Podcasts about World War II

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1939–1945 global conflict between the Axis and the Allies

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Best podcasts about World War II

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Latest podcast episodes about World War II

Making Stitches Podcast
THE PATCHWORK GIRLS with Elaine Everest

Making Stitches Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 28:16


For many of us, our crafts take a back seat as we concentrate on our careers and creativity can be stifled by everyday life. For novelist, Elaine Everest, a childhood growing up with a mother who made clothes and sewed for friends and family, that creativity stayed with her. From dressmaking as a young girl to making designer garments on a knitting machine for London boutiques to then setting up her own business sewing raincoats for dogs, Elaine achieved a lot before she embarked on yet another creative career as a novelist.Sewing is a theme which runs through Elaine's series 'The Woolworths Girls' and is centre stage in her latest book; The Patchwork Girls. The story, set in World War II, sees a group of women form a sewing circle making patchwork quilts and other items for the war effort. Elaine drew on her own experience of crafts to write the story which shows the healing effects of both friendships and creativity. Elaine says that although her interest in crafting had waned over the years, the events of the past 18 months have reacquainted her with sewing, crochet and other crafts and that they have 'saved' her during lockdown. She spoke to me about her life, her love of creativity and how she ended up writing a string of novels.The Patchwork Girls is published by Pan MacMillan. You can find out more about Elaine on her website, Facebook, Instagram & TwitterFor full show notes for this episode, please visit the Making Stitches website.The music featured in this episode is Make You Smile by RGMusic from Melody Loops.You can support Making Stitches Podcast with running costs through Ko-fi.Making Stitches  Podcast is supported by the Making Stitches Shop.Making Stitches Podcast is presented, recorded and edited by Lindsay Weston.

History Unplugged Podcast
Winston Churchill: Political Master, Military Commander

History Unplugged Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 51:40


From his earliest days Winston Churchill was an extreme risk taker and he carried this into adulthood. Today he is widely hailed as Britain's greatest wartime leader and politician. Deep down though, he was foremost a warlord. Just like his ally Stalin, and his arch enemies Hitler and Mussolini, Churchill could not help himself and insisted on personally directing the strategic conduct of World War II. For better or worse he insisted on being political master and military commander. Again like his wartime contemporaries, he had a habit of not heeding the advice of his generals. The results of this were disasters in Norway, North Africa, Greece, and Crete during 1940–41. His fruitless Dodecanese campaign in 1943 also ended in defeat. Churchill's pig-headedness over supporting the Italian campaign in defiance of the Riviera landings culminated in him threatening to resign and bring down the British Government. Yet on occasions he got it just right, his refusal to surrender in 1940, the British miracle at Dunkirk and victory in the Battle of Britain, showed that he was a much-needed decisive leader. Nor did he shy away from difficult decisions, such as the destruction of the French Fleet to prevent it falling into German hands and his subsequent war against Vichy France.To talk about these different aspects of his leadership is today's guest, Anthony Tucker-Jones, author of Winston Churchill: Master and commander. He explores the record of Winston Churchill as a military commander, assessing how the military experiences of his formative years shaped him for the difficult military decisions he took in office. He assesses his choices in the some of the most controversial and high-profile campaigns of World War II, and how in high office his decision making was both right and wrong.

Dan Snow's History Hit
Britain's Overlooked Hero: From the Trenches to the Blitz

Dan Snow's History Hit

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 19:35


Serving on the front lines of the First World War, the homefront of the Second World War and as a community leader throughout his life, George Arthur Roberts was a truly inspirational figure. Yet, his amazing story is little known. After the outbreak of the First World War broke out he travelled from Trinidad to the UK and eventually joined the Middlesex Regiment. He saw considerable action at the Battle of Loos, the Dardanelles campaign and the Somme where his wounds forced him out of the war. A man of considerable bravery and a keen cricketer George was known for picking up and throwing enemy grenades back into their trenches. Too old to fight in the Second World War he became a firefighter serving in Southwark, London. In 1944 he was awarded the British Empire Medal for his work in the fire service and the community. That community work was equally impressive as whilst in the fire service he founded the Discussion and Education groups of the fire service. He was also one of the founder members of the League of Coloured Peoples, an influential civil rights organisation that looked after Britain's black community.To say that he is an inspirational figure is an understatement and joining dan to talk about his extraordinary life Dan is joined by his great-granddaughter, Samantha Harding. She and Dan discuss the events of George's life, Samantha's own story of discovery as she uncovered his life and the vital legacy that figures such as George can have today. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Millennials Are Killing Capitalism
"Sense Of Duty For Each Other" Alex Turrall on Collectivity & Nature In Soviet Pedagogy

Millennials Are Killing Capitalism

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 68:17


In this episode we interview Alex Turrall, an independent researcher and primary school teacher. We talk to Alex about two reviews they've written for Liberated Texts. Liberated Texts is an independent book review website which features works of ongoing relevance that have been forgotten, underappreciated, suppressed or misinterpreted in the cultural mainstream since their release. Liberated Texts focuses on texts with anti-colonial, anti-imperialist themes and those related to the history of Marxism, communism and revolution globally. We ask Alex to talk about the work of Soviet pedagogues Anton Makarenko and Vasily Sukhomlinsky. In doing so Alex touches on the interventions of these Soviet educators at two key points in Soviet history, after the revolutionary rupture with the Tsarist Russian Empire and in the aftermath of World War II. Along the way, Alex touches on different techniques and strategies illuminated by the books they reviewed for Liberated Texts. Alex also talks about the influence of these pedagogical figures within the socialist world and among liberation movements. We'll links to the articles, the video Alex references and some other resources in the show notes. We apologize in advance for all the mispronunciation in this episode, as we try to pronounce various names in unfamiliar languages to us. As of publishing this episode, we have hit our big goal of 1,000 patrons. Thank you so much all for your support. Both Josh and I are doing this work full-time now, and we couldn't do it without you all. So if you are listening and haven't become a patron of the show yet, it's still a great time to do so. Now here is our conversation with Alex Turrall on Makarenko and Sukhomlinsky.  Links: A Pedagogy of Nature: Vasily Sukhomlinsky's My Heart I Give to Children by Alex Turrall (Liberated Texts) A Pedagogy of the Collective - From The Soviet Union To Latin America: Makarenko, His Life and Work by Alex Turrall (Liberated Texts) Sukhomlinsky's Lesson Las Makarenkas Educadoras (Cuba) MST, Agro-ecology and Pedagogy Makarenko Archives    

Ideas Untrapped
RULE OF LAW AND THE REAL WORLD

Ideas Untrapped

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 64:14


''Rule of law'' is the generally accepted description for how well a political system conforms to formal rules - rather than functioning through the whims of the most powerful social or political agents. For a society to be described as one functioning under rule of law - there must be rules and those rules must be equally applied to everyone in the society. Let us call this Letter of the Law. These rules are usually expressed through the constitution of a country and enforced through the courts. But simply having rules and enforcing them does not suffice in the making of the rule of law - and it is an incomplete (however accurate) conception of it. Some rules can be drafted in bad faith or with the express purpose of protecting the interest of the political elites responsible for governance. This is why many scholars have argued that the rule of law can only be said to exist in a state that functions under rules designed to protect the civil liberties (individual rights, freedom of speech, freedom of association, etc.) of the people living within its territory. Let us call this the Character or Spirit of the Law. The character of the law understood as the fulfilment of constitutionally-guaranteed civil liberties is the most common standard by which governance is judged to conform or deviate from the rule of law. For example, countries that routinely violate the rights of citizens in whatever form cannot be said to be governed by the rule of law, even if it has a written constitution. Consideration of the character of the law is the context to understanding the work of my guest on this episode, Paul Gowder.He is a professor of law at NorthWestern university with a broad research interest and expertise. Paul departs from this common derivation of the character of the law as rooted in liberty - and argued that for the rule of law to be broadly applicable in different societies (not dependent on the political institutions and ethical ideals of any specific society) with varying cultures and traditions of governance, it must be rooted in Equality. To understand Paul's argument, I will briefly state two important aspects that set the tone for our conversation - this should not be taken as an exhaustive summary of his work and I encourage you to check out his website and book. The first is that the rule of law as a principle regulates the actions of the state (government), and it is not to be conflated with other rules that regulate the actions of citizens. This is such an important point because one of the most egregious expressions of the law is when a government uses it to oppress citizens. Secondly, Paul outlines three components of the rule of law based on equality as 1) regularity - the government can only use coercion when it is acting in ''good faith'' and under ''reasonable interpretation'' of rules that already exist and are specific to the circumstances. 2) publicity - the law has to be accessible to everyone without barriers (''officials have a responsibility to explain their application of the law, ...failure to do so commits hubris and terror against the public"). 3) generality - the law must be equally applicable to all. Putting all these elements together gives us a rule of law regime where everyone is equal before the law, and the state does not wantonly abuse citizens or single out particular groups for systematic abuse.I enjoyed this conversation very much, and I want to thank Paul for talking to me. Thank you guys too for always listening, and for the other ways you support this project.TRANSCRIPTTobi; I greatly enjoyed your work on the rule of law. I've read your papers, I've read your book, and I like it very much. I think it's a great public service if I can say that because for a lot of time, I am interested in economic development and that is mostly the issue that this podcast talks about. And what you see in that particular conversation is there hasn't really been that much compatibility between the question of the rule of law or the laws that should regulate the actions of the state, and its strategy for economic development. Most of the time, you often see even some justification, I should say, to trample on rights in as much as you get development, you get high-income growth for it. And what I found in your work is, this does not have to be so. So what was your eureka moment in coming up with your concept, we are going to unpack a lot of the details very soon, but what motivated you to write this work or to embark on this project?Paul; Yeah, I think for me, part of the issue that really drives a lot of how I think about the rule of law and you know, reasons behind some of this work is really a difference between the way that those of us who think about human freedom and human equality, right? I think of it as philosophers, right. So they're philosophers and philosophers think about the ability of people to live autonomous lives, to sort of stand tall against their government, to live lives of respect, and freedom and equality. And that's one conversation. And so we see people, like, you know, Ronald Dworkin, thinking about what the rule of law can deliver to human beings in that sense. And then, you know, there's this entire development community, you know, the World Bank, lots of the US foreign policy, all of the rest of those groups of people and groups of ideas, talk about the rule of law a lot and work to measure the rule of law and invest immense amounts of money in promoting what they call the rule of law across the world. But mostly, it seems to be protecting property rights for multinational investment. And I mean, that makes some kind of sense, if you think that what the rule of law is for is economic development, is increasing the GDP of a country and integrating it into favourable international networks of trade. But if you think that it's about human flourishing, then you get a completely different idea of what the rule of law can be, and should be. And so this sort of really striking disjuncture between the two conversations has driven a lot of my work, especially recently, and especially reflecting even on the United States, I think that we can see how domestic rule of law struggles - which we absolutely have, I mean, look at the Trump administration, frankly, as revolving around this conflict between focusing on economics and focusing on human rights and human wellbeing.Tobi; It's interesting the polarization you're talking about. And one way that I also see it play out is [that] analyst or other stakeholders who participate in the process of nation-building in Africa, in Nigeria… a lot of us that care about development and would like to see our countries grow and develop and become rich, are often at opposite ends with other people in the civil society who are advocating for human rights, who are advocating for gender equality, who are advocating for so many other social justice issues. And it always seems like there's no meeting ground, you know, between those set of views, and I believe it does not have to be so. So one thing I'm going to draw you into quite early is one of the distinctions you made in so many of your papers and even your book is the difference between the conception of the rule of law that you are proposing versus the generally accepted notion of the rule of law based on individual liberty in the classical liberal tradition. I also think that's part of the problem, because talking about individual liberty comes with this heavy ideological connotation, and giving so many things that have happened in Africa with colonialism and so many other things, nobody wants any of that, you know. So you are proposing a conception of the rule of law that is based on equality. Tell me, how does that contrast with this popularly accepted notion of the rule of law [which is] based on individual liberty?Paul; So I think the way to think about it is to start with the notion of the long term stability of a rule of law system. And so here is one thing that I propose as a fact about legal orders. Ultimately, any kind of stable legal order that can control the powerful, that is, that can say to a top-level political leader, or a powerful multinational corporation, or whomever, no, you can't do this, this violates the law and make that statement stick depends on widespread collective mobilization, if only as a threat, right. And so it's kind of an analytic proposition about the nature of power, right? If you've got a top-level political leader who's in command of an army, and they want to do something illegal, it's going to require very broad-based opposition, and hence very broad-based commitment to the idea of leaders that follow the law in order to prevent the person in charge of an army from just casually violating it whenever they want. Okay, accept that as true, what follows from that? Well, what follows from that is that the legal system has to actually be compatible with the basic interests of all. And what that tends to mean and I think this is true, both historically, and theoretically, is leaving aside the philosophical conceptual difference between liberty and equality, which I'm not sure is really all that important. Like I think, ultimately, liberty and equality as moral ideas tend to blur together when you really unpack them. But practically speaking, any stable legal order that can control the powerful has to be compatible with the interests of a broad-based group of the human beings who participate in that legal order. And what that entails is favouring a way of thinking about the rule of law that focuses on being able to recruit the interests of even the worst off. In other words, one that's focused on equality, one that's focused on protecting the interests of the less powerful rather than a laissez-faire libertarian conception of the rule of law that tends to be historically speaking, compatible with substantial amounts of economic inequality, hyper-focus on ideas - like property rights, that support the long-standing interests of those who happen to be at the top of the economy, often against the interests of those that happened to be at the bottom of the economy, right. That's simply not a legal order that is sustainable in the long run. Lately, I've been thinking a lot about the way that this has played out in [the] United States history, in particular. I might have a book that's coming out in December that focuses on a historical account of the development of the rule of law, particularly in the United States. I mean, it's my own country. And so at some point, I had to get talked into writing that book. And we can see that in our history right at the get-go, you know, in the United States, at the very beginning, the rule of law dialogue tended to be focused on protecting the interests of wealthy elite property holders. And this actually played a major part, for example, in the United States' most grievous struggle, namely the struggle over slavery, because slaveholders really relied on this conception of the Rule of Law focusing on individual freedom and property rights to insist on a right to keep holding slaves against the more egalitarian idea that “hey, wait a minute, the enslaved have a right to be participants in the legal system as well.” And so we can see these two different conceptions of legality breaking the United States and breaking the idea of legal order in the United States right at the get-go. And we see this in country after country after country. You know, another example is Pinochet's Chile, which was the victim of [the] United States' economics focused rule of law promotion efforts that favoured the interests of property holders under this libertarian conception over the interests of ordinary citizens, democracy and mass interests. In other words, over the egalitarian conception, and again, you know, devolved into authoritarianism and chaos.Tobi; Yeah, nice bit of history there, but dialling all the way, if you'll indulge me... dialling all the way to the present, or maybe the recent past, of course; where I see another relevance and tension is development, and its geopolitical significance and the modernization projects that a lot of developed countries have done in so many poor and violent nations, you know, around the world. I mean, at the time when Africa decolonized, you know, a lot of the countries gravitated towards the communist bloc, socialism [and] that process was shunted, failed, you know, there was a wave of military coups all over the continent, and it was a really dark period.But what you see is that a lot of these countries, Nigeria, for example, democratized in 1999, a lot of other countries either before then or after followed suit. And what you see is, almost all of them go for American-style federal system, and American-style constitutional democracy, you know. And how that tradition evolved... I mean, there's a lot you can explain and unpack here... how that tradition evolved, we are told is the law has a responsibility to treat people as individuals. But you also find that these are societies where group identities are very, very strong, you know, and what you get are constitutions that are weakly enforced, impractical, and a society that is perpetually in struggle. I mean, you have a constitution, you have rules, and you have a government that openly disregards them, because the constitutional tradition is so divorced from how a lot of our societies evolve. And what I see you doing in your work is that if we divorce the rule of law from the ideal society, you know [like] some societies that we look up to, then we can come up with a set of practical propositions that the rule of law should fulfil, so walk me through how you resolve these tensions and your propositions?Paul; Well, so it's exactly what you just said, right? I mean, we have to focus on actual existing societies and the actual way that people organize their lives, right. And so here's the issue is, just like I said a minute ago, the rule of law fundamentally depends on people. And when I say people, I don't just mean elites. I don't just mean the wealthy, I don't just mean the people in charge of armies, and the people in charge of courthouses, right? Like the rule of law depends, number one, on people acting collectively to hold the powerful to the law. And number two, on people using the institutions that we say are associated with the rule of law. And so just as you describe, one sort of really common failure condition for international rule of law development efforts - and I don't think that this is a matter of sort of recipient countries admiring countries like the US, I think this is a matter of international organizations and countries like the US having in their heads a model of what the law looks like and sort of pressing it on recipient countries.But you know, when you build institutions that don't really resemble how the people in a country actually organize their social, political and legal lives, you shouldn't be surprised when nobody uses them. You shouldn't be surprised when they're ineffective. But I mean, I think that it's been fairly compared to a kind of second-generation colonialism in that sense where countries like the US and like Germany, attempt to export their legal institutions to other countries, without attending to the ways that the people in those countries already have social and legal resources to run their lives. And so I'll give you an example that's interesting from Afghanistan. So in Afghanistan, sort of post the 2000s invasion, and so forth, some researchers, mostly affiliated with the Carnegie Institution, found that the really effective rule of law innovations, the really effective interventions were ones that relied on existing social groups and existing structures of traditional authority. And so, you know, you could build a courthouse and like, ask a formal centralized state to do something, maybe it would work, maybe it wouldn't, maybe people would use it, maybe they wouldn't. But if you took local community leaders, local religious leaders, gave them training, and how to use the social capital they already have to help do things like adjudicate disputes, well, those would actually be effective, because they fit into the existing social organization that already exists. So I'll give you another example. I have a student who... I had… I just graduated an S.J.D student from Uganda who wrote a dissertation on corruption in Uganda. And one of the things that he advocated for I think, really sensibly was, “ okay, we've got this centralized government, but we've also got all of these traditional kingdoms, and the traditional kingdoms, they're actually a lot more legitimate in the sociological sense than the centralized government.People trust the traditional kingdoms, people rely on the traditional kingdoms for services, for integrating themselves into their society. And so one useful way of thinking about anti-corruption reforms is to try and empower the traditional kingdoms that already have legitimacy so that they can check the centralized government. And so that kind of work, I think, is where we have real potential to do global rule of law development without just creating carbon copies of the United States. Tobi; The process you describe, I will say, as promising as it may sound, what I want to ask you is how then do you ensure that a lot of these traditional institutions that can be empowered to provide reasonable checks to the power of the central government also fulfil the conditions of equality in their relation to the general public? Because even historically, a lot of these institutions are quite hierarchical...Paul; Oh, yeah... and I think in particular, women's rights are a big problem.Tobi; Yeah, yeah and there's a lot of abuses that go on locally, even within those communities, you know. We have traditional monarchies who exercise blanket rights over land ownership, over people's wives, over so many things, you know, so how then does this condition of equality transmit across the system?Paul; Yeah, no, I think that's the really hard question. I tell you right now that part of the answer is that those are not end-state processes. By this I mean that any realistic conception of how we can actually build effective rule of law institutions, but also genuinely incorporate everyone's interests in a society is going to accept that there's going to be a kind of dynamic tension between institutions.You know, sometimes we're going to have to use the centralized state to check traditional institutions. Sometimes we're going to have to use traditional institutions to check the centralized state. Elinor Ostrom, Nobel Prize-winning political scientist and her sort of the Bloomington School of Political Economy, emphasized for many years this idea that they called Polycentrism. That is the idea that multiple, overlapping governance organizations that are sort of forced to negotiate with one another, and forced to learn from one another, and really integrate with one another in this sort of complex tension-filled kind of way, actually turns out to be a really effective method of achieving what we might call good governance. And part of the reason is because they give a lot of different people, in different levels of [the] organization, ways to challenge one another, ways to demand inclusion in this decision, and let somebody else handle that decision, and participate jointly in this other decision. And so I think that neither the centralized state alone, nor traditional institutions alone is going to be able to achieve these goals. But I think efforts to integrate them have some promise. And India has done a lot of work, you know, sort of mixed record of success, perhaps, but has done a lot of work in these lines. I think, for example, of many of the ways that India has tried to promote the growth of Panchayats, of local councils in decision making, including in law enforcement, but at the same time, has tried to do things like promote an even mandate, the inclusion of women, the inclusion of Scheduled Castes, you know, the inclusion of the traditionally subordinated in these decision making processes. And as I said, they haven't had complete success. But it's an example of a way that the centralized state can both support traditional institutions while pushing those institutions to be more egalitarian.Tobi; Let's delve into the three conditions that you identified in your work, which any rule of law state should fulfil. And that is regularity, publicity, and generality. Kindly unpack those three for me.Paul; Absolutely. So regularity is...we can think of it as just the basic rule of law idea, right? Like the government obeys the law. And so if you think about this notion of regularity, it's... do we have a situation where the powerful are actually bound by legal rules? Or do we have a situation where, you know, they just do whatever they want? And so I'd say that, you know, there's no state that even counts as a rule of law state in the basic level without satisfying that condition, at least to some reasonable degree. The idea of publicity really draws on a lot of what I've already been saying about the recruitment of broad participation in the law. That is, when I say publicity, what I mean is that in addition to just officials being bound by the law, ordinary people have to be able to make use of the law in at least two senses. One, they have to be able to make use of the law to defend themselves. I call this the individualistic side of publicity, right? Like if some police officer wants to lock you up, the decision on whether or not you violated the law has to respond to your advocacy, and your ability to defend yourself in some sense. And then there's also the collective side of this idea of publicity, which is that the community as a whole has to be able to collectively enforce the boundaries of the legal system. And you know, we'd talk a lot more about that, I think that's really the most important idea. And then the third idea of generality is really the heart of the egalitarian idea that we've been talking about, which is that the law has to actually treat people as equals. And one thing that I think is really important about the way that I think about these three principles is that they're actually really tightly integrated. By tightly integrated, I mean you're only going to get in real-world states, regularity (that is, officials bound by the law) if you have publicity (that is, if you have people who aren't officials who actually can participate in the legal system and can hold officials to the law). We need the people to hold the officials in line. You're only going to get publicity if you have generality. That is, the people are only going to be motivated to use the legal system and to defend the legal system if the legal system actually treats them as equals. And so you really need publicity to have stable regularity, you really need generality to have stable publicity.Tobi; Speaking of regularity, when you say what constrains the coercive power of the state is when it is authorised by good faith and reasonable interpretation of pre-existing reasonably specific rules. That sounds very specific. And it's also Scalonian in a way, but a lot of people might quibble a bit about what is reasonable, you know, it sounds vague, right? So how would you condition or define reasonable in this sense, and I know you talked about hubris when you were talking about publicity. But is there a minimum level of responsibility for reasonability on the part of the citizen in relation to a state?Paul; That's, in a lot of ways, the really hard philosophical question, because one of the things that we know about law is that it is inherently filled with disagreement, right? Like our experience of the legal system and of every state that actually has something like the rule of law is that people radically disagree about the legal propriety of actions of the government. And so in some sense, this idea of reasonableness is kind of a cop-out. But it's a cop-out that is absolutely necessary, because there's no, you know, what [Thomas] Nagel called a view from nowhere. There's no view from nowhere from which we can evaluate whether or not on a day to day basis, officials are actually complying with the law in some kind of correct sense. But again, I think, you know, as you said, to some extent, that implies that some of the responsibility for evaluating this reasonableness criterion falls down to day to day politics, falls down to the judgment of ordinary citizens. Like, my conception of the rule of law is kind of sneakily a deeply democratic conception, because it recognizes given the existence of uncertainty as to what the law actually requires of officials both on a case by case basis. And, broadly speaking, the only way that we're ever going to be able to say, Well, you know, officials are more or less operating within a reasonable conception of what their legal responsibilities are, is if we empower the public at large to make these judgments. If we have institutions like here in the US, our jury trials, if we have an underlying backstop of civil society and politics, that is actively scrutinizing and questioning official action.Tobi; So speaking of publicity, which is my favorite...I have to say...Paul; Mine too. You could probably tell. Tobi; Because I think that therein lies the power of the state to get away with abusive use of its legitimacy, or its power, so to speak. When you say that officials have a responsibility to explain their application of the law, and a failure to do so commits hubris and terror against the public. So those two situations - hubris and terror, can you explain those to me a bit?Paul; Yeah. So these are really, sort of, moral philosophy ideas at heart, particularly hubris. The idea is there's a big difference, even if I have authority over you, between my exercising that authority in the form of commands and my exercising that authority in the form of a conversation that appeals to your reasoning capacity, right. So these days, I'm thinking about it in part with reference to... I'm going to go very philosophical with you here... but in reference to Kant's humanity formulation of the categorical imperative, sorry. But that is a sense in which if I'm making decisions about your conduct, and your life and, you know, affecting your fundamental interests, that when I express the reasons to you for those decisions, and when I genuinely listen to the reasons that you offer, and genuinely take those into account in my decision making process, I'm showing a kind of respect for you, which is consistent with the idea of a society of equals.As opposed to just hi, I'm wiser than you, and so my decision is, you know, you go this way, you violated the law, right? Are we a military commander? Or are we a judge? Both the military commander and the judge exercise authority, but they do so in very different ways. One is hierarchical, the other I would contend is not.Tobi; Still talking about publicity here, and why I love it so much is one important, should I say… a distinction you made quite early in your book is that the rule of law regulates the action of the state, in relation to its citizens.Paul; Yes.Tobi; Often and I would count myself among people who have been confused by that point as saying that the rule of law regulates the action of the society in general. I have never thought to make that distinction. And it's important because often you see that maybe when dealing with civil disobedience, or some kind of action that the government finds disruptive to its interests, or its preferences, the rule of law is often invoked as a way for governments to use sometimes without discretion, its enforcement powers, you know.So please explain further this distinction between the rule of law regulating the state-citizen relation versus the general law and order in the society. I mean, you get this from Trump, you get this from so many other people who say, Oh, we are a law and order society, I'm a rule of law candidate.Paul; Oh, yeah.Tobi; You cannot do this, you cannot do that. We cannot encourage the breakdown of law and order in the society. So, explain this difference to me.Paul; Absolutely, then this is probably the most controversial part of my account of the rule of law. I think everybody disagrees with this. I sort of want to start by talking about how I got to this view. And I think I really got to this view by reflecting on the civil rights movement in the United States in particular, right. Because, you know, what we would so often see, just as you say about all of these other contexts, is we would see officials, we would see judges - I mean, there are, you know, Supreme Court cases where supreme court justices that are normally relatively liberal and sympathetic, like, you know, Justice Hugo Black scolding Martin Luther King for engaging in civil disobedience on the idea that it threatens the rule of law. It turns out, and this is something that I go into in the book that's coming out in December... it turns out that King actually had a sophisticated theory of when it was appropriate to engage in civil disobedience and when it wasn't. But for me, reflecting on that conflict in particular, and reflecting on the fact that the same people who were scolding peaceful lunch-counter-sit-ins for threatening the rule of law and, you know, causing society to descend into chaos and undermining property rights and all the rest of that nonsense, were also standing by and watching as southern governors sent police in to beat and gas and fire hose and set dogs on peaceful protests in this sort of completely new set of like, totally unbounded explosions of state violence. And so it seems to me sort of intuitively, like these can't be the same problem, right, like ordinary citizens, doing sit-ins, even if they're illegal, even if we might have some reason to criticize them, it can't be the same reason that we have to criticize Bull Connor for having the cops beat people. And part of the reason that that's the case, and this is what I call the Hobbesian property in the introduction to the rule of law in the real world...part of the reason is just the reality of what states are, right? Like, protesters don't have tanks and police dogs, and fire hoses, right? Protesters typically don't have armies. If they do, then we're in a civil war situation, not a rule of law situation, the state does have all of those things. And so one of the features of the state that makes it the most appropriate site for this talk about the rule of law is this the state has, I mean, most modern states have, at least on a case by case basis, overwhelming power. And so we have distinct moral reasons to control overwhelming power than we do to control a little bit of legal disobedience, right, like overwhelming power is overwhelming. It's something that has a different moral importance for its control. Then the second idea is at the same time what I call the [...] property... is the state makes claims about its use of power, right? Like ordinary people, when they obey the law or violate the law, they don't necessarily do so with reference to a set of ideas that they're propagating about their relationship to other people. Whereas when modern states send troops in to beat people up, in a way what they're doing is they're saying that they're doing so in all of our names, right, particularly, but not exclusively in democratic governments. There's a way in which the state represents itself as acting on behalf of the political community at large. And so it makes sense to have a distinctive normative principle to regulate that kind of power.Tobi; I know you sort of sidestepped this in the book, and maybe it doesn't really fit with your overall argument. But I'm going to push you on that topic a bit. So how does the rule of law state as a matter of institutional design then handles... I know you said that there are separate principles that can be developed for guiding citizen actions, you know...Paul; Yes. Tobi; I mean, let's be clear that you are not saying that people are free to act however they want.Paul; I'm not advocating anarchy.Tobi; Exactly. So how does the rule of law state then handle citizens disagreements or conflicting interests around issues of social order? And I'll give you an example. I mentioned right at the beginning of our conversation what happened in Nigeria in October 2020. There's a unit of the police force that was created to handle violent crimes. Needless to say that they went way beyond their remit and became a very notoriously abusive unit of the police force. Picking up people randomly, lock them up, extort them for money. And there was a situation where a young man was murdered, and his car stolen by this same unit of the police force and young people all over the country, from Lagos to Port Harcourt to Abuja, everywhere, felt we've had enough, right, and everybody came out in protest. It was very, very peaceful, I'd say, until other interests, you know, infiltrated that action. Paul; Right. Tobi; But what I noticed quite early in that process was that even within the spirits of that protests, there were disagreements between citizens - protesters blocking roads, you know, versus people who feel well, your protest should not stop me from going to work, you know, and so many other actions by the protesters that other people with, maybe not conflicting interests, but who have other opinions about strategy or process feel well, this is not right. This is not how to do this. This is not how you do this, you know, and I see that that sort of provided the loophole, I should say, for the government to then move in and take a ruthlessly violent action. You know, there was a popular tollgate in Lagos in the richest neighbourhood in Lagos that was blocked for 10 days by the protesters. And I mean, after this, the army basically moved in and shot people to death. Today, you still see people who would say, Oh, well, that's tragic. But should these people have been blocking other people from going about their daily business? So how does the rule of law regulate issues of social order vis-a-vis conflict of interest?Paul; So I think this is actually a point in favour of my stark distinction between state action and social action as appropriate for thinking about the rule of law. Because when you say that the state used...what I still fundamentally think of as like minor civil disobedience...so, like blocking some roads, big deal! Protesters block roads all the time, right, like protesters have blocked roads throughout human history, you know, like, sometimes it goes big, right? Like they love blocking roads in the French Revolution. But oftentimes, it's just blocking... so I blocked roads.I participated in, you know, some protests in the early 2000s. I participated in blocking roads in DC, right, like, fundamentally "big deal!" is the answer that the state ought to give. And so by saying to each other and to the government, when we talk about the rule of law, we mean, the state's power has to be controlled by the law, I think that gives us a language to say... even though people are engaging in illegal things, the state still has to follow legal process in dealing with it, right.The state still has to use only the level of force allowed by the law to arrest people. The state can't just send in the army to shoot people. And the principle that we appeal to is this principle of the rule of law. Yeah, maintaining the distinction between lawbreaking by ordinary people and law-breaking by the state helps us understand why the state shouldn't be allowed to just send in troops whenever people engage in a little bit of minor lawbreaking and protests.Tobi; So how does the law... I mean, we are entering a bit of a different territory, how does the law in your conception handles what... well, maybe these are fancy definitions, but what some people will call extraordinary circumstances. Like protests with political interests? Maybe protesters that are funded and motivated to unseat an incumbent government? Or in terrorism, you know, where you often have situations where there are no laws on paper to deal with these sort of extraordinary situations, you know, and they can be extremely violent, they can be extremely strange, they're usually things that so many societies are not equipped to handle. So how should the rule of law regulate the action of the state in such extraordinary circumstances?Paul; Yeah, so this is the deep problem of the rule of law, you know, this is why people still read Carl Schmitt, right, because Carl Schmitt's whole account of executive power basically is, hey, wait a minute emergencies happen, and when emergencies happen, liberal legal ideas like the rule of law dropout, and so fundamentally, you just have like raw sovereignty. And that means that the state just kind of does what it must. Right. So here's what I feel about Schmitt. One is, maybe sometimes that's true, right? And again, I think about the US context, because I'm an American and you know, I have my own history, right? And so in the US context, I think, again, about, Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War, right.Like Abraham Lincoln broke all kinds of laws in the Civil War. Like today, we'd call some of the things that he did basically assuming dictatorial power in some respects. I mean, he did that in the greatest emergency that the country had ever faced and has ever faced since then. And he did it in a civil war. And sometimes that happens, and I think practically speaking, legal institutions have a habit of not standing in the way in truly dire situations like that. But, and here's why I want to push back against Carl Schmitt... but what a legal order can then do is after the emergency has passed...number one, the legal order can be a source of pressure for demanding and accounting of when the emergency has passed, right. And so again, I think of the United States War on Terror, you know, we still have people in United States' custody imprisoned at Guantanamo Bay.September 11 2001, was almost 20 years ago. It's actually 20 years ago and a month, and we still have people locked up in Guantanamo Bay. That's insane. That's completely unjustifiable. And one of the jobs of the legal system is to pressure the executive to say, okay, buddy, is the emergency over yet? No, really, we think that the emergency is over yet. I want reasons, right, publicity again, I want an explanation from you of why you think the emergency is still ongoing. And the legal system can force the executive to be accountable for the claim that the emergency is still ongoing. That's number one. Number two is that law tends to be really good at retroactively, sort of, retrofitting things into legal order, right. And so again, I think about the Civil War. You know, after the US Civil War, lots of civil wars, sorry. American-centric person trying to fight against it. But after the US Civil War, you know, the courts took a pause. And then we have a lot of cases where they took a lot of the things that Lincoln did, they said, okay, some of them at least were illegal, some of them were legal, but only under very specific circumstances. And so they actually built legal doctrine that took into account the emergency that Lincoln faced, and then later wars, such as in the Second World War, the courts took the lessons from the experience in the American Civil War, and used that to impose more constraints. So to bring it about that the emergency actions that Franklin Roosevelt took in the Second World War weren't completely sui generis, sort of like right acts of sovereignty, but were regulated by legal rules created during the Civil War, and after the Civil War. And again, they weren't perfect, right? You know, during the Second World War, the United States interned Japanese Americans, you know, again, sort of completely lawless, completely unjustifiable, but you know, it's an ongoing process. The point is that the legal system is always... the law is always reactive in emergencies. But the reactive character of the law can nonetheless be used as a way to control and channel sovereign power, even in these sort of Schmittian emergency situations.Tobi; So two related questions, your work is interdisciplinary, because you try to blend a lot of social science into legal philosophy. But speaking of legal order and your primary profession, I mean.. for the sake of the audience parties into a lot of other cool stuff, I'm going to be putting up his website in the show notes. But speaking of legal order, and the legal profession, why is so much of the legal profession fascinated with what I would say the rule by law, as opposed to the rule of law. A lot of what you get from lawyers, even some law professors in some situations is [that] the law is the law, and you have to obey it. And even if you are going to question it, however unjustified it may seem, you still have to follow some processes that maybe for ordinary citizens are not so accessible or extremely costly, you know, which I think violate regularity, right, the way you talk about it retrospective legislation, and so many other things. So why is the legal profession so fascinated with the law, as opposed to justification for the law?Paul; Yeah, I think that question kind of answers itself, right. It's unfortunate... I mean, it's sort of natural but it's unfortunate that the people who most influence our dialogue about the way that we, you know, live in [the] society together with a state, namely by organizing ourselves with law happen to be people who are the specialists who find it easiest, right? And so I think the simple answer is right on this one, at least in countries like the United States, I'm not sure how true this is in other countries. But in the United States, the domination of legal discourse by lawyers necessarily means that the sort of real practical, real-world ways in which ordinary people find interacting with anything legal to be difficult, oppressive, or both just aren't in view, right? This is hard for them to understand.But I think in the US, one of the distortions that we've had is that we have an extremely hierarchical legal profession, right. So we have very elite law schools, and those very elite law schools - one of which I teach at - tend to predominantly produce lawyers who primarily work for wealthy corporations and sort of secondarily work for the government. Those lawyers tend to be the ones that end up at the top of the judiciary, that end up in influential positions in academia, that end up, you know, in Congress. The lawyers that, you know, see poor people, see people of subordinated minority groups and see the very different kinds of interactions with the legal system that people who are worse off have, that see the way that the law presents itself, not as a thing that you can use autonomously to structure your own life. But as a kind of external imposition, that sort of shows up and occasionally inflicts harm on you. Those lawyers aren't the ones who end up in our corridors of power. And it's very unfortunate, it's a consequence of the hierarchical nature of, at least in the US, our legal profession. And I suspect it's similar in these other countries as well.Tobi; In your opinion, what's the... dare I say the sacrosanct and objective - those are rigid conditions sorry - expression of the rule of law? The current general conception of the rule accedes to the primacy of the Constitution, right. I've often found that problematic because in some countries you find constitutional provisions that are egregious, and in other cases, you find lawyers going into court to challenge certain actions that they deem unjust, or that are truly unjust on the basis of the same constitution. Right. So what do you think is the most practical expression of the rule of law? Is it written laws? Is it the opinion of the judges? Is it how officials hold themselves accountable? What's the answer?Paul; So I think I'm gonna like sort of twist this a little bit and interpret that question is like, how do you know the extent to which the rule of law exists in a particular place? And my answer is, can ordinary people look officials in the eye, right, you know... if you're walking down the street, and you see a police officer, you know, are you afraid? Or can you walk past them and confidently know you're doing nothing wrong so there's nothing really effectively but they can do to you, right? If you're called in to deal with some kind of bureaucratic problem, like the tax office, can you trust that you exist in a relationship of respect? You know, can you trust that when you show them, actually here are my receipts, I really did have that expense, that that's going to be taken seriously? You know, if people, everybody, feels like they can stand tall, and look government officials in the eye, then to that extent, I think that the rule of law exists in a society.Tobi; Final question, what's the coolest idea you're working on right now?Paul; Oh, gosh. So like I said, I've got two books under contract right now. The first book is a history/theoretical constitutional law account of the development and existing state of the rule of law in the United States. The second book, which I'm more excited about, because it's the one that I plan to write this year, but it's also a lot harder, is I'm trying to take some of the governance design ideas that we see from the notion of rule of law development, and others such as governance development things and apply them to Private Internet platforms, right? Like, basically to Facebook. Um, I was actually involved in some of the work, not at a super high level, but I was involved in some of the work in designing or doing the research for designing Facebook's oversight board. And I'm kind of trying to expand on some of those ideas and think about, you know, if we really believe that private companies, especially in these internet platforms are doing governance right now, can we take lessons from how the rest of the world and how actual governments and actual states have developed techniques of governing behaviour in highly networked, large scale super-diverse environments and use those lessons in the private context? Maybe we can maybe we can't I'm not sure yet. Hopefully, by the time I finish the book, I'll know.Tobi; That's interesting. And I'll ask you this, a similar, I'll say a related situation is currently happening in Nigeria right now, where the President's Twitter handle or username, tweeted something that sounded like a thinly veiled threat to a particular ethnic group. And lots of people who disagreed with that tweet reported the tweet, and Twitter ended up deleting the tweet in question, which high-level officials in Nigeria found extremely offensive, and going as far as to assert their sovereign rights over Twitter and say, well, it may be your platform, but it is our country and we are banning you. How would you adjudicate such a situation? I mean, there's the question of banning Donald Trump from the platform and so many other things that have come up.Paul; Yeah, I mean, it's hard, right? So there are no easy answers to these kinds of problems. I think, ultimately, what we have to do is we have to build more legitimate ways to make these decisions. I mean, here are two things that we cannot do, right?Number one is we can't just let government officials, especially when, you know, as with the Donald Trump example, and so many others, the government officials are the ones who are engaging in the terrible conduct make these decisions. Number two is we also just can't let a bunch of people sitting in the Bay Area in California make those decisions. Like, ultimately, this is on, you know, property in some abstracted sense of like the shareholders of these companies. But we cannot simply allow a bunch of people in San Francisco, in Menlo Park, and you know, Cupertino and Mountain View, and all of those other little tech industry cities that have no understanding of local context to make the final decisions here. And so what we need to do is we need to build more robust institutions to include both global and local and affected countries, grassroots participation, in making these decisions. And I'm trying to sort of sketch out what the design for those might look like. But, you know, talk to me in about a year. And hopefully, I'll have a book for you that will actually have a sketch.Tobi; You bet I'm going to hold you to that. So, a year from now. So still on the question of ideas, because the show is about ideas. What's the one idea you'd like to see spread everywhere?Paul; Oh, gosh, you should have warned me in advance... that... I'm going to go back to what I said at the very beginning about the rule of law. Like I think that the rule of law depends on people, right? Like there is no such thing as the rule of law without a society and a legal system that genuinely is equal and advantageous to ordinary people enough to be the kind of thing that people actually support. Like ordinary people... if you cannot recruit the support of ordinary people for your legal political and social system, you cannot have the rule of law. That's true whether you're a developing country, that's true whether you're the United States, right. Like I think, you know, part of the reason that we got Donald Trump in the United States, I think, is because our legal system and with it our economy, and all the rest are so unequal in this country, that ordinary voters in the United States didn't see any reason to preserve it. Right and so when this lunatic and I mean, I'm just going to be quite frank here and say Donald Trump is a complete lunatic, right... when this lunatic is running for office who shows total disregard for existing institutions, like complete willingness to casually break the law. An electorate that actually was full of people who felt (themselves) treated respectfully and protected and supported by our legal and political institutions would have sent that guy packing in a heartbeat. But because the American people don't have that experience right now, I think that's what made us vulnerable to somebody like Donald Trump.Tobi; Thank you so much, Paul. It's been so fascinating talking to you.Paul; Thank you. This has been a lot of fun. Yeah, I'm happy to come back in a year when I've got the platform thing done.Tobi; Yeah, I'm so looking forward to that. This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at www.ideasuntrapped.com/subscribe

In Our Time
Iris Murdoch

In Our Time

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 54:25


Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the author and philosopher Iris Murdoch (1919 - 1999). In her lifetime she was most celebrated for her novels such as The Bell and The Black Prince, but these are now sharing the spotlight with her philosophy. Responding to the horrors of the Second World War, she argued that morality was not subjective or a matter of taste, as many of her contemporaries held, but was objective, and good was a fact we could recognize. To tell good from bad, though, we would need to see the world as it really is, not as we want to see it, and her novels are full of characters who are not yet enlightened enough to do that. With Anil Gomes Fellow and Tutor in Philosophy at Trinity College, University of Oxford Anne Rowe Visiting Professor at the University of Chichester and Emeritus Research Fellow with the Iris Murdoch Archive Project at Kingston University And Miles Leeson Director of the Iris Murdoch Research Centre and Reader in English Literature at the University of Chichester Producer: Simon Tillotson

In Our Time: Culture
Iris Murdoch

In Our Time: Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 54:25


Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the author and philosopher Iris Murdoch (1919 - 1999). In her lifetime she was most celebrated for her novels such as The Bell and The Black Prince, but these are now sharing the spotlight with her philosophy. Responding to the horrors of the Second World War, she argued that morality was not subjective or a matter of taste, as many of her contemporaries held, but was objective, and good was a fact we could recognize. To tell good from bad, though, we would need to see the world as it really is, not as we want to see it, and her novels are full of characters who are not yet enlightened enough to do that. With Anil Gomes Fellow and Tutor in Philosophy at Trinity College, University of Oxford Anne Rowe Visiting Professor at the University of Chichester and Emeritus Research Fellow with the Iris Murdoch Archive Project at Kingston University And Miles Leeson Director of the Iris Murdoch Research Centre and Reader in English Literature at the University of Chichester Producer: Simon Tillotson

In Our Time: Philosophy
Iris Murdoch

In Our Time: Philosophy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 54:25


Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the author and philosopher Iris Murdoch (1919 - 1999). In her lifetime she was most celebrated for her novels such as The Bell and The Black Prince, but these are now sharing the spotlight with her philosophy. Responding to the horrors of the Second World War, she argued that morality was not subjective or a matter of taste, as many of her contemporaries held, but was objective, and good was a fact we could recognize. To tell good from bad, though, we would need to see the world as it really is, not as we want to see it, and her novels are full of characters who are not yet enlightened enough to do that. With Anil Gomes Fellow and Tutor in Philosophy at Trinity College, University of Oxford Anne Rowe Visiting Professor at the University of Chichester and Emeritus Research Fellow with the Iris Murdoch Archive Project at Kingston University And Miles Leeson Director of the Iris Murdoch Research Centre and Reader in English Literature at the University of Chichester Producer: Simon Tillotson

Profiles In Eccentricity
The Obscure Genius of Geoffrey Pyke

Profiles In Eccentricity

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 107:15


This week Matt treats the lads to the story of a man who escaped prison during World War One, designed ice ships for the allies during the Second World War and in between was a real oddball, inventor and journalist! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Midnight Train Podcast
The Bedlam Asylum... um...Bethlem Royal Hospital. OLD AF.

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 152:38


Today we are taking the train to a wonderful little building… Actually scratch that… This place was once so crazy( no pun intended) that its nickname became a common word.  The definition of the word is "A place or situation of chaotic uproar, and where confusion prevails. " The word is Bedlam. The place is Bethlehem Royal Hospital. The hospital is considered the first lunatic asylum. The word "bedlam" is derived from the hospital's nickname. Bedlam is a bastardization of the word bethlem, which in turn was a corruption of the name Bethlehem. Although the hospital became a modern psychiatric facility, historically it was representative of the worst excesses of asylums in the era of lunacy reform. We're gonna get into all that craziness tonight and see what kind of "Bedlam" actually went on there.    Bethlem Royal Hospital's origins are unlike any other psychiatric hospital in the western world. As a formal organization, it can be traced to its foundation in 1247, during the reign of King Henry III, as a Roman Catholic Monastery for the Priory of the 'New Order of St Mary of Bethlem' in the city of London proper. It was established by the Italian Bishop of Bethlehem, Goffredo de Prefetti, following a donation of personal property by the London Alderman and former City-Sheriff, the Norman, Simon FitzMary. It bears its name after its primary patron and original overseer. The initial location of the priory was in the parish of Saint Botolph, in Bishopsgate's ward, just beyond London's wall and where the south-east corner of Liverpool Street station now stands. Bethlem was not initially intended as a hospital, much less as a specialist institution for the mentally ill. Rather, its purpose was tied to the function of the English Church; the ostensible purpose of the priory was to function as a centre for the collection of alms to support the Crusaders, and to link England to the Holy Land. Bishop De Prefetti's need to generate income for the Crusaders, and restore the financial fortunes of his apostolic see was occasioned by two misfortunes: his bishopric had suffered significant losses following the destructive conquest of the town of Bethlehem by the Khwarazmian Turks in 1244; and the immediate predecessor to his post had further impoverished his cathedral chapter through the alienation of a considerable amount of its property. The new London priory, obedient to the Church of Bethlehem, would also house the poor, disabled and abandoned; and, if visited, provide hospitality to the Bishop, canons and brothers of Bethlehem. The subordination of the priory's religious order to the bishops of Bethlehem was further underlined in the foundational charter which stipulated that Bethlems's prior, canons and male and female inmates were to wear a star upon their cloaks and capes to symbolize their obedience to the church of Bethlehem.   During the 13th and 14th centuries, with its activities underwritten by episcopal and papal indulgences, Bethlem's role as a center for the collection of alms for the poor continued. However, over time, its link to the mendicant Order of Bethlehem increasingly devolved, putting its purpose and patronage in severe doubt. In 1346 the Prior of Bethlem, a position at that time granted to the most senior of London's monastic brethren, applied to the city authorities seeking protection; thereafter metropolitan office-holders claimed power to oversee the appointment of prios, and demanded in return an annual payment of 40 shillings from the coffers of the order. It is doubtful whether the City of London ever provided substantial protection, and much less that the priorship fell within their patronage, but dating from the 1346 petition, it played a role in the management of Bethlem's organization and finances.   By this time the crusader bishops of Bethlehem had relocated to Clamecy, France under the surety of the Avignon papacy. This was significant as, throughout the reign of King Edward III (1327–77), the English monarchy had extended its patronage over ecclesiastical positions through the seizure of alien priories, mainly French. These were religious institutions that were under the control of non-English religious houses. As a dependent house of the Order of Saint Bethlehem in Clamecy, Bethlem was vulnerable to seizure by the English crown, and this occurred in the 1370s when Edward III took control of all English hospitals. The purpose of this appropriation was to prevent funds raised by the hospital from enriching the French monarchy, via the papal court, and thus supporting the French war effort. After this event, the Head Masters of the hospital, semi-autonomous figures in charge of its day-to-day management, were crown appointees, and Bethlem became an increasingly secularized institution. The memory of Bethlem's foundation became muddled. In 1381 the royal candidate for the post of master claimed that from its beginnings the hospital had been superintended by an order of knights, and he confused the identity of its founder, Goffredo de Prefetti, with that of the Frankish crusader, Godfrey de Bouillon, the King of Jerusalem. The removal of the last symbolic link to the mendicant order was confirmed in 1403 when it was reported that master and inmates no longer wore the symbol of their order, the star of Bethlehem. This was exclusively a political move on the part of the hospital administrators, as the insane were perceived as unclean or possessed by daemons, and not permitted to reside on consecrated soil.   From 1330 Bethlehm was routinely referred to as a "hospital" does not necessarily indicate a change in its primary role from alms collection – the word hospital could as likely have been used to denote a lodging for travellers, equivalent to a hostel, and would have been a perfectly apt term to describe an institution acting as a centre and providing accommodation for Bethlem's peregrinating alms-seekers or questores. It is unknown from what exact date it began to specialise in the care and control of the insane. Despite this fact it has been frequently asserted that Bethlem was first used for the insane from 1377. This rather precise date is derived from the unsubstantiated conjecture of the Reverend Edward Geoffrey O'Donoghue, chaplain to the hospital, who published a monograph on its history in 1914. While it is possible that Bethlem was receiving the insane during the late fourteenth-century, the first definitive record of their presence in the hospital is provided from the details of a visitation of the Charity Commissioners in 1403. This recorded that amongst other patients then in the hospital there were six male inmates who were "mente capti", a Latin term indicating insanity. The report of the 1403 visitation also noted the presence of four pairs of manacles, eleven chains, six locks and two pairs of stocks although it is not clear if any or all of these items were for the restraint of the inmates. Thus, while mechanical restraint and solitary confinement are likely to have been used for those regarded as dangerous, little else is known of the actual treatment of the insane in Bethlem for much of the medieval period. The presence of a small number of insane patients in 1403 marks Bethlem's gradual transition from a diminutive general hospital into a specialist institution for the confinement of the insane; this process was largely completed by 1460. In 1546, the Lord-Mayor of London, Sir John Gresham, petitioned the crown to grant Bethlem to the city properly. This petition was partially successful, and King Henry VIII reluctantly ceded to the City of London "the custody, order and governance" of the hospital and of its "occupants and revenues". This charter came into effect in 1547. Under this formulation, the crown retained possession of the hospital, while its administration fell to the city authorities. Following a brief interval when Bethlem was placed under the management of the Governors of Christ's Hospital, from 1557 it was administered by the Governors of the city Bridewell, a prototype House of Correction at Blackfriars. Having been thus one of the few metropolitan hospitals to have survived the dissolution of the monasteries physically intact, this joint administration continued, not without interference by both the crown and city, until Bethlem's incorporation into the National Health Service (NHS) took place in 1948.    In 1546, the Lord-Mayor of London, Sir John Gresham, petitioned the crown to grant Bethlem to the city properly. This petition was partially successful, and King Henry VIII reluctantly ceded to the City of London "the custody, order and governance" of the hospital and of its "occupants and revenues". This charter came into effect in 1547. Under this formulation, the crown retained possession of the hospital, while its administration fell to the city authorities. Following a brief interval when Bethlem was placed under the management of the Governors of Christ's Hospital, from 1557 it was administered by the Governors of the city Bridewell, a prototype House of Correction at Blackfriars. Having been thus one of the few metropolitan hospitals to have survived the dissolution of the monasteries physically intact, this joint administration continued, not without interference by both the crown and city, until Bethlem's incorporation into the National Health Service (NHS) took place in 1948.   The position of master was a sinecure largely regarded by its occupants as means of profiting at the expense of the poor in their charge. The appointment of the early masters of the hospital, later known as keepers, had lain within the patronage of the crown until 1547. Thereafter, the city, through the Court of Aldermen, took control of these appointments where, as with the King's appointees, the office was used to reward loyal servants and friends. However, compared to the masters placed by the monarch, those who gained the position through the city were of much more modest status. Thus in 1561, the Lord Mayor succeeded in having his former porter, Richard Munnes, a draper by trade, appointed to the position. The sole qualifications of his successor in 1565 appears to have been his occupation as a grocer. The Bridewell Governors largely interpreted the role of keeper as that of a house-manager and this is clearly reflected in the occupations of most appointees during this period as they tended to be inn-keepers, victualers or brewers and the like. When patients were sent to Bethlem by the Governors of the Bridewell the keeper was paid from hospital funds. For the remainder, keepers were paid either by the families and friends of inmates or by the parish authorities. It is possible that keepers negotiated their fees for these latter categories of patients.   In 1598 the long-term keeper, Roland Sleford, a London cloth-maker, left his post, apparently of his own volition, after a nineteen-year tenure. Two months later, the Bridewell Governors, who had until then shown little interest in the management of Bethlem beyond the appointment of keepers, conducted an inspection of the hospital and a census of its inhabitants for the first time in over forty years. Their express purpose was to "to view and p[er]use the defaultes and want of rep[ar]ac[i]ons". They found that during the period of Sleford's keepership the hospital buildings had fallen into a deplorable condition with the roof caving in, the kitchen sink blocked up and reported that: "...it is not fitt for anye man to dwell in wch was left by the Keeper for that it is so loathsomly filthely kept not fitt for anye man to come into the sayd howse".   The 1598 committee of inspection found twenty-one inmates then resident with only two of these having been admitted during the previous twelve months. Of the remainder, six, at least, had been resident for a minimum of eight years and one inmate had been there for around twenty-five years. Three were from outside London, six were charitable cases paid for out of the hospital's resources, one was supported by a parochial authority, while the rest were provided for by family, friends, benefactors or, in one instance, out of their funds. The precise reason for the Governors' new-found interest in Bethlem is unknown but it may have been connected to the increased scrutiny the hospital was coming under with the passing of poor law legislation in 1598 and to the decision by the Governors to increase hospital revenues by opening it up to general visitors as a spectacle. After this inspection, the Bridewell Governors initiated some repairs and visited the hospital at more frequent intervals. During one such visit in 1607 they ordered the purchase of clothing and eating vessels for the inmates, presumably indicating the lack of such basic items.    The year 1634 is typically interpreted as denoting the divide between the mediaeval and early modern administration of Bethlem.    Although Bethlem had been enlarged by 1667 to accommodate 59 patients, the Court of Governors of Bethlem and Bridewell observed at the start of 1674 that "the Hospital House of Bethlem is very olde, weake & ruinous and to[o] small and straight for keeping the greater numb[e]r of lunaticks therein att p[re]sent". With the increasing demand for admission and the inadequate and dilapidated state of the building it was decided to rebuild the hospital in Moorfields, just north of the city proper and one of the largest open spaces in London. The architect chosen for the new hospital, which was built rapidly and at great expense between 1675 and 1676, was the natural philosopher and City Surveyor Robert Hooke. He constructed an edifice that was monumental in scale at over 500 feet (150 m) wide and some 40 feet (12 m) deep. The surrounding walls were some 680 feet (210 m) long and 70 feet (21 m) deep while the south face at the rear was effectively screened by a 714-foot (218 m) stretch of London's ancient wall projecting westward from nearby Moorgate. At the rear and containing the courtyards where patients exercised and took the air, the walls rose to 14 feet (4.3 m) high. The front walls were only 8 feet (2.4 m) high but this was deemed sufficient as it was determined that "Lunatikes... are not to [be] permitted to walk in the yard to be situate[d] betweene the said intended new Building and the Wall aforesaid." It was also hoped that by keeping these walls relatively low the splendour of the new building would not be overly obscured. This concern to maximise the building's visibility led to the addition of six gated openings 10 feet (3.0 m) wide which punctuated the front wall at regular intervals, enabling views of the facade. Functioning as both advertisement and warning of what lay within, the stone pillars enclosing the entrance gates were capped by the figures of "Melancholy" and "Raving Madness" carved in Portland stone by the Danish-born sculptor Caius Gabriel Cibber.   At the instigation of the Bridewell Governors and to make a grander architectural statement of "charitable munificence", the hospital was designed as a single- rather than double-pile building,  accommodating initially 120 patients. Having cells and chambers on only one side of the building facilitated the dimensions of the great galleries, essentially long and capacious corridors, 13 feet (4.0 m) high and 16 feet (4.9 m) wide, which ran the length of both floors to a total span of 1,179 feet (359 m). Such was their scale that Roger L'Estrange remarked in a 1676 text eulogising the new Bethlem that their "Vast Length ... wearies the travelling eyes' of Strangers". The galleries were constructed more for public display than for the care of patients as, at least initially, inmates were prohibited from them lest "such persons that come to see the said Lunatickes may goe in Danger of their Lives"   The architectural design of the new Bethlem was primarily intended to project an image of the hospital and its governors consonant with contemporary notions of charity and benevolence.    By the end of the 18th century the hospital was in severe disrepair. At this point it was rebuilt again on another site.  As the new facility was being built attempts were made to rehouse patients at local hospitals and admissions to Bethlem, sections of which were deemed uninhabitable, were significantly curtailed such that the patient population fell from 266 in 1800 to 119 in 1814. The Governors engaged in protracted negotiations with the City  for another municipally owned location at St. George's Fields in Southwark, south of the Thames.   The deal was concluded in 1810 and provided the Governors with a 12 acres site in a swamp-like, impoverished, highly populated, and industrialised area where the Dog and Duck tavern and St George's Spa had been.   A competition was held to design the new hospital at Southwark in which the noted Bethlem patient James Tilly Matthews was an unsuccessful entrant. Completed after three years in 1815, it was constructed during the first wave of county asylum building in England under the County Asylum Act ("Wynn's Act") of 1808. Female patients occupied the west wing and males the east, the cells were located off galleries that traversed each wing. Each gallery contained only one toilet, a sink and cold baths. Incontinent patients were kept on beds of straw in cells in the basement gallery; this space also contained rooms with fireplaces for attendants. A wing for the criminally insane – a legal category newly minted in the wake of the trial of a delusional James Hadfield for attempted regicide – was completed in 1816. Problems with the building were soon noted as the steam heating did not function properly, the basement galleries were damp and the windows of the upper storeys were unglazed "so that the sleeping cells were either exposed to the full blast of cold air or were completely darkened". Faced with increased admissions and overcrowding, new buildings, designed by the architect Sydney Smirke, were added from the 1830s. The wing for criminal lunatics was increased to accommodate a further 30 men while additions to the east and west wings, extending the building's facade, provided space for an additional 166 inmates and a dome was added to the hospital chapel. At the end of this period of expansion Bethlem had a capacity for 364 patients. In 1930, the hospital moved to the suburbs of Croydon,[211] on the site of Monks Orchard House between Eden Park, Beckenham, West Wickham and Shirley. The old hospital and its grounds were bought by Lord Rothermere and presented to the London County Council for use as a park; the central part of the building was retained and became home to the Imperial War Museum in 1936. The hospital was absorbed into the National Health Service in 1948. 1997 the hospital started planning celebrations of its 750th anniversary. The service user's perspective was not to be included, however, and members of the psychiatric survivors movement saw nothing to celebrate in either the original Bedlam or in the current practices of mental health professionals towards those in Mneed of care. A campaign called "Reclaim Bedlam" was launched by Pete Shaughnessy, supported by hundreds of patients and ex-patients and widely reported in the media. A sit-in was held outside the earlier Bedlam site at the Imperial War Museum. The historian Roy Porter called the Bethlem Hospital "a symbol for man's inhumanity to man, for callousness and cruelty."  The hospital continues to operate to this day in this location.    Ok so with that history out of the way let's drive into what really transpired to give this hospital it reputation and that drove Bedlam to strain it's current meaning in our lexicon.    Early on Sanitation was poor and the patients were malnourished. Most of the patients were able to move about freely, but those who were considered dangerous were kept chained to the walls. Patients' families often dumped unwell family members in the asylum and disowned them. We've discussed other asylums and things dealing with them so we won't get into the fact that most of the patients were horribly misdiagnosed due to little to no understanding of mental health until relatively recently. Some of the treatments used ranged from barbaric and esoteric to just plain crazy.    One of those crazy ass ones was called rotational therapy. Charles Darwin's grandfather, Erasmus Darwin, began using “rotational therapy”, which involved spinning a patient around and around on a chair or swing for up to an hour. They would sometimes be spun over 100 times per minute. Obviously this would create issues for the patient. Many would get sick and vomit. Most would become very upset and distraught while becoming severely disoriented. The vomiting was seen as a good thing and progress in the treatment. Doctor Joseph Mason Cox was a doctor who actually picked up this type of treatment later on. The time spent spinning, and the speed of the spin, were to be determined by the good doctor. Considering the fact that the common side effect was fear, extreme pallor, vomiting, and voiding the bowels and bladder, the doctor evidently commonly overdid it. Of course he didn't think so at the time. He wrote happily that, “after a few circumvolutions, I have witnessed the soothing lulling effects, when the mind has become tranquillized and the body quiescent.” It's true that after being spun until fluid leaves the body via every available orifice, most people have had the fight taken out of them and are ready for a nap. There is one positive side effect of this kind of rampant torture of the insane. Scientists started noticing that vertigo has visual effects, and used the chairs to study them. These rotating chairs mark the beginning of a lot of visual and mental experiments done on perception. The early 1800s were a particularly grim time, and many patients were chained to the walls naked or almost naked, as the medical director felt that it was necessary to break each person's will.    Some of the more barbaric and esoteric treatments included bloodletting, leeches and good old fashioned starvation and beatings.  Ice baths would often be used to try and calm down hysterical patients.    At the time, bloodletting was believed to be a completely acceptable and normal way to cure a patient of a variety of mental and physical ailments. Doctors thought that they could literally bleed a sickness out of a patient, which not only doesn't work, it extra-double doesn't work on mental illnesses. Many of the patients were forced to undergo treatment with leeches and the induction of blisters, which mostly just sounds unpleasant, but it often proved fatal. Reportedly, the physicians at the time at least understood that everyone needs blood, so only patients who were deemed strong enough to undergo treatment were allowed to have this "cure."    Here's another fun one. A doctor named William Black wrote that patients were placed in straitjackets and given laxatives, which was seen at Bethlem as one of the "principal remedies." Hearing voices? Some explosive diarrhea oughta clear that up. Seizures? One diarrhea for you. Diarrhea for everyone!   We all know the best thing for someone who may not be in their right mind is to be left alone… in the dark… for long periods of time… Like really long periods of time. Well we may know that's probably NOT the best, but Bedlam never got the message. Some patients were left alone in solitary for days, weeks, even months at a time. Seems very counterproductive.    One of the worst ones was the example of the inhumane conditions was that of James Norris. Norris, an American Marine, had been sent to Bethlem on the 1st of February 1800. Her was kept in Bethlem's “incurable wing,” Norris' arms were pinned to his sides by iron bars. He was also kept chained to the wall by his neck. This fifty-five-year-old man had been continuously kept in this position for “more than twelve years.”   The apathy of families abandoning their relatives to a hellish existence in Bethlem led to a new form of exploitation. From the 1700s to the 1800s, there was a marked increase in the dissection of bodies to learn more about human anatomy. In the 1790s, Bethlem's chief surgeon was Bryan Crowther, a man who saw opportunity in the search for corpses to study. Crowther would dissect Bethlem's dead patients in the name of medical science, believing that he would be able to find a difference in the brains of his mentally ill patients, compared to “normal” people. Of course, he did these operations without any kind of consent or legal right.   One of the best ways to sum up the reasoning behind this torture is to let you know from the man who was behind the worst of it. John Haslam was one of the most sinister figures in the history of Bethlem, and it was while he was the head of management that the institution sunk to a new low in depravity. While Bryan Crowther was conducting illegal dissections as chief surgeon, Haslam used various tortures against the patients. He was adamant that the first step to curing the patients was breaking their wills first. So ya… They figured fuck em… Break their will and they'll be fine… Wow. Oftentimes patients would lack even basic amenities for living. That includes proper clothing and food.    To make things even worse for the patients, from approximately the early 1600s until 1770, the public was able to go for a wander through Bedlam. Money was collected as entrance fees, and it was hoped that seeing the crazy people would make people feel sufficiently compassionate that they would donate funds to the hospital. Another reason for this is that they hoped it would attract the families of these patients and that they would bring those patients food and clothing and other things they needed so the hospital would not have to provide them.    Oh if that's not bad enough, how about the mass graves. Modern-day construction of the London Underground unearthed mass graves on the grounds of Bethlem, created specifically to get rid of the corpses of those who didn't survive the hospital's care. Discovered in 2013, the mass graves dating back to 1569, and there are somewhere close to 20,000 people buried in them. Amazingly, authorities have managed to identify some of the deceased, but many others will likely never get a face and name.   Anything about any of these areas being haunted? Yup we got that too. Although the first few sites have long been transformed into other things, the girls that happened there could have left tons of negative juju. We found this cool story.            "The Liverpool Street Underground Station was opened in February of 1874 on the site of the original Bedlem Hospital. Former patients haunt this busy section of the London Underground.    One compelling sighting happened in the summer of 2000. A Line Controller spotted something strange on the CCTV camera that he was monitoring that showed the Liverpool Station. It was 2:00 am in the morning and the station was closed for the night. This witness saw a figure wearing white overalls in an eastbound tunnel. He became concerned since he knew no contractors worked the station this late at night. He called his Station Supervisor to report what he was seeing on the screen.   The Supervisor went to investigate. The Line Controller watched as his Supervisor stood nearby the mysterious figure. So he was confused when his Supervisor called to say he had not seen any figure. The Line Controller told his boss that the figure had stood so close to him that he could have reached out and touched it. Hearing this the Supervisor continued to search for the figure.   Again the Line Controller saw the figure walk right passed his boss on his screen, but again his boss did not see the figure. The Supervisor finally giving up went to leave the station but as he did so he spotted white overalls placed on a bench that he had passed before. He stated that they could not have been placed there without him seeing who did it.   Even before the Liverpool Station was built the area where the hospital stood was considered haunted. Between 1750 and 1812 many witnesses reported hearing a female voice crying and screaming. It is believed that this is a former patient from Bedlam.    Rebecca Griffins was buried in the area. While alive she always frantically clutched a coin in her hand. Witnesses state they hear her asking where her ha' penny is."   Fun stuff!   The following comes from the old building that was turned into the imperial war museum.    It is said that  to this day  the spectres of those who suffered in Bedlam still roam the hallways and rattle their chains in remembered anguish.   During the Second World War, a detachment of the Women's Auxiliary Air Force was stationed inside the Imperial War Museum with barrage balloons. Much of the museum has parts that date back to Bedlam and it isn't hard to imagine them as cells full of the damned inmates. Many of the young girls who were garrisoned inside had never heard of the buildings sordid past, so had no reason to fear it. Yet soon complaints began to flood in as during the night many found they couldn't sleep, kept up by strange moaning and the rattling of chains. The long passed inmates of Bedlam made their displeasure well known. Eventually the complaints became so bad the entire detachment had to be rehoused nearby.   Possibly the most famous ghost of Bedlam is the sad spectre of poor Rebecca. At a merchant's house by London Bridge lived a lovely young girl by the name of Rebecca. She fell head over heels in love with a handsome young Indian man who had come to lodge with the family. So besotted was she that when he packed up his bags to return to India she was shocked that he hadn't loved her quite nearly as much as she'd loved him. She helped him to pack his things, hoping all the while that he would change his mind and agree to stay. But all she received was a gold sovereign that he slipped into her hand before leaving forever.   The grief of her spurning was too much for her mind to handle and she snapped, soon being admitted to Bedlam Hospital. The golden sovereign he had given her was gripped firmly in her fist for the remainder of her short life, the final token from her lost love, never to be given up. When she finally wasted away into death it didn't go unnoticed by one of the guards who prised the coin from her hand and then buried her without her most prized possession. It was after that the guards, inmates and visitors all began to report a strange sight indeed. A wan and ghostly figure began to roam the halls of Bedlam, searching for her lost love token, her spirit refusing to be put to rest until she had it back in her hand. It is said that she still wanders the halls to this day, looking for that stolen coin to make her whole once more.   Well… There you have it, the history and craziness of Bedlam Asylum!    British horror movies https://screenrant.com/best-british-horror-movies/   BECOME A P.O.O.P.R.!! http://www.patreon.com/themidnighttrainpodcast   Find The Midnight Train Podcast: www.themidnighttrainpodcast.com www.facebook.com/themidnighttrainpodcast www.twitter.com/themidnighttrainpc www.instagram.com/themidnighttrainpodcast www.discord.com/themidnighttrainpodcast www.tiktok.com/themidnighttrainp   And wherever you listen to your favorite podcasts.   Subscribe to our official YouTube channel: OUR YOUTUBE   Support our sponsors www.themidnighttraintrainpodcast.com/sponsors   The Charley Project www.charleyproject.org

We Have Ways of Making You Talk
384. Walking the Ground

We Have Ways of Making You Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 42:07


James Holland is a keen advocate of walking the ground to gain a deeper understanding of the events of the Second World War. In this special podcast James walks us around some of the key sites in Valletta, Mdina and the old Ta'Qali airbase as he explores the locations which informed much of his writing in Fortress Malta.A Goalhanger Films productionProduced by Rotimi KolapoExec Producer Tony PastorTwitter: #WeHaveWays@WeHaveWaysPodWebsite: www.wehavewayspod.comEmail: wehavewayspodcast@gmail.com See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sing Out! Radio Magazine
Episode 2141: #21-42: Honky Tonkin', Pt.1

Sing Out! Radio Magazine

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 58:30


The audience for country music in the years following the World War II was predominantly male, and many of the records were aimed at the jukeboxes that thrived in the bars and watering holes where working class audience gathered. This week on the program, we'll sample some classic honky-tonk music from the late '30s until today. We'll hear Kitty Wells, Hank Snow, Buck Owens, Webb Pierce and of course Hank Williams … along with contemporary tunes from The Byrds, Emmylou Harris and Asleep at the Wheel. Let's go Honky Tonkin' … this week on The Sing Out! Radio Magazine.Episode #21-42: Honky Tonkin', Pt.1Host: Tom DruckenmillerThe Sing Out! Radio Magazine is broadcast weekly on the finest public radio stations nationwide and syndicated on iTunes, Stitcher, Podomatic, The Folk Music Notebook and on the Sing Out! website www.singout.orgArtist/”Song”/CD/LabelPete Seeger / “If I Had A Hammer”(excerpt) / Songs of Hope and Struggle / Smithsonian Folkways Don Rich / “Buckeroo” / Country Pickin': The Don Rich Anthology / SundazedThe Byrds / “You're Still on My Mind” / Sweetheart of the Rodeo / ColumbiaHank Williams / “Honky Tonk Blues” / 40 Greatest Hits / PolydorJean Shepard /w Ferlon Husky / “A Dear John Letter” / Super Hits / GustoEmmylou Harris & the Nash Ramblers / “Two More Bottles of Wine” / Ramble in Music City / NonesuchBuddy Holly / “Midnight Shift” / The Definitive Collection / DeccaAsleep at the Wheel / “The Letter that Johnny Walker Read” / Half a Hundred Years / BismeauxVal Mindel & Emily Miller / “Lonely Street” / Close to Home / Yodel-Ay-HeeKitty Wells / “It Wasn't God Who Made Honky Tonk Angels” / Essential Honky Tonk / Not NowRoger Miller / “Kansas City Star” / All Time Greatest Hits / MercuryDon Rich / “Chicken Pickin'” / Country Pickin': The Don Rich Anthology / SundazedVernon Solomon / “Beaumont Rag” / Texas Hoedown Revisited / CountyJess Willard / “Honky Tonk Hardwood Floor” / Hillbilly Boogie and Jive / AtomicatHank Snow / “I'm Moving On” / The Very Best of Hank Snow / BMGPatsy Montana / “Montana Plains” / Ragged But Right: Great Country String Bands of the 1930's / RCAMerle Haggard / “Mama Tried” / Live at Billy Bob's Texas / Smith Music GroupWebb Pierce / “There Stands the Glass” / King of the Honky Tonk / MCABuck Owens / “Under Your Spell Again” / Right After the Dance / AtomicatWillie Nelson / “Heartaches by the Number” / A Tribute to Ray Price / LegacyBill Doggett / “Honky Tonk pt.2” / Honky Tonk / Ace Pete Seeger / “If I Had A Hammer”(excerpt) / Songs of Hope and Struggle / Smithsonian Folkways

The Music History Project
Ep. 111 - V-Discs

The Music History Project

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 68:27


During World War II special records were sent overseas to the troops with the goal of boosting morale. These records which would later be called V (for victory) Discs have a fascinating history. This week on The Music History Project we will hear from two music historians about this unique program including one who remembers hearing the music being played over the PA system of his ship. We will also hear from a musician who was played on several of these records and a retailer in Europe who remembers selling them after the war ended.

Spybrary
Transcription by Kate Atkinson

Spybrary

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 8:00


Author CP Bennison gives us her thoughts on the spy novel Transcription by Kate Atkinson on the Spybrary Spy Book Podcast. Brush Pass Review. Transcription is a spy novel by British novelist Kate Atkinson, published in September 2018. The novel focuses on the activities of British orphan Juliet Armstrong throughout World War II and afterwards, and how she begins a career as a low-level transcriptionist for MI5, before rising through the ranks.

ABA Journal: Modern Law Library
Want to change a veteran's life through pro bono? There's a manual for that

ABA Journal: Modern Law Library

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 29:02


Since World War II, more than two million service members have been discharged from U.S. military service with a status other than "honorable discharge." Having a discharge that falls below a certain level can impact a veteran's access to pensions, GI Bill education benefits, health care, insurance or home loans, as well as carrying a stigma. But when a veteran's circumstances are given another look, there may have been mitigating factors that weren't considered at the time of their discharge. As we've gained more understanding of conditions like post-traumatic stress disorder and addiction, it's become clear that some behaviors once seen as prompted by malice or poor character might instead have been a symptom of mental illness or a rational response to trauma like military sexual assault. A discharge status could also have been given as an act of retaliation, or because of bias and discrimination. There can be a possible remedy: requesting a military discharge upgrade. For the first time in 30 years, there is a new manual to help guide veterans and their legal counsel through the process of requesting an upgrade, giving a fully updated look at a process that can be challenging to navigate. In this episode of the Modern Law Library, the ABA Journal's Lee Rawles speaks with Dana Montalto, one of the authors of the Military Discharge Upgrade Legal Practice Manual and an attorney and instructor with the Veterans Legal Clinic at Harvard Law's Legal Services Center. Getting a discharge upgrade can be life-changing for a veteran, and the work can be done by a pro bono attorney, says Montalto. It's not an area of the law that features in law school classes, which is one of the reasons there was a push to create this new resource. In this episode, Montalto shares how she became involved in veterans legal services, answers some common questions lawyers have when considering pro bono work in this area, and talks about the many people and organizations who took part in the yearslong process of creating this resource.  

Legal Talk Network - Law News and Legal Topics
Want to change a veteran's life through pro bono? There's a manual for that

Legal Talk Network - Law News and Legal Topics

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 29:02


Since World War II, more than two million service members have been discharged from U.S. military service with a status other than "honorable discharge." Having a discharge that falls below a certain level can impact a veteran's access to pensions, GI Bill education benefits, health care, insurance or home loans, as well as carrying a stigma. But when a veteran's circumstances are given another look, there may have been mitigating factors that weren't considered at the time of their discharge. As we've gained more understanding of conditions like post-traumatic stress disorder and addiction, it's become clear that some behaviors once seen as prompted by malice or poor character might instead have been a symptom of mental illness or a rational response to trauma like military sexual assault. A discharge status could also have been given as an act of retaliation, or because of bias and discrimination. There can be a possible remedy: requesting a military discharge upgrade. For the first time in 30 years, there is a new manual to help guide veterans and their legal counsel through the process of requesting an upgrade, giving a fully updated look at a process that can be challenging to navigate. In this episode of the Modern Law Library, the ABA Journal's Lee Rawles speaks with Dana Montalto, one of the authors of the Military Discharge Upgrade Legal Practice Manual and an attorney and instructor with the Veterans Legal Clinic at Harvard Law's Legal Services Center. Getting a discharge upgrade can be life-changing for a veteran, and the work can be done by a pro bono attorney, says Montalto. It's not an area of the law that features in law school classes, which is one of the reasons there was a push to create this new resource. In this episode, Montalto shares how she became involved in veterans legal services, answers some common questions lawyers have when considering pro bono work in this area, and talks about the many people and organizations who took part in the yearslong process of creating this resource.  

Free Library Podcast
Anthony Doerr | Cloud Cuckoo Land

Free Library Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 59:11


In conversation with John Freeman Anthony Doerr won the 2015 Pulitzer Prize for All the Light We Cannot See, ''a beautiful, daring, heartbreaking, oddly joyous novel'' (Seattle Times) about a blind French girl and a German boy navigating the carnage of World War II. Also the winner of the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Fiction and a National Book Award finalist, it spent more than two years on the New York Times bestseller list. Doerr's other work includes the novel About Grace, two story collections, and a memoir, for which he has earned five O. Henry Prizes, the Story Prize, and a Guggenheim Fellowship, among other honors. A novel of the interconnected tapestry of human experience, Cloud Cuckoo Land weaves together the lives of a fifteenth century orphan, an octogenarian in present-day Idaho, and a girl on an interstellar spacecraft decades from today. John Freeman was the editor of Granta until 2013. His books include Dictionary of the Undoing, How to Read a Novelist, Tales of Two Americas, and Tales of Two Planets. His poetry includes the collections Maps, The Park, and the forthcoming Wind, Trees. In 2021, he edited the anthologies There's a Revolution Outside, My Love with Tracy K. Smith, and The Penguin Book of the Modern American Short Story. An Executive Editor at Knopf, he teaches writing and literature classes at NYU. (recorded 10/19/2021)

Everything Everywhere Daily History Podcast

Subscribe to the podcast!  https://podfollow.com/everythingeverywhere/ Secrecy is a huge part of military success. You want to be able to communicate with your own forces without the enemy finding out what your plans are.  As America entered World War II, they were in need of a method of communication that couldn't be cracked by Germany or Japan. They found the answer they were looking for in the languages of Native Americans.  Learn more about Navajo Code Talkers and the other Native American languages used in World War II, on this episode of Everything Everywhere Daily. http://www.audibletrial.com/EverythingEverywhere -------------------------------- Associate Producers: Peter Bennett & Thor Thomsen   Become a supporter on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/everythingeverywhere   Discord Server: https://discord.gg/UkRUJFh   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/everythingeverywhere/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/everywheretrip Reddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/EEDailyPodcast/ Website: https://everything-everywhere.com/everything-everywhere-daily-podcast/  

Macroaggressions
#170: The Strategy of Tension

Macroaggressions

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 70:19


In the wake of World War II, Western Europe was in ruins while power vacuums were being filled with rulers loyal to American interests. Operation Gladio was launched to destabilize any regime that might pose a threat to those interests. The “strategy of tension” was a plan to control public opinion through the use of fear, propaganda, agent provocateurs, and terrorism to instill panic into the populace. This tactic did not end in the decades after the war, and it is certainly not limited to only happening in Europe. The 2017 Las Vegas shooting has all the fingerprints of a new Operation Gladio campaign that has been redirected at the American public instead of the Italians, so is the United States being targeted for destabilization now as a way of installing fear into the public much in the way it happened decades earlier? HYPOCRAZY New Book: https://amzn.to/3AFhfg2 Sponsors: Emergency Preparedness Food: www.preparewithmacroaggressions.com Chemical Free Body: https://www.chemicalfreebody.com and use promo code: MACRO Honey Colony: https://www.honeycolony.com and use promo code: MACRO C60 Purple Power: https://c60purplepower.com/ Promo Code: MACRO Wise Wolf Gold & Silver: www.Macroaggressions.gold Coin Bit App: https://coinbitsapp.com/?ref=0SPP0gjuI68PjGU89wUv Macroaggressions Merch Store: https://www.teepublic.com/stores/macroaggressions?ref_id=22530 LinkTree: linktr.ee/macroaggressions Books: Controlled Demolition on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08M21XKJ5 Purchase "The Octopus Of Global Control" Amazon: https://amzn.to/3aEFFcr Barnes & Noble: https://bit.ly/39vdKeQ Online Connection: Link Tree: https://linktr.ee/Macroaggressions Discord Link:  https://discord.gg/4mGzmcFexg Website: www.theoctopusofglobalcontrol.com Facebook: www.facebook.com/theoctopusofglobalcontrol Twitter: www.twitter.com/macroaggressio3 Twitter Handle: @macroaggressio3 YouTube: www.youtube.com/channel/UCn3GlVLKZtTkhLJkiuG7a-Q Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2LjTwu5 Email For Helium Miner: Email: theoctopusofglobalcontrol@protonmail.com

EECO Asks Why Podcast
161. Hero - Tom Domitrovich, Vice President of Technical Sales at Eaton

EECO Asks Why Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 33:26


Thomas Domitrovich is making a huge impact on industry and is leading the way at Eaton by educating so many people on the wonderful world of power.  He shares how his journey started in Pennsylvania and one of the first projects he ever did where he had to do short circuit calculations.  Now when most people do these they use software but Tom performed this by hand and absolutely nailed it!  He learned so much through that process and his passion for teaching others pours out in everything he does. His advice about recognizing our own capabilities and weaknesses is spot on.  It's from those weaknesses that we can all get stronger and Tom finds so much joy in helping people solve problems which helps them grow as professionals.  He loves to find time outside and any time he can strap on his Gibson Les Paul is a good day! Tom has a wonderful family that he shares some meaningful stories about dating back to World War II and no doubt they are true heroes themselves.  We salute Thomas for how he serves industry day in and day out and we are proud to call him our hero! Guest: Thomas Domitrovich - Vice President of Technical Sales at EatonIndustry War Story Submission: Send us a DM!FacebookInstagramHost: Chris GraingerExecutive Producer: Adam SheetsAudio/Video Editor: Andi ThrowerAdditional Resources:ThomasDomitrovich.comYouTube

Shedunnit
Agatha Christie Writes Alone (Queens of Crime At War 1)

Shedunnit

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 30:09


Agatha Christie had a very productive WW2. This is the start of Queens of Crime at War, a six part series looking at what the best writers from the golden age of detective fiction did once that period came to an end with the start of the Second World War. This episode also marks the start of the Shedunnit Pledge Drive! I'm aiming to add 100 new members to the Shedunnit Book Club by the end of 2021, with the aim of producing more mini series like this one. If you'd like to be part of that and feel able to offer some support, please visit shedunnitshow.com/pledgedrive. Thanks to my guests: — J.C. Bernthal is an Agatha Christie scholar and the author of Queering Agatha Christie. His website is jcbernthal.com and he is on Twitter as @jcbernthal — Martin Edwards is a crime writer and the author of, among many other books, The Golden Age of Murder. Find out more about all his work at martinedwardsbooks.com or via his Twitter as @medwardsbooks There are no spoilers in this episode. Books referenced: — The Golden Age of Murder by Martin Edwards — Agatha Christie Goes To War edited by Rebecca Mills and J.C. Bernthal — And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie — Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie — Murder Must Appetise by Harry Keating — The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie — The ABC Murders  by Agatha Christie — Death on the Nile by Agatha Christie — One, Two Buckle, My Shoe by Agatha Christie — An Autobiography by Agatha Christie — Sad Cypress by Agatha Christie — Evil Under the Sun by Agatha Christie — N or M?  by Agatha Christie — The Body in the Library by Agatha Christie — The Secret Adversary by Agatha Christie — Partners in Crime by Agatha Christie — Bletchley Park: The Codebreakers of Station X by Michael Smith — The Moving Finger by Agatha Christie — Curtain by Agatha Christie — Sleeping Murder by Agatha Christie — The Labours of Hercules by Agatha Christie — Taken at the Flood by Agatha Christie — A Murder is Announced by Agatha Christie — The Hollow  by Agatha Christie — Five Little Pigs by Agatha Christie Thanks to today's sponsor: — Girlfriend Collective. Get $25 off your $100+ purchase of sustainable, ethically made activewear at girlfriend.com/shedunnit. — Milk Bar. Get $10 off any order of $50 or more when you go to milkbarstore.com/shedunnit. To be the first to know about future developments with the podcast, sign up for the newsletter at shedunnitshow.com/newsletter. Find a full transcript of this episode at shedunnitshow.com/agathachristiewritesalonetranscript. The podcast is on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram as @ShedunnitShow, and you can find it in all major podcast apps. Make sure you're subscribed so you don't miss the next episode. Click here to do that now in your app of choice. The original music for this series, "The Case Of The Black Stormcloud", was created by Martin Zaltz Austwick. Find out more about his work at martinzaltzaustwick.wordpress.com. Links to Blackwell's are affiliate links, meaning that the podcast receives a small commission when you purchase a book there (the price remains the same for you). Blackwell's is a UK independent bookselling chain that ships internationally at no extra charge.

Leonard Lopate at Large on WBAI Radio in New York
Chude Pam Allen & Steven Hiatt on Reluctant Reformers: Racism & Social Reform Movements in the US

Leonard Lopate at Large on WBAI Radio in New York

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 54:54


(10/19/21) Chude Pam Allen and Robert Allen's new book Reluctant Reformers: Racism and Social Reform Movements in the United States, an updated edition of the latter's iconic 1974 title, explores the racism that drove the US political system from the early 19th century to the end of World War II. In addition to a forward by New York Times columnist Jamelle Bouie, this new printing includes a postscript describing the Black freedom movement of the 1960s and the central role it has played in the development of today's radical social justice movements. Join us for a conversation with Chude Pam Allen and the book's editor Steven Hiatt in this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large on WBAI.

Savage Minds Podcast
Haim Bresheeth-Žabner

Savage Minds Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 105:43


Filmmaker, photographer and film studies scholar Haim Bresheeth-Žabner discusses his latest book, An Army Like No Other: How the Israel Defense Force Made a Nation (2020) analysing the IDF within the larger project political project of Zionism. Reflecting upon his parents who survived Auschwitz, his birth in Cinecittà in a displaced persons’ camp, to his childhood and formative years in Israel growing up in an Arab house in Jaffa, Bresheeth-Žabner explains how his life and family heritage have informed his political values with a deep understanding of being displaced. Bresheeth-Žabner criticises the unnecessary formation of the Israeli state to resolve the refugee crisis after the Second World War while contending that the creation of Israel was emblematic of a state “where the value system of the army becomes the value system of a nation” noting that the IDF was never a defensive army but instead one of aggression. Discussing how international powers led to the dispossession of an entire nation of its home and the conterminous destruction that is connected to the Nakba (النكبة‎), Bresheeth-Žabner notes how Zionism was implemented to control power bases within the Middle East. Discussing recent accusations of anti-Semitism within the British Labour Party, Bresheeth-Žabner ridicules the tactics of aligning criticism of Israel with anti-Semitism and details how he reported himself to the Labour Party as “anti-Semitic” according to its regulations two years before resigning from the party. Get full access to Savage Minds at savageminds.substack.com/subscribe

Changing the Rules
Episode 90: Learn More About The Luckiest People in the World, Guest Ray Loewe

Changing the Rules

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 26:19


Guest Co-host:  Bill Hughes:  w.hughes@verizon.net Transcription:Kris Parsons00:02Welcome to changing the rules, a weekly podcast about people who are living their best life and how you can figure out how to do it too. Join us with your lively host Ray Loewe, better known as the luckiest guy in the world.Ray Loewe00:15Good morning, everybody, and welcome again to changing the rules, changing the rules as a podcast where we try and showcase some of the luckiest people in the world. And remember, the luckiest people in the world are those people who take control of their own lives, design them to their own specs, and then live them under their own terms. And in the process of doing that, they take all those rules that they've been saddled with all their lives and revamp them a little bit so that they can make them work for them and not be restrictions and impediments to the life they want to live. So last week, we started doing something a little different. We have a co-host, co-host, Bill who's and say, Hi, Bill, hello, okay, and Bill decided to turn the tables on me last time. And he decided to interview me as opposed to letting me interview him. And we ran out of time because evidently, I have more to say than anybody wants to listen to. And, and so we're going to continue this week. So uh so Bill is a life planning consultant. That's not a good word to describe him, but it kind of does the best that we can. He is a coach, and he helps people revamp their lives and make themselves feel luckier and luckier. So Bill, thanks for joining us. And it's your show. So I'm, I'm at your mercy.Bill Hughes01:50Oh, that's good to know. Even though somehow rather, I think the tables will end up getting turned once again. I guess, continuing on in part two of this. Something has been coming up more and more frequently is this whole notion of changing the rules? So what rules can we be changing?Ray Loewe02:10Well, the rules you change are the rules that don't fit you. Okay? You know, rules do two things. They tell you what you have to do. And they tell you what you can't do. Okay, now, some of these rules are pretty good. Okay. You know why I thought this idea of quarantine during the heat of COVID was a pretty good idea. I mean, I don't I didn't want to go out there and catch it. So when somebody told me that was the rule, I decided that was my rule. But you know, there, there were some rules that were set up when we were back in elementary school that I've rejected over time, I had a teacher once upon a time who set a rule for me, and she said, Ray, you're gonna do fine in life, just spend a lot of time correcting your mistakes and your weaknesses. Okay, right. And guess what I did that for a while I accepted that as one of my rules. And I wound up with a whole lot of really strong weaknesses. But they never really improved, like my strengths did. So one of the roles I changed is, you kind of ignore your weaknesses, and you build on your strengths, and you ally yourself with other people who are really good at the things that you were not so good at. So the whole idea is you got to look at what works for you. And you got to look at what you're going to accept in what you're not going to accept.ill Hughes03:33So that gets to the whole notion of really changing mindset. It Yeah, it's this, this idea that, that you go along to get along, and then all of a sudden, one day, you realize that that's not in your best interest. I mean, even with the example that you gave, one of the things that people could, and I believe actually did do during the shutdown, and all the restrictions that were imposed on us, wasn't it, it caused us to become more introspective. And in that process, their mindset changed. How did yours change?Ray Loewe04:13Okay, well, let me give you an example of that. And one of the things that COVID did to us is said, Oh, we can't go out and meet with each other. Well, I missed that a lot. Okay, one of the things that seems to drive me that makes me happy and being happy is one of the mindsets of the luckiest people in the world, is that I like to go out and talk to people on a regular day on a regular basis. I need the feedback that other people give me, I need them to challenge me. I need to know what are they doing that I might want to steal from them and do too, okay. So one of the things that we did is we had Virtual coffee and cocktails. And it's still going on and every Thursday morning, a group of us that can be as few as three or four, or as many as 10 or 12. And we have a conversation now we just find out what other people's view of the world is. And we never know who's going to show up. And we do that for cocktails.Bill Hughes05:23And the interesting thing about that is that invariably, somebody shows up, that has an interesting story.Ray Loewe05:31Always. And, and, and it is amazing to me that it comes out of the woodwork. You know you sit there and you say, Oh, you know, it's gonna be boring, and they're never boring because people are never boring. And if you think about your friends, you think about the fact that all of a sudden, you're shut off from them, and you can't talk to them, and you can't reap the joy that they bring you. You got to do something. So we changed the rules.Bill Hughes06:03And then the other interesting thing about that, that I really appreciate is the fact that the randomness of it, the random folks that show up, you know, being locked away for a period of time, really, you don't realize how grateful we need to be with some of the random occurrences of people that come into our lives, and have the opportunity to change things. And so that that really gets to the whole notion of this community that we're building.Ray Loewe06:34Well, hopefully, okay, so let's back up again, a little bit, let's, let's talk about these podcasts that we're doing. Okay. One of the things about the podcast, again, is it's a question of bringing people into your lives, that have different mindsets and different ways of thinking about things. And you don't have to like everything they say. And you don't even have to listen to everything that they say but if you take the time to be observant at all of a sudden, you find out that there are a whole lot of people out there doing exciting things that maybe you want to do. Remember, last week, we talked about the barrier that you have of people expanding their lives and, and that some people just never wanted to leave their job because there was a comfort level, right. And a lot of that is because they didn't have the opportunity to talk to some of these people that are just doing incredibly interesting things. Okay. And when you do have the opportunity to do that, all of a sudden your life becomes fulfilled you steal things from other people.Bill Hughes07:41Borrow, I like the word borrow.Ray Loewe07:44Well, borrow is temporary, and there's nothing temporary about this.Bill Hughes07:48You're not gonna get it back, you're not going to get it back. Ray Loewe07:50Once I get an idea from you, Bill is gone. Right? Bill Hughes07:54Well, what makes you think mine aren't borrowed from somewhere else?Ray Loewe07:57Well, they probably are, and what's wrong with that. And the whole idea is that there are exciting things to do out there. So my wife, Sandy, and I decided early in the game that we wanted to do some traveling, as we got more time and I was able to step away from the financial planning business. And, you know, we started with a short bucket list. You know, we wanted to spend some time in Europe, we wanted to go down to South America a little bit. But the next thing we know is we're meeting people on these trips. And we met somebody who had been in Antarctica well guess what, we've been Antarctica now and up close and personal with a whole lot of penguins. And then you sit there and you say, Okay, I haven't been to Australia yet. And you talk to people that you meet along the way and they tell you how great a trip this is. And then the next thing you do is you incorporate it into your life. So people are really, really important part of being lucky, in my opinion.Bill Hughes09:08The other thing that you mentioned that I always brings back the story of the penguins, for sure. But it goes to something deeper because why don't you real quickly share that penguin story for a second for those that might not have heard it.Ray Loewe09:23Well, there are life lessons that occur on these adventures if you open yourself to them. And if you look, we were in Antarctica and Antarctica is an expedition type of trip and you're on a ship and you're based on a ship and what you do is usually early in the morning you get up and you get on a Zodiac and you go to some point on land and then you see things like penguins or whales or in some cases people that are stationed there and then you come back and you have lunch and you take a nap and you go out again in the afternoon and you can do this because it's light 24 hours a day, okay? So you're not impeded by anything. And most people took every one of these excursions because it's a pricey trip, you're going a long way. And one day, there was a couple we had dinner with the night before. And we noticed they weren't on the morning excursion. And I caught them at noon at lunch. And I said to where were you guys? And it was kind of a sheepish grin on people. And they said, Well, we looked at the hill, we had to walk up today to see the penguins we were supposed to see. And we didn't think we could make it so we didn't go. And I did this doubletake. I mean, that surprised me. And I didn't have to say another thing. And they came back and they said, Well, we made a mistake, we waited too long to take this trip.Bill Hughes10:59Yeah, that really that that that that particular life lesson, so to speak, I know had a big impact on you going even in this direction, because how many people that you worked within retirement planning that were putting things off until they had enough money?Ray Loewe11:18Yeah, and that's the tendency, you know, I'll do that after I retire, when I have more money and when I have more time. And the lesson that I learned here is that you're sometimes waiting until you have enough money means that you're not going to be able to do something that you really wanted to do. And the same is true with time. You know, unfortunately, this process called aging, which by the way, I think is the ultimate life sport is aging. Okay. And it does things to you, you know uh people have a stroke people get conditions, and they no longer can do things that they want to do. And part of feeling lucky is to head off regrets it's to head them off early. And to say, what are the things that if I didn't get a chance to do I would, it would bother me.Bill Hughes12:14Right, but that gets back to your list again to and taking the introspective time necessary to kind of figure out what, for lack of a better term what your bucket list is.Ray Loewe12:24Okay, so let's, let's take a minute and talk about planning here because there's no substitute to sitting down and spending some time planning. And I think the planning has to be kind of a quarterly thing. And it only has to take an hour or two each quarter, it doesn't have to be long. But somewhere you got to sit down, and you got to say, okay, based on what I know, now, based on my experiences, what do I want to do, okay, and make the list and you start figuring out what's important, what you're going to do and what you're going to put off doing. The second part of that option is to talk to a whole lot of people or read or do research of some kind, and start to figure out what are the things that you never thought you might do that might all of a sudden become interesting, and you add them to your bucket list so that your life keeps expanding, it gets larger and larger and larger the day you start to see your life get smaller, you're going the wrong way, you know, and this is like, you've got to grow and to be happy and to be content. And the day you start pulling in the horns is not a good thing.Bill Hughes13:35Right? Well, and that that gets back to going back in time a bit to some of the things that you've encountered. And one of those things that you encountered along that pathway was a coaching operation called Strategic CoachRay Loewe13:49It had a very significant offer on a very significant part of my life. So uh So let me tell you another story. So we sat around, we used to go to Chicago every three months, and we'd sit around in a coaching group and we had a coach who would teach us some things, but the biggest thing that you got out of it is we had 35-40 people that showed up every time and you had discussions with them. So I'm sitting there with a guy sitting next to me who's a real realtor. And he declares that he's going to run a marathon and like a dummy. I said, Okay, you finish your marathon, I will go back to competitive swimming, which I had dumped for 30 years after college By the way, and I will win a national championship. Now I have no idea where that came from, except that I figured this guy would never finish this marathon. Well, to make a long story short, he finished the marathon and I had to go back and redo this part of my life. Now that was one of those life events that changed where you go because swimming right now is part of my regiment it's trying to stay in shape, trying to stay healthy, is part of that goal of reaching maybe 100. And whether I actually reached 100 or not, is maybe not relevant. But I want to have that in my mind. Like, that's part of what I want to do and, and the only way you're going to do that is to physically stay in shape and take care of things.Bill Hughes15:31And well there was more involved in it than that, too, because I know that even though people say swimming is like riding a bicycle, once you've learned it, you don't forget about it. At the end of the day, competitive swimming is another whole ballgame. So how did you go about the research necessary? And what steps did you end up taking a day to get yourself in shape to take care of that?Ray Loewe15:55I hate to work out, you have to understand that I am a potato chip and ice cream guy on the couch in front of the TV. And if I were left to what, you know, just felt comfortable during the day, that's what I would do. The fact that I decided to do this is the only way I'm going to do this is to mouth off, and then have accountability coaches. And you know, the value of an accountability coach when you say you're going to do something and you got somebody who's going to get on your case, if you don't, right, right. And, and the other thing that I did I know that I knew that I had to do was I had to go out and hire a coach, I wasn't going to do this on myself. So I actually found a kid's group. And I wound up working out with the 12 and 13-year-olds who I can barely keep up with, by the way. Right? Right. Okay. And you get that support group and, and again, that's part of a community about feeling lucky and being lucky. You have to have others involved with this if it's gonna make it work. So anyway, that's what happened and he every year, every five years, you become the baby and your age group, you get a competitive advantage because my wife wanted to travel and you can't work out with the same intensity when you're on the Nile River in Egypt. I would not want to swim in the Nile for anything, okay? And so you change the rules, and you figure out what's going to work for you to allow you to do those things that are important to you. Bill Hughes17:36Right, well, you know, that gets back to this whole thing too, because I know we spent quite a bit of time talking about getting things off the list as well as on the list and making sure that things get done before you can't do them. But you had another story to that kind of interested me it was I guess your trip to Africa and your plane ride.Ray Loewe17:58Oh, the plane that was not going to make it.Bill Hughes18:01Yeah, right. It was a 1940s vintage plane.Ray Loewe18:05Well yeah, you know, again, this is part of what you get if you keep your mind and your eyes open. And it took somebody else to pull this story out of me. But the fact is we're on a safari and I was excited about this and I think Sandy was excited and apprehensive about it because we're going to Africa we're going to see leopards and lions and rhinos and they're going to be up close personal so when we had to fly into Johannesburg to do this and we fly in a normal airliner you know we get there we're wandering around the terminal to get to meet our group and as we walk down the concourse, Sandy looks out the window and there's this old plane sitting there and the old plane is pretty old. And she says I hope that's not our plane that that that planes too old to fly it should be retired. So needless to say, we meet our group and the first thing our guide says is she says, Let me introduce you to your aircraft. And she points to this point. And she says, this plane flew magnificent missions during World War Two and we figure uh oh it all over you know, we're gonna die on this trip. And later she said this plane was commissioned in 1941, the year before we were born. But here's the end result of this the aircraft was repurposed. It was repurposed to do a job and it was repurposed based on its strengths. It was never going to fly across country or across the ocean anymore. Okay. But it was a wonderful plane for taking a small group of us and being able to see all the scenery below us. It was able to land in small spots. And we were told later that it could fly on one engine if it had to. And it could land on no engines if it had to. And the end result when we got back is the plane did a great job of doing what it was supposed to do. Now, I'm sitting in Chicago, talking to a friend of mine later, and kind of telling the story. And she said, you know, what a great parable, if you think about it as a parable, because here was an airplane that was, should have been retired. In Sandy's words it should have been retired, it was old, you know, what's it going to do anymore, but somebody looked at his strengths. And somebody said, you know, you can rebuild this, you can repurpose it, and this plane could have additional life. And that is so true of the luckiest people in the world, too. And they do this, they sit there and instead of saying, My life is over, I've reached a certain age, and I'm just going to coast, they look at what are the strengths in their lives that they had? How can they be repurposed? How can they still have a mission in life? And how can they still bring value to other people? And actually, that meeting in Chicago took that story, and it made it have meaning to me. And there's a wonderful part of my life.Bill Hughes21:21Well, you know, the thing is that it gets back to the fact that even if you think you, you can't, you, maybe you can, but the process is getting there working through some of the strange things that you can contribute back. I mean, we, the lady, the cupcake lady with is a great example of that. I mean, for all intents and purposes, wants to tell that a little bit.Ray Loewe21:43Yeah, again, one of our podcasts was a young lady by the name of Ruth. And Ruth had a major life event, she had a very strange kind of stroke, it was a stroke that occurred kind of paralyzed her in the back. And one day, she's down at the beach, and she's having a great day, and the next day, she can't move. And after months and months of rehab, and realizing she can't do her job anymore. Unlike others who would give up, Ruth sat down and said, What do I love to do, and what can I still do, and she loved to cook and bake. And she limited herself to muffins, soups, etc, she started a small catering business on her own, okay, and she took she repurposed her life, she's bringing value to people, she's making a living, you know, she's still got some ups and downs, figuring out where she's going and stuff like that. But again, it's this whole concept of, you don't have to give up when you get a certain age, you can still be good at something. And in some cases, you can actually be the best there ever was, right? Because we get rid of the junk,Bill Hughes22:58right? But that's a great example of the people that show up on those calls, for sure. And many of the people you individually isolate and identify and bring into the podcast. So I think that that that's really, the value of this community is expanding beyond what you might be, if you're a natural introvert, you know, being able to, to get additional focus, and begin to ask those questions.Ray Loewe23:27Yeah, and, and, you know, part of what we're doing here, what we're trying to do is start with the podcast and say, you know these are 20-25 minutes long, occasionally go longer or a little shorter. But the idea is, meet somebody who is happy with their status and life who's going forward, regardless of their age, okay? And take a listen to it and say, Is this me? Are there things in here that I can use that would motivate me, and help them or use them to help expand your life and where you're going, and we do one of these a week I, I'll tell you a Bill, they're the most motivating things in the world. For me, when I get done with one of these interviews, I am so excited, I can't sit down for a while. Absolutely, and, and coffee and cocktails. And then the other event that we're trying to do is we're trying to do some Friends Connection events periodically.Bill Hughes24:22And we have one coming up. And we have one coming up.Ray Loewe24:26And we're going to have coffee together at a roastery of one of our friends and members. And he's going to show us how he roast coffee. And more important though, it's a chance to sit there and talk to people that we haven't seen face to face for a while. Right? And we got terminated from a trip that we're going to take to Greece before this COVID thing that we'll be back because again, the whole idea is how can we meet exciting people, whether we know them already or they're new or their a friends of friends, and use their database use their experience to expand our lives. And that's what this is all about. The whole idea is to live life to the fullest, to feel great about it to be happy to know that you're bringing value to other people. And that's the mission of what we're trying to do. And so join the luckiest people in the world.Bill Hughes25:25Absolutely. Thanks, Ray, yeahRay Loewe25:27We're done.Bill Hughes25:28We're done for the time being.Ray Loewe25:31Okay, so we're gonna come back next week. And Bill is still going to be our co-host. We're going to have a different guest, hopefully, next week and we're going to get a different, luckiest person in the world. And we're going to get their perspective on life and where they're going, and we're going to see what we can steal. Absolutely. All right. So Taylor, sign us off, and we'll see you all next week.Kris Parsons25:56Thank you for listening to changing the rules, a weekly podcast about people who are living their best life, and how you can figure out how to do that too. Join us with your lively host of Ray Loewe, better known as the luckiest guy in the world. 

Trees A Crowd
Field Maple: Is it a BIRD (tongue)? Is it (an experimental Second World War) PLANE (cargo drop)? No! It's the colourful corky bungs of the SAPINDACEAE!

Trees A Crowd

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 14:43


Our forty-fourth tree, Field Maple (Acer campestre); the sole truly native member of an incredibly colourful family. Their branches have supported Roman vines, the fruits have inspired modern military design, and the wood is one of the most sonorous - inspiring everyone from Stradivarius to Fender. You can drink its sap, make salads from its leaves; but the best way for your senses to enjoy the Field, and indeed all Maples, is simple to open one's eyes at the end of Autumn. Unforgettable foliage; a stunner. More from David Oakes as he uproots the secrets and stories beneath the 56(ish) Native Trees of the British Isles can be found at: https://www.treesacrowd.fm/56Trees/ Weekly episodes available early AND bonus content made free to forage by "Subscribtion Squirrels" on our Patreon. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Big Seance Podcast
198 - The Second Empire Strikes Back - Big Seance

Big Seance Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 69:01


  Kaleb Higgins purchased a three-story 1889 Second Empire home in Saint Louis. It needed lots of love and many repairs, but has a spectacular mansard roof! It was originally built by Charles S. Brown, who co-owned the Hall and Brown Woodworking Machine Company. Kaleb started The 2nd Empire Strikes Back YouTube channel to document the whole restoration, and it has become incredibly popular! In this episode he shares his passion for the history of the home, learning about the original family who occupied it, and how you can help him bring the house back to life! And is it possible that a viewer discovered a ghost in the home? Plus, this episode marks the return of Tim Prasil with a brand NEW installment of Spectral Edition! Visit BigSeance.com/198 for more info.   Other Listening Options Direct Download Link   In this episode: Episode Teaser :00 Intro :54 Remember our friend Tim Prasil and the Spectral Edition? Stay tuned after the interview for a brand new installment! 1:37 Some background on Kaleb Higgins and his popular YouTube channel, The Second Empire Strikes Back. 2:13 What drew Kaleb to purchasing this 1889 Second Empire house in the Saint Louis Place neighborhood? 6:11 The house's current condition and what goes into restoring it. 8:27 The Charles S. Brown family, the Hall and Brown Woodworking Machine Company, historic dog tags, and the history of the house. 10:50 Kaleb is truly bringing something back to life. A home that has a history, a history connected to humans who had their own lives and passions, and their own legacies. Kaleb is doing this with passion and empathy, and he's sharing it with the world by letting us hang out with him while he does his magic. 14:03 How do you balance time and work in the house with creating the content? 15:06 Getting feedback and support from viewers. 17:14 Finding and returning letters from World War II. 19:15 The search for Hall and Brown machinery and historic interior photos from the home. 20:51 “Good bones” and a great historic photo of the Brown family in front of the house! 24:40 The beauty and purpose of a mansard roof! 26:37 Making a connection with the past. 28:25 "It's always been more than a house." 32:04 Does a ghost reside in the home? 33:19 Kim's Second Empire Strikes Back Vlogs 38:11 Wallpaper, contractors, financing, and when will we get to see the finished product? 40:25 How can you support Kaleb and the Second Empire Strikes Back Project? 45:16 Kaleb Higgins the Artist 47:25 Kaleb's final thoughts and where to find Second Empire Strikes Back! 51:49 Railroad EXTRA #1 - A brand NEW Spectral Edition with Tim Prasil! 55:34 A special THANK YOU to Patreon supporters at the Super Paranerd and Parlor Guest level! 1:05:25 Outro 1:07:39   For more on The Second Empire Strikes Back YouTube Kim's YouTube Patreon Facebook Instagram Twitter   The Big Seance Podcast can be found right here, on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Pandora, Spotify, TuneIn Radio, Stitcher, Amazon Music, and iHeart Radio. Please subscribe and share with a fellow paranerd! Do you have any comments or feedback? Please contact me at Patrick@BigSeance.com. Consider recording your voice feedback directly from your device on my SpeakPipe page! You can also call the show and leave feedback at (775) 583-5563 (or 7755-TELL-ME). I would love to include your voice feedback in a future show. The candles are already lit, so come on in and join the séance!

Full Disclosure with Ben Nakhaima
Nina Bergman talks Hell Hath No Fury

Full Disclosure with Ben Nakhaima

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 30:58


Actress Nina Bergman joins the podcast to talk about her upcoming World War II thriller, Hell Hath No Fury. Ben and Nina discuss the Fury-Wilder fight, filming during the pandemic, her travels from Europe, breaking into the entertainment industry at 16, finding fulfillment in your work, and more! Make sure to follow @bennakhaima to stay up to date. Visit FullDisclosureWithBen.com to listen to every episode of the podcast. Subscribe to the podcast via: Apple Podcasts Spotify Stitcher Google Android

Fandom Podcast Network
True Believers MCU Podcast EP.34: CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE FIRST AVENGER (2011). Infinity Saga Timeline Re-Watch.

Fandom Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 105:20


True Believers MCU Podcast EP.34: CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE FIRST AVENGER (2011). Infinity Saga Timeline Re-Watch. Welcome to the Fandom Podcast Network's TRUE BELIEVERS Marvel MCU Infinity Saga Chronological Timeline Re-Watch Podcast! Here on the TRUE BELIEVERS Marvel MCU Chronological Infinity Saga Timeline Re-Watch, we will re-watch the MCU in Chronological order! We will discuss our re-watch reactions and connections to the original Marvel comics and how they relate to the past, current and future MCU Universe. Your TRUE BELIEVERS Marvel MCU Podcast hosts will discuss CAPTAIN AMERICA: The First Avenger (2011). Captain America: The First Avenger is a superhero film based on the Marvel Comics character Captain America. Produced by Marvel Studios and distributed by Paramount Pictures, it is the fifth film in the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU). The film was directed by Joe Johnston, written by Christopher Markus and Stephen McFeely, and stars Chris Evans as Steve Rogers / Captain America alongside Tommy Lee Jones, Hugo Weaving, Hayley Atwell, Sebastian Stan, Dominic Cooper, Neal McDonough, Derek Luke, and Stanley Tucci. During World War II, Steve Rogers, a frail man, is transformed into the super-soldier Captain America and must stop the Red Skull from using the Tesseract as an energy source for world domination.   Warning *SPOILERS AHEAD*! The FPN TRUE BELIEVERS Marvel MCU Podcast will explore the MCU universe in detail, from the movies, TV series and comics. Fandom Podcast Network Contact Information True Believers: A Marvel & MCU Podcast Fandom Facebook Group: Are you enjoying our True Believers Marvel MCU Podcast Discussion? Then join our Facebook group: "True Believers: A Marvel & MCU Podcast Fandom Group" Link: https://www.facebook.com/groups/143313841014405 - The FANDOM PODCAST NETWORK YouTube Channel:  https://www.youtube.com/c/FandomPodcastNetwork - Master feed for all FPNet audio podcasts: http://fpnet.podbean.com/ - Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Fandompodcastnetwork - Email: fandompodcastnetwork@gmail.com - Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/fandompodcastnetwork/ - Twitter: @fanpodnetwork / https://twitter.com/fanpodnetwork FPN True Believers Marvel MCU Host & Guest Contact Info: - Kyle Wagner on Twitter: @AKyleW / Instagram: @Akylefandom - Kevin Reitzel on Twitter & Instagram: @spartan_phoenix - Drew Kaplan on social media: Twitter: @DrewKaplan /  Instagram: @DrewKaps MCU Maven: https://www.instagram.com/mcumaven/ MCU Maven Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mcumaven MCU Maven on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCaMuephi30udjNydbt4ugHQ Star Wars Maven on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/StarWarsMaven Star Wars Maven Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/StarWarsMaven Star Wars Maven Twitter: @StarWarsMaven Star Wars Maven Instagram: @StarWarsMaven Email: StarWarsMaven@gmail.com   - Tee Public Fandom Podcast Network Store:  https://www.teepublic.com/stores/fandom-podcast-network

New Books in History
David J. Mozina, "Knotting the Banner: Ritual and Relationship in Daoist Practice" (U Hawaii Press, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 72:37


Mozina's Knotting the Banner: Ritual and Relationship in Daoist Practice (U Hawaii Press, 2021) weaves together ethnography, textual analysis, photography, and film, inviting readers into the religious world of Daoist practice in today's south China by exploring one particular ritual called the Banner Rite to Summon Sire Yin, as practiced in central Hunan province. Performed as the first public ritual by a Daoist apprentice at his own ordination, the Banner Rite seeks to summon Celestial Lord Yin Jiao, the ferocious martial deity who supplies the exorcistic power to protect and heal bodies and spaces from illness and misfortune. A lot is at stake. If the apprentice cannot successfully summon the deity in front of his village community and the pantheon of gods in attendance, he would not be able to be ordained that day and would risk losing the confidence of villagers who might hire him in the future. Through a close reading of the ritual in its social and historical contexts, Mozina shows that the efficacy of rituals like the Banner Rite is driven by the ability of a master to form an intimate relationship with exorcistic deities like Yin Jiao, which is far from guaranteed. Mozina reveals the ways in which such ritual claims are rooted in the great liturgical movements of the Song and Yuan dynasties (960–1368) and how they are performed these days amid the social and economic pressures of rural life in the post-Mao era. Knotting the Banner will be of interest to students and scholars of Daoism and Chinese religion and will also appeal to historians of religion and anthropologists, especially those working on ritual. Noelle Giuffrida is a professor and curator of Asian art at the School of Art and the David Owsley Museum of Art at Ball State University. Her research focuses on Chinese art, particularly the history of collecting and exhibiting premodern works in American museums after World War II and the visual culture of Daoism in late imperial China. Her teaching and curatorial experience extend broadly both temporally—from Neolithic to contemporary—and cross-culturally to China, Korea, and Japan, as well as to South and Southeast Asia. Her book Separating Sheep from Goats: Sherman E. Lee's Collecting of Chinese Art in Postwar America (University of California Press, 2018) uses American curator and museum director Sherman E. Lee (1918–2008) as a lens through which to investigate the history of collecting and exhibiting Chinese art. Email her at ngiuffrida@bsu.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books Network
David J. Mozina, "Knotting the Banner: Ritual and Relationship in Daoist Practice" (U Hawaii Press, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 72:37


Mozina's Knotting the Banner: Ritual and Relationship in Daoist Practice (U Hawaii Press, 2021) weaves together ethnography, textual analysis, photography, and film, inviting readers into the religious world of Daoist practice in today's south China by exploring one particular ritual called the Banner Rite to Summon Sire Yin, as practiced in central Hunan province. Performed as the first public ritual by a Daoist apprentice at his own ordination, the Banner Rite seeks to summon Celestial Lord Yin Jiao, the ferocious martial deity who supplies the exorcistic power to protect and heal bodies and spaces from illness and misfortune. A lot is at stake. If the apprentice cannot successfully summon the deity in front of his village community and the pantheon of gods in attendance, he would not be able to be ordained that day and would risk losing the confidence of villagers who might hire him in the future. Through a close reading of the ritual in its social and historical contexts, Mozina shows that the efficacy of rituals like the Banner Rite is driven by the ability of a master to form an intimate relationship with exorcistic deities like Yin Jiao, which is far from guaranteed. Mozina reveals the ways in which such ritual claims are rooted in the great liturgical movements of the Song and Yuan dynasties (960–1368) and how they are performed these days amid the social and economic pressures of rural life in the post-Mao era. Knotting the Banner will be of interest to students and scholars of Daoism and Chinese religion and will also appeal to historians of religion and anthropologists, especially those working on ritual. Noelle Giuffrida is a professor and curator of Asian art at the School of Art and the David Owsley Museum of Art at Ball State University. Her research focuses on Chinese art, particularly the history of collecting and exhibiting premodern works in American museums after World War II and the visual culture of Daoism in late imperial China. Her teaching and curatorial experience extend broadly both temporally—from Neolithic to contemporary—and cross-culturally to China, Korea, and Japan, as well as to South and Southeast Asia. Her book Separating Sheep from Goats: Sherman E. Lee's Collecting of Chinese Art in Postwar America (University of California Press, 2018) uses American curator and museum director Sherman E. Lee (1918–2008) as a lens through which to investigate the history of collecting and exhibiting Chinese art. Email her at ngiuffrida@bsu.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in East Asian Studies
David J. Mozina, "Knotting the Banner: Ritual and Relationship in Daoist Practice" (U Hawaii Press, 2021)

New Books in East Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 72:37


Mozina's Knotting the Banner: Ritual and Relationship in Daoist Practice (U Hawaii Press, 2021) weaves together ethnography, textual analysis, photography, and film, inviting readers into the religious world of Daoist practice in today's south China by exploring one particular ritual called the Banner Rite to Summon Sire Yin, as practiced in central Hunan province. Performed as the first public ritual by a Daoist apprentice at his own ordination, the Banner Rite seeks to summon Celestial Lord Yin Jiao, the ferocious martial deity who supplies the exorcistic power to protect and heal bodies and spaces from illness and misfortune. A lot is at stake. If the apprentice cannot successfully summon the deity in front of his village community and the pantheon of gods in attendance, he would not be able to be ordained that day and would risk losing the confidence of villagers who might hire him in the future. Through a close reading of the ritual in its social and historical contexts, Mozina shows that the efficacy of rituals like the Banner Rite is driven by the ability of a master to form an intimate relationship with exorcistic deities like Yin Jiao, which is far from guaranteed. Mozina reveals the ways in which such ritual claims are rooted in the great liturgical movements of the Song and Yuan dynasties (960–1368) and how they are performed these days amid the social and economic pressures of rural life in the post-Mao era. Knotting the Banner will be of interest to students and scholars of Daoism and Chinese religion and will also appeal to historians of religion and anthropologists, especially those working on ritual. Noelle Giuffrida is a professor and curator of Asian art at the School of Art and the David Owsley Museum of Art at Ball State University. Her research focuses on Chinese art, particularly the history of collecting and exhibiting premodern works in American museums after World War II and the visual culture of Daoism in late imperial China. Her teaching and curatorial experience extend broadly both temporally—from Neolithic to contemporary—and cross-culturally to China, Korea, and Japan, as well as to South and Southeast Asia. Her book Separating Sheep from Goats: Sherman E. Lee's Collecting of Chinese Art in Postwar America (University of California Press, 2018) uses American curator and museum director Sherman E. Lee (1918–2008) as a lens through which to investigate the history of collecting and exhibiting Chinese art. Email her at ngiuffrida@bsu.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/east-asian-studies

Tell Me What to Google
A Titanic Hero at Dunkirk: Charles Lightoller

Tell Me What to Google

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 37:28


Charles Lightoller was the Second Officer on board the ill-fated maiden voyage of the H.M.S. Titanic. Only saved by an exploding boiler, he went on to a notable life and may have been responsible for saving hundreds of lives during the World War II evacuation of Dunkirk. In this episode, we talk about the Titanic, Charles Lightoller and the heroic actions in Dunkirk, France. Then we invite Comedian and Circus Performer Jonathan Burns on to play the quick quiz!   To see Bob and Louie: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jH5JvkoEzXM   Review this podcast at https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-internet-says-it-s-true/id1530853589   Get half off when you sign up for an annual plan at One Day University: http://onedayu.com/internet Bonus episodes and content available at http://Patreon.com/MichaelKent For 15% at SCOTTeVEST, visit http://scottevest.cwv7.net/a3VBZ

History Hack
History Hack: Ike and Winston

History Hack

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 52:34


Jonathan Jordan returns to talk all about his stellar work into the relationship between Eisenhower and Churchill both during and after the Second World War. Like the episode? Send us a tip! https://ko-fi.com/historyhack Like the podcast, join the fun on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/historyhack

YUTORAH: R' Dr. Aaron Rakeffet-Rothkoff -- Recent Shiurim
R' Meir Kahane. Baruch (Benji) Goldstein. Rebbetzin Esther Jungreis: Her Birth, Her World War II Experiences, Her Family, and Her Appearance at Madison Square Garden. Creation of Hineni

YUTORAH: R' Dr. Aaron Rakeffet-Rothkoff -- Recent Shiurim

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 108:22


Award Wieners Movie Review Podcast
Episode 62 - The Best Years of Our Lives Movie Review

Award Wieners Movie Review Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021


Episode 62 - The Best Years of Our Lives David and John come back with a life-altering experience while discussing the World War II vets homecoming drama The Best Years of Our Lives, winner of the 1946 Oscar for best motion picture.

Dan Snow's History Hit
Dresden Survivor: Remembering Victor Gregg

Dan Snow's History Hit

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 23:41


On 12 October 2021 World War Two veteran Victor Gregg passed away peacefully in his sleep just before his 102 birthday. He was part of a unique generation that with the passing of the years is sadly disappearing all too fast. Victor joined the army in 1937 and served and India and Palestine before the war. During the Second World War, he fought in the Western Desert before joining the Parachute Regiment. He was taken prisoner as the Allies retreated during the Battle of Arnhem, and was taken as a POW to Dresden, where he was alive during the Dresden firebombing. In this episode, we pay tribute to him by replaying the last interview at the time of his 100th birthday. He spoke to Dan about what he learned over his extraordinary life, his wartime experiences, and the profound impact they had upon how he saw the world.You can also watch Out of the Inferno: Surviving Dresden, where on the 73rd anniversary of the firebombing of Dresden, Dan accompanied Victor, as he returned to the city for a historic meeting with Irene Uhlendorf, who was just 4 years old on the night of the bombing. Together they are able to talk about the horrors of that night and the effect that it has had on the rest of their lives. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Join Us in France Travel Podcast
The Martyred Village of Oradour-sur-Glane, Episode 359

Join Us in France Travel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 65:09


This episode recounts the history of the martyred village of Oradour-sur-Glane near Limoges. What happened? Do we know why? We like to think things like that can never happen again because the Second World War is far behind us now. But it's never a given and there are senseless massacres going on today still. Let's talk about it and why parents and leaders should never teach hate #joinusinfrance #WW2 #podcast This episode features my frequent guest Elyse Rivin. You can book a tour with her through her website and you can also support her on Patreon. Full show notes for this episode are here: https://joinusinfrance.com/359 Patreon | Boutique | Newletter | Booking

Teaching Learning Leading K-12
Kenneth D. Evans - Missing: A World War II Story of Love, Friendships, Courage, and Survival - 420

Teaching Learning Leading K-12

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 68:25


Kenneth D. Evans - Missing: A World War II Story of Love, Friendships, Courage, and Survival. This is episode 420 of Teaching Learning Leading K12, an audio podcast. Kenneth D. Evans' decade-long quest to learn and write about his father's World War ll experiences was featured in Salt Lake City's Deseret News on Father's Day 2017. Missing: A World War II Story of Love, Friendships, Courage, and Survival is his first book. He was a CPA and business consultant for more than 40 years. During his career, he helped set up and served as a board member on several nonprofit organizations, including an equine therapy center for people with disabilities and a foundation operating schools in Guatemala. He also assisted in interfaith disaster relief efforts following Hurricanes Beulah and Katrina. An outdoor enthusiast, Ken enjoys fly-fishing, horseback riding, and spending time at his family cabin. He and his wife Sandy have six children and fifteen grandchildren. They reside on his family's farm in Saratoga Springs, Utah. Thanks for listening! Enjoy! But wait... Remember that Lynn at Connect Flow Grow is ready to help you deal with stress. She has new two new exciting classes: (Click on the links below to learn about each class.) Stress Less Society and Stress Less Family! Through these classes, Lynn will help you or your family learn how stress affects your lives and healthy ways that you can combat it. Don't wait. Go deal with that stress and get on with your life!   Could you do me a favor? Please go to my website at https://www.stevenmiletto.com/reviews/ or open the podcast app that you are listening to me on and would you rate and review the podcast? That would be Awesome. Thanks!   Have you been wanting to tell your story on podcasts? Podcasts are a great way to grow your personal and business brand. Kitcaster specializes in developing real human connections through podcast appearances. If you are an expert in your field, have a unique story to share, or an interesting point of view-- it's time to explore the world of podcasting with Kitcaster. Go to https://kitcaster.com/tllk12 or go to my webpage at https://stevenmiletto.com/sponsors click on the Kitcaster logo to apply for a special offer for friends of Teaching Learning Leading K12.   Ready to start your own podcast? Podbean is an awesome host. I have been with them since 2013. Go to https://www.podbean.com/TLLK12 to get 1 month free of unlimited hosting for your new podcast.    Remember to take a look at NVTA (National Virtual Teacher Association) The NVTA Certification Process was created to establish a valid and reliable research-based teacher qualification training process for virtual teachers to enhance their teaching and develop their ongoing reflective skills to improve teaching capacity. NVTA is an affiliate sponsor of Teaching Learning Leading K12, by following the link above if you purchase a program, Teaching Learning Leading K12 will get a commission and you will help the show continue to grow.    Don't forget to go to my other affiliate sponsor Boone's Titanium Rings at www.boonerings.com. When you order a ring use my code - TLLK12 - at checkout to get 10% off and help the podcast get a commission.   Oh by the way, you can help support Teaching Learning Leading K12 by buying me a soft drink (actually making a donation to Teaching Learning Leading K12.) That would be awesome! You would be helping expand the show with equipment and other resources to keep the show moving upward. Just go to https://www.buymeacoffee.com/stevenmiletto Thanks! Have an awesome day! Connect & Learn More: https://www.amazon.com/MISSING-World-Friendships-Courage-Survival/dp/1732370206 https://missingwwiistory.com/ https://missingwwiistory.com/contact/ Length: 1:08:25

Saturday Mornings with Joy Keys
Joy Keys chats with Filmmaker Gregory S. Cooke about Black women in WWII

Saturday Mornings with Joy Keys

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 30:00


Gregory S. Cooke is a career educator, documentary filmmaker, and World War II historian, dedicated to helping "relocate African Americans from the margins to the main pages of American and global history.” He is the Founder and President of the Basil and Becky Educational Foundation, a recipient of the Congressional Black Caucus, Veterans Braintrust Award (2019). Gregory is the creator of Invisible Warriors: African American Women in World War II, a critically acclaimed feature-length documentary that explores the wartime experiences of 600,000 “Rosie the Riveters”- “hidden figures” - pioneers who courageously triumph over racism and sexism to create job opportunities in industry and government for themselves and future generations of African American women. Invisible Warriors is an inaugural recipient of the Better Angels/Lavine/Ken Burns Fellowship (2020), and also received the Congressional Black Caucus, Veterans Braintrust Award (2019). Gregory is also the driving force behind the historical documentary, Choc'late Soldiers from the USA (CSUSA), the untold story of 140,000 African American men and women who cross a racial divide and form an unexpected bond with British civilians during World War II.

Casefile True Crime
Case 192: The Sodder Children

Casefile True Crime

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 54:06


On Christmas Eve 1945, while most citizens of the town of Fayetteville, West Virginia celebrated the end of World War Two, Italian immigrants - George and Jennie Sodder watched their house go up in flames... --- Narration – Anonymous Host Research & writing – Jessica Forsayeth Creative direction – Milly Raso Production and music – Mike Migas Music – Andrew D.B. Joslyn This episode's sponsors: ShipStation – Try ShipStation FREE for 60 days with promo code ‘CASEFILE' Noom – The last weight loss program you'll need. Start your trial today The Jordan Harbinger Show – Learn the stories, secrets, and skills of the world's most brilliant and interesting people For all credits and sources please visit casefilepodcast.com/case-192-the-sodder-children

Net Assessment
Richard Haass Is Unhappy

Net Assessment

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 61:12


Chris, Melanie, and Zack return to discuss Richard Haass's critique of “Washington's new flawed foreign policy consensus.” The Council on Foreign Relations president laments the bipartisan turn away from the mostly internationalist spirit that has informed U.S. foreign policy since the end of the World War II. Is he right? Does such a consensus exist? And does that explain why successive U.S. presidents seem so skeptical of internationalism? The three also try to discern what Haass favors as an alternative, but conclude that dissatisfaction with the current direction of U.S. foreign policy doesn't easily translate into specific and implantable policies. Grievances for Katherine Tai for an underwhelming speech on U.S. trade policy, for Sens. Ted Cruz and Josh Hawley for holding up ambassadorial appointments, and to those who harassed Sen. Kyrsten Sinema — in the restroom! — for being … jerks. Attagirl to Nobel Peace Prize winner Maria Ressa who braved abuse and intimidation for uncovering corruption and misrule in the Philippines and elsewhere. Chris gives a shout out to Reps. Jim McGovern and Peter Meijer for introducing legislation to rein in executive power, and Melanie praises the developers at GlaxoSmithKline for their life-saving new malaria vaccine. She also gives a special shout out to her nephew Zack and his Utah state champion golf team at Long Peak High School. Links: Richard Haass, “The Age of America First: Washington's Flawed New Foreign Policy Consensus,” Foreign Affairs, November/December 2021, https://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/united-states/2021-09-29/biden-trump-age-america-first. Richard Haass, “What Mike Pompeo doesn't understand about China, Richard Nixon and U.S. foreign policy,” Washington Post, July 25, 2020, https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/07/25/what-mike-pompeo-doesnt-understand-about-china-richard-nixon-us-foreign-policy/.   New American Engagement Initiative Annual Student Competition, https://www.atlanticcouncil.org/programs/scowcroft-center-for-strategy-and-security/new-american-engagement-initiative/naei-annual-student-competition/. New American Engagement Initiative Future Foreign Policy series with Rep. Joaquin Castro, Monday, Oct. 18 at 3:30 pm, https://www.atlanticcouncil.org/event/future-foreign-policy-series-featuring-rep-joaquin-castro/. “America is shorthanded in foreign affairs. Thanks, Ted Cruz,” Washington Post, Oct. 10, 2021, https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2021/10/10/america-is-shorthanded-foreign-affairs-thanks-ted-cruz/. Ankit Panda Twitter, https://twitter.com/nktpnd/status/1447366126447570946?s=12. Apoorva Mandavilli, "A 'Historic Event': First Malaria Vaccine Approved by WHO," New York Times, Oct. 6, 2021, https://www.nytimes.com/2021/10/06/health/malaria-vaccine-who.html.  Connor O'Brien, “Lawmakers aim for blockbuster overhaul of war powers, arms sales,” POLITICO, Sept. 30, 2021, https://www.politico.com/news/2021/09/30/war-powers-act-bipartisan-overhaul-514794. Dina Smeltz, Ivo Daalder, Karl Friedhoff, Craig Kafura, and Emily Sullivan, "A Foreign Policy for the Middle Class--What Americans Think," Chicago Council on Global Affairs, Oct. 2021, https://www.thechicagocouncil.org/sites/default/files/2021-10/ccs2021_fpmc_0.pdf. Peggy Noonan, "Progressives Hold the Capital Captive," Wall Street Journal, Oct. 7, 2021, https://www.wsj.com/articles/biden-progressives-aoc-squad-sinema-reconciliation-infrastructure-lbj-approval-polling-11633643510.  Tyler Haslam, "High School Golf: Kihei Akina Leads Lone Peak Knights to 8th State Title in 9 Years," Deseret News, Oct. 5, 2021, https://www.deseret.com/2021/10/5/22708095/high-school-golf-kihei-akina-leads-lone-peak-knighs-to-8th-state-title-in-9-years-6a-uhsaa.   

Slate Star Codex Podcast
Links For October

Slate Star Codex Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 23:37


https://astralcodexten.substack.com/p/links-for-october [Remember, I haven't independently verified each link. On average, commenters will end up spotting evidence that around two or three of the links in each links post are wrong or misleading. I correct these as I see them, and will highlight important corrections later, but I can't guarantee I will have caught them all by the time you read this.] 1: Our World In Data - we are winning the war on oil spills: 2: @incunabula: “Cheese is one of the 5 things the Western book as we know it depends on. The other four are snails, Jesus, underwear and spectacles. If even one of these things was absent, the book you hold in your hand today would look completely different. I'll explain why…” 3: Mansana de la Discordia (“the block of discord”) is a city block in Barcelona where four of the city's most famous architects built houses next to each other in clashing styles: It's also a pun on manzana de la Discordia, “Apple of Discord” 4: As late as the 1930s, most upper-middle-class American families had servants. By the end of World War II, almost nobody did. The transition was first felt as a supply-side issue - well-off people wanted servants as much as ever, but fewer and fewer people were willing to serve. Here's an article on the government commission set up to deal with the problem. I first saw this linked by somebody trying to tie it in to the current labor shortage. 5: Harvard Gazette reviews Stephen Pinker's new book on rationality. Someone sent this to me for the contrast with Secret Of Our Success - Pinker argues that hunter-gatherer tribes use critical thinking all the time, are skeptical of arguments from authority, and “owe their survival to a scientific mindset”. I'd love to see a debate between Pinker and Henrich (or an explanation of why they feel like they're really on the same side and don't need to iron anything out). 6: It's hard to talk about IQ research without getting accused of something something Nazis. But here's a claim that actually, Nazis hated IQ research, worrying that it would “be an instrument of Jewry to fortify its hegemony” and outshine more properly Aryan values like “practical intelligence” and “character”. Whenever someone tells you that they don't believe in IQ, consider calling them out on perpetuating discredited Nazi ideology.

Media Literate
Snack Episode 6: Memorialization and World War 2 Films

Media Literate

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 8:55


From the The Odyssey to Saving Private Ryan (1998), why are War stories so prevalent in our culture, and what purpose do they serve? Join us with the return of Kevin, who finally tells us the truth about his Twilight journey, and dive into the reasons behind memorialization in War Films. 

Marketing Trends
Art as An Asset Class with Masterworks' Executive, Michael Wenner

Marketing Trends

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 40:20


There are few things in life that are not volatile. The stock market rises and falls, much like a pendulum swinging from left to right. Crypto is viewed as a rocket ship, but it's returns remain mostly inconsistent, and the housing market has seen its fair share of crashes over the years. But if you're looking for one asset class that bucks the trend when it comes to volatility, fine art might just be it.For centuries art has been seen as an avenue for the rich and famous to flex their wealth, but Masterworks believes it's business model of allowing everyday consumers to invest in multi-billion dollar pieces of art, is shattering that glass ceiling and democratizing art for all.“We consider ourselves fiduciaries or financial advisors. We're doing that because art is a very confusing and brand new asset class. We're the only ones enabling access to this $1.7 trillion market. From a suitability standpoint, to let someone Yolo their life savings into a Banksy is not something that we want our customers to do. We don't think it makes sense for someone that has a $5 million retirement portfolio to put in a hundred dollars. So we'll tell that person, just keep your money; keep the cash; put it in stocks. So we're really getting people, not only to understand what is art as an asset class, why is art important, but to make sure they're investing responsibly and investing a part of their portfolio, that actually makes sense.”Michael Wenner is VP of Marketing and Director of Business Development at Masterworks, a platform that lets everyday consumers invest in pieces of art such as Banksy, Kaws, and Basquiat. Michael joined me on this episode of Marketing Trends to discuss how Masterworks is using centuries of data to its advantage to not just identify which pieces of art the company invests in, but also why they are opening that data up to everyone. Michael also dives into why he is bullish on content marketing, and how Masterworks views itself more as a financial institution rather than an art gallery.  Enjoy this episode.Main TakeawaysData Strategy: When you need to get the attention of your prospective audience in a big way, you need to offer them something that is useful to them. Creating a large set of data about your field or industry that you can leverage to engage clients and leave a good impression with them is a great way to make a splash. Marketing a new asset class: Education is the keystone of grounding a good marketing campaign for a product or service that doesn't have a market yet. You've got to get creative and think about what you can do to bring value to your potential consumers.Content Marketing Doesn't Work: There is an argument to be made that annoying your customers, and prospective customers with an array of content emails, that can trigger bounce rates to go up, is not worth that loss. Those email addresses represent dollars and you should take every opportunity you have in front of your customer to serve them with your products. The most effective approach can be that of brute-force. Be direct with your potential clients; do whatever it takes to get their emails.Key Quotes“We always talk about how Facebook it's such a great platform, that people have given so much information about themselves. LinkedIn is giving you much more relevant information. You can tell exactly how wealthy and how successful someone is. So we don't really do role-based targeting or job-based targeting, but it's really incredible that by what you're able to do by brute force. [Linkedin's] technology's obviously not as good as Facebook, but you can figure out how to set up targeting campaigns. You can get to the wealthiest, most successful people on earth. It's going to cost you, but if you can convince them it's the best way to do it.” “We consider ourselves fiduciaries or financial advisors. We're doing that because art is a very confusing and a brand new asset class. We're the only ones enabling access to this $1.7 trillion market. From a suitability standpoint, to let someone YOLO their life savings into a Banksy is not something that we want our customers to do. And we also don't think it makes sense for someone that has a $5 million retirement portfolio to put in a hundred dollars. So we'll tell that person, just keep your money; keep the cash; put it in stocks. So we're really getting people, not only to understand what is art as an asset class, why is art important, but to make sure they're investing responsibly and investing a part of their portfolio, that actually makes sense.”“Our data science team has been doing incredible things. We have the largest proprietary data set of art market returns. We took 50 years of art auction results that were all published physically in the Sotheby's and Christie's pamphlets. We had a team of about 25 interns go in and [enter], this piece of art was bought for this and then sold for this. And we created this huge database to bring it all together. No one else had done it because it's a pain [to do so].. So we created this database, and our data science team was then able to look at using A.I., all these different, fascinating insights, which artists markets are returning the best, which years within those artists markets, even which type of art. We were able to single out contemporary art, post-World War II art, coming from this time period. We're seeing that it has this type of returns.” “You look at is as art or it's a $1.7 trillion market. And until Masterworks, there was absolutely no way to invest in it. hose who did want to enter it,, who wanted to build a diversified portfolio would need tens of millions of dollars. You could buy one piece. And if that one piece went down in value,you'd spend a million dollars on it and you weren't diversified, it's not really a secure asset or a strategic asset class.” “Our goal is to educate people on art as an asset class. If people get excited about investing in art and they Google it, we're the first search result and we always will be. We are so happy to give our research away. We're working with other banks in investment platforms to educate them, give them all of our data, give them our price database, show them how different artists markets have different loss rates in different correlations, because we want to educate everyone. Not only are we getting new people into the asset class, but we're also growing it at the same time. We can actually have a huge impact on the market and we consider ourselves one of the top buyers in the art market.” “I used to do content marketing and I really disliked it. e just don't think that has any value. I'll tell you why: our user base is very interested in two things, diversity and returns. Diversity, meaning investment diversity diversification. So when we email them we want to give them those two things. We only email people with new investment offerings. We don't want to bug them. Something that's really important to us is our email list. So if we're sending content (which we have in the past, and that gives us higher unsubscribed rates.) We're just not going to do it. We think of our email list as currency. If we're going to do something to devalue our currency, we're not going to do it.““I see NFTs not having a similar impact. I do not believe NFTs are a strategic asset class. Strategic asset classes are ones that have been around for awhile. It can be part of a portfolio. NFTs have a false sense of scarcity. You're basically putting a JPEG on the blockchain and calling it scarce, even though you don't own any of the IP. I am short on NFTs.”. BioMichael Wenner is Vice President of Marketing and Director of Business Development at Masterworks. Michael began his career in finance doing sales and trading for five years. Near the end of this time, he started shifting towards doing more marketing, especially digital. He started a newsletter called MarketSnacks that was eventually acquired by Robinhood. Then he went to work in FinTech at YieldStreet before stepping over to Masterworks. To learn more, click here: {{URL of detail page on found on www.mission.org}}---Marketing Trends podcast is brought to you by Salesforce. Discover marketing built on the world's number one CRM: Salesforce. Put your customer at the center of every interaction. Automate engagement with each customer. And build your marketing strategy around the entire customer journey. Salesforce. We bring marketing and engagement together. Learn more at salesforce.com/marketing. 

City Cast Chicago
Let's Take a Moment to Remember Timuel Black

City Cast Chicago

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 11:38


Timuel Black died yesterday at the age of 102, and while 102 seems like a lot, his accomplishments could fill multiple lifetimes. Black's family migrated to Chicago during the first wave of the Great Migration, something he spoke about extensively and even wrote about in his first book. His family's journey, his upbringing in Chicago, and his encounter with Nazi camps during World War II inspired a life of activism and work that helped the movement towards desegregation and civil rights in Chicago. Host Jacoby Cochran sat down with WBEZ's Natalie Moore to talk about Black's legacy, the intersection of scholarship and his lived experience, and her personal connection to one of the city's most prominent Chicagoans.  Guest: Natalie Moore — Reporter, WBEZ To learn more about Black's life and legacy, check out his 2019 memoir "Sacred Ground: The Chicago Streets of Timuel Black" Follow us on Twitter: @CityCastChicago Sign up for our newsletter: chicago.citycast.fm

Sea Control - CIMSEC
Sea Control 284 – Planning the Pacific War and Admiral Richmond Kelly Turner

Sea Control - CIMSEC

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021


By Jon Frerichs Rear Admiral Tom Williams, Dr. Tim Francis, and Dr. Shawn Woodford join the program to discuss the career of Admiral Richmond Kelly Turner and his role in planning the war in the Pacific during World War II. Download Sea Control 284 – Planning the Pacific War and Admiral Richmond Kelly Turner Links … Continue reading Sea Control 284 – Planning the Pacific War and Admiral Richmond Kelly Turner →

Documentary on One - RTÉ Documentaries
Tearoom, Taylor, Saviour, Spy

Documentary on One - RTÉ Documentaries

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 39:25


Margaret Kearney Taylor was a woman who kept many secrets. She was known as the Irishwoman who ran an elegant tearoom in Madrid, Spain for more than fifty years. But she was also was part of a network which helped thousands of Allied servicemen and Jewish refugees escape the Nazi regime in Europe during World War Two. (2016) See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Good Phight: for Philadelphia Phillies fans
The Dirty Inning: Five Hundred Games of Suckitude

The Good Phight: for Philadelphia Phillies fans

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 78:06


As World War II erupted across the globe, the Phillies were trying their best to lighten the mood the only way they knew how: Losing five hundred baseball games. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Gospel Spice
How can we personally live up to our calling to freedom today? | with Os Guinness - Part 2

Gospel Spice

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 31:33


Episode 115 - Stephanie is deeply passionate about the message of Os Guinness. In Part 2 of this interview, Os and Stephanie take things personally: how will our true knowing of God shape our calling and tranform us into the force for transformation God is calling us to be? Os takes us to the Old Testament truths of justice, community and covenant as radically important ideas that show the world the way forward for each of us personally. “There are two revolutionary faiths bidding to take the world forward,” Guinness writes. “There is no choice facing America and the West that is more urgent and consequential than the choice between Sinai and Paris. Will the coming generation return to faith in God and to humility, or continue to trust in the all sufficiency of Enlightenment reason, punditry, and technocracy? Will its politics be led by principles or by power?” While Guinness cannot predict our ultimate fate, he warns that we must recognize the crisis of our time and debate the issues openly. As individuals and as a people, we must choose between the revolutions, between faith in God and faith in Reason alone, between freedom and despotism, and between life and death. GOSPEL SPICE GIVEAWAY We are giving away copies of the Magna Carta of Humanity, the phenomenal book that we are discussing today on the show. To enter for a chance to win, go to gospelspice.com/giveaway. Winners will be drawn at random among the entries and contacted directly. MEET OS GUINNESS Os Guinness is an author and social critic. Great-great-great grandson of Arthur Guinness, the Dublin brewer, he was born in China in World War Two where his parents were medical missionaries. A witness to the climax of the Chinese revolution in 1949, he was expelled with many other foreigners in 1951 and returned to Europe where he was educated in England. He completed his undergraduate degree at the University of London and his D.Phil in the social sciences from Oriel College, Oxford. Os has written or edited more than thirty books, including The Call, Time for Truth, Unspeakable, A Free People's Suicide, The Global Public Square, Last Call for Liberty, and Carpe Diem Redeemed. His latest book, The Magna Carta of Humanity: Sinai's Revolutionary Faith and the Future of Freedom, was published in 2018. Since moving to the United States in 1984, Os has been a Guest Scholar at the Woodrow Wilson Center for International Studies, a Guest Scholar and Visiting Fellow at the Brookings Institution, and Senior Fellow at the Trinity Forum and the EastWest Institute in New York. He was the lead drafter of the Williamsburg Charter in 1988, a celebration of the bicentennial of the US Constitution, and later of “The Global Charter of Conscience,” which was published at the European Union Parliament in 2012. Os has spoken at many of the world's major universities, and spoken widely to political and business conferences across the world. He lives with his wife Jenny in the Washington DC area. You will find him at http://www.osguinness.com/ IF YOU'VE ENJOYED THIS INTERVIEW, YOU WILL LOVE OUR GOSPEL SPICE SERIES!  Click to check out the first episode of each season: We are currently in the middle of our series titled "Centering on Christ: the Tabernacle" which is such a fitting context for today's interview! Check out the first episode in this current series on gospelspice.com or wherever you are listening to this one from! "Identity in the Battle": https://www.podcastics.com/episode/74762/link/   The Gospel of Matthew: https://www.podcastics.com/episode/3281/link/ The Psalms:    The Gospel of Luke: https://www.podcastics.com/episode/40838/link/ The Book of Proverbs: https://www.podcastics.com/episode/68112/link/ DISCOVER THE GOSPEL SPICE MINISTRIES BEHIND THIS EPISODE If you enjoyed this episode, we invite you to discover more about how God is at work at Gospel Spice Ministries, and even to join in His work! There are 3 easy ways to do that: PLAY IT FORWARD by SHARING the show with friends and family: https://www.podcastics.com/podcast/38/link/ PAY IT FORWARD by supporting us financially: gospelspice.com/payitforward PRAY IT FORWARD by praying for us and those you share it with! Go to gospelspice.com for more info about Gospel Spice Ministries, the umbrella ministry over the podcast. You will discover our partners and the various services we offer, such as in-depth Bible studies with interactive conversation groups, a couple of times a year.  Go to gospel-spice.com (with a "dash"!) to join the Gospel Spice Podcast community and interact with us! Contact us on the website or at contact@gospelspice.com to send us your prayer requests (we pray for you as a team every week!) and let us know how we can come alongside you.   Support us!

Apple News Today
Why U.S. child care is in crisis and what to do about it

Apple News Today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 7:17


Day-care providers are struggling with a worker shortage while federal relief has been slow to help. USA Today looks at what’s happening, as well as possible solutions. Many of the smugglers who bring migrants into the U.S. are Mexican teenagers. One of them tells his story to the Washington Post. CNN reports on a Maryland husband and wife accused of attempting to sell U.S. nuclear secrets to another country in exchange for cryptocurrency.After nearly 80 years of marriage without a wedding photo due to World War II, a couple finally has one. NBC News shows how hospice workers decided to fix things.