Podcasts about burma

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard

Country in Southeast Asia

  • 1,224PODCASTS
  • 2,055EPISODES
  • 43mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 23, 2021LATEST
burma

POPULARITY

20112012201320142015201620172018201920202021


Best podcasts about burma

Show all podcasts related to burma

Latest podcast episodes about burma

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed
Advertising or Accountability? Archaeology Needs Critical Friends in The Media! - WB 12th Oct 2021

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 37:33


Welcome to Watching Brief. As the name implies, each week Marc (Mr Soup) & Andy Brockman of the Pipeline (Where history is tomorrow's news) cast an eye over news stories, topical media and entertainment and discuss and debate what they find. Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/archaeosoup 0:00 Introduction 4:19 How We Began 11:55 Being a Critical Friend 18:17 Other Voices & The ‘Soul' of Archaeology 27:00 Conclusions Link of the Week: Watching Brief - Jan 2017: https://youtu.be/K2ytK6ar-ds Links: Archaeoscoop: Richard III: It's Him! https://youtu.be/Ga-K1qxey_g The ‘Sun' article is no longer online, but: Head of 'Geordie Roman god' found at Binchester: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-tees-23164533 Archaeologists Find Ancient Stone Head Which Could Be Roman Geordie God: https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2013/jul/04/stone-head-roman-geordie-god Cameron Appointed Peer, MOD and Odyssey Colluded over Balcehn's HMS Victory: https://www.heritagedaily.com/2012/07/cameron-appointed-peer-mod-and-odyssey-colluded-over-balchens-hms-victory/46034 Springtime for Hitler and “N@zi War Diggers”: https://www.heritagedaily.com/2014/03/springtime-for-hitler-and-nazi-war-death-porn-diggers/102632 Assumed Missing – Reported Buired – the Search for the Lost Spitfires of Burma: https://www.heritagedaily.com/2015/03/assumed-missing-reported-buried-the-search-for-the-lost-spitfires-of-burma/107095 The Buried Spitfires of Burma: A ‘Fake' History: https://www.hive.co.uk/Product/Andy-Brockman/The-Buried-Spitfires-of-Burma--A-Fake-History/24703841 High Court sets Stonehenge Tunnel on Road to Nowhere! What Happens Next? - WB 31st July 2021: https://youtu.be/i4E_Kqhoubo Sheffield Shock Closure: Staff & Students Speak! - WB 27th May 2021 https://youtu.be/Qhm3JiUZymM Sheffield University "Disposed of" Key Documents During Archaeology Dept Review - WB 12th June 2021: https://youtu.be/rQ77L-Z6iPI  “The Future of Our Past is Family" - Worcester Graduates Speak! - WB 30th Aug 2021: https://youtu.be/rgqI7HWGs-Q

Insight Myanmar
David Eubank: A Man of Faith and Action Fights for Burma

Insight Myanmar

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 126:19


David Eubank didn't know that a single moment on a jungle path in 1997 would prove to be so eventful for not only his own life, but an entire nation as well. Living in Thailand at the time, David was growing distressed hearing about a Burmese military operation that was displacing over half a million people. So loading up four backpacks with medicine, he decided to travel the border to see if he could find anyone who needed help. One thing led to another, and that trip ultimately give birth to the Free Burma Rangers (FBR). In this episode's wide-ranging interview, David goes into his background of 25 years living and supporting those many ethnic communities, sharing what he's learned from the different groups, the various hardships they've faced, and even the strange and exotic foods he's sampled.  As a Christian, David's faith in a higher power has been a major factor in his work. To this day, his faith animates all of his humanitarian work. “That's the heart of why I do it,” he says. Even in these most difficult of times, he draws on the reservoir of his faith; in spite of his first-hand knowledge of 25 years of Tatmadaw cruelty, he still tries to love his enemy. Still, this does not mean allowing entire populations to be victimized without recourse, and David acknowledges that self-defense, whether on an individual or communal level, is a basic human right everywhere in the world. Compounding the Myanmar military's brutal tactics used has been the almost total lack of response or engagement by any international actor, a fact which has surprised and greatly distressed David, especially given the extent of the unfolding humanitarian disaster and Myanmar's geopolitical importance. He believes there is so much good that other nations and foreign entities could still do now, if only they chose to.  Support this podcast

The Bangkok Podcast | Conversations on Life in Thailand's Buzzing Capital
From Coffee to Conflict: Kenyan Ambassador Lindsay Kiptiness [S5.E32]

The Bangkok Podcast | Conversations on Life in Thailand's Buzzing Capital

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 44:27


Greg interviews Lindsay Kiptiness, the Kenyan Ambassador to Thailand. Ambassador Kiptiness begins by introducing himself and explains his responsibilities as ambassador to Thailand, Laos, Vietnam, Cambodia and Burma. He explains his unfortunate arrival during COVID times, and his desire to really explore Thailand when it fully re-opens. The Kenyan healthcare system is behind Thailand's, but he notes that Nairobi did serve as the center of COVID treatment for UN officials.  Greg asks the Ambassador about Kenyan products, and the Ambassador regales Greg with pitches for Kenyan coffee and Kenyan purple tea. No, that's not a typo, and the Ambassador assures us it is the best tea in the world. :)  The conversation continues on to cover cultural misconceptions, the fickle nature of the global community in times of crisis, and the expatriate Kenyan (and African communities) in Thailand, which is growing, and the Thai community in Kenya, which unfortunately is not. Greg and the Ambassador discuss the reasons for this, and the Ambassador contends there is simply not enough information about Kenya and Africa in Thailand. In fact, the Ambassador makes the point that Greg has made many times on the podcast: all expats are to some extent ambassadors for their home country, and Mr. Kiptiness encourages all Kenyans in Thailand to do their best to promote their home country.  Don't forget that Patrons get the ad-free version of the show as well as swag and other perks. And we'll keep our Facebook, Twitter, and LINE accounts active so you can send us comments, questions, or whatever you want to share.

Desert Island Dishes
The Rangoon Sisters: Aka Emily and Amy Chung: NHS Doctors and Burmese Supperclub Hosts

Desert Island Dishes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 52:57


My guests today are Emily and Amy Chung – aka The Rangoon Sisters These two sisters are junior doctors by day, cooks by night as they host sell-out supper clubs as part of their mission to put Burmese food on the culinary map. The sisters started their supperclub in 2013 after visiting Burma for the first time in 2012 and have since gone on to raise £10,000 for charities since then Their number 1 fan is Grace Dent – who said that their Mohinga (fish chowder) was ‘the nicest thing she put in her mouth in 2017' Grace Dent has said: As a restaurant critic, I constantly giggle at their humble manner of serving some of the best food I ever eat. It is always brought to the table with the words, “This probably isn't very good but see if you like it.” They brought out their debut cookbook last year to critical acclaim – it was in the Observer Food Monthly top 10 books of 2020. Steeped in family recipes and stories which are well written and easy to follow, it's not hard to see why it has been such a hit. Emily has said; “We are always nervous that we can pull this off again,” “But then the empty plates come back to the kitchen and we think, at some level, we're doing OK.”---Thank you to our sponsor Cooks Matches. Find them on Instagram @cooksmatches and head to their website www.cooksmatches.co.uk to find out more.--Thank you for listening!If you don't already and you would like to, then do come and follow me on Instagram @desertislanddishesYou can sign up for the newsletter and find a whole host of different recipes at www.desertislanddishes.co See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The John Batchelor Show
1767: #ScalaReport: The supply chain does not improve quickly into 2022. Chris Riegel CEO Scala.com

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 12:35


.Photo:  Punjab Regiment uses mules for carrying cargo in Burma during WWII. Animals have been used for logistic purposes by different peoples throughout history; the Roman army, in particular, preferred mules over donkeys for their moving capacity. #ScalaReport: The supply chain does not improve quickly into 2022. Chris Riegel CEO Scala.com https://9to5mac.com/2021/10/12/iphone-13-production-report/

10% Happier with Dan Harris
Stepping Back From Stress| Bonus Meditation with Alexis Santos

10% Happier with Dan Harris

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 7:17


Taking a bigger perspective and staying grounded in the body helps us experience life's inevitable stress without being taken over by it.About Alexis Santos:Alexis has practiced and taught Insight Meditation in both the East and West since 2001. He has been a long-time student of Sayadaw U Tejaniya (a well respected meditation teacher in Burma whose teachings have attracted a global audience), and his teaching emphasizes knowing the mind through a natural and relaxed continuity -- a style of practice that's particularly useful during our crazy lives. Alexis has completed the Spirit Rock/IMS Teacher Training, teaches retreats across the globe, and currently lives in Portland, Maine.To find this meditation in the Ten Percent Happier app, you can search for “Stepping Away from Stress,” or click here: https://10percenthappier.app.link/content?meditation=6ab4db4d-eeb9-4f7e-baca-14938ce9d57c.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

New Books in Intellectual History
Hans Martin Krämer and Julian Strube, "Theosophy across Boundaries: Transcultural and Interdisciplinary Perspectives on a Modern Esoteric Movement" (SUNY Press, 2020)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 63:29


Theosophy across Boundaries: Transcultural and Interdisciplinary Perspectives on a Modern Esoteric Movement (SUNY Press, 2020) brings a global history approach to the study of esotericism, highlighting the important role of Theosophy in the general histories of religion, science, philosophy, art, and politics. The first half of the book consists of seven perspectives on the activities of the Theosophical Society in very different regional contexts, ranging from India, Vietnam, China, and Japan to Victorian Britain and Israel, shedding new light on the entanglement of "Western" and "Oriental" ideas around 1900. The second half explores specific cultural influences that Theosophy exerted in the spheres of literature, art, and politics, using case studies from Sri Lanka, Burma, India, Japan, Ireland, Germany, and Russia. The examples clearly show that Theosophy was part of a truly global movement, thus providing an outstanding example of the complex entanglements of the global religious history of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Hans Martin Kramer is Professor of Japanese Studies at Heidelberg University in Germany. Julian Strube is Assistant Professor in Religious Studies at the University of Vienna. Samee Siddiqui is a PhD Candidate at the Department of History, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His dissertation explores discussions relating to religion, race, and empire between South Asian and Japanese figures in Tokyo from 1905 until 1945. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

New Books in History
Hans Martin Krämer and Julian Strube, "Theosophy across Boundaries: Transcultural and Interdisciplinary Perspectives on a Modern Esoteric Movement" (SUNY Press, 2020)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 63:29


Theosophy across Boundaries: Transcultural and Interdisciplinary Perspectives on a Modern Esoteric Movement (SUNY Press, 2020) brings a global history approach to the study of esotericism, highlighting the important role of Theosophy in the general histories of religion, science, philosophy, art, and politics. The first half of the book consists of seven perspectives on the activities of the Theosophical Society in very different regional contexts, ranging from India, Vietnam, China, and Japan to Victorian Britain and Israel, shedding new light on the entanglement of "Western" and "Oriental" ideas around 1900. The second half explores specific cultural influences that Theosophy exerted in the spheres of literature, art, and politics, using case studies from Sri Lanka, Burma, India, Japan, Ireland, Germany, and Russia. The examples clearly show that Theosophy was part of a truly global movement, thus providing an outstanding example of the complex entanglements of the global religious history of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Hans Martin Kramer is Professor of Japanese Studies at Heidelberg University in Germany. Julian Strube is Assistant Professor in Religious Studies at the University of Vienna. Samee Siddiqui is a PhD Candidate at the Department of History, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His dissertation explores discussions relating to religion, race, and empire between South Asian and Japanese figures in Tokyo from 1905 until 1945. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books Network
Hans Martin Krämer and Julian Strube, "Theosophy across Boundaries: Transcultural and Interdisciplinary Perspectives on a Modern Esoteric Movement" (SUNY Press, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 63:29


Theosophy across Boundaries: Transcultural and Interdisciplinary Perspectives on a Modern Esoteric Movement (SUNY Press, 2020) brings a global history approach to the study of esotericism, highlighting the important role of Theosophy in the general histories of religion, science, philosophy, art, and politics. The first half of the book consists of seven perspectives on the activities of the Theosophical Society in very different regional contexts, ranging from India, Vietnam, China, and Japan to Victorian Britain and Israel, shedding new light on the entanglement of "Western" and "Oriental" ideas around 1900. The second half explores specific cultural influences that Theosophy exerted in the spheres of literature, art, and politics, using case studies from Sri Lanka, Burma, India, Japan, Ireland, Germany, and Russia. The examples clearly show that Theosophy was part of a truly global movement, thus providing an outstanding example of the complex entanglements of the global religious history of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Hans Martin Kramer is Professor of Japanese Studies at Heidelberg University in Germany. Julian Strube is Assistant Professor in Religious Studies at the University of Vienna. Samee Siddiqui is a PhD Candidate at the Department of History, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His dissertation explores discussions relating to religion, race, and empire between South Asian and Japanese figures in Tokyo from 1905 until 1945. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in World Affairs
Hans Martin Krämer and Julian Strube, "Theosophy across Boundaries: Transcultural and Interdisciplinary Perspectives on a Modern Esoteric Movement" (SUNY Press, 2020)

New Books in World Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 63:29


Theosophy across Boundaries: Transcultural and Interdisciplinary Perspectives on a Modern Esoteric Movement (SUNY Press, 2020) brings a global history approach to the study of esotericism, highlighting the important role of Theosophy in the general histories of religion, science, philosophy, art, and politics. The first half of the book consists of seven perspectives on the activities of the Theosophical Society in very different regional contexts, ranging from India, Vietnam, China, and Japan to Victorian Britain and Israel, shedding new light on the entanglement of "Western" and "Oriental" ideas around 1900. The second half explores specific cultural influences that Theosophy exerted in the spheres of literature, art, and politics, using case studies from Sri Lanka, Burma, India, Japan, Ireland, Germany, and Russia. The examples clearly show that Theosophy was part of a truly global movement, thus providing an outstanding example of the complex entanglements of the global religious history of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Hans Martin Kramer is Professor of Japanese Studies at Heidelberg University in Germany. Julian Strube is Assistant Professor in Religious Studies at the University of Vienna. Samee Siddiqui is a PhD Candidate at the Department of History, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His dissertation explores discussions relating to religion, race, and empire between South Asian and Japanese figures in Tokyo from 1905 until 1945. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/world-affairs

1001 Heroes, Legends, Histories & Mysteries Podcast

Part two-Led by Claire Chennault, the Flying Tigers were a group of American pilots who originally signed as mercenaries for China in 1941 to fight Japanese aggression in China and Burma. Chennault had worked to build China's air force since 1937 when the Japanese invaded China and seized Shanghai and Nanking, but finally received help from FDR in 1941 in the form of planes and pilots. Chennault had the answer for the fast Japanese Zero plane- but it would take training and discipline to make sure his men learned it. When they did, it provided the first good news since the invasion of Pearl Harbor and listed American and Chinese morale. Voices AVG Cols Tex Hikk, Ed Rector, Dick Rossi. East Asia Media. YOUR REVIEWS AT APPLE/ITUNES ARE NEEDED AND APPRECIATED!   Copy and Paste the highlighted links to your Apple or Android Devices for free listening:  APPLE USERS   Catch 1001 RADIO DAYS now at Apple iTunes!  https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/1001-radio-days/id1405045413?mt=2 Catch 1001 HEROES now at Apple iTunesPodcast App: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/1001-heroes-legends-histories-mysteries-podcast/id956154836?mt=2 Catch 1001 CLASSIC SHORT STORIES at iTunes/apple Podcast App Now: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/1001-classic-short-stories-tales/id1078098622?mt=2 Catch 1001 Stories for the Road at iTunes/Apple Podcast now: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/1001-stories-for-the-road/id1227478901?mt=2 ANDROID USERS- 1001 Radio Days right here at Player.fm FREE: https://player.fm/series/1001-radio-days 1001 Classic Short Stories & Tales: https://castbox.fm/channel/1001-Classic-Short-Stories-%26-Tales-id381734?country=us 1001 Heroes, Legends, Histories & Mysteries: https://castbox.fm/channel/1001-Heroes%2C-Legends%2C-Histories-%26-Mysteries-Podcast-id1114843?country=us 1001 Stories for the Road: https://castbox.fm/channel/1001-Stories-For-The-Road-id1324757?country=us Catch ALL of our shows at one place by going to www.1001storiesnetwork.com- our home website with Megaphone. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

History Unwritten
3.8 - The Battle of Nong Sarai

History Unwritten

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 37:57


Ayutthaya was a husk of its former self. A burnt out shell, ruled by a puppet king installed by their conquerors in Burma. But that puppet would not sit dormant. He rebuilt the city, drove off attackers from Cambodia, and prepared the way for an Ayutthayan resurgence. But this is not, really, his story. The liberation of Ayutthaya would not have happened without the capable leadership of Prince - then King - Naresuan, the "Black Prince" of Ayutthayan history. Though cruel, abrasive, and obsessed with war, Naresuan would free his country from the Burmese once and for all. Series Website

Resilienderung: ein Resilienz-Kurs  zur Veränderung
47. Embodiment: wie unser Körper Emotionen beeinflusst

Resilienderung: ein Resilienz-Kurs zur Veränderung

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 18:27


In der Episode Nr 9. „Lächeln... Was Dein Körper mit Deinem Geist macht“ hatten wir über die „Facial Feedback-Hypothese“ gesprochen. Nun wollen wir vertiefen, wie wir unseren Gemütszustand durch den Körper beeinflussen können – natürlich mit Studien untermauert.Hast Du Fragen? Rückmeldungen? Wünschst du dir, dass wir über ein bestimmtes Thema sprechen, liegt dir etwas besonders am Herzen? Ich freue mich auf deine Nachricht, hier unten, oder auf www.sanalucia.de/anfrage Motto: Wenn wir den Empfindungen nicht die gebührende Aufmerksamkeit schenken, gelangen wir nicht zu den tiefsten Ebenen des Geistes. Die tiefste Ebene des Geistes ist laut Buddha ständig in Kontakt mit Körperempfindungen. S. N. Goenka, Vipassana-Meditationslehrer aus Burma  Studien:Riskind, J.H., Gotay, C.C. Physical posture: Could it have regulatory or feedback effects on motivation and emotion? - Motiv Emot 6, 273–298 (1982). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00992249Bloch, S., (1985) «Approches pluridisciplinaires de l'émotion, modèles effecteurs des émotions fondamentales : relations entre rythmes respiratoires…Gary L. Wells , Richard E Petty. The Effects of Over Head Movements on Persuasion: Compatibility and Incompatibility of Responses September 1980. Basic and Applied Social Psychology 1(3):219-230 Musik: musicfox.com 

Haymarket Books Live
What's Happening in Myanmar?

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 90:27


Join us to discuss the popular uprising in Myanmar and its global repercussions in labor, feminist dynamics, and for ethnic minorities. A panel of women will discuss three specific aspects of this momentous upheaval: labor struggles, the feminist dynamic, and the role of ethnic minorities. Since February, an uprising has been in progress against a military coup in Myanmar. The military, which has been in power since 1948 when the country became independent from Britain, declared the coup to overturn the results of a legitimate election in which the National League for Democracy gained a majority of seats in the parliament. Over 1000 protesters have been killed, over 4000 arrested and 20 sentenced to death since the coup. The majority of the population have been denied any type of COVID care or vaccination. A general strike involving most sectors of the population has been ongoing. Women, who have been explicitly challenging misogyny and the second-class status of women in Burmese society, have come out in support of the uprising. Various oppressed national minority populations, including the Rohingya, have also joined the uprising. The opposition National Unity Government is now calling for a federalist alternative to the military-civilian government that ruled from 2015 on. The combined might of the capitalist state-army, which promotes ethno-religious chauvinism and misogyny, and the important strategic role which Myanmar plays for various global powers, makes its military government hugely powerful. Authoritarian powers around the world are also learning from the coup for their own fascistic purposes. The struggle in Myanmar and similar struggles around the world cannot move forward without global grassroots solidarity to oppose the military government and to give voice to Myanmar women, striking labor activists and ethnic minorities. Speakers: Debbie Stothard is an active promoter of human rights in Burma and the ASEAN region. During her 32-year career, she has worked as a journalist, community education consultant, governmental advisor, and trainer in Malaysia, Australia, and Thailand. In 1996, she founded the Alternative ASEAN Network on Burma (ALTSEAN-Burma) and was elected Secretary-General of the International Federation for Human Rights (FIDH) in 2013. She developed the first women-specific human rights training program for Myanmar in 1997, an initiative which is ongoing, and has supported many local and national young women leaders in Myanmar. Yasmin Ullah is an independent Rohingya social justice activist. She was born in the Northern Rakhine state of Myanmar. Her family fled to Thailand in 1995 when she was a child and she remained a stateless refugee until moving to Canada in 2011. Yasmin has served as the President of the Rohingya Human Rights Network, a non-profit group led by activists across Canada advocating and raising public awareness of the Rohingya genocide. Myra Dahgaypaw is the Managing Director of the U.S. Campaign for Burma. She is a Karen human rights activist from Karen State, Eastern Burma. She was an internally displaced person and a refugee prior to resettling in the U.S. at age of 13. Myra has played a strong role in her community as an organizer and a human rights advocate. Previously, Myra worked as a human rights advocate at the United Nations with the Burma Fund United Nations Office. Moderator Frieda Afary is an Iranian American librarian, translator, and activist. She produces the blog Iranian Progressives in Translation and writes about the Middle East and the politics of solidarity for a variety of publications, including New Politics magazine. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/hyXXPJxnq6Y Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

Shaping Opinion
What’s Next in Afghanistan

Shaping Opinion

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 45:05


Journalist Hollie McKay joins Tim from Afghanistan where she lives and from where she files her reports as the Taliban strengthens its control over the country in the wake of the U.S. pullout. Hollie is a war crimes investigator, an author and a reporter who gives a view on what life is like for the people of Afghanistan now that the Taliban is in control. https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/Afghanistan_auphonic.mp3 Photo Source: Hollie McKay America just marked the 20th anniversary of the September 11th terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center, the Pentagon and four hijacked aircraft. The attacks were waged by Islamic terrorists with the backing of Osama Bin Laden and the terrorist group Al Qaeda.  At the time, Al Qaeda and the Taliban operated terrorist training camps in Afghanistan, where the 9/11 hijackers trained. On October 7, 2001, the United States and Great Britain responded to the 9/11 attacks by targeting terrorist training camps in Afghanistan with bombs and cruise missiles. That led to a war against the terrorists in that country and a 20-year war-time occupation. By August of this year, that conflict started to come to its end as the United States pulled out of the country. Over the 20 years of the Afghan war, more than 3,500 allied troops died in combat. That includes 2,448 American service members. More than 20,000 Americans suffered combat-related wounds. Many more came home with scars you can't see. According to Brown University, roughly 69,000 Afghan security forces were killed during that period, as well as 51,000 Afghan civilians and 51,000 terrorists and militants. The United States had spent $2 trillion on the conflict.  In the end, the U.S. left billions of dollars in military equipment and arms, including armored vehicles, drones and military helicopters. In 10 days in August, from August 6th through the 15th, the Taliban took control of Kandahar, Mazar-e-Sharif and then the capital city, Kabul. The incumbent Afghan government quickly fell apart with the country's president fleeing to the UAE. The U.S. evacuated its embassy, and thousands of American citizens went to the Kabul airport to flee the country. During the evacuation, two suicide bombers attacked the Kabul airport, killing more than 103 people, including 12 American Marines and one U.S. Navy medic. By the time the Taliban took control, there were still an undetermined number of Americans and Afghan allies still in the country. Hollie McKay is a war crimes investigator and has worked on the frontlines of several war zones that have included Iraq, Pakistan, Syria, Iran, and many other places, including Afghanistan. Links Afghans Dying at Border as Tensions Intensify Between Taliban, Pakistan, New York Post Driving Across What Was Once Afghanistan's Terror-Filled Highway, Knewz The Transformation of Kabul, One Month After the Taliban Takeover, New York Post Taliban Official: Strict Punishment, Executions Will Return, Associated Press Hollie McKay (website) About this Episode's Guest Hollie McKay Hollie McKay Hollie S. McKay is a foreign policy expert and war crimes investigator. She was an investigative and international affairs/war journalist for Fox News Digital for over fourteen years where she focused on warfare, terrorism, and crimes against humanity. Hollie has worked on the frontlines of several major war zones and covered humanitarian and diplomatic crises in Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Syria, Iran, Turkey, Yemen, Saudi Arabia, Burma, Russia, Africa, Latin America, and other areas. Her globally-spanned coverage, in the form of thousands of print articles and essays, has included exclusive and detailed interviews with numerous captured terrorists, as well as high-ranking government, military, and intelligence officials and leaders from all sides. She has spent considerable time embedded with US and foreign troops,

1001 Heroes, Legends, Histories & Mysteries Podcast
THE FLYING TIGERS OF WWII (PT 1)

1001 Heroes, Legends, Histories & Mysteries Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 53:51


Led by Claire Chennault, the Flying Tigers were a group of American pilots who originally signed as mercenaries for China in 1941 to fight Japanese aggression in China and Burma. Chennault had worked to build China's air force since 1937 when the Japanese invaded China and seized Shanghai and Nanking, but finally received help from FDR in 1941 in the form of planes and pilots. Chennault had the answer for the fast Japanese Zero plane- but it would take training and discipline to make sure his men learned it. When they did, it provided the first good news since the invasion of Pearl Harbor and listed American and Chinese morale. Voices AVG Cols Tex Hikk, Ed Rector, Dick Rossi. East Asia Media. YOUR REVIEWS AT APPLE/ITUNES ARE NEEDED AND APPRECIATED!   Copy and Paste the highlighted links to your Apple or Android Devices for free listening:  APPLE USERS   Catch 1001 RADIO DAYS now at Apple iTunes!  https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/1001-radio-days/id1405045413?mt=2 Catch 1001 HEROES now at Apple iTunesPodcast App: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/1001-heroes-legends-histories-mysteries-podcast/id956154836?mt=2 Catch 1001 CLASSIC SHORT STORIES at iTunes/apple Podcast App Now: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/1001-classic-short-stories-tales/id1078098622?mt=2 Catch 1001 Stories for the Road at iTunes/Apple Podcast now: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/1001-stories-for-the-road/id1227478901?mt=2 ANDROID USERS- 1001 Radio Days right here at Player.fm FREE: https://player.fm/series/1001-radio-days 1001 Classic Short Stories & Tales: https://castbox.fm/channel/1001-Classic-Short-Stories-%26-Tales-id381734?country=us 1001 Heroes, Legends, Histories & Mysteries: https://castbox.fm/channel/1001-Heroes%2C-Legends%2C-Histories-%26-Mysteries-Podcast-id1114843?country=us 1001 Stories for the Road: https://castbox.fm/channel/1001-Stories-For-The-Road-id1324757?country=us Catch ALL of our shows at one place by going to www.1001storiesnetwork.com- our home website with Megaphone. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Pod Save the World
Jared Kushner is “Rasputin in a slim-fitting suit”

Pod Save the World

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 94:28


Tommy and Ben talk about the results of the German elections, Senate hearings on Afghanistan, a report about a Trump administration plan to arrest Wikileaks founder Julian Assange, votes on Israel and Yemen on Capitol Hill, an update on Burma, and funny Trump foreign policy stories. Then Washington Post journalist Jason Rezaian joins to talk about his new podcast 544 Days, which details his time being held hostage in Iran's notorious Evin prison. For a closed-captioned version of this episode, please visit crooked.com/podsavetheworld.  For a transcript of this episode, please email transcripts@crooked.com and include the name of the podcast. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

History Unwritten
3.7 - Wheel Turning Kings

History Unwritten

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 55:25


Southeast Asia in the 16th century was a playground for ambitious kings hoping to build their empires. The kings of Ayutthaya, Burma, Lan Xang and Cambodia vied for dominance - to become a Chakkavatti - a "Wheel Turning King" from Buddhist philosophy. From the many, only one would stand victorious. The question is: Who would it be? And what would become of the losers? Series Website

Coffee With Cory
[Rerun] The Moment Before Letting Go

Coffee With Cory

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 5:55


The moment before letting go is when we grip the hardest. In this episode, Cory shares a story during his time in Burma where he surrendered fully and experienced the peace that came from it.As always, if you'd like to get free access to my resource library, including guided meditations, book recommendations, app recommendations, and more, text your email address to: +1 (631) 337-8298

The Global Politico
This week: Dispatches from UNGA

The Global Politico

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 1:02


We're doing something different this week: host Ryan Heath will be bringing you snapshots from the field at the United Nations General Assembly, where prime ministers rub elbows with the world's biggest business and nonprofit leaders. Starting Tuesday morning, Ryan and producer Olivia Reingold will share quick dispatches with global insiders during the most important week of their year. Ryan Heath is the host of the "Global Insider" podcast and newsletter.  Olivia Reingold produces “Global Insider.”  Irene Noguchi edits “Global Insider” and is the executive producer of POLITICO Audio.  Linda Thomas-Greenfield is the U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations.   You can subscribe to Ryan's “Global Insider” newsletter here. And check out POLITICO's other newsletters:  China Watcher West Wing Playbook Playbook Nightly Corridors EU's Brussels Playbook Morning Tech Morning Energy Weekly Shift

The Global Politico
The ambassador to everywhere: Linda Thomas-Greenfield

The Global Politico

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 27:04


Nearly all U.S. Ambassador posts are unfilled. As the Biden administration struggles to get nominees confirmed, Linda Thomas-Greenfield, the U.S. Ambassador to the U.N., has been thrust into the spotlight while leading Presidential delegations around the world. She opens up to host Ryan Heath about the possibility of the U.S. recognizing the Taliban, the Ted Cruz holdup, and what “gumbo diplomacy” really means. Ryan Heath is the host of the "Global Insider" podcast and newsletter.  Olivia Reingold produces “Global Insider.”  Irene Noguchi edits “Global Insider” and is the executive producer of POLITICO Audio.  Linda Thomas-Greenfield is the U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations.   You can subscribe to Ryan's “Global Insider” newsletter here and Alex's “National Security Daily” newsletter here.  And check out POLITICO's other newsletters:  China Watcher West Wing Playbook Playbook Nightly Corridors EU's Brussels Playbook Morning Tech Morning Energy Weekly Shift

The Broken Record Radio Show
Attica, Burma

The Broken Record Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 106:55


Full Episode 9-13-21 - In this episode, we have a big picture COVID discussion with Dimitri, Amanda yells 'Attica!' for some reason, and Dave updates us on the fast-developing situation in Burma, completely ignored by the media. Check out our Patreon and become a supporter to listen to our post-show conversations. patreon.com/thebrokenrecordradioshow

Burmese Entrepreneur
#20 CHILLI OIL - From Burma via Manchester, England

Burmese Entrepreneur

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 44:03


In this episode my guest is May Kyi Noo - the owner of a new Burmese business based in Manchester, England. Here she shares her story of moving to the UK as a teenager, finding the North 'boring!' compared to the South, and finally going on to start her online chilli oil brand: Rice Over Everything.    

Rock N Roll Pantheon
Stephanie and Stephanie Talk Tunes: "That's When I Reach for My Revolver," Mission of Burma

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 33:37


Punk's not dead. Join the Stephanies as they discuss Mission of Burma's notorious ear-splitting shows (and the story of nearly losing their hearing), the very strange history of the song's title, and the other Roger Miller. On the way, they discuss the "Nirvana baby," Nandi Bushell's rising star with the Foo Fighters, and weird venue rules. Thanks for following us -- find us at @stephaniestalktunes across all channels and at stephaniestalktunes.com. Rock on. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Fourth Messenger Podcast - Teachings and Art from the Sangha
Liberation through Kindness | Venerable Canda

The Fourth Messenger Podcast - Teachings and Art from the Sangha

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2021 57:22


Ven. Canda went forth as a Buddhist nun in Burma in 2006 and subsequently took full ordination with Ajahn Brahm. She founded the Anukampa Bhikkhuni project in England, which aims to create a monastic home for bhikkhunis. To support their vision, visit https://anukampaproject.org/donate/. More information and monastic teachings may be found at https://www.fourthmessenger.org.

Last Word
Jill Murphy (pictured), Len Gibson, Dame Elizabeth Blackadder, Nanci Griffith

Last Word

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 28:05


Matthew Bannister on: The children's author Jill Murphy who based her best-selling stories of the Worst Witch on her own schooldays. Len Gibson, the former prisoner of war from Sunderland who worked on the notorious Burma railway and later taught Dave Stewart of the Eurythmics to play guitar. Dame Elizabeth Blackadder, the acclaimed artist noted for her exquisite Japanese-influenced paintings of flowers and cats. Nanci Griffith, the singer and songwriter from Texas who was known as the 'queen of folkabilly'. Producer: Lucy Wai Interviewed guest: Bob Harris Interviewed guest: Alexandra Gladwell Interviewed guest: Brian Burnie Interviewed guest: Pamela Todd Interviewed guest: Alice Strang Interviewed guest: Duncan Macmillan Archive clips used: BBC, Jackanory Words or Pictures 1995; CBBC/ZDF, The Worst Witch 2017; BBC, Woman's Hour 2016; Pathe News, Japanese planes 1943; WarGen, The War Memories of Len Gibson 2019; Daft as a Brush charity, Dave Stewart tribute to Len Gibson 2021; BBC, Conversation with Artists 1982; BBC, Words and Music 1994; BBC, Bob Harris' Country 2012.

Tea Biz
Tea News and Biz Insight - September 3, 2021

Tea Biz

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 20:28


HEAR THE HEADLINES – Timely Tea Delivery is in Troubled Waters | Tea is Thriving in the Convenience Channel | Iran Tea Production is Up 25pct | NEWS - The disruption of global supply chains is getting worse. Container vessel reliability for tea shipments crossing the Pacific continued to decline this summer as prices reached new heights. The World Container Index for eight East-West routes rose to a composite cost of $9,613 for the week of August 19 – up 360% compared to the same period last year. Consignments of tea shipped from Shanghai to Rotterdam increased 659% to $13,698 last week. | FEATURES – This week Tea Biz puts Burmese chefs in the spotlight for their culinary contributions in tea... and then we travel to London where Unilever unveiled four guiding principles of regenerative agriculture a topic currently trending in tea. Tea Leaf Cuisine Pickled tea leaves may sound a bit out of the ordinary but not for Southeast Asian chefs. Burma, now known as Myanmar, is an ancient crossroads influenced by the cuisine of bordering Bangladesh, China, Thailand, and Laos. It is here that laphet became a national dish that is now finding its way to US and European consumers in branded packaged goods. Regenerative Agriculture Danone CEO Emmanuel Faber writes that “never before have the health of people and the health of the planet been so closely interconnected.” Beginning this week, the Tea Biz Podcast and Blog undertakes a series of interviews with thought-leaders in tea from organizations such as the Rainforest Alliance, growers in Sri Lanka, where a nationwide ban on the import and manufacture of plant chemicals was instituted in May; and with multinationals like Unilever, a company with extensive tea holdings that recently unveiled its basic principals of regenerative agriculture. Today's segment is a primer introducing the topic and asking the critical question: Can a world that has already eroded a third of the planet's soils feed a population of 10 billion without intensive agricultural practices that rely on heavy inputs of fertilizer, herbicides, and pesticides necessary to sustain monoculture farming?

Warriors In Their Own Words | First Person War Stories
James E.T. Hopkins: WWII Combat Surgeon in Merrill's Marauders

Warriors In Their Own Words | First Person War Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 49:36


James E.T Hopkins was a surgical intern before he volunteered with the Army Medical Corps. After serving in Fiji and the Solomon Islands, Hopkins volunteered again for what would eventually be known as Merrill's Marauders. Merrill's Marauders fought primarily in the jungles of Burma, executing deep penetration missions behind enemy lines. The 1962 film Merrill's Marauders is based on their experiences. As a combat surgeon, Hopkins was unarmed on the battlefield, and completely exposed as he treated the wounds of fellow Marauders. To hear more stories about the Marauders, listen to our interview with Col. Logan. E. Weston, nicknamed 'The Fightin' Preacher'. To learn more about Hopkins, click here.

Insight Myanmar
Towards a More Just Society

Insight Myanmar

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 121:15


Marlar has spent years researching gender studies, women's rights, and violence against women in Burmese society. She notes that besides Myanmar being a patriarchal culture, there is the Burmese Buddhist belief of “pon,”which refers to the good karma inherently bestowed upon men. Due to pon, Marlar is prevented from meditating in certain places in Shwedagon Pagoda, which led her as a girl to wonder if even the lowest male thief has more merit than she or any other woman does in Burma. Marlar acknowledges that her critique of the ways in which Burmese women are marginalized flies in the face over a century of writings that in fact claim the opposite. Colonial British literature highlighted the greater freedoms they observed among Burmese women than in societies in other colonial lands. And more recently, several notable Burmese female writers, such as Ma Thanegi and Mi Mi Khaing, have made similar claims, pushing a theory of agency and independence for Burmese women. But Marlar claims they are writing from a place of privilege that is more indicative of their own circumstances, and at the expense of understanding the lived reality of the vast majority of other women across the country.  Marlar notes that more recently, technology and the Internet have connected the Burmese people to the rest of the world, allowing the #MeToo movement to take off in Myanmar. In her view, any potential solution needs to be holistic, bringing together family, community, and culture to end this destructive cycle. She has worked with both community organizations and legislators prior to the coup on a watershed law punishing violence against women, but it was not passed, and she feels that part of the reason was that the Rohingya crisis monopolized the NLD's attention. She also places blame squarely on Aung San Suu Kyi for not being a real feminist leader. On the sensitive topic of rape, Marlar explains that one of the main reasons it goes underreported is out of shame. However in Myanmar, there not only is shame for the woman, but also the male relatives, who feel emasculated for failing to properly protect them. This is why rape is a favored tactic of the Tatmadaw, as it undermines the pride and morale of the men they are fighting. As challenging as Marlar's struggle for gender rights have been, nothing compares to the current state since the coup was launched, which she calls a total “nightmare in which basic human rights have disappeared.  Support this podcast

TV Guidance Counselor Podcast
TV Guidance Counselor Episode 486: Clint Conley

TV Guidance Counselor Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 63:44


This week Ken welcomes bassist and singer from Mission of Burma, long time Chronicle producer and personal hero Clint Conley to the show. Ken and Clint discuss the nexus of punk rock and television, finding interesting things in New England, growing up just outside NYC, having a father "in the business", grad school at BU, the interaction of the high brow and lowbrow, the arty and the boneheaded, weirdo bands, Cousin Brucie, Ed Sullivan, rock bands on TV, the importance of 1966 for Youth Culture, Batman, Gallant Men, copycat shows, Combat!, Secret Agent, The Rifleman, Man from U.N.C.L.E., plat spinning, vaudeville acts, Hollywood Palace, Boris Karlof, seeking out all the horror movies, Channel 9 and 11, Alan King, Ed Sullivan giving extra time to Sly Stone, The Rascals, Raymond Burr, fearing iron lungs and quicksand, the worthless nature of Tucker Carlson, Candid Camera, Prank Shows, Hulabaloo, Richard Pryor and George Carlin on young rock n roller John Davidson's show, My Mother the Car, Vic Morrow, the Twilight Zone disaster and E! Network's re-enactments, Eric Burden and the Animals, Gidget, band names, Night of Whirling Death, Wild Wild West, Car 54, Where Are You?, having a VCR in the 1970s, hating Lost in Space, being scared of Billy Mumy, taping Iggy Pop on Dinah Shore, the greatness of Green Acres, meeting Mary Tyler Moore, W.C. Fields tribute by his own son, The Smothers Brothers, The Amazing Randi, Johnny Carson: GOTCHA!, The 100 Foot Wave, and the greatness of Barry Jenkin's The Underground Railroad.

The John Batchelor Show
1629: Afghanistan 2021 and South Vietnam 1975 were in the same 12th century. Matt Steinglass @TheEconomist

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2021 10:55


Photo:  Chindit Operations -  A Chindit column crossing a river in Burma, 1943.. CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow Afghanistan 2021 and South Vietnam 1975 were in the same 12th century. Matt Steinglass @TheEconomist . https://www.economist.com/asia/2021/08/28/the-afghan-government-was-undone-by-its-own-corruption?utm_medium=pr&utm_source=us-e

Light Beings and Wayshowers
Finding Purpose with the Ancient Grandmothers

Light Beings and Wayshowers

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 23:08


The Ancient Grandmothers are not actually grandmothers at all, but a spirit collective sent to work with us as we learn and grow throughout this lifetime. Their work encompasses the learning and knowledge since the beginning of time! In this episode, you will hear: my history with meeting the Ancient Grandmothers in Burma; this spirit collective's experiences throughout history in helping others find their purpose; the joint path that all humans share; a Transformational Healing to move you towards your purpose. SHOW NOTES The Mentorship Program with Adalina-Two available spots as of Sept. 7th! Read more about session booking here Adalina East on IG @adalinaeast Adalina East on Facebook @AdalinaHealing

Wonders of the World
086 - Shwedagon Pagoda of Yangon

Wonders of the World

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 43:08


Like a giant bell covered in gold, Shwedagon Pagoda lords over Yangon, Myanmar (Burma)'s skyline.  Its story is much like Burma's: elusive, mysterious. Shin Sawbu was a princess of the southern kingdom of Hanthawaddy Pegu. Through an exciting life documented by practically nobody, she rose to become queen and then in retirement to bring the gold to the great pagoda. In this episode, we attempt as best we can to piece together her story and we make a Burmese curry while we're at it. Sources: Victoria and Albert Museum website Wikifreakingpedia Duguid, Naomi. Burma: Rivers of Flavor Lonely Planet Myanmar Insights Guide Myanmar Photograph by Marcin Konsek / Wikimedia Commons / CC BY-SA 4.0

Southeast Asia Crossroads Podcast - CSEAS @ NIU
Elephant Riders of the Burmese and Kachin Forestlands with Jacob Shell

Southeast Asia Crossroads Podcast - CSEAS @ NIU

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 65:59


Jacob Shell is an Associate Professor of Geography and Urban Studies at Temple University. He received his PhD in Geography from Syracuse University. Shell arrived at his interest in Burma (Myanmar) through the topic of transportation: in particular transportation on animal-back. His first book, "Transportation and Revolt: Pigeons, Mules, Canals, and the Vanishing Geographies of Subversive Mobility," was published by MIT Press in 2015. Shell initially set out to write a book about elephants as a means of transportation in 2012, a research framing which directed his attention to the teak forests of central Burma, as well as to the forests of Kachin State and to Northeast India. His book about this topic, "Giants of the Monsoon Forest: Living and Working with Elephants," was published by WW Norton in 2019. Shell also draws maps.

Sacramental Whine
Opening the Books with Edward Jarvis

Sacramental Whine

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 38:18


Welcome to episode 100, the countdown to 100 is complete! I am delighted to have as my guest Edward Jarvis. Edward Jarvis (born in Yorkshire, England, 1975) is the author of several books including Carlos Duarte Costa: Testament of a Socialist Bishop and Sede Vacante: The Life and Legacy of Archbishop Thuc. Edward has a mixed ancestry which includes Slovenian, Irish, and French (Huguenot). Not initially academically-minded, he did a wide variety of jobs before leaning towards education and social work. Volunteering at a church-run rehab center in Italy led to a casual suggestion of enrolling on a theology course. Edward attributes now his particular interests within theology and religious studies to three factors: a non-religious upbringing, empathy for all things marginal and misunderstood, and the inspiring individuals and unusual experiences his life has been blessed with. Edward's studies (first in Italy, then in England and Brazil) coincided with his growing interest (and just a little involvement) in the ISM and the Independent Catholic world. Noticing significant gaps in the literature on these topics and the unreliability of many online sources, Edward began to nourish the idea of contributing to the published scholarship. His fourth book, The Anglican Church in Burma, is about to be published by Penn State University Press, though this one will be his first book on a non-ISM topic. Links: Convergent Streams: The Premier ISM Magazine. Sacramental Whine: Chronicling the ISM, Vol. 1. Sacramental Whine: Chronicling the ISM, Vol. 2. This podcast is hosted by Bishop David Oliver Kling and produced by the Community of Saint George (a Young Rite jurisdiction).

Myanmar Oral History Project - life stories
U Kyaw Thein Lwin born 1927, his career up to today after leaving in 1954 the Pyidawtha, Burma's first owned steamship

Myanmar Oral History Project - life stories

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 81:07


We left the third interview with Captain KT Lwin in Rotterdam in 1952 taking delivery of the steamship Pyidawtha (see https://i.pinimg.com/originals/63/49/7d/63497db1c18bd22337ad2a8c6bf6b4be.jpg) , Burma's first commercial steamship to be owned by the Government post independence. He sailed on this vessel for a couple of years before becoming the country's first Burmese Harbour Pilot.  He then became Harbour Master, then Marine Superintendent of Burma's Five Star Line (the nation's commercial shipping line est 1959 with Israeli management - https://www.facebook.com/Myanma-Five-Star-Line-102752987844185/), then the founding Managing Director of the Institute of Marine Technology.  He retired from this role in 1974 having served the Government for 30 years from the time he joined the Navy as a seventeen year old in 1944.He then started his private sector career which included time in Singapore and Thailand where he had several roles including working for a Singapore company chartering and crewing vessels, for Duta Marine (a Thai company) and for SeaTran (another Thai company) before retiring due to ill health in 1984 and moving to Australia.  He kept himself busy importing orchids from Thailand but gave that up after 6 months as the business was beset with problems. With his health recovered he focused on building up his own family company, Mariner Shipping Services, which provides Burmese crew to many different shipping companies.  Whilst at the time of my interview he remains its largest shareholder he handed over the "reins" to other family members many years ago.The interview ends with 94 year old KT providing some life and health advice and, in particular, to those listeners over 50.

DigiGods
DigiGods Episode 225: Les Vacances de M. CineDieu

DigiGods

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2021 120:02


Fabulous new boxed sets from Arrow, memorable classics from Warner Archive and top tier TV old and new, only on the DigiGods! DigiGods Podcast, 08/03/21 (M4a) — 55.90 MB right click to save Subscribe to the DigiGods Podcast In this episode, the Gods discuss: 48 Hours (Paramount Presents) (Blu-ray) Almost Famous (4k Remastered) (4k UHD Blu-ray) American Gods: Season Three (Blu-ray) Annie Get Your Gun (Blu-ray) Another 48 Hours (Paramount Presents) (Blu-ray) Another Thin Man (Blu-ray) Athena (Blu-ray) Bachelor in Paradise (Blu-ray) Baki (Blu-ray) The Bermuda Depths (Blu-ray) Bordertown Season 3 (Blu-ray) Broadway Melodry of 1940 (Blu-ray) C.B. Strike: Lethal White (DVD) Chain Lightning (Blu-ray) Charmed Season 4 (Blu-ray) The Critic: The Complete Series (DVD) Crossfire (Blu-ray) The Dead Zone - Collector's Edition (Blu-ray) Doctor Who: The King's Demons (DVD) Doctor Who: The Visitation: Special Edition (DVD) Doctor Who: Tomb of the Cybermen: Special Edition (DVD) Doctor X (Blu-ray) Dororo (Blu-ray) Dr. Oakley, Yukon Vet Season 9 (DVD) Drop Dead Gorgeous (Blu-ray) Drunk History: The Complete Series (DVD) Drunken Master II (Blu-ray) Each Dawn I Die (Blu-ray) Earwig and the Witch (Blu-ray) Elfen Lied (Blu-ray) Emma: Victorian Romance Season One (Blu-ray) Emma: Victorian Romance Season Two (DVD) Escape from Fort Bravo (Blu-ray) Gangs of London, Season 1 (Blu-ray) Genius Season 3: Aretha (DVD) Green Dolphin Street (Blu-ray) Grisaia Complete Collection (Blu-ray) Guns for San Sebastian (Blu-ray) Heartland Docs, DVM Season 3 (DVD) The Herculoids: The Complete Original Series (Blu-ray) His Dark Materials: The Complete Second Season (Blu-ray) I Wouldn't Be in Your Shoes (Blu-ray) Isle of the Dead (Blu-ray) It Happened at the World's Fair (Blu-ray) Karakuri Circus (Blu-ray) Killing Bites (Blu-ray) Knights of Sidonia (Blu-ray) Laidbackers (Blu-ray) Life below Zero: Next Generation Season 2 (DVD) The Little Rascals - The ClassicFlix Restorations, Volume 1 (Blu-ray) The Little Rascals - The ClassicFlix Restorations, Volume 2 (Blu-ray) Lucky (DVD) Madame Curie (Blu-ray) Maoyu - Archenemy & Hero (Blu-ray) Mortal Kombat (4k UHD Blu-ray) Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House (Blu-ray) Mysterious Girlfriend X (Blu-ray) Objective, Burma! (Blu-ray) Our Cartoon President Season 3 (DVD) Parks and Recreation: The Complete Series (Blu-ray) Pennyworth: The Complete Second Season (Blu-ray) Percy vs. Goliath (DVD) The Private Lives of Elizabeth & Essex (Blu-ray) Pump Up the Volume (Blu-ray) Queens Blade Rebel Warriors (Blu-ray) Quick Change (Blu-ray) Reversal of Fortune (Blu-ray) Rugrats: The Complete Series (DVD) Running Wild with Bear Grylls Season 6 (DVD) Seance (Blu-ray) The Sergio Martino Collection (Blu-ray) Shameless: The Eleventh and Final Season (DVD) Snatch (4k UHD Blu-ray) Star Trek: Discovery: Season Three (Blu-ray) Step by Step (Blu-ray) Swordgai (Blu-ray) Take Me Out To The Ball Game (Blu-ray) The Tender Trap (Blu-ray) There Was a Crooked Man (Blu-ray) They Won't Believe Me (Blu-ray) To Love Ru Darkness (Blu-ray) Ultraman Galaxy Mega Monster Battle (Blu-ray) Vengeance Trails: Four Classic Westerns (Blu-ray) The Walking Dead Season Ten (Blu-ray) Weird Wisconsin: The Bill Rebane Collection (Blu-ray) The Wild Life of Dr. Ole Season 1 (DVD) The Yearling (Blu-ray) Your Honor (DVD) Ziegfeld Follies (Blu-ray) Please also visit CineGods.com. 

Warriors In Their Own Words | First Person War Stories
Colonel Logan E. Weston: The Fightin' Preacher and Merrill's Marauders in WWII

Warriors In Their Own Words | First Person War Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 50:28


Colonel Logan E. Weston (nicknamed The Fightin' Preacher) served in WWII in the famous special ops force, called Merrill's Marauders. The Marauders fought primarily in the jungles of Burma, executing deep-penetration missions behind enemy lines. The 1962 film Merrill's Marauders is based on their experiences.

Fighting On Film
Objective, Burma! (1945) Ft. James Holland

Fighting On Film

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2021 56:18


Lace up your jump boots, sharpen your machetes, load up your M1A1 Carbines and strap on your parachutes. This week we are joined by special guest historian James Holland as we discuss the 1945 Errol Flynn film 'Objective, Burma!' We discuss the the war in Burma, the controversy around the film's release in the UK and of course the film's star Errol Flynn. Be sure to follow us on Twitter @FightingOnFilm and on Facebook. For more check out our website www.fightingonfilm.com Thanks for listening!

Finest Hours
The Leader of the Forgotten Army: William Slim

Finest Hours

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 26:37


William Slim was crucial to the British advance to liberate Burma from the Imperial Japanese Army in World War 2.

The John Batchelor Show
1551: The Second World Wars: How the First Global Conflict Was Fought and Won. Victor Davis Hanson, Hoover Institution, @HooverInst

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2021 13:25


Photo:   The Second World Wars: How the First Global Conflict Was Fought and Won.  Victor Davis Hanson, Hoover Institution, @HooverInst   https://www.amazon.com/Second-World-Wars-Global-Conflict-ebook/dp/B01N808V2J/ref=sr_1_4?dchild=1&keywords=victor+hanson&qid=1627682136&s=digital-text&sr=1-4 A definitive account of World War II by America's preeminent military historian. World War II was the most lethal conflict in human history. Never before had a war been fought on so many diverse landscapes and in so many different ways, from rocket attacks in London to jungle fighting in Burma to armor strikes in Libya. The Second World Wars examines how combat unfolded in the air, at sea, and on land to show how distinct conflicts among disparate combatants coalesced into one interconnected global war. Drawing on 3,000 years of military history, bestselling author Victor Davis Hanson argues that despite its novel industrial barbarity, neither the war's origins nor its geography were unusual. Nor was its ultimate outcome surprising. The Axis powers were well prepared to win limited border conflicts, but once they blundered into global war, they had no hope of victory. An authoritative new history of astonishing breadth, The Second World Warsoffers a stunning reinterpretation of history's deadliest conflict.

We Have Ways of Making You Talk

The final task of assaulting the Arakan Peninsula as part of the Burma campaign was given to the British 3rd Commando Brigade. Their challenge was to cut off the Japanese supply and escape routes to Rangoon.Historian Lucy Betteridge-Dyson, whose grandfather fought in Burma, joins Al Murray and James Holland to discuss the campaign and the infamous fight for Hill 170.A Goalhanger Films productionProduced by Joey McCarthyExec Producer Tony PastorTwitter: #WeHaveWays@WeHaveWaysPodWebsite: www.wehavewayspod.comEmail: wehavewayspodcast@gmail.com See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Forgotten Wars
Episode 1.43 Some Battle Scenes That Belong in a Movie … in this installment of the Anglo-Boer War

Forgotten Wars

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2021 30:20


An epic clash at Vlakfontein, a comical scene at Groenkop, & some dark scenes elsewhere in this episode. Notes: 1) Be a reason that there is a Q&A episode by using this link to send me questions related to the history we've covered: https://forgottenwarspodcast.com/contact/ 2) Be the first to help the show go on and become a permanent part of an episode by supporting us on Patreon using this link: https://forgottenwarspodcast.com/donate/

UnderCurrents
BONUS: Thant Myint-U on Myanmar

UnderCurrents

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2021 38:27


In this bonus episode, Chatham House has teamed up with the Asia Matter podcast to co-publish a discussion of the latest developments in Myanmar.  The most shocking political development in Asia so far this year is arguably the seizure of power by the military in Myanmar, and the arrest of the country's former de facto leader Aung San Suu Kyi. The military's crackdown on protests and other resistance against the coup has so far resulted in hundreds of deaths and thousands of arrests. In this episode the Asia Matters podcast discusses the impact of the coup and how the current situation may develop in the months ahead. Joining the conversation is Thant Myint-U, one of the best known historians of the country and the author most recently of The Hidden History of Burma. Undercurrents will return on Friday with a regular episode.

SuperFeast Podcast
#127 Preserving Classical Chinese Medicine with Dr. Simon Feeney

SuperFeast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2021 62:01


Dr. Simon Feeney's journey along the virtuous path of classical Chinese medicine and healing has been far from ordinary. His integrity and purist approach to everything he does, has successfully set a new standard for wholesale Chinese Herbs in Australia, with the establishment of his company/clinic Empirical Health six years ago. Purity, Quality, and Potency are the principle values of Empirical Health; The first and only Australian certified organic Chinese herb wholesaler dedicated to Dao Di principles. A Physician in Classical Chinese Medicine, Acupuncturist, extensively knowledgable herbalist, and ongoing devoted scholar (20 years) of ancient medical Burmese scriptures, Simon's passion for upholding essential ancient knowledge is evident in everything he does. Like all journeys of the heart, Simon's is full of incredible stories; Stories of ancient manuscripts with cures for Leprosy, herbal preparations to treat malaria, being held at gunpoint in the name of preserving ancient teachings, and quests of translating bygone measurements for 2000-year-old formulas used in the Han Dynasty. In this potent conversation, Simon and Mason discuss the preservation of Classical Chinese medicine through lineage, the institutionalisation of TCM (where it's lacking), concocting ancient formulas, species identification when it comes to Dao Di, and the reverence for classical Chinese medicine as a complete system. Tune in for ancient knowledge and so much more.   "If that herb's not available, what are we going to do? How are we going to adapt? Chinese medicine's beautiful like that, all of a sudden new things evolve, and that's the nature of Chinese medicine. It's still evolving. But it's not evolving as the western mind thinks about evolving, in the sense of, "Right, all that stuff's behind me, I need to forge forward into the darkness. No, it's evolving based on history".   - Dr. Simon Feeney     Host and Guest discuss: Pulse diagnosis. The Han Dynasty. Chinese herbalism. Energetics of herbs. Availability of herbs. Plant identification. Administration techniques. Therapeutic alkaloid testing. Quality discernment of herbs. Dao Di (original growing region) principles The evolving nature of Chinese Medicine. Genetic testing and proper identification of herbs. The current Chinese medicine renaissance in the west. Dosage; The right dose, for the right person at the right time.   Who is Simon Feeney? Empirical Health's Director, Simon Feeney continues to pursue his lifelong passion for the study of Traditional Medicine under a Theravadin Buddhist Monk, who has been guiding his learning for the past 20 years. Simon's commitment to fusing ancient knowledge with contemporary insight inspired his formal studies in Melbourne, Australia at the Southern School of Natural Therapies, where he completed his Bachelor's Degree of Chinese Herbal Medicine and Traditional Chinese Acupuncture. Along with his studies in the classical Chinese Medicine works of the Han Dynasty (200BC) and the refined art of Traditional Japanese Acupuncture, Simon is also a trained Bowen Therapist. Having studied intensively under one of Melbourne's leading Chinese Medicine gynaecologists. He has a special interest in chronic conditions, internal medicine, sub-clinical health, and other ‘hard to treat' conditions.   For the last 20 years, Simon has been working closely with his teacher to understand a number of scriptures from Burma (now called Myanmar). These writings, dating as far back as 500 AD, largely pertain to monastic order as well as ancient medical knowledge and further underpin Simon's dedication to preserving the integrity of the ancient ways for modern application and translation. Simon has travelled extensively through Thailand and Myanmar in documenting these texts and assisting in the preservation of this essential ancient knowledge to understand, use, and appreciate in the modern world. Simon has completed an extensive post-graduate education including a specialist course in Canonical Chinese Medicine under the internationally acclaimed educator and physician Dr. Arnaud Versluys Ph.D. director of Institute of Classical East Asian Medicine (ICEAM). He is a member of the Australian Traditional Medicine Society and a registered member of the Australian Health Practitioners Registration Agency (AHPRA). His extensive knowledge as a herbalist came from him spending endless hours working through ancient texts identifying doses of various herbs, deciphering and translating those that were successfully used centuries ago into modern applications, yet have been largely lost in modern times. His growing prominence has now extended from Chinese Medicine physicians to also include a number of veterinarians who have sought out formulas for use in their animal clinics. Simon's life journey and his long-standing passion for helping people has also involved him working with a non-profit organisation and temple, that will help build a library to hold rare and ancient manuscripts.   CLICK HERE TO LISTEN ON APPLE PODCAST    Resources: Facebook Instagram Empirical Health Empirical Health Shop empiricalhealth.com   Q: How Can I Support The SuperFeast Podcast? A: Tell all your friends and family and share online! We'd also love it if you could subscribe and review this podcast on iTunes. Or  check us out on Stitcher, CastBox, iHeart RADIO:)! Plus  we're on Spotify!   Check Out The Transcript Here:   Mason: (00:01) Simon, thanks so much for joining me.   Simon Feeney: (00:03) You got it. Thanks for the invitation.   Mason: (00:04) Absolute pleasure. In the flesh no less.   Simon Feeney: (00:06) I know. First time, hey.   Mason: (00:08) Yeah.   Simon Feeney: (00:08) I don't know. Yeah.   Mason: (00:09) You're coming down from Brisbane?   Simon Feeney: (00:11) Yeah, just been up at a conference, so coming back down through here and thought I'd stop in and take up the invitation, and it all worked out beautifully.   Mason: (00:18) Yeah, getting the practitioner gang back together.   Simon Feeney: (00:20) Yes, exactly. Yeah, it's always good to be amongst some colleagues and shoot the breeze and connect after such a long time of separation, and so it's been very nice, very rewarding for everyone, I think.   Mason: (00:32) So I love your company.   Simon Feeney: (00:35) Thank you.   Mason: (00:37) Yeah, I know-   Simon Feeney: (00:38) Ditto.   Mason: (00:38) Thank you. I don't know if it's an unusual friendship or not the... I was very curious about your company when it came up, and you've established it with such authority, and I have so many friends who are acupuncturists, and they were telling me when you first came on the scene, and just how relieved they were that you were bringing Chinese herbs of this quality to Australia because you go to Chinatown, you go and pick up your cistanche, whatever, anything you kind of like, or your formulas, and you're like, "I assume they're clean and pure."   Simon Feeney: (01:21) Well, sometimes you have to pick out cigarette butts or a piece of plastic or something. That used to be what it was like, literally it was like that. I mean, when I trained with my first herbalist, he had his big display, and he was a real traditionalist so he said, "If you can't identify anything, you shouldn't be using it." So he had no names. It wasn't in alphabetical order. It was just depending on how much he used it. But it used to be that he had a bottle of, like a little container, that used to put all the bits that he found into the thing that was just rubbish.   Mason: (01:53) That's amazing.   Simon Feeney: (01:53) Yeah, because it was much less regulated back... There still is no regulation for the quality of Chinese herbs in Australia still to this day.   Mason: (02:02) This is loose.   Simon Feeney: (02:03) So we have to set our own standards.   Mason: (02:06) I mean, I guess there are... Again, it sits in a grey area. Technically, it is regulated, but because it's such an underground world and operation in business, it's not really enforced.   Simon Feeney: (02:22) No, it's not. That's right. I mean, the practise of it is, but the quality is not regulated. You've got these companies in Taiwan and in China now, but there is no official regulation for the quality, but once you start treating patients and you start wanting these herbs for, your kids are born and your wife is pregnant, then you want to have some sort of assurity that they are good quality, and that you're not doing any damage. Do no harm is the foundation of all clinical practise. That's what started the journey for me, so looking for that kind of quality.   Mason: (03:06) And I guess the most obvious one that comes up is pesticides-   Simon Feeney: (03:10) Huge [crosstalk 00:03:10].   Mason: (03:10) ... and I think everyone can relate to that in their immediate consciousness [crosstalk 00:03:15]-   Simon Feeney: (03:15) Yes.   Mason: (03:18) When I started the company I was obsessed, and so that's why I went and sourced herbs that I wanted, but then started to talk to people who, like this woman, she's pregnant. I want to give this to my mom who just had an aneurysm.   Simon Feeney: (03:32) That's right.   Mason: (03:33) All of a sudden, your level of...   Simon Feeney: (03:34) That's serious stuff.   Mason: (03:35) It's serious shit.   Simon Feeney: (03:36) Yeah, it's really... Yeah.   Mason: (03:36) Don't muck around.   Simon Feeney: (03:37) Yeah. No, you're talking about young foetuses. You're talking about the beginning of life, so you don't want to be doing any damage whatsoever, and you want to be assured, assured 100% with no doubt, that what you're doing is safe and not only effective, but primarily safe.   Mason: (03:56) One thing I'm liking though is the self-regulation that does come up because I know you've started out a couple of years ago, a few years ago, officially distributing?   Simon Feeney: (04:06) We've been distributing for about six years or so now. Yeah, yeah.   Mason: (04:11) Wow, and so what's been the uptake? Where have you guys... I guess it's because I've been tuned in to what you're doing. I've seen you grow exponentially, but was there a constant exponential growth in the beginning, or was it a mad slog going up against the big Chinese herb companies in Australia?   Simon Feeney: (04:28) Well, like you said earlier, just coming in it with authority and that sort of certainty. I was never happy with... Basically, I started because it was just in my clinic and wanted to make formulas, so I wanted to make these old ancient formulas from the Han Dynasty, so 2000 year old formulas, figuring out how to make them is a whole 'nother level. I had to work out what a liang was, what a [zhu 00:04:52], what a [fen 00:04:53], what a [zhang 00:04:53], what are all these measurements that absolutely made no sense to what I learnt at university and was completely impractical in terms of figuring out. So I had to figure all that out, but then I had to look at the herbs and figure out all that. So then we're realising that you have all these adulterations in Chinese medicine, so incorrect species identifications, quality discernment, and then safety and purity of the herbs.   Simon Feeney: (05:20) So that led me to kind of trying to find the better, better, better, better quality, and then looking for the paperwork that supported that. Some of it was there, it was kind of falsified. I found all these little things that you didn't want to find as a herbalist, you didn't want to know about, and it was like, "Well, I think I have to try to find the best I can possibly find in the world," and I asked my community internationally, the Chinese medicine community internationally, "Where's the best?" And they all pointed to this one guy in the US, Andrew Ellis. And so I contacted him and I was like, "I want to talk to you." About a year and a half later, he responded back to me on Facebook.   Mason: (06:00) Whoa!   Simon Feeney: (06:01) And then said... Yeah, and then literally I was on the phone with him that afternoon because he said, "What are you doing now?" And I was like, "Oh, man." I had a cancellation from a patient, and so I'm sitting there and all of a sudden it comes up. And then about an hour later on the phone, we started talking about all these ancient formulas, and then he said, "I'm going to Hangzhou in two weeks. Want to come?"   Mason: (06:23) Holy shit.   Simon Feeney: (06:23) And two weeks later, I was in Hangzhou meeting these, I mentioned to you earlier, these big Chinese companies and going out to farms and understanding all the testing, and the rest is history. And then I was like, "I want to bring that back to Australia," and I brought it back to Australia, and I told some of the suppliers and they got so upset with me. They were so upset with me. Some of them are not even talking to me still because I did that. So it was almost like a calling out, it's kind of like losing face for some of those people, which is a shame.   Mason: (06:51) I mean, okay, so there's a couple of things. You've gone over, and you've started going to these meetings with these herb companies that based on the demand of you going, "Hey, I want to know that there's no pesticides. I'd like this testing to be done. I want genetic testing, or proper identification."   Simon Feeney: (07:12) Yeah, yeah. The alkaloid testing and everything, that's what we want.   Mason: (07:16) I can't remember where I've read these stories, but in regards to where this is unregulated... There's an element of upregulation on what is the highest quality herb, and I remember hearing the initial stories of when [Dedao 00:07:31] became relevant, or [Daode 00:07:34], been when all the trading routes became, those roads became really tended to, and all of a sudden you're getting Schisandra berry where Schisandra berry doesn't really grow and then people going, "Hang on. This isn't the excellent Schisandra that I'm used to. Where's it come from? Oh, it's actually coming from over here now because we can grow it more," and then that person that knew what they were talking about going, "No, I want that Schisandra berry from this region and grown this way," and all of a sudden, there's this born this invisible unregulated at just the highest quality. And it's been completely driven by people like yourself, like... was it Andrew?   Simon Feeney: (08:13) Andrew Ellis, yeah. Andy Ellis, yeah.   Mason: (08:16) But it's hard to communicate to people and then you've gone over there-   Simon Feeney: (08:21) It's very complicated.   Mason: (08:22) ... and met with these huge businesses that you've gone, and then driven by Andrew's demands, then furthered by your demands are going, "No. I need the herbs at this level."   Simon Feeney: (08:31) The correct... I mean, the concept of this adulteration concept is very, very complicated, and as you mentioned, it comes all the way back to trade routes and all sorts of things. The principles of Daode are so complicated. You've got everything from completely incorrect species, like just one example is just Sheng Ma. So Sheng Ma's a herb that they use. I think in English it's like a Black Cohosh, and I think that's the English name for it. Anyway, we think about Sheng Ma and different kinds of Sheng Ma, but if you look at Sheng Ma, the actual herb, you can have something in the north called Sheng Ma and the south called Sheng Ma, but the north call that one [Ma Hua Toe 00:09:13], but in the south, they call it Sheng Ma. So, that can be one issue.   Simon Feeney: (09:19) So when I went to Thailand, for example, I went into a wholesaler, I was looking for [Her Hung Hua 00:09:25], and they're like, "Here it is," and I'm like, "No, no, no. You've got it wrong," because what I was saying was [Her Hung Wa 00:09:29]."   Simon Feeney: (09:30) It's like a special, like a flower. And then all of a sudden you realise, "No, no, no. You're using the wrong species." "No, you're not. You're using the wrong species." "But I've been using it in clinics for 10 years." "Well, I don't know, me too." "You've been using it for what purpose?" "I've been using it for this purpose." "Okay." So in some cases there's just incorrect species, so you just get a completely wrong species. In other instances you can have a different... And one thing does what it does therapeutically and the other one doesn't, and it's just been used for whatever reason, maybe it's got a mild action, but sometimes it just doesn't. It doesn't even have the marker, the therapeutic alkaloid in it, because you can measure these things now. That's the first example.   Simon Feeney: (10:11) Second examples are where you have two different species of, same gene, it's different species with exactly the same function. An example of that's suan zao ren, so suan zao ren has two different kinds of suan zao ren, [foreign language 00:10:31] and spinose. So the spinose species is a little bit more effective, but this is for insomnia and that sort of stuff. But the [foreign language 00:10:40] is being used long enough in the history of Chinese medicine therapeutically and effectively in the clinic to say, "Yeah, it's kind of suan zao ren."   Mason: (10:49) Far out.   Simon Feeney: (10:49) Right?   Mason: (10:51) Yeah.   Simon Feeney: (10:52) And then you've got others. You got like a, and don't even get me started on chai hu bupleurum sinensis. I mean, bupleurum species. There's like 50 that are in use. But in the north the bei chai hu is different from the nan chai, so the bei chai hu is very good at venting shaoyang, so getting out pathologies in the system. This kind of lingering, they call it like a lingering pathogenic factor, but it's just kind of a TCM way of seeing this. It's basically stuck, like the shaoyang imbalance, we need to regulate shaoyang. Doesn't stop the flaring from it, but that's a different herb, [wan chin 00:11:29], but the chai hu doesn't... in the sinensis species does that.   Simon Feeney: (11:35) But then the nan chai hu which is the southern chai hu, that vents and courses the liver. So if you're using those the opposite way around because they were written... It's complicated, sorry, if I get distracted.   Mason: (11:49) Go for it.   Simon Feeney: (11:50) The sinensis is used in all Shang Han Lun formulas, so the classical formulas to vent shaoyang. And in the modern one, the nan chai hu is used in Xiao Chai Hu Tang, which is a very common formula in Chinese medicine... Sorry, Xiao Yao San, to course liver chi and get rid of the stasis. When you swap those around and use them in the context of that formula, they can really cause problems. They can cause the adverse effects that you want. And people think, "Oh, it's me or it's something else." No, it's the species. And the complications of species identification is intense and when it comes to Daode the... I was talking to an indigenous guy, indigenous elder in South Australia, and I was asking about this concept. I was talking about this with him because I was talking about, oh, the way you decoct something.   Simon Feeney: (12:41) And he said, "Oh, Simon, I'm going to bring you something." And he brought me this herb and he's like, "Try it, and see what you think," and he wanted to watch me taste it. I'm tasting it and I'm like "Oh, wow. This does this." And he's like, "Oh, good. Good." And I said, "We should get more of this, and teach me how to use it in clinic and I can apply it." And he said, "Oh... " I said, "Can you grow it?" And he said, "No, no, no. You totally missed the point. You totally don't understand. This is only therapeutically effective if it is on the north side of the river on a south-facing slope. If it's on the other side of the river, it doesn't have any function." So that's a whole 'nother level. So now we're talking about, this can actually be the correct species in the correct area, but it comes back to these really deep principles of Daode.   Mason: (13:27) So I always try to get to the crux of why this comes about. Why we get all these problems and I can see, first of all, blaring the obvious is commercialization, extreme commercialization, taking away from the nature based element of this philosophy.   Simon Feeney: (13:41) Yeah.   Mason: (13:42) Then the other one, you're saying, you got all these people in clinic using a herb because it's in a textbook and you told that you can get this in a pulse, and that in tongue, that in a complexion, this is the formula you're going to be using. "Oh, it's not working." Well, something wrong with-   Simon Feeney: (13:55) Something is wrong with me.   Mason: (13:57) ... this person or the herb. Yeah, it's like, oh, yeah, me or...   Simon Feeney: (13:58) Yeah, or Chinese medicine doesn't work. I've given up, I'm going to go and... Yeah.   Mason: (14:01) Well, that's the most, I guess for me it's a funny frustrating thing because Chinese medicine is such a complete and ancient system-   Simon Feeney: (14:10) It is.   Mason: (14:10) ... that we know works.   Simon Feeney: (14:11) It is.   Mason: (14:12) Yet, the way it's been, I can see in Australia the frustration and of course when you see it get kind of very westernised. You see this belittling of Chinese medicine. If anyone comes in with cancer you need to send them to a big boy doctor, that's a western doctor because your system can't do it.   Simon Feeney: (14:29) No, we can do a lot of stuff and it's definitely the bane of my existence. I mean, it comes back to the principles of... And it goes further. You talk about, first thing is, is basically plant identification. That's step one. So we can see already how complicated that is and we haven't really even gone into the... There's a reason that it happens in the first place, like it's not necessarily... It can be because of innocence. It could just be just not only misidentification but just availability, and availability, what's the... necessity is the mother of all creations. People just need that herb, it's just not available. What are we going to do? How are we going to adapt?   Simon Feeney: (15:14) And so, Chinese medicine's beautiful like that and then all of a sudden new things evolve, and that is the nature of Chinese medicine. It is still evolving, but is evolving based on history. It's not evolving in the sense, like the western mind thinks about evolving in the sense of, "Right, all that stuff's behind me and I need to forge forward into the darkness." I learnt this from my teacher, Arnaud Versluys. Obviously, everyone says everything because they're "Who taught them before?" So I've got to acknowledge that this idea came from my teacher.   Simon Feeney: (15:49) So in the west you forge forward into the darkness with your mind like, "Right, we're going to create new things." And the eastern way of thinking is the absolute opposite. It spins around, you're looking at the foundations of what you have and how they manifest into the future, and the future's often behind you and you're sitting in this present moment. That's a completely different way of looking into the future. And so, trying to get these foundations are very, very important so you've got this... Anyway, back to the [inaudible 00:16:18] process. So plant identification is one thing and then you get to the quality discernment of something, and then you're looking at, right, it's this, this grown this time of the year, it's got pungency, it's got this, it's got that, it's got all its nature, it's got its chi, it's got its signature, it's got its flavour.   Simon Feeney: (16:33) And then you look at dosage, it's a whole 'nother thing and it's underpinning your point which is watering down and diluting the efficacy of the medicine. If you're not using the right dose for the right person at the right time, you can't blame the medicine. And then administration techniques, so different administration techniques are being completely ignored during the course of Chinese medicine. It's very interesting to look at.   Simon Feeney: (17:04) An example like qinghao, so Artemisia annua. What was the name? The lady's name? She got a nobel prize for a science in which she went back to the history of where she started testing qinghao for malaria. So she tested it as an extract or as a granule, and she tested it as a powder, she tested it as a decoction, she tested the level in which she was able to break down these malaria strains. And eventually, she kept following her way back, back, back into the history of Chinese medicine.   Simon Feeney: (17:41) She eventually went and came back to this guy called Ge Hong who was the first person to talk about qinghao, and what did he say? "Read the subtext," he says. "Do a cold water extraction." So take the thing and actually take it, wring it out in cold water and beat it 100 times, all right? And then they tested it and it just... just demolished, just demolished. I get goosebumps thinking about it, the malarial strains, and I've seen it effective on the Thai-Burmese border when we're working there, like it's just so effective. But if you don't do it, the correct administration, you don't use the correct administration technique, you're not going to get that purpose. So every step of the way, identification, quality, dosage, administration, all these steps are very... any of those that are lacking. you're going to get an inferior clinical result.   Mason: (18:33) Okay, because I love to jump in because it frustrates me when people are going and getting acupuncture. We talk about, a lot here about finding someone practising a classical Chinese medicine verse just straight out of the western taught model and it's a distinction I think is quite, I think it's quite stark. Someone like yourself is going, "Okay. I'm going to now have to go and study by myself after I've gotten trained." Tahnee, my wife, knew your name because I think podcasts you've been on talking about dose, so I really want to hear about that. But you just bring up a couple of things I think are just super significant in terms of when you're working with a practitioner.   Mason: (19:21) One, we've brought up the fact that someone could be using a herb and that's any... Of course, we can do that, but it also speaks to the quality of practitioner that we're producing that you not able to get into the mindset and question and understand and see, "Okay, I'm going to be able to chop and change and find what is that energetic of that herb that's not working in this situation, and being able to feel, and be present and be tactile." And you encapsulated that in being able to look, by looking behind you to why the history of this medicine and knowing that the answer's going to be there somewhere if you can not just forge into the darkness.   Simon Feeney: (20:03) No, we shouldn't be making... We're not making this stuff up. We are using the history of that medicine. It's the foundation of what we're doing, and I think it's very hard for, because we have huge egos in the west, like we want to be seen as this guru or we want to be seen as these things and I see it every day in Chinese medicine. You see, "Oh, he was wrong and she's wrong," like, man, we're all part of this. We're all part of this medicine and the only way we can make it better is if we work together, we unify and we basically...   Mason: (20:40) Everyone needs to listen to a little bit of Vanilla Ice, "Stop. Collaborate and listen."   Simon Feeney: (20:44) I wasn't expecting that.   Mason: (20:50) It comes up in my head so much because I can't think of the word collaborate without-   Simon Feeney: (20:54) Oh, without, oh, that's your relationship.   Mason: (20:54) ... singing that to myself.   Simon Feeney: (20:54) Yeah, yeah. Nice.   Mason: (20:57) And I mean it's the same for me in business. I'm a very reluctant businessman and watching other people come up in the medicinal mushroom space and the tonic herb space, and watching myself that perhaps at times kind of, like I just observe what my reaction to that is, especially when you see such a lack of collaboration going on. And every time I dip into the Chinese doctor world, the herbalist world, acupuncturist world, and I can see there's a lot of passion without collaboration a lot of the time. Everyone's just bickering at each other and bickering about like, "Well, this text says this and my lineage says this," and it's like, I mean...   Simon Feeney: (21:41) I mean, we do have that division. I mean, it's just human nature I guess. Politics is in everything. There's politics in an elevator. So that is an issue. It's very much like the martial arts world. This technique doesn't work better, but guess what happens, eventually you kind of get better and better and better. That's the nature of I guess competition in a sense. It was very much like that. They're all, "This guy's next to this guy." If you look at the way it was, like they had booze outside hospitals, just a guy waiting to take your pulse and write your script and get a little bit of money to feed his family. So he had to be good, or he or she had to be good.   Simon Feeney: (22:22) And they're always, "Oh... " And I guess the difference is badmouthing other people as opposed to just being good. So you can spend a lot of time, that's what Andy taught me. I said to him, "Oh, I'm so frustrated. Everyone's saying they've got this pesticide test, and said they got this and they got that. They're saying they got the same stuff as us, but I know they don't." And he's like, "Simon. Simon, just let your herbs speak for themselves."   Mason: (22:45) Great advice.   Simon Feeney: (22:45) I was like, oh, awesome advice. Awesome advice. And that's what it comes down to.   Mason: (22:51) And that's walking the path.   Simon Feeney: (22:52) It is walking... Yeah, it is. It's tough-   Mason: (22:54) I love coming across people like that.   Simon Feeney: (22:56) Yeah. Yeah.   Mason: (22:57) Because it's tough when you're getting triggered by your shadows. You get up and there's all these mirrors for yourself when you get into business, and if you can rise above, let your herbs speak for themselves, go, "There's more than enough for anyone. I'm championing the lineage. I'm championing people being well." All of a sudden-   Simon Feeney: (23:15) Yeah. You're bringing awareness to these issues and it's great. It's what we need. It's what everyone needs.   Mason: (23:21) I'm really-   Simon Feeney: (23:21) We're trying to get people well.   Mason: (23:23) I mean, that's ultimately-   Simon Feeney: (23:26) It's for our community, yeah.   Mason: (23:26) That's where I slap my palm on my head when everyone starts like, when people reporting each other, going after each other, stealing from each other, getting sneaky covert calls, and then we figure out what's going on and we're like, "Dude, just call us." We help so many young businesses and I talk to people who are bigger than me. I ask them advice all the time, and it's so nice when you can get out of that, there's that combative nature because we're trying to get everyone well.   Simon Feeney: (23:59) Yes, absolutely we are. And I think, as you must experience it, it's difficult when you're coming from your perspective, and I think you were mentioning before people are saying, "But you're not this, and you're not that."   Mason: (24:12) Not a herbalist.   Simon Feeney: (24:13) "You're not this and you're not that." It's tough. People spend a lot of time training and they get protective. Same things happening in our acupuncture industry at the moment. There's people spending five years studying their butts off, taking time away from their families. They're living really meagerly to get their degree in acupuncture and they come out, and then a dry needler opens up nextdoor to them and says, "Oh, acupuncture's not safe," or something, and then they give someone a pneumothorax, and then it's, what happens? An acupuncture needle did this. Yeah, but who was holding the acupuncture needle? Some person who's...   Mason: (24:58) What you're talking to there is when there's someone, like there's someone with herbs saying they got the same thing. It's hard if you know someone's potentially going to do damage, like that's if you get out and you know you're in a system and it's one thing to ignore if someone's just doing something measly, but if you know that's going to do damage, how do you not get combative and triggered?   Simon Feeney: (25:20) Yeah, yeah. Yeah. So...   Mason: (25:21) Because I know dry needle, it's always funny... Well, for me, verse the ultimate institutional herbal practise. This is why I enjoy going out and seeking these conversations with practitioners, with people like yourself that are such experts in the system of healing. And I've learnt how to not justify my existence but yet acknowledge that there's this part of me that is so... I've always been called to just stay away from becoming a practitioner and be... I love being folky. Okay, cool, we've identified, there's like a rise of, [inaudible 00:26:07] identified that this works in a very lifestyle kind of space potentially to keep us out of the practitioner office and then cultivate an ability to respect when something goes beyond your expertise, and then go and interact with a practitioner. I mean, I don't know if you [inaudible 00:26:22]-   Simon Feeney: (26:21) Yeah, definitely. I mean, it reminds me of when I... In my 20s, we used to hang out with this Buddhist monk. For years and years, we travelled Southeast Asia unearthing these old manuscripts, and I would spend years... He's one of only two people in the world who can read this stuff, and we would... The stuff that we saw, and I sometimes would bring the script to him and say, "Oh, [Bunty 00:26:48], this one looks really old, is this good?" He's like, "Oh, yeah. That's a thousand years old." And all this stuff was just getting eaten by insects and some of it is just, pertains to really interesting information. This is what started my whole journey.   Simon Feeney: (27:01) So one day I gave him... Normally the texts are about two foot long and they're all on palm leaf or etched by hand. This one was only about 20cm long, and I opened it up and it had all these graphs on it and pictures of the body and all these sort of astrological symbols and stuff. And I said, "Bunty, what is this?" And he's like, "Oh, it's a medical text. The reason it's so small is that the monks used to pop it in their robes and then travel with them, " and they couldn't take the big ones because they would stay at the monastery and they would study them. They would study monastic culture... Oh, sorry, the monastic order and things like that. Anyway, spend a lot of time with him and that, and then I said, "What's on it?" And he said, "Oh, this is for, what's that herb? What's the condition where your skin's falling off?" I'm like "Leprosy?" "Yeah, yeah. This formula's for leprosy." "What?! There's a formula here for leprosy in this stuff?" "Oh, there's a lot of stuff in that, Simon. You have no idea, there's a lot of stuff in that." "This has to be known."   Simon Feeney: (27:54) So I spent a lot of time hanging with him and learning about all the individual herbs and all the formulations and did all this stuff at a very grassroots level. It came to the point where he said to me, and I tried to raise all this capital through this big project to get all this funding to help him get this medicine protected, get these manuscripts into museums, all this stuff. We digitalized. I spent many, many days and nights getting smashed by mosquitoes digitizing these things, smuggled them out of Burma, all sorts of stuff, and arrested at gunpoint, it was hectic. And it got to a point where no one would take me seriously. No one would take me seriously.   Mason: (28:34) Why?   Simon Feeney: (28:35) Because I didn't have any credentials. I said, "Bunty, I'm so frustrated that this project would say, Alan, this person wants to know, our investors want to know this or our project coordinator, to get the funding from this we need to have some sort of legitimacy to you."   Mason: (28:53) This is when you're going into the healing of disease state.   Simon Feeney: (28:56) So I'm working into that. Yes.   Mason: (28:56) That kind of thing with these formulas.   Simon Feeney: (28:59) Yes. Yeah, and also sort of building projects to support them as a culture as well in terms of books and just... I mean, legitimization basicallY. And so, my teacher said, "Ah, Simon, you go and get paper." And I was like, "What do you mean, Bunty?" "You, I teach you enough for here. You go get paper" So I was like, "Okay." Everything he's ever said to me I've just listened to, and it's good to have someone like that in life. And then I left and I got my... I spent five years getting a piece of paper.   Mason: (29:34) Here?   Simon Feeney: (29:36) Yeah, in Australia. Yeah. And that's kind of what that was my path, and it depends on which path you're going and I certainly think that there is room for everybody and there's room for being... I think that's... It's just a different path.   Mason: (29:52) Yeah, I definitely did... That story's insane. [inaudible 00:29:57].   Simon Feeney: (29:58) Oh, there's lots more. Yeah.   Mason: (30:00) Well, let's go, like I'd love to go lots more. I mean, there's a crossroad and I can definitely relate to that crossroad. When you're looking at leprosy and you're looking at these, this is a formula classically done and doses classically done. This information needs to get out there. If you want to go out and start talking about that, you need a piece of paper behind you for sure.   Simon Feeney: (30:25) Yes, you do. Yeah, yeah. And it's not for everyone, and I respect people who don't do that just as much. Like Chinese medicine is built on all kinds of people. Actually, the foundations of it come from aesthetics, come from people like [Shen Nung 00:30:40]. Anyway, this guy didn't have a piece of paper, so I'm not saying it's important-   Mason: (30:45) You just had a translucent [crosstalk 00:30:46].   Simon Feeney: (30:46) I did have a translucent [inaudible 00:30:48]. And just lots and lots of meditation and lots of time in a cave.   Mason: (30:53) Yeah. I mean, I feel like-   Simon Feeney: (30:55) There's room for everything.   Mason: (30:57) Yeah. I mean, for me, I, at one point, like I'm walking that line where you've got, like I'm going I want to step out of practitioner, and so there's a level of what grandma and grandpa says like, "Oh, no. Take that. It makes you strong." I'm at that point where I'm like for the least this little bit of my path I'm happy just going, "Yeah, makes you strong. Yeah, that'll get you thinking a bit sharper." I don't want to say anything more than that. I'm going to have to know if we've got TGA products where we can only say immunity and those kinds of things, or actually we're able to say like cultivate Jing and things like that.   Mason: (31:38) But nonetheless, I'm really enjoying, for me, being at that point where I just sit literally within the kitchen household, and then I had all these, for me, then all of a sudden that opens me up to getting really curious and inviting folks like yourself onto the podcast. And then going, I feel like I can go on an adventure with you. I know my place, and I think that's something that I've liked in going forward with tonic herbalism, non-institutionalised kind of like style of herbal, like it's shoot from the hip, it's grassroots and it's chaotic and archaic, and I kind of like that. But the collaboration at some point needs to happen and they need to get humbled, and I think the tonic or herbal world needs to realise where its edges are.   Simon Feeney: (32:33) Yeah, and same with everything. Same with Chinese medicine. I know that I share this with a lot of practitioners whatever they come from, I mean everything from western surgeons to Chinese medicine practitioners is that you have to know the limitations of that. When you come out you're like, "I can treat everything with Chinese medicine." I'm thinking this, right, as a new graduate. There is nothing this medicine can't do, and then you treat it once and it works, and you treat it twice and it works, and you treat it the third time, I've totally got this, and then it doesn't work.   Simon Feeney: (33:12) Right, okay. Well, go back to my training, go back to my [inaudible 00:33:16] again. Try this, try that, try this, try that, do more training, you're upset with yourself. You're like, "Why doesn't this work?" Okay, factor all these things in. Yeah, all this, got the best quality herbs, got the best... You can do all this and be the best you possibly did 100%, got this pulse right, I've nailed it. Still can't get a result, why? Don't know. The person might need surgery. So to come to that realisation that... It's a really good realisation, a very humbling experience because you say, "Right, just there is a time and place for everything."   Simon Feeney: (33:47) I had a patient with terminal cancer, and I had to say goodbye. That was really tough for the first time it happens. It's so sad when your first patient dies. It's really, really difficult because you think that... I mean, coming from the [Daoist 00:34:11] point of view, you're trying to create everlasting life.   Mason: (34:16) Immortality.   Simon Feeney: (34:16) Immortality, maybe. And then all of a sudden that happens and it's devastating. It's devastating, but it's very humbling and it just makes you do what you can do.   Mason: (34:31) Let's go, I want to hear more about these gooey adventures that you go on where you've gone out of like... You've kind of gone from the diagnostic Chinese... Are you all right?   Simon Feeney: (34:42) Yes, yes, yes.   Mason: (34:42) Yeah? Chinese medicine too... and there's times when you have limitations and then obviously there's... But you've looked and gone, yeah, but we're not being as effective as we can be because we're not dosing say correctly or there's this... There's not this, like bricks and mortar, it's not just bricks and mortar style Chinese medicine. There's obviously something else back in the classics that you're wanting to bring to the forefront, particular formulas, dosage, or maybe there's something like a tactile, like being more agile within your clinic where you actually face backwards to the past, and therefore you've actually got your finger on the pulse in a sense where you can move rather than just following the textbook and have that kind of skill.   Mason: (35:29) I'm curious about that, like I don't know if that's even appropriate what I'm bringing up there, but I get the sense of you... There's this movement and you're part of it going back to these classics which makes you more of a personal... brings more of a humanness and this greater agile skillset to yourself in clinic with that patient. I don't know if that makes sense in that statement.   Simon Feeney: (35:50) Sort of, yeah. So I think there is a renaissance in Chinese medicine currently. It's from the west. The west is guiding this because I mean, I could just think of literally like two days ago I got lectured. I'm not sure if I want to bring this up, but look, this is the truth of what happened. I got a lecture. I consider myself a very, not a specialist by any means, but certainly an obsessive, I'm obsessed with the classics. I'm obsessed with this kind of administration, I'm obsessed with understanding these texts, and I was lectured by this lady... Actually, no, I'm not going to talk about that. So, I'm going to change the topic.   Mason: (36:40) I don't know even if it helps in that context not talking about that specific situation, but let's see on not with you but in a broader sense maybe bring up where's the clashing of the heads between the renaissance and what's maybe been really institutionalised in Australia in the west and China.   Simon Feeney: (36:59) Yeah, definitely. So the way that the TCM model is being taught currently, it's lacking. It's lacking the clinical application. It wasn't until I met my teacher, Arnaud Versluys that I really realised, "Wow. This is really, really good medicine," and I talked to people about his level of pulse diagnosis that he has taught us in Australia to other people who are super experienced and they're like, "That's impossible. You can't have two people feeling the same pulse and coming up with the same conclusion." I'm like, "No, no, no." I've seen it time and time again. I can give you an example, if you like?   Mason: (37:35) Yeah, please.   Simon Feeney: (37:36) First time I met Arnaud, we had 50 students on either side feeling each pulse. So 50 students feeling the right pulse, and 50 students feeling the left pulse, and he felt both-   Mason: (37:47) I can just imagine.   Simon Feeney: (37:47) It was awesome. It was awesome. And so, he's just in the centre figure feeling these people's pulses. He's feeling the pulse, writing the script, giving it to them, to the patient. The patient's going over sitting there, and then everyone's trying to feel what he felt, and this is part of the training and part of his training, it's called pulse calibration. So what we're trying to calibrate our fingers to feel exactly what he's feeling.   Simon Feeney: (38:06) One of his top students was there and anyway, so there's a patient sitting down and she comes over to the patient and says to the student that's feeling her pulse, "Would you mind if I just quickly feel the pulse? Just wanted to jump in." "Course, no worries. You're the... " So she feels the pulse, and he's like, "Would you like to see the formula?" And she goes "Oh, no, no. It's fine. I just want to check." And then she said the formula name [foreign language 00:38:28]. And he said "Oh, wow. That was pretty good." The student said to her, "Wow, I bet you don't know the dosages," which is kind of being a bit condescending to her. And she's like, "Well... " blah-blah-blah. And she said about one of the doses, she said the [Che Bai 00:38:45] was at 48g. And he goes "No, 24". He thought she got one thing wrong and that was enough to say that she wasn't legitimate, like that was already just super, super... I was just going, "Wow, whatever. I want to learn this." But then she goes, "Oh... " And she didn't take offence to it.   Simon Feeney: (39:08) She in fact just went and took the opportunity to feel the pulse to figure out what she'd done wrong, and then she feels the pulse and she's like, "Really? I thought he would have done 48." And he's like... And she said, "Can I see the paper?" "Yeah" The student had written 24. She said "Excuse me, Arnaud. This patient, did you do Che Bai at 24 or 48g?" And he goes through his notes and he goes, "48," and she looked down at the student. She said, "Maybe you need to check your notes." And I was just blown away. I've never seen anything like that in pulse diagnosis, to be able to replicate that, and that's what Chinese medicine is, is replication. But that information and trying to replicate it without diluting it, it takes a lot of effort to say the least. It's hard. It's hard to keep that level of quality going. Anyway, off tangent but...   Mason: (40:07) Well, I mean, it's on tangent because I think we are... I mean, especially on the podcast and the people that tune in, we're such, for me, I'm such a fan of Chinese medicine and I'm such a fan of clinical acupuncture, and to see it flail sometimes is really heartbreaking.   Simon Feeney: (40:29) Yes, yes.   Mason: (40:30) And to hear something like that, it's such a transformation. Immediately, it transforms me into a way of seeing the world that I always, I move towards. I feel like there's a sense, when you look at the classics and you look at the metaphor and the story there's a sense of animism that emerges in me and I can feel the world view and the skillset that a practitioner's going to need in order to be able to come up with the same pulse diagnosis every single time, and I think, what happened? We took out the story, the love, the animism and everyone goes, "Yeah, but that's going to be good because it's going to be [inaudible 00:41:14], we cut out all the shit that's not... " Cut the spirit out basically, and we're going to get more consistency.   Simon Feeney: (41:20) Yeah. That's what happened.   Mason: (41:20) And the opposite happened.   Simon Feeney: (41:20) Yeah. Well, I mean the TCM model is still being taught every day. Look, if you talk to some incredible acupuncturist like David White here in Australia, and these guys are bringing back some of that old acupuncture system, but it died, like it was killed. They killed it. It was dead. Luckily, we had actually had it for herbalism, Chinese herbalism, we had an actual physical thing to touch and to measure. So during the cultural evolution that was actually an opportunity to grow. It was then institutionalised obviously, but some of that old stuff survived. It survived in Taiwan, really. That's really what's made that survival. But it survived in practitioners like my teacher's teacher's teacher, Dr. Tian.   Simon Feeney: (42:14) So he lived till 98 basically treating 300 patients a day, and passed it onto a few students and one of those students was my teacher's teacher. And he survived with that same thing even though he went through that period, but he just kept practising the classic, kept practising the classic, practised what his teachers practised and he managed to pass it onto Arnaud, and now Arnaud is passing it onto us. But most of it definitely has been lost to a degree, very much similar to what happened in western herbalism. I remember talking to Jimi, I heard you interview Jimi and he's-   Mason: (42:49) Love him.   Simon Feeney: (42:50) He's a great guy. Yeah. He-   Mason: (42:52) That's Jimi Wollumbin, everybody.   Simon Feeney: (42:54) Yeah.   Mason: (42:54) Yeah.   Simon Feeney: (42:54) Yeah, he called me up one day just out of the blue and we just started talking, and I was like, "Wow, I could talk to this guy for a long, long time." So, yeah, very interesting, and I think he was sort of illustrating that as well, kind of that massive loss of herbalism, and then I think people like him are really kind of bringing that back to western herbalism, seems to me.   Mason: (43:15) Yeah.   Simon Feeney: (43:16) Seems to me. It's needed.   Mason: (43:16) And likewise yourself.   Simon Feeney: (43:17) Yeah.   Mason: (43:18) Having these conversations when... Well, I mean for you especially, and I know we won't go too much into it, you're really playing in both worlds.   Simon Feeney: (43:26) Yes.   Mason: (43:26) You really got your foot... You're rubbing up against the way that TCM is being taught here.   Simon Feeney: (43:32) Yeah.   Mason: (43:34) Directly with the new-   Simon Feeney: (43:35) Yeah, a lot of people get upset with me, unfortunately. Yeah. Yeah.   Mason: (43:37) It's kind of fun, isn't it?   Simon Feeney: (43:38) So you're thinking, welcome to my world.   Mason: (43:39) [crosstalk 00:43:39] world. I mean, I kind of tell people regularly. They're like, "How often does it happen that you have someone contacting you and getting upset?" I'm like, "I don't know why, not often."   Simon Feeney: (43:53) Oh, good, good. Yeah.   Mason: (43:55) But I don't know why. I think because I was beaten by the press and I think and try and have a conversation with myself to be like, "What am I doing that rubs up against the wrong way of... " and it's the TCM people, or even my classical acupuncturist. He gets upset at me sometimes because he's moved away now so, people, you can't ask me for his name because everyone's looking for that classic like, "Oh my God, you got a classical acupuncturist in the area? Can I have his name?" You know, for having like a few individual herbs, and I'm like, "I get it." I'll sit down and have a discussion of my rationale or where I was when I brought them into the range and now, how they're being used and how practitioners are using, so on and so forth. But I would much prefer to have it than leave that conversation in the shadows.   Simon Feeney: (44:47) Yeah. I think it's probably just jealousy for other people. I think they're probably just jealous of your success and that's not very attractive for those people.   Mason: (44:58) It's weird.   Simon Feeney: (44:59) But I think bringing this awareness to people in Australia is necessary. I think it's great what you've done, what you've achieved. I've seen your place now, it's really great. Well done. Yeah. I think it's great, yeah.   Mason: (45:12) Thank you very much. I really appreciate it. I think part of the mission is on the sidelines it can be the joker scallywag bringing attention to what you're talking about, to what Jimi Wollumbin is talking about. Do you know Rhonda Chang?   Simon Feeney: (45:25) I don't, no.   Mason: (45:25) I'm going to see if I've got a spare one of her books to give you. She's got a book called Chinese Medicine Masquerading as Yi.   Simon Feeney: (45:33) As?   Mason: (45:33) Yi.   Simon Feeney: (45:33) Oh, yeah. Okay.   Mason: (45:38) Blows it out, like documenting exactly how this new TCM is an invention that came about in the 50s.   Simon Feeney: (45:46) Yes, yes. Yeah.   Mason: (45:48) And I'm sure none of it's going to be news to you.   Simon Feeney: (45:50) Yeah. Well, it's funny, I was talking about the, even on the weekend someone was talking about some basic concepts like chi, people still think it's energy. You look at the translation, it's really fair. So these kinds of ideas are very new to the western Chinese medicine practitioners. It's very hard to understand that, because a lot of people come into the medicine with a very romantic view of what Chinese medicine is and can do. I was the same. I was very, how herbalism they can treat all this stuff, but then when you really start to practise and you realise it's not as... You've got to be very pragmatic about it, you've got to be very systematic about it, you've got to approach it with a clinical mindset. It's a very different thing, a very different way of thinking about it.   Simon Feeney: (46:47) But when you see how it connects with natural phenomena then you can actually reconnect with that whole idea. When you start to understand that, for example, you learn about different conformations, or just the translations. So for example, like the six, they call the six channels, they used to call the six channels or the six meridians or the six systems or the six warps. It just gives you a... It's very planned, and you can learn it like that. I'm talking about Tai Yang, Yang Min, Shao Yang, et cetera. When you translate it a different way, which is we translate it as conformations which is the way my teacher, Arnaud, translates it. It takes on a whole different perspective.   Simon Feeney: (47:29) So a conformation is something that's... It's vessels that are conforming to natural phenomena. So all of a sudden you're looking at it from a natural perspective and you're looking from a metaphoric, you're using natural metaphors to understand the body because we are just the microcosm of the macrocosm. And then you can get that whole romantic perspective and artistic perspective of what the medicine is. It returns, but it's only due to this renaissance that we're going through at the moment. It doesn't happen in the current model that's taught, but it's like everything, probably the same as accounting, I don't know.   Mason: (48:15) I mean, the world of numbers, I know there's a... I know, I've got friends that are sacred mathematicians [crosstalk 00:48:22]-   Simon Feeney: (48:21) Yes, exactly. There you go. Well done, exactly. Well said, yeah.   Mason: (48:27) Yeah. It is exciting. It is exciting feeling the story-telling and the metaphor and the alive, spiritually alive world can-   Simon Feeney: (48:38) It is. It's living and breathing. You feel it when the pulse changes. When you give someone a formula and their pulse changes and you go, "Whoa!" Or the seasons change, you feel it in their pulse. It's awesome.   Mason: (48:48) I mean, and I know what happened to the water.   Simon Feeney: (48:51) Yes. Yes.   Mason: (48:51) I can feel that. Was it like-   Simon Feeney: (48:52) Yes, it changes. Things change. Everything courses and lives and breathes.   Mason: (48:59) It's nice to see that, it's so simple. It's something that's so, it's so looked down on to have that romantic, that animism, yet you should have that with extreme structure and discipline at the same time.   Simon Feeney: (49:17) It does. It's both of those things simultaneously, and that Daoist medicine. That is the interaction and the mutual exchange of yin and yang and the cosmos, it's good.   Mason: (49:31) And the people that feel it, they feel the lineage.   Simon Feeney: (49:34) Yeah, it's very, very... It's in you. Yeah, absolutely. You practise it, and that's why it's kind of protected.   Mason: (49:42) I'd love to just go down that rabbit hole maybe hear some more adventures along the way, especially around the dosing. As I said, Tahnee knew you.   Simon Feeney: (49:51) Yes. Dosage stuff, yeah.   Mason: (49:53) Yeah, heard your stuff and I mean, if anything can go to the difference between something not working clinically and working clinically...   Simon Feeney: (50:01) Yeah.   Mason: (50:02) Transformational.   Simon Feeney: (50:03) Yes, it's huge. Yeah. So that whole dosage journey started when I started to make those classical pills. So a good example is MaZiRenWan. It's a hemp seed pill that's used for chronic constipation and inflammation in the small intestine, and that formula when I was trying to physically make it, because this is what I was trying to do. I wanted to use the, this back to this kind of original dosage but as an administration technique, so I was trying to use the administration techniques to be the way they were originally used. As I mentioned before with Artemisia, these kinds of factors are really, really huge.   Simon Feeney: (50:41) So you have Tang, Sans and Wans. So Tang's a decoction, so it's much more for sorting the organs clean, a very acute medicine. Sans are the powders, and they're for things that you need a little bit of hydrochloric acid to absorb into the body. And then Wans are pills, so they're much more chronic issues that have to be gently administered into the body or you want them to slowly get into the bloodstream. So you use honey, acts like a slow-release mechanism so it helps the herbs to stabilise, not get affected by the hydrochloric acid and absorb through the walls of the small intestine, straight into the bloodstream, straight into the liver, and then systematically.   Simon Feeney: (51:20) So, I didn't want to use Wans as Tangs and Tangs as Sans and Sans as Tangs or Wans. I wanted to use them according to the classics, so then I have to make them. So, go to the textbook, go to make them, read the current dosages, like this gramme equal this liang, this is this gramme, make it, slop. What's going on? Try a different formula, totally dry. How am I going to roll this into a pill?   Simon Feeney: (51:51) Now, I'd made medicine with my teacher on the border in Burma and Thailand, and I made boiled pills with him. I'd seen everyone, I'd hang out with the monks in the temples, breaking, grinding up herbs. I'd been doing that for years, learning all these techniques. I went "This is not right. Something's not right here." So, then I went "Okay, well, like you do, foundational medicine. Go back to the foundations." Went back to the foundations, what were the dosages? Oh, it's one liang of this, I have no idea what that is. It's half a jin. Well, I don't know what that is. It's one jin. Well, at least I know that half a jin, if I figure out what a jin is, I can figure out what half a jin is. A zhang? Don't even know, that's like a volume measurement? And then a [chur 00:52:35]. A chur is just a foot of something. I'm like, what the hell am I doing? How am I going to make this formula?   Simon Feeney: (52:43) So, okay, what is a liang? Because I knew that eight liang is one jin, half a jin will be four liang, et cetera, et cetera. Then you have these fen measurements and zhu measurements, and all these old measurements. I read every book I can find about this measurement stuff, and then I start going to the people who I feel like know the most in the English world, and even found some Chinese text. One liang equals 15.625g, and I'm like, "That's pretty precise."   Simon Feeney: (53:17) My dad's a PhD in algebra and he taught me at a very age about all sorts of mathematical things, so I was obsessed. How come everything thinks it's 3g when he's saying, and these people are like the authority, it's 15.625. So find out that, I mean how much do you want to know? Do you want me to... Am I boring you?   Mason: (53:37) I mean, I'm fascinated.   Simon Feeney: (53:40) Okay.   Mason: (53:40) Screw everyone listening, I want to hear you.   Simon Feeney: (53:43) I'm not sure this is right for your audience, but even if it's just for me and you... Yes, I mean, I don't care if you-   Mason: (53:47) No, go for it. You'll be surprised at how much they'll be loving this.   Simon Feeney: (53:53) Okay. So, yeah, 15.625g. So it turns out that this weight system comes off an old measurement system, so it's this old bell and you need to use a pitch pipe to tune the bell and it's called a Huang bell, and you use this pitch pipe that's cut with a particular size of bamboo. You know, how you got the knots in the bamboo and the gap? So then they create this at different sizes, and would create a different tune, right, when you "hoo". You... whatever, blow on it, right?   Mason: (54:20) When you hoedown on it.   Simon Feeney: (54:23) So in order to figure out how high that had to be, it was based on putting pieces of broomcorn millet inside this thing, and 1200 of those would be where you cut it off to make the pitch for the bell, this is a ceremonial bell. Turns out 1200 of that is 12 zhu, and 24 zhu is one liang. So I went and became a specialist in black broomcorn millet because of course that's what you do.   Mason: (54:56) Of course, that seems so obvious.   Simon Feeney: (54:58) Then I counted... It was such an obvious conclusion, right. So I had to find not only that but I had to find black broomcorn millet that was produced in the Han dynasty, which was an interesting process. Counted them all out, 1200, weighed them all out, 7.8g, right, 15.625, that's how they came up with the conclusion. So I was certain that's what that dose was.   Mason: (55:17) There's no industry for this in the Han... Where did you say was it?   Simon Feeney: (55:20) In the Han dynasty.   Mason: (55:21) In the Han...   Simon Feeney: (55:22) Yeah. Oh, sorry.   Mason: (55:22) Like where were you sourcing the millet? Where did you say you had to go and source it somewhere in China?   Simon Feeney: (55:26) Oh, basically just research. Yeah, just extensive research into the growth patterns of black broomcorn... because I didn't want to know that the size was different. Like the wheat grain had changed, it's different. The size, so if I'm counting them individually...   Mason: (55:39) That's what I'm thinking, yeah.   Simon Feeney: (55:40) Yeah, yeah, yeah. So we're talking about a volume measurement with something that could be potentially bigger or smaller. So, long story short, I started to figure out what a liang was. Then I could find out what a jin was, and half a jin was, and then this, and a zhu and a zhang. Put it all together based on those weights, perfect pills.   Mason: (55:59) Do you know where the-   Simon Feeney: (56:00) Like, yeah!   Mason: (56:01) Like that is [crosstalk 00:56:01] I'm feeling [crosstalk 00:56:02].   Simon Feeney: (56:03) Yeah. It was good moment.   Mason: (56:05) You're looking at your dad about how elated he was when he got like a massive formulation and you're like, "I get it."   Simon Feeney: (56:11) Yeah. It was a revelation, yeah.   Mason: (56:15) Where was the crux point where it's gone away from these forms of measurements? Where has the standardisation occurred that led to such dramatic poor translations on the formulas?   Simon Feeney: (56:28) What an awesome question. I mean, gosh that's complicated. So many factors. I mean, every factor from... As we mentioned earlier, quality to so many species differentiation, change in the environment, change in climate, lifestyle, people's... In the Han dynasty [inaudible 00:56:48] are living in huts versus living in air conditioned housing, so the strength of someone's digestive system that could cope with that compared to now. So that's one theory why it kind of got reinterpreted, but then if you look back through the dynasties each measurement system sort of changed, and then there's conflicting arguments, and then it kind of... and let's just all, just a big discussion.   Simon Feeney: (57:15) And so, there's sti

Buddhism for Everyone with JoAnn Fox
Episode 108: One Who Harms No Living Being

Buddhism for Everyone with JoAnn Fox

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2021 24:27


In this episode, we explore non-harmfulness. Non-harm is so central to Buddhism, the two can not be separated from each other. Our own inner peace is dependent upon lessening and eventually eliminating the harm we do to others. Inner peace is the great victory and prize for removing this harm from our actions of body, speech and mind.    ----------------------------------------- While residing at the Jetavana monastery, the Buddha uttered Verse (270) of this book, with reference to a fisherman named Ariya.   Once, there was a fisherman who lived near the north gate of Savatthi. One day through his supernormal power, the Buddha found that time was ripe for the fisherman to attain Sotapatti Fruition. So on his return from the alms-round, the Buddha, followed by the bhikkhus, stopped near the place where Ariya was fishing. When the fisherman saw the Buddha, he threw away his fishing gear and came and stood near the Buddha. The Buddha then proceeded to ask the names of his bhikkhus in the presence of the fisherman, and finally, he asked the name of the fisherman. When the fisher man replied that his name was Ariya, the Buddha said that the Noble Ones (ariyas) do not harm any living being, but since the fisherman was taking the lives of fish he was not worthy of his name.   Then the Buddha spoke in verse as follows:   Verse 270: He who harms living beings is, for that reason, not an ariya (a Noble One); he who does not harm any living being is called an ariya. At the end of the discourse the fisherman attained Sotapatti Fruition. --Buddha, The Dhammapada   ------------------------------------------------ Mindfulness practice: Watch our mind for harm we do to others, even subtle harm.  What causes us to harm? Can you notice what precedes the wish to strike out? ------------------------------------------------   4 of Noble Eightfold Path include not harming through: Right thought Right speech  Right action  Right livelihood  ------------------------------------------------ "A monk decides to meditate alone.  Away from his monastery, he takes a boat and goes to the middle of the lake, closes his eyes and begins to meditate.  After a few hours of unperturbed silence,  he suddenly feels the blow of another boat hitting his.  With his eyes still closed, he feels his anger rising and, when he opens his eyes, he is ready to shout at the boatman who dared to disturb his meditation.  But when he opened his eyes,  he saw that it was an empty boat, not tied up, floating in the middle of the lake ...    At that moment, the monk achieves self-realization and understands that anger is within him; it simply needs to hit an external object to provoke it.    After that, whenever he meets someone who irritates or provokes his anger, he remembers;  the other person is just an empty boat.  Anger is inside me.  "   ---Thich Nhat Hanh ------------------------------------------------------   On most mornings I see all the little birds eating at my birdfeeder. A squirrel comes, a rabbit, and also a huge glossy Ibis all eat together peacefully. Now when a hawk is nearby all the birds scream and warn each other. Sometimes the mockingbirds or the Blue Jays band together and gang up on the hawk to drive him away. I always find it curious that even though the ibis is as big as the hawk or perhaps larger, the little birds all know that the Ibis won't harm them. They gather together in harmony and without fear. Somehow they know that the ibis is not a danger to them. I can't help but dream of a world where the animals know that humans are not a harm to them or a danger. Currently they know that we are a danger to them and that causes me great pain. I long to see a day when humans are the caretakers of the earth and all her species. When humans are the protectors of those more vulnerable and the environment, not a source of fear and destruction.   Links and References Buddha. The Dhammapada: Verses and Stories. Translated by Daw Mya Tin, M.A. Edited by Editorial Committee, Burma Tipitaka Association Rangoon, Burma, 1986. Courtesy of Nibbana.com. For free distribution only, as a gift of dhamma. Link: https://www.tipitaka.net/tipitaka/dhp/verseload.php?verse=270

Dan Carlin's Hardcore History
Show 67 - Supernova in the East VI

Dan Carlin's Hardcore History

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2021 345:52


When do spirit, tenacity, resilience and bravery cross into madness? When cities are incinerated? When suicide attacks become the norm? When atomic weapons are used? Japan's leaders test the limits of national endurance in the war's last year.

The John Batchelor Show
1435: The Russians in Burma with guns. Michael Yon, Patreon.com @GordonGChang, Gatestone, Newsweek, The Hill

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2021 11:55


Photo: A view of the Cantonment Gardens (now Kandaw Minglar Garden) in 1868.CBS Eye on the World with John BatchelorCBS Audio Network@BatchelorshowThe Russians in Burma with guns. Michael Yon, Patreon.com @GordonGChang, Gatestone, Newsweek, The Hillhttps://www.themoscowtimes.com/2021/02/17/russia-backs-myanmar-military-after-china-raises-concerns-a72983

The John Batchelor Show
1429: #MicePlague3: May 15: The plague of mice threatens NSW, joined by a plague of Beijing threats. Jeremy Zakis #OzWatch.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2021 13:03


Photo: Communist jahkrit ai lam hpe..  Magawap maga mu.  Propaganda aimed at the Kachin people in northernmost Burma, for whom the Jingpho language is traditional. CBS Eye on the World with John BatchelorCBS Audio Network@Batchelorshow#MicePlague3: May 15: The plague of mice threatens NSW, joined by a plague of Beijing threats. Jeremy Zakis #OzWatch.https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australia/australia-e2-80-99s-mouse-plague-six-months-ago-it-was-war-now-whole-towns-have-accepted-their-presence/ar-BB1gKo9v

Cleared Hot
Episode 182 - Hollie McKay

Cleared Hot

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2021 167:37


Hollie McKay is a foreign policy expert and war crimes investigator. She was an investigative and international affairs/war journalist for Fox News Digital for over fourteen years where she focused on warfare, terrorism, and crimes against humanity. Hollie has worked on the frontlines of several major war zones and covered humanitarian and diplomatic crises in Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Syria, Iran, Turkey, Yemen, Saudi Arabia, Burma, Russia, Africa, Latin America, and other areas. Her globally-spanned coverage, in the form of thousands of print articles and essays, has included exclusive and detailed interviews with numerous captured terrorists, as well as high-ranking government, military, and intelligence officials and leaders from all sides. She has spent considerable time embedded with US and foreign troops, conducted extensive interviews with survivors of torture, sex slavery, and forced child jihadist training, refugees, and internally displaced people to communicate the complexities of such catastrophes and war crimes on local populations. Hollie’s columns have additionally been featured in the Wall Street Journal and her writings referenced in innumerable mainstream publications and academic journals. Additionally, she has won numerous foreign press and humanitarian awards. She is acclaimed by her peers as one of the most diligent reports in her field. Qalo Babbel LMNT Better Help