOTE IN THE CELTIC TOP 20 This is our way of finding the best songs and artists each year. Just list the show number, and the name of as many bands in the episode as you like. Your vote helps me create next year's Best Celtic music of 2021 episode.  Vote Now! THIS WEEK IN CELTIC MUSIC 0:06 - House of Hamill "Cat Bacon" from Folk Hero 4:32 - WELCOME 5:42 - Jon Pilatzke "Love At The Endings (Ed Reavy) / Lucky In Love / The Dawn" from Amongst Friends 9:21 - Muireann Nic Amhlaoibh "Sweet Kingwilliamstown" from Thar Toinn / Seaborne 14:48 - Brad Reid "An Fidheall Gorm" from New Scotland 17:21 - We Banjo 3 "Hold onto Your Soul" from Roots to Rise (Live) 21:33 - FEEDBACK 26:34 - Songs For Ceilidh "Kailey Won't You Dance" from Falling Forward 29:41 - Steve Gibb "Josefins Dopvals" from The Boatman 33:22 - Matthew Young "Finnegan's Wake" from Here's to Dear Old Erin 36:41 - Ed Miller "The Banks of Sicily" from Generations of Change 41:00 - Gaelynn Lea “Swinging On a Gate” from All the Roads That Lead Us Home 44:20 - Plunk Murray "Black Velvet Band" from Another Drink 49:31 - THANKS 52:54 - Bang On The Ear "Elwyn Benders Reel" from F15TEEN 55:05 - Eireann's Call "Tell God and the Devil" from Tús 58:19 - Steel City Rovers "Andrew's Hall" from Grand Misadventures 1:01:04 - Coast "Oceanos" from 10.2 1:05:28 - CLOSING 1:07:16 - Gerry O'Connor "O'Reilly's Greyhound (Reels)" from Last Night's Joy The Irish & Celtic Music Podcast was edited by Mitchell Petersen with Graphics by Miranda Nelson Designs. The show was produced by Marc Gunn, The Celtfather. Subscribe through your favorite podcatcher or on our website where you can become a Patron of the Podcast for as little as $1 per episode. Promote Celtic culture through music at http://celticmusicpodcast.com/. WELCOME TO CELTIC MUSIC * Helping you celebrate Celtic culture through music. I am Marc Gunn. I'm a musician and podcaster. Four times a month, I share my love of Irish and Celtic music from around the globe with you. I hope you find a new favorite Celtic band or musician or fall back in love with one. But I'm also here for the artists. The artists in this show need your support, which you can do by buying their music or telling a friend about the band you found. You can find a link to all of the artists, along with show times for each song when you visit our website at celticmusicpodcast.com. You can also support this podcast on Patreon. Pub Songs & Stories is a Virtual Public House for musicians to share the stories and inspiration behind their music. I'm looking for some good stories to share on our companion podcast.  If you have a story that you'd like to share about a song, from a gig, or maybe even just a piece of Celtic history that you love. Drop me an email. Put “Pub Story” in the show subject. Tell me about your story. Maybe I'll ask you to record your story for the show. THANK YOU PATRONS OF THE PODCAST! Because of Your kind and generous support, this show comes out at least four times a month. Your generosity funds the creation, promotion and production of the show. It allows us to attract new listeners and to help our community grow. As a patron, you get to hear episodes before regular listeners. When we hit a milestone, you get an extra-long episode. You can pledge a dollar or more per episode and cap how much you want to spend each month over on Patreon. And if you pledge $5 or more per episode, you'll also get the all new music-only episodes. I introduce the show, play non-stop music for nearly an hour, and then close the show. Plus, you'll get access to hundreds of free MP3 downloads. A super special thanks to our newest patrons: Larry J, Kevin S, Kriskorn C You can become a generous Patron of the Podcast on Patreon at SongHenge.com. CELTIC CHRISTMAS PODCAST IS BACK IN A NEW FORMAT Do you like Christmas music? I also host the Celtic Christmas Podcast. The podcast has new format this year. Instead of music episodes like I do here on the Irish & Celtic Music Podcast, the show highlights a Celtic musician with Christmas music that you can buy OR Stream on our all new Celtic Christmas Playlists. The first playlist of the season is now available. It highlights Celtic Christmas Women. Most of the tracks from last year's Celtic Christmas Women episode of the Irish & Celtic Music Podcast. So it's a fantastic playlist. So if you're on Spotify, follow the link to listen. Now that said, I did republish that music podcast episode on the feed. But starting November 28, the all new show launches with a new Celtic Christmas playlist. You can help spread Celtic Christmas Cheer. Subscribe to the show at CelticChristmasPodcast.com and help me develop a brand new Christmas podcast and playlist experience! TRAVEL WITH CELTIC INVASION VACATIONS Every year, I take a small group of Celtic music fans on the relaxing adventure of a lifetime. We don't see everything. Instead, we stay in one area. We get to know the region through its culture, history, and legends. You can join us with an auditory and visual adventure through podcasts and videos. Learn more about the invasion at http://celticinvasion.com/ #celticmusic #irishmusic #celticmusicpodcast I WANT YOUR FEEDBACK What are you doing today while listening to the podcast? You can send a written comment along with a picture of what you're doing while listening. Email a voicemail message to celticpodcast@gmail.com Thom Danger Speck sent a photo: “ Listening to Night Fall #531 while doing a pre-winter clean of my property. Cheers to you Marc! Thanks for helping to keep me warm!” Peter Bengston emailed a photo of "Little free library. I'm seeing quite a few of these on my neighborhood walks." Alexander Randall 5th emailed: "Tell all your musicians, this podcast really works!! This has happened to me over and over. You play a great piece by a band I never heard of. I listen to it over and over, then research the band, find their web site and buy everything. You played a fabulous piece - Dragonfly by the Gothard Sisters. I went to their web site and bought everything. You played a fabulous piece - Argyle Lassies by Capercaille. I bought all their CD's.  Bought everything. You played a fabulous piece - St Patricks March by the Bookends. Bought everything. You played a fabulous piece - Millers Maggot by the Flying Toads. Bought everything. Same for Altan, Silotar, Barrule, Bothy Band... I can't figure out your voting system, Best this year - cast a vote for the Gothard Sisters Dragonfly. On a completely different note, I heard this band at a renaissance fair playing German medieval instruments with modern arrangements.  Blew me away.  The band is Wolgemut.  Here is a spotify playlist.  Maybe for a change of pace in your podcast... You are doing great work Marc - Keep it up."

The Family Thrive with Audra & Justin
Tembi Locke on Parenting With Grace, Growing Through Grief & Thriving No Matter What

The Family Thrive with Audra & Justin

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 68:20


EPISODE #26 - You know today's guest from dozens of roles in television and movies, starting as one of Will Smith's crushes in the iconic Fresh Prince of Bel Air to her most recent role as Elise Torres in Netflix's hilarious and endearing comedy, Never Have I Ever.Along the way she lived her best life, working as an actress in Hollywood, falling in love with and marrying Saro, a Sicilian chef, coping with his later cancer diagnosis, adopting a daughter, and then eventually caring for Saro and their daughter as he passed away in 2012. Her journey then turned toward understanding and living through grief, the lessons of which she turned into a 2019 memoir called From Scratch: A Memoir of Love, Sicily, and Finding Home. The book has been adapted into a series by Netflix, produced by Reese Witherspoon, coming out next year.We met Tembi way back when she started doing work around grief and caregiving after her husband passed away. Our work with childhood cancer families in MaxLove Project provided a lot for us to connect over. Now all these years later we get to connect over parenting, growing through grief, finding resilience in the face of tragedy, and planting roots and choosing love no matter what life throws our way.

Sportsmen's Nation - Whitetail Hunting
Huntavore - Eric Gunn, Way of the Hunt & Roadkill Denial

Sportsmen's Nation - Whitetail Hunting

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 76:06


On this episode of Huntavore, Nick is joined by Eric Gunn; outdoorsman, chef, and creator of @wayofthehunt.  Eric loves to use wildgame in his dishes, getting inspiration from his Sicilian heritage.  Nick and Eric talk about the season of wild harvest going on right now with hunters, also,as a Maryland resident, was denied picking up a roadkill deer.  Eric gets into some high level cooking and using some unique parts in your stock.  Stay tuned for an exciting new episode of Huntavore.Eric Gunn is a native of Maryland.  Growing up in and around some of the best hunting grounds in the country.  Waterfowl, seafood, whitetails, bears, and crazy tiny elk called Sika deer.  Lots of opportunities for sportsmen.  However, one aspect is not open to venison loves, roadkill.  Eric goes into a tale of being told he couldn't pick up a fresh deer because a salvage permit is needed.  These permit holders travel the roads and pick up carcasses only to be incinerated and dumped into the landfill.       Hard days of hunting and chasing animals and for some of us the celebration of butchering our game.  The two guys reflect on their thankfulness for the opportunity and the gifts they were able to harvest and use into the upcoming year.  Nick's favorite holiday is fast approaching as Thanksgiving is just around the corner. This season always is a great time to reflect on the bounty we've been given or opportunity to chase and take.  Eric shares about his heritage coming from Sicily, and about a few of the dishes that translate well into venison.  A couple with the new cool cut on the block, the shanks, and even getting into keep trotters (the hoof section) for enriching stock.  In old world cooking, nothing goes to waste,  “Waste not, want not” and using more from our deer is something to be thankful for. Tappecue Meat ProbesInstagram: @tappecueWebsite: https://bit.ly/2NIr0XjCoupon Code 10% off: HUNT10 Huntavore is Powered by Simplecast

Wine for Normal People
Ep 399: Basilicata, Italy and the Wines of Aglianico del Vulture

Wine for Normal People

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 48:02


Basilicata is a tiny region that represents the arch of the Italy's boot -the small area that borders Calabria in the west, Puglia in the east, Campania in the north and the Gulf of Taranto in the south. In this, Italy's 3rd least populous region, wine has been made for thousands of years but today, what remains is just 2,006 ha/5,000 acres of vineyards, which is 0.15% of Italy's total wine production. Of the 2% that is DOC wine, there is a shining star – a wine that can rival the best of the best in all of Italy – Aglianico del Vulture (ahl-LYAh-nee-koh del VOOL-too-ray). In this show we discuss the background of this southern Italian region and discuss the jewel in its crown.     Here are the show notes… We first discuss the location and land of Basilicata In the southern Apennines, Basilicata is the most mountainous region in the south of Italy. 47% is covered by mountains, 45% is hilly, and only 8% is plains. The west is the hillier area, the east runs into flatter land into Puglia. There is a small stretch of coastline between Campania and Calabria and a longer one along the Gulf of Taranto, between Puglia and Calabria. Photo: Getty Images We do a good look at the history of Basilicata, but the highlights are: People (or really ancestors of modern people) have inhabited the area since Paleolithic times. Matera is considered one of the oldest continuous civilizations in the world. Its Sassi district, which has now become a UNESCO World Heritage Site, has caves on a rocky hillside that were inhabited by people as far back as the Paleolithic times. Greeks settled in Basilicata from at least the 8th c BCE and likely brought Aglianico with them. Basilicata has been conquered by nearly everyone who paraded through southern Italy over the centuries. In the 1970s and 80s there was a renaissance in wine in Basilicata but it didn't last. Today, there is renewed hope and investments, as a new generation of winemakers takes over their family domaines, establishes new properties and combines traditional and modern winemaking to make excellent wines.   We mention several DOCs of Basilicata: Photo of Matera: Getty Images Matera DOC was granted in 2005 It is 50 ha / 124 acres, and produces about 11,200 cases per year REDS: Matera Primitivo (90%+ Primitivo/Zinfandel grape), Matera Rosso (at least 60% Sangiovese and 30% Primitivo), and Matera Moro, (a minimum of 60% Cabernet Sauvignon, 20% Primitivo and 10% Merlot). There are basic and Riserva levels Whites: Matera Greco (85%+ Greco), Matera Bianco (minimum of 85% Malvasia Bianca di Basilicata) There is also spumante (sparkling) made in the Champagne method   Grottino di Roccanova DOC was granted in 2009 8 ha / 20 acres, and producers about 3,000 cases per year White/Bianco (Minimum of 80% Malvasia Bianca di Basilicata) Red/Rosso: Sangiovese with Cabernet Sauvignino, Malvasia Nera di Basilicata, Montepulciano   Terre dell'Alta Val d'Agri DOC was granted in 2003. At 11 ha / 27 acres, the area makes a mere 3,840 cases a year. Vineyards can be no higher than 800 m/ 2,625 ft Red/Rosato: Rosso (Minimum 50% Merlot; minimum 30% Cabernet Sauvignon; maximum 20% other red grapes). Riserva and regular versions Photo: Getty Images, Val d'Agri   We spend the rest of the show discussing  Aglianico del Vulture DOC/DOCG, which is 25% of Basilicata's total production Vulture's land… Vulture is an extinct volcano that was last active about 130,000 years ago. It is 56 km/35 miles north of Potenza at an altitude of 1,326m/4,350 ft, close to borders with Puglia and Campania. Woods surround the area and the top of the slope has more volcanic soils and lower lying vineyards have more mixed, colluvial, and clay soils. The elevations are specified by the DOC – too low or too high and you won't get great flavor development or quality wine, so the range is 200-700 m/660 -2300 ft. The variety of soils, elevations and exposures mean that there are different styles of Aglianico del Vulture. Photo: Getty Images Vulture's climate… Vulture is continental in climate and it has lower average daily temperatures than Sicily or Tuscany. There are cool breezes that sweep in from the Adriatic, cooling the area and preventing humidity. Elevation also keeps things cooler, especially at night, which means the grapes experience a long growing season, building flavor in the hot sun during the day, and cooling at night to hoard acidity.  The rain shadow of Mount Vulture also keeps the weather cool and dry.  That said, in some years the drought is fierce, grapes can get sunburned, the tannins can be tough, and the wine can be overly alcoholic.     Characteristics of Aglianico del Vulture Aglianico is a thick-skinned grape that needs mineral-rich soils with clay and limestone (like what is on Vulture). It can be overcropped, so careful tending to the grapes leads to better results (this is kind of a dumb thing to say, since that's the case with all grapes, but I'm putting it out there anyway!).   Flavors range in Aglianico del Vulture. Younger wines are high in tannins and acidity, with black cherry, chocolate, flowers, minerals, dark-fruit, and shrubby, forest notes. With a few years (5 or more), you may get nuances of Earl gray tea, black tea, licorice, earth, tar, spice, and violets. The tannins calm with age, but the acidity remains – with age (7-10 years) these wines are pretty impressive. We discuss the fact that there are some lighter styles and some savory, complex ones, but most are minerally with tannin in some form. Photo of Aglianico: Getty Images  Aglianico del Vulture was made a DOC in 1971 It is 520/1,284 acres, and it's average production is 235,000 cases The wine is red or spumante – all is 100% Aglianico (the sparkling must be made in the Champagne method). Reds are required to be aged for 9-10 months in a vessel of the producer's choice before release (oak isn't required). Spumante must rest for 9 months on the lees. Photo: Monte Vulture, Getty Images Aglianico del Vulture Superiore DOCG/ Riserva Superiore DOCG was created in 2010. It is within the Aglianico del Vulture DOC but is only 89 ha/220 acres Production is much smaller, at 6,670 cases. The wine is 100% Aglianico. Superiore is required to spend 12 months in oak, 12 months in a bottle, cannot be sold until at least three years after harvest. Superiore Riserva spends 24 months in oak, 12 in bottle, and cannot be released until at least 5 years after harvest. Both categories must reach a minimum of 13.5% ABV (basically a guarantee that the grapes are ripe!)     In the show we discuss the food of Basilicata and mention a few specialties: M.C. Ice was surprised that in this area, bread crumbs were a cheese substitute, sprinkled over pasta, meat, and vegetables. Horseradish is common here, along with Italian hot peppers, beans, pork sausage, and the famed bread of Matera, which is a Protected Georgraphical Indication and uses wheat grown locally and a yeast infused with fruit.     Producers are vital to getting a quality wine. This is my list… D'Angelo (Split into D'Angelo and Donato D'Angelo recently, and each is good) Paternoster (recently sold to Veneto's Tommasi family) Cantine del Notaio Elena Fucci Terre degli Svevi /Re Manfredi Grifalco Eubea and Basilisco (both small-production bottlings) Bisceglia (we were drinking the 2018 Terre di Vulcano, which was about $18) DOC wines are around US$20/GBP£15, DOCG wines are more like US$45/GBP£43.   __________________________ Thanks for our sponsors this week: Wine Access: Access to the best wines for the best prices! For 15% off your next order, go to www.wineaccess.com/normal   If you think our podcast is worth the price of a bottle or two of wine a year, please become a member of Patreon... you'll get even more great content, live interactions and classes!  www.patreon.com/winefornormalpeople To register for an AWESOME, LIVE WFNP class with Elizabeth go to: www.winefornormalpeople.com/classes _____________________________ Some interesting sources I used for this show: Italian Wine Central (Great for data on DOCs/DOCGs) "The Wines of Basilicata Paradise Lost and Found" 4/17, Vinous, by Ian d'Agata  NY Times Article on Aglianico

THE NETCHICKS
The One About Sicily Gretzky

THE NETCHICKS

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 74:13


Happy Thursday! The episode you all have been waiting for is here!! Sara tells Natalie every single thing that happed during her birthing process, what the best part was, what the hardest part was, how Sicily's name came about and what life is like now with Sicily. They laughed, they cried, and they FINALLY caught up on everything.   Produced by Dear Media