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Division within Christianity, originating with the 16th century Reformation, that now numbers 40% of all Christians

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Catholic Answers Live
#10386 Tips for Defending the Faith - Trent Horn

Catholic Answers Live

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021


Questions Covered: 13:15 – My Protestant friend thinks that Purgatory takes away from the salvific action of Christ on the cross. 19:52 – I have friends who are outspoken pagans, but I befriend them with the intention of evangelizing without beating them over the head. 22:40 – I'm not a Catholic. Does “heathen” or “pagan” refer to me? 28:50 – How can I answer my Protestant family members who ask whether non-Catholics can go to heaven? 32:51 – How can I have a meaningful dialogue with anti-Catholics? I think a lot of the time people are just making talking points, not listening to each other in discussion. 41:00 – Why do you believe that the Protestant version of God is similar to the Catholic version? 49:55 – My ex-Mormon friend experienced abuse in his background and is against anything religious as a result. How can I bring him around to Catholicism? …

TonioTimeDaily
I am recovering from religious imperialism and religious extremism

TonioTimeDaily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 22:32


"Ireland: Beginning in the late seventeenth century, the British government passed a series of anti-Catholic laws in Ireland known as the Penal Laws. The first of these was passed in 1695. This was followed in 1697 by the Bishops' Banishment Act, and in 1704 by the Act to Prevent the Further Growth of Property. The Penal Laws were designed to force Catholics to the lowest socioeconomic status. For example, under the Penal Laws, Catholics were not allowed to own a horse worth more than five pounds. Furthermore, any Catholic who was offered five pounds for a horse was required to sell it. Catholics were also prohibited from possessing arms. Only Protestants were allowed to hold political positions or allowed to practice law. Catholics were excluded from political power and they were not allowed to be members of a grand jury. Catholics were not allowed to vote in parliamentary elections. The land laws also served to divide the Catholics by conferring extraordinary privileges on any member of a Catholic family who became a Protestant. For example, an eldest son could deprive his father of the management and disposal of his property by becoming a Protestant. Bishops and members of Catholic religious orders were banished from the island. Ordinary priests had to register their names and parishes and were required to promise that they would uphold the law. Only one priest was allowed per parish. No new Catholic clergy were allowed to enter the country. Since bishops were required for ordination and with no Catholic education allowed, it was assumed that the Catholic clergy would die out within a generation. However, the laws were not rigidly enforced nor was there any attempt to promote the conversion of the Catholic masses to Protestantism. By the 1720s, Catholic priests and bishops operated fairly freely, but discreetly, in much of Ireland. The United States: The policy of the United States with regard to American Indians has assumed that “civilizing” the Indians so that they could be assimilated into American culture required them to become Christians, preferably Protestant Christians. The United States government actively encouraged and financially supported missionary efforts on Indian reservations. The period of time from 1870 to 1934 can be considered the Dark Ages for American Indian Religious Freedom. During this time, the active suppression of American Indian religions reached its peak. While the government had always supported missionary efforts, conversion of Indians and suppression of Indian religions took a new dimension with the implementation of President Ulysses Grant's Peace Policy in 1870. Under the policy, a single Christian denomination would become responsible for administering all Indian programs on each reservation and would have a monopoly on proselytization. There was no concern at this time for either the existence or validity of any Indian religions. In fact, Indian religious leaders were seen as barriers to progress and could be jailed for expressing their religious concerns." --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/antonio-myers4/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/antonio-myers4/support

JR.'s Sermons
The Christmas Branch - O Christmas Tree

JR.'s Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 36:06


At the beginning of the Advent season, we ask what hope looks like. In a world that craves peace on earth and goodwill for all people, a world that is far from those dreams, how do we hope? Jeremiah invites us into his model faithful presence in a hurting world - one that invites us to look for God right where we're hurting. That's hope.

Leading Saints Podcast
The Story Behind Pornography Use | An Interview with Jay Stringer

Leading Saints Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 60:26


Jay Stringer is a therapist, author, and public speaker. He guides men and women to overcome unwanted sexual behaviors, and to discover how their story is shaping unwanted sexual behavior or betrayal trauma. He grew up as the son of a Protestant minister in the Presbyterian church, holds a master of Divinity and masters of Counseling Psychology, and is an ordained minister. Steven Shields, ACMHC CET1, is a therapist who acts as a guide to help others heal from trauma and addiction. As founder of Unashamed Unafraid, a non-profit organization, he hosts the podcast that shares hope for sexual addiction recovery. Unashamed funds scholarships for people to go to retreats and receive therapy. Steve works in his private practice in Salt Lake City, at OnSite in Nashville Tennessee, and at the Oaks in San Diego California doing trauma intensives and workshops. His favorite event to speak at is the WarriorHeart Bootcamp every year. Steve is unofficially the biggest Leading Saints and “KF” fan! In this podcast episode, Kurt and co-host Steve speak with Jay about how leaders can best provide help and guidance to those who have been affected by unwanted sexual behaviors. Jay Stringer Steve Shields Highlights 6:15 How can leaders help members with sexual brokenness? Leaders should stop trying to ‘manage' the problem but try to help the member find the core problem. 8:10 Unwanted sexual behavior is a roadmap to healing, not a life sentence to sexual shame or sexual addition. 9:30 Leaders need to listen to the stories and experiences that are behind the unwanted behavior. 13:30 Invite people to take authorship and authority over their unwanted behaviors. It's so much more than ripping out their behavior from their life. Behaviors and addictions come from somewhere much deeper. 17:00 Many people turn to unhealthy sexual behavior or porn because they lack purpose. 17:45 How can a leader create space to listen? Stories are what change the human heart. Stop the practical suggestions because they are not going to work. 20:10 Jay gives a list of questions that can help leaders in interviews. These questions will lead to stories and help the member connect the dots between the current unwanted sexual behavior and the past pain or underlying story. 22:30 You don't have to be a therapist but a safe place for people to share their stories. People don't always need suggestions but someone that has compassion for them. 30:00 How do you help members come to you to confess and talk about the problems they are having? 34:15 Shame convinces people to stay silent about their sexual brokenness. Leaders need to normalize talking about sex and porn. 40:45 Share your scars, not your wounds, when you are in leadership. Be vulnerable to share your scars and experiences too. God wants us to share our stories. 42:30 This is not just a men's issue but a human issue. Many women are also viewing pornography and having affairs. 47:30 While connection and community are very important to recovery and healing it's also very important to take time alone. You have to learn to sit with yourself and not just try to distract yourself all the time. 53:00 How can we find the right community? Links UnashamedUnafraid.com Unwanted: How Sexual Brokenness Reveals Our Way to Healing The Journey Course Kintsugi pottery jay-stringer.com Instagram @jay_stringer_ Read the TRANSCRIPT of this podcast

Cornfield Theology
Confessionalism (Part 1 of 4)

Cornfield Theology

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 10:42


It’s been a while since I have posted on the blog or dropped a podcast. Throughout October and early November, I took a step back to focus on denominational responsibilities and lead Redemption Hill Church into a new Sunday morning location. By God’s grace, both responsibilities went well, but now I am back in the saddle! Over the next several weeks, I’ll be posting on why Redemption Hill Church is confessional. The term confessional has lost its luster over the last 100 years, but prior, most churches held to a confession of faith. I want to show in these blog posts the value of confessions and why a local church should be confessional. The next four blogs on confessionalism will be about 1) The Nature of Confessionalism, 2) The Parameters of Confessionalism, 3) A Vision of Confessionalism 4) the Subscription to a Confession. If you are new to confessionalism, or the term is foreign, that’s ok. The purpose of cornfieldtheology.com is to introduce people to new concepts, terms, and theological ideas. These four blogs on confessionalism have been adapted from a paper I submitted to the elders of Trinity Fellowship Churches in preparation for Theology Day before our General Assembly. In this first blog post on the nature of confessionalism, I focus on why confessions are written down, the historical aspect of confessions, and the uniting effect of confessions. Confessions are Written Down It has become fashionable for many non-mainline Protestant churches to be vague about theology and doctrine. And the traditional mainline protestant churches have jettisoned their historic creeds and confessions. If not on paper, then with function. The reasons for the ambiguity are numerous. However, what is trendy is not historical. For most of church history, denominations and churches had robust creeds and confessions. These creeds and confessions provided clarity, which helped guard against heresy and doctrinal confusion. Throughout history, creeds and confessions were polemical and divided denominations from each other, but they also united local churches to one another. Creeds and confessions could guard against heresy and join like-minded churches because creeds and confessions are written down. It is popular to hear a local pastor or church member say they do not need a confession or creed because they have the Bible. “No creed but the Bible!” is declared. However, the declaration falls on deft ears. Carl Trueman affirms, I do want to make the point here that Christians are not divided between those who have creeds and confessions and those who do not; rather, they are divided between those who have public creeds and confessions that are written down and exist as public documents, subject to public scrutiny, evaluation, and critique, and those who have private creeds and confessions that are often improvised, unwritten, and thus not open to public scrutiny, not susceptible to evaluation and, crucially and ironically, not, therefore, subject to testing by Scripture to see whether they are true.– Carl Trueman All Christians live by a Creed. The fundamental difference between confessional and non-confessional churches and Christians can be summed up in one question: How can you know what a pastor and church believe? Answer. Doctrine is written down. The benefits of holding to a Confession of Faith that is written down are outlined in these blog posts. Nevertheless, suffice it to say, part of the nature of being confessional is that a document explicitly states doctrine. Confessions are Rooted in Tradition The second aspect of confessions is their rootedness in tradition. As J.V. Fesko points out, the wor

Catholic Answers Live
#10377 Why it Matters to Be Catholic - Karlo Broussard

Catholic Answers Live

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021


Questions Covered: 12:00 – How can I explain to my brother that he needs to be married in the Catholic Church for it to be a valid marriage? 18:45 – Why would you have to have apostolic succession to validly consecrate the Eucharist? 31:10 – I heard that Catholicism is more “mystical” than other branches of Christianity because Catholics have things like intercession of the saints and the apocryphal books. Why does that matter? 46:06 – How should I talk to my Protestant parents about my interest in Catholicism? …

Catholic Answers Live
#10376 Tips for Defending the Faith - Trent Horn

Catholic Answers Live

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021


Questions Covered: 04:50 – Is it a more accurate translation to call Mary “full of grace” or “favored one”? 13:35 – How can we clarify the poor side effects that unintentionally came out of Vatican II to those who dislike the council? 19:32 – How can we defend the Real Presence of the Eucharist, especially when there's so much proof from the early church that people reject? 24:00 – How can God have free will if he's not capable of sinning? 33:57 – What would you say to someone who says the Church Fathers were too focused on philosophy instead of Scripture? 41:35 – How can I respond to the charge that the Catholic Church killed thousands of Protestant martyrs in England? 47:20 – What's the best way to start talking to my Hindu friend about Catholicism? 52:16 – When we come to our resurrection, how will humanity all fit on earth? Will there be enough space? …

Ask Christopher West
The Blessing and The Curse | ACW151

Ask Christopher West

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 33:56


What is the morality of embryo adoption? How do you overcome sexual sin in a dating relationship? Why does God permit the blessing of chidren to come from sinful acts? Ask Christopher West is a weekly podcast in which Theology of the Body Institute President Christopher West and his beloved wife Wendy share their humor and wisdom, answering questions about marriage, relationships, life, and the Catholic faith, all in light of John Paul II's beautiful teachings on the Theology of the Body. Get a copy of God Is Beauty, A Retreat on the Gospel and Art (https://www.godisbeautybook.com) by Karoly Wojtyla/John Paul II. Available now for the first time in English. Want to support the Theology of the Body Institute and have a better chance of us answering your question? Join our Patron Community (https://tobpatron.com)! Patron Question: Hi Christopher! Thank you so much for the work you do. As a young, Protestant, mother-of-two, I've learned so much from the resources you provide. It has deepened my faith as I have come to a better understanding of how I, as a Christian, am to live both body and soul together. My husband and I are looking for clarity in how to approach embryo adoption. We've noticed in our circles a trend in which a wife will feel passionately about embryo adoption and desire to help the babies that have been frozen as the result of IVF, but their husbands are not on board. Such has been our own case. My initial thought was that embryo adoption can be a way to alleviate the suffering that IVF has caused and since it is an adoption, the baby placed in the womb already belongs to the adoptive parents. My husband views this similarly to surrogacy since it separates pregnancy from the sexual act. It seems that the discomfort he and other men share is the idea that their wife would be pregnant with someone else's child. We have tried more than once to find succinct justification for embryo adoption that doesn't simplify it to an "ends justifies the means" argument, but have found nothing. It just grieves me to think that there might not be a solution for these babies that are in such a state of helplessness and abandonment. How can we think through this biblically? Question 2: Thank you for the light you have shared through your work – I've been fundamentally changed by your work. I am having a lot of trouble practicing chastity with my boyfriend. Both of us keep repeating sexual sins and confessing and doing it over and over again. We know the gravity of what we are doing and we debrief every time to try and work harder and do better as we discern our possible marriage to one another. I am asking for practical advice on how to really avoid non-marital sex and how to renew in hope after confession. I am always moved and healed by God's forgiveness but I feel a sense of despair and hopelessness in our continued failure to respect each other's bodies. I would also like to know if you have any advice for those struggling to persevere in prayer in moments of temptation, and any advice for how to continue practicing chastity in a relationship after failing so many times. Qestion 3: I know that the sins we commit come with consequences. Almost every sin I can think of has a negative consequence, but when it comes to fornication (well, obviously sometimes the consequences can be negative in terms of AIDS and other STDs) but sometimes God's will is to give the couple who engaged in fornication a child, which I believe is always a blessing no matter the circumstances in which the child was conceived. Why do you think God would intend this, to bless people with children while all other sins have negative consequences? I can't think of any other sin that has the possibility of giving us a blessing. Submit your question at AskChristopherWest.com (http://www.askchristopherwest.com). Resources mentioned this week: View our COURSE SCHEDULE (https://tobinstitute.org/programs/tobi-schedule/) to register for a course, ONLINE or IN-PERSON! If you are in financial need and honestly cannot afford a book or resource recomended on this podcast, contact: michele@tobinstitute.org Find Christopher West on Facebook (http://www.facebook.com/cwestofficial) and Instagram (http://www.instagram.com/cwestofficial). Discover the Theology of the Body Institute (http://www.tobinstitute.org). If you enjoy the podcast, help us out by writing a review (https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/ask-christopher-west/id1448699486). Thanks for listening! Christopher and Wendy hope their advice is helpful to you, but they are not licensed counseling professionals. If you are dealing with serious issues, please consult our list of trusted professionals (https://tobinstitute.org/wp-content/uploads/TOBI-Recommended-Psychologists-Updated-6-8-20.pdf). Featuring music by Mike Mangione (https://www.mikemangione.com/).

Relevant History
Episode 37 - Lion of the North

Relevant History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 100:10


In 1626, King Christian IV of Denmark-Norway joined the Thirty Years' War as a champion of the Protestant cause. Within four years, he would be sent home with his tail between his legs. But the Protestants would gain a new champion: the Swedish King Gustavus Adolphus. In a few short years, the Lion of the North would forge a military reputation equaled by only a handful. Just as importantly, he would keep the Protestants in the fight, forcing the Catholic Habsburg monarchy to continue a costly, draining war. Here is Gustavus Adolphus' story, and how he shaped the course of history. SUBSCRIBE TO RELEVANT HISTORY, AND NEVER MISS AN EPISODE! Relevant History Patreon: https://bit.ly/3vLeSpF Subscribe on Apple Music (iTunes): https://apple.co/2SQnw4q Subscribe on Google Music: https://bit.ly/30hUTRD Subscribe on Spotify: https://spoti.fi/38bzOvo RSS feed: https://bit.ly/2R0Iosz Relevant History on Twitter: https://bit.ly/3eRhdtk Relevant History on Facebook: https://bit.ly/2Qk05mm Relevant History SubscribeStar: https://www.subscribestar.com/relevant-history Official website: https://bit.ly/3btvha4 Episode transcript: https://docs.google.com/document/d/e/2PACX-1vTyEbrFsmM2A3B5A5hJ9xBQ-IM4EeR0GFov0_xL7CUIB2rsD8-HxOUD_0fvYqAIqC543Q9NXg10qlmD/pub Music credit: Sergey Cheremisinov - Black Swan

Clearnote Church
Overcome Evil with Good (Romans 12:17-21)

Clearnote Church

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 63:17


Romans 12:17-21. From the "The Book of Romans" sermon series. Preached by Tim Bayly.

JR.'s Sermons
Pilgrim 2021 - Church of Theseus

JR.'s Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 45:26


Churches serving or doing missions work often feels paternalistic. How do we serve those outside the church, how do we love those outside the church, in ways that respect them as equally God's image-bearers? The model of the ancient pilgrimage can help us imagine a better way to meet others - as students who can help one another know God better!

Just Talking with Friends Podcast
Status of the Protestant Church

Just Talking with Friends Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 72:04


Ending Season 2, Pastors Rechab Gray and Ike Todd reflect on the Protestant Church: what has it done well during the pandemic and what it still needs to work on. What do we, as the Church, the Body of Christ, need to do to move forward in being the Hands and Feet of Christ. This episode is not only a reflection, but a call forward. 

Heart and Soul
The hidden faiths of Northern Ireland

Heart and Soul

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 27:12


This year marks the centenary of Northern Ireland. Since its inception it has been divided between those who want to be Irish, who are mostly Catholic, and those who want to remain British, who are mostly Protestant. But what about the people of faith outside the sectarian divide – or those of no faith? Reporter Julia Paul meets Joseph Nawaz, whose father was a Muslim from Pakistan and whose mother a white Catholic from Northern Ireland. His parents were married in the 1970s, at a time when most NI churches wouldn't even marry a Catholic and Protestant. Joseph talks about his journey to embrace his mixed heritage and the two very different religions in his childhood. Esther Chong was born in Malaysia to Chinese parents and moved to Northern Ireland for a better life. The day after she arrived she attended a service at the Chinese Christian Church in Belfast and she says God began to show her her path forward in Northern Ireland. Both her children are autistic and she now runs support groups at her church for other Chinese families, especially those who struggle with the language barrier. Dr Satyavir Singhal is a consultant at the Royal Hospital in Belfast and a Hindu. He moved to Northern Ireland from India with his family in 2000. The more people in Northern Ireland asked him about his faith and his country of birth, the more he was drawn closer to his faith. In 2014, he became more involved in the Indian Community Centre and Hindu Temple in Belfast, and now he teaches society about Hinduism. (Photo: Dr Satyavir Singhal. Credit: Julia Paul)

Catholic Answers Live
#10372 Open Forum - Joe Heschmeyer

Catholic Answers Live

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021


Questions Covered: 06:05 – Why do Catholics single out abortion as a sin that we're expected to stop others from doing? There are many many other sins in this world, so why should I be concerned with this one in particular? 13:00 – How will you know when Jesus has come again? 19:45 – If evil thoughts come into someone's mind, could they be put there by Satan apart from my will? If that's the case, do I have to confess it? What's the Church teaching? 24:40 – Can the Catholic stance on the death penalty be backed up with sola scriptura? 35:30 – As a Protestant, where should I begin my research if I'm interested in Catholicism? 43:05 – Are Satan and the demons in hell suffering, or just the people who go there? And are we able to contact the souls in hell, whether from this life or the next? 48:20 – Have you read By Man Shall His Blood Be Shed? What do you think of what it teaches about the death penalty compared to what Pope Francis is teaching now? …

Let's THINK about it
Step 50: The Hero Trendency

Let's THINK about it

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 27:11


The Hero Story Perhaps there has always been an effort towards optimization, and it generally looks like technology. When speaking of self optimization, or overcoming , we are speaking of the hero's journey popularized by Joseph Campbell. Campbell spoke a lot of the parallels of the external journey and the internal journey… the external circumstances gave the individual the opportunity to react and grow.In the 50's-70's there was a wave of belief in unlocking human potential through psycho-science-type things like intensive practice hypnosis and subliminal training… or just LSD. Some of these practices were previously used in religious awakening, but we wrapped them up under the guise of science, and then they were abused by programs like MK Ultra.During this time, people thought of the human as a blank slate that could be written, molded or shaped. (optimized?) An example of this is Laszlo Polgar, born in Hungary, and with an idea about raising children, ended up getting married and having his first child in 1969. He and his wife Clara, raised children around the idea that they could create a genius through specific narrow focus. They had three children, the Polgar sisters, who all excelled at chess, reaching amazing heights, and were declared National Treasures. In fiction, chess is too boring, so the blank slates are in the genre of assassin Killers: examples are Kill Bill, Atomic Blonde, or Leon the Professional where they are trained, usually for revenge or duty. On the darker side you have children raised by handlers or governments as weapons, like in John Wick, Black Widow, Hannah, or Kate. So what if instead of being a badass with Kalashnikovs and stilettos you're a phenom with golf clubs? This is the Tiger Woods story, a history of brutal authoritarian parenting generating mental resiliency and overcoming. A lot of success, but a lot of trauma.Physically, many of us are not capable of such heroic heights: we cannot optimize enough to overcome our genetics, despite how much protein we consume. Enter science to the rescue as the mythical augmented man: Perhaps the Six Million Dollar Man or the darker side of Robocop, more of an automaton cyborg. Talk about efficiency: just turn the man into a machine. We are culturally conditioned to accept this is the way of the future as far back as cartoons like Inspector Gadget: the bumbling doofus with all sorts of extensions and rockets and wheels that both saved the day and naturally lead to slapstick pratfalls.Backtrack: This takes us back to an earlier podcast, step 28, in which I mentioned Henri Bergson, and his summary of what makes something funny, which is “the mechanical encrusted upon the living.”Of course, the real warning: when we lean too heavily into external power, technology, optimization (or even habits and productivity), we cease to be human in a certain way. We trade in the hard path of “overcoming” for the easy path of instant power, and in that substitution, we lose something. Yet, an alternate form optimization technology exists: Arcane Magics. I'm going to suggest, this path of learning the secrets of Arcane magics of habit stacking and personal productivity is the most alluring current path to be super, to achieve your potential. From Fiction to Fact While I have been talking about science through fictional stories, in many ways it has stepped into reality.You want to see something insane: look up clips from the 1920's Olympics compared to todays Olympics: Over 100 years the science of optimization and dedicated practice works… physically at least… until they turn into that unhinged balance beam killer super model from “The Spy who dumped me.” In America, we seem to live in a society that links success and progress and achievement with wealth and appearance. This is the manifest destiny of self-actualization woven into the Protestant work ethic, capitalist, American Mythos… and technology is often the vehicle and the key.But dedication to science and technology is problematically deterministic and class eugenics can spring up from it, as played out in the movie Gattaca. The secret to tricking an unjust technocracy? Keep secrets, and work harder than everyone else.But in this age of the internet we need to know exactly how: what was his diet? What drugs was he on? Boxers or briefs?And this is the trap we are in today: there are so many paths laid out before us by the millionaires and self-hacking crowds that we have a myriad of paths to successful optimization. Yet when someone, like in Gattaca, has an overpowering, all-consuming goal to be more… or in Kill Bill to kill more… we find their dedication and focus grants results. This can be called “dedicated practice” and myths of a 10,000 hour rule to mastery circulate around it. The beauty of it is that maybe we don't need neural implants and bionic arms. Maybe the new magics are habit stacks, routines, the mystical arcana of time-blocking and flow state. The only thing left is to find an all-consuming, overpowering desire that we can shape our life around… and that is not so much hero stuff, as a very old question of all of mankind: what is my purpose? What is my mission?  The Superman, the Ubermensch, Nietzsche How can we do an episode on superheroes, and overcoming without at least bringing up Friedrich Nietzsche. He popularized the concept of Übermensch or Overman or Beyondman… now most commonly seen as Superman.(By the way, this concept is affiliated with the Nazi party due to Nietzsche's sister misusing his texts.)The Overman is really a man of overcoming… and to confuse it with physical power as the Superman warrior is quite superficial. In our society many people appear superhero, overcoming physicality, but staying in vanity. The hero's journey is ultimately a journey towards self-integration, towards wholeness, and as Jung said “individuation” through the unification of opposites.In Nietzsche's book thus spoke zarathustra the prophet Zarathustra, who comes down from his mountaintop to share his knowledge with masses is spurned by the people. He attempts to tell them of the Ubermensch, but they reject this hard life of overcoming. All spiteful and disappointed, Zarathustra decides to prophesy the disgusting concept of Last man: a lazy decadent person, born of a civilization incapable of standing up to challenge or hardship, only interested in comfort. The last man takes no risks, preferring security. This is the soft and secure rationalist who has forgotten how to dream and everything the Ubermensch would do appears as illness, or madness.Intentional hardship? Are you crazy? So, how do we push back against the zombie conformity of security that seems so rational? It seems – indeed – to be illogical to try. Isn't it in our best interest to protect ourselves and stay comfortably in the middle of the herd? Yes, for survival maybe, but what about thriving? What about self-actualization?One way is to find something external to ourselves that is more important, someway we can help: A hero uses the challenge, the tension and hardship, to manifest creativity, to innovate. Are scientists and technologists our superheroes, the innovators or our time? How about the optimizers, the overcomers?  The guys and gals hitting flow state, or testing intermittent fasting: testing, and testing, and suffering, and sharing all this data with us. Are they climbing the mountain and coming back down with the mountain-top insights? Perhaps. But what if their motivation is internet rewards, or just a whole bucket full of hacks? That would be a less than noble goal.Experimentation can happen culturally, too. Can we not appreciate the heroism of the alternate lifestyle?The real challenge, the wisdom handed down to us through some religion, philosophy, and myths is to blend all opposites: overcome and move beyond dualities of good and evil, conscious and unconscious, spiritual and earthly… this is how you become an individual.Most of us are what is called a “dividual”, not undivided, as an “individual.” We are the divided self. Fragmented. We have not overcome or transcended, or as Hegel would say “subsumed.” Sure, we might be fit, we may look like the image of the superhero, but is maintaining appearances more like the act of the lastman? I am not saying they cannot coincide, but the motivation is a vital distinction to understanding conformity and overcoming.What I do know, is we -in our society- are really good at superficial appearances… placing the signifier before the signified.  The point, I think, is that to become a real human, a whole and integrated self, is a harder and a more heroic a journey than scientific shortcutting or following formulas that guarantee results. Sure, science/tech is great and helpful, but it shouldn't do the overcoming for you: you have to do that. Also, the hero is often portrayed alone, the monk ascending the mountain to find enlightenment or Superman in his Fortress of Solitude after keeping secrets, but you do not have to do this alone. Sure, you will have to work and push back against mindless conformity, but take the journey with others and avoid the solipsistic individuality of the shallow villain. 

Paul VanderKlay's Podcast
The Crisis of Protestant Worship with Len Vander Zee another CRCNA Minister

Paul VanderKlay's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 91:08


Len is working on writing a book following his book on Sacraments on worship. He's just getting started. Let him know what you think in the comments.   Discord link. Good for just a few days. Check with more recent videos for a fresh link. https://discord.gg/UtXjCExw Paul Vander Klay clips channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCX0jIcadtoxELSwehCh5QTg My Substack https://paulvanderklay.substack.com/ Estuary Hub Link https://sites.google.com/view/estuaryhubcontent/home If you want to schedule a one-on-one conversation check here. https://paulvanderklay.me/2019/08/06/converzations-with-pvk/ There is a video version of this podcast on YouTube at http://www.youtube.com/paulvanderklay To listen to this on ITunes https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/paul-vanderklays-podcast/id1394314333  If you need the RSS feed for your podcast player https://paulvanderklay.podbean.com/feed/  All Amazon links here are part of the Amazon Affiliate Program. Amazon pays me a small commission at no additional cost to you if you buy through one of the product links here. This is is one (free to you) way to support my videos.  https://paypal.me/paulvanderklay To support this channel/podcast with Bitcoin (BTC): 37TSN79RXewX8Js7CDMDRzvgMrFftutbPo  To support this channel/podcast with Bitcoin Cash (BCH) qr3amdmj3n2u83eqefsdft9vatnj9na0dqlzhnx80h  To support this channel/podcast with Ethereum (ETH): 0xd3F649C3403a4789466c246F32430036DADf6c62 Blockchain backup on Lbry https://odysee.com/@paulvanderklay https://www.patreon.com/paulvanderklay Paul's Church Content at Living Stones Channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCh7bdktIALZ9Nq41oVCvW-A To support Paul's work by supporting his church give here. https://tithe.ly/give?c=2160640

Grace in Focus
Chapter 1: More Than One Meaning of “Faith Alone?”

Grace in Focus

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 13:50


Welcome to Grace in Focus radio. Bob and Shawn have started a new series where they will be discussing Wayne Grudem’s book “Free Grace Theology: Five Ways it Diminishes the Gospel.” On this episode, the guys will first discuss Grudem’s opening arguments as they are based on the Protestant confession of faith. They will also

The Bicks Do...Shakespeare
Episode 67 - Shakespeare and Religion

The Bicks Do...Shakespeare

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 78:01


Religion is always a touchy subject, but for most of the world today it's not nearly as dangerous a point of discussion as it was during Shakespeare's lifetime. Protestant and Catholic debates hadn't just destroyed previously unassailable assumptions on articles of faith, they'd led to war, religious persecution to the point of murder, and constant political and religious upheaval. While Shakespeare's time was one of relatively steady Protestant rule, the crises of the past hundred years hadn't disappeared magically upon Shakespeare's birth, and his plays reflect a conflicted mixture of religious viewpoints in the shape of his characters and the stories they live through. This episode we looked at the history of religion in England, and then how that history manifested in the plays. Notes: The video Lindsay references around anti-Judaism practices in Elizabethan England is a good watch! The Folger Shakespeare Unlimited episode on religion is also a fabulous listen and we'd highly recommend it if we say anything remotely interesting. As promised, Aidan quoted two scholarly articles, so here are the requisite MLA format citations for both: Ribner, Irving. “SHAKESPEARE, CHRISTIANITY, AND THE PROBLEM OF BELIEF.” The Centennial Review, vol. 8, no. 1, Michigan State University Press, 1964, pp. 99–108, http://www.jstor.org/stable/23737596. Hunt, Maurice. “VISIONARY CHRISTIANITY IN SHAKESPEARE'S LATE ROMANCES.” CLA Journal, vol. 47, no. 2, College Language Association, 2003, pp. 212–30, http://www.jstor.org/stable/44325209.  Ancient Bickerings: Which of Shakespeare's plays is his most religious?

Write About Now
What Your Fitness Instructor and Charles Manson Have in Common

Write About Now

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 56:23


What do Soulcycle, QAnon and Charles Manson all have in common? Well, they're all related to cults. For this exciting episode, listen in as author and linguist Amanda Montell takes a deep dive into the cult-ish language we see in our day-to-day lives. She should know: She's the author of the critically-acclaimed book Cultish: The Language of Fanaticism and hosts a podcast about modern-day cults called Sounds like a Cult. On the pod, Amanda and Jon talk about their experiences with cults and the mechanisms that make them powerful. They tackle concepts like thought-terminating cliches, algorithms, and the Protestant ethic — all of which play a part in forming a cult-like mentality. Listen to this episode, but be warned: You may not see your fitness instructor the same way again.

Travels Through Time
Tracy Borman: Elizabeth I and the Spanish Armada (1588)

Travels Through Time

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 48:14


Historians often refer to the reign of Queen Elizabeth I as being England's Golden Age. And of all the forty-five years in which she was the monarch, the year 1588 stands out as the most dramatic. It was a year of peril, a year of valour and a year of heartbreak. In this episode bestselling historian and novelist Tracy Borman takes us back to the anxiety-ridden days of 1588. We watch on as the queen makes a speech that will pass into legend. We hover close by as one of her most famous portraits is painted. And we see the end of a tragic tale, as Robert Dudley, the Earl of Leicester, dies. While various events compete for attention throughout that summer – the arrival of the Armada, Leicester's health - Elizabeth remains at the heart of everything. As Tracy Borman argues (and Violet Moller agrees), she was a queen to outrank all of the others. As ever, maps, images and much more about this episode is to be found at our website tttpodcast.com. Click here to order Tracy Borman's book from John Sandoe's who, we are delighted to say, are supplying books for the podcast. Show notes Scene One: 9 August, 1588. Tilbury. As Philip II's Armada is blown up the English Channel by a decidedly Protestant wind, Elizabeth rallies her troops at Tilbury, dressed in a breastplate and plumed helmet. Scene Two: August/September, 1588. The painting of the Armada portrait. Elizabeth celebrates victory over Philip of Spain by ordering a pearl-spangled dress to wear for a glittering new portrait, filled with symbolism and hidden meaning. Scene Three: 4 September, 1588, Oxfordshire. Elizabeth's closest friend and love of her life Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester, dies in Oxfordshire leaving her heartbroken. Memento: The plumed helmet that Elizabeth wore when she delivered her Tilbury Speech. People/Social Presenter: Violet Moller Guest: Tracy Borman Production: Maria Nolan Podcast partner: Unseen Histories Follow us on Twitter: @tttpodcast_ Or on Facebook See where 1588 fits on our Timeline 

Clearnote Church
Be Ready for the End of All Things (Matthew 24:36-51)

Clearnote Church

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 46:58


Matthew 24:36-51. From the "New Testament" sermon series. Preached by Juergen von Hagen.

JR.'s Sermons
Transformation 2021 - Church of Theseus

JR.'s Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 37:09


Too often, faith is reduced to an intellectual exercise. But Jesus pressed for transformation, change so dramatic it was described as 'resurrection' or 'rebirth'. What does it look like for us to pursue this sort of new life here at Catalyst in the coming year?

Nightlife
This Mortal Coil: Wayside Weddings

Nightlife

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 22:42


Who married you?  Pastor Jon Owen on why the Wayside Chapel was the place to go for some couples when all other doors were closed.

Gospel Tangents Podcast
Protestant Theology in Book of Mormon? (Part 5 of 8)

Gospel Tangents Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 22:35


Should evangelicals be scared of the Book of Mormon? Pentecostal scholar Dr. Christopher Thomas says most of the theology in the Book of Mormon is thoroughly protestant! Does that surprise you? Chris:  Well, aside from the fall, and aside from Jesus appearing so often so early, the Book of Mormon is pretty, kind of, Protestant. […] The post Protestant Theology in Book of Mormon? (Part 5 of 8) appeared first on Gospel Tangents.

Apollos Watered
Episode 13: Deep Conversation w/Nancy Pearcey, Pt. 2-Loving the Body, Learning the Language, & Life Change

Apollos Watered

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 58:43


Travis & Nancy Pearcey (America's pre-eminent evangelical Protestant female intellectual) continue their discussion on embracing God's design for the body, defending the faith by drawing attention to inconsistencies in worldviews, stories of life change of those who have embraced God's design, the importance of language and much more. At the center of their discussion is Nancy's insightful and hope-filled book, "Love Thy Body: Answering Hard Questions About Life And Sexuality." Learn more about Nancy http://www.nancypearcey.com/ (here) and get her book https://www.amazon.com/Love-Thy-Body-Answering-Questions/dp/0801075971/ref=sr_1_2?crid=2YCPXA9R8J5SL&keywords=nancy+pearcey&qid=1636812387&qsid=144-7553468-5152734&sprefix=nancy+pear%2Caps%2C214&sr=8-2&sres=0801075971%2C1433502208%2C146278772X%2CB00UCOHE4Y%2C0891077669%2C0736976159%2C0310525047%2CB01181G30K%2CB007V695XO%2C1576587606%2C1576588726%2CB01FMVU3ZS%2C1947644912%2C1576588211%2C0842336079%2C1645435261&srpt=ABIS_BOOK (here).

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Friday, November 12, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsMemorial of Saint Josaphat, Bishop and Martyr Lectionary: 495All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint JosaphatIn 1595, the Orthodox bishop of Brest-Litovsk in present-day Belarus and five other bishops representing millions of Ruthenians, sought reunion with Rome. John Kunsevich—who took the name Josaphat in religious life—was to dedicate his life, and die for the same cause. Born in what is now Ukraine, he went to work in Wilno and was influenced by clergy adhering to the 1596 Union of Brest. He became a Basilian monk, then a priest, and soon was well known as a preacher and an ascetic. He became bishop of Vitebsk at a relatively young age, and faced a difficult situation. Most monks, fearing interference in liturgy and customs, did not want union with Rome. By synods, catechetical instruction, reform of the clergy, and personal example, however, Josaphat was successful in winning the greater part of the Orthodox in that area to the union. But the next year a dissident hierarchy was set up, and his opposite number spread the accusation that Josaphat had “gone Latin” and that all his people would have to do the same. He was not enthusiastically supported by the Latin bishops of Poland. Despite warnings, he went to Vitebsk, still a hotbed of trouble. Attempts were made to foment trouble and drive him from the diocese: A priest was sent to shout insults to him from his own courtyard. When Josaphat had him removed and shut up in his house, the opposition rang the town hall bell, and a mob assembled. The priest was released, but members of the mob broke into the bishop's home. Josaphat was struck with a halberd, then shot, and his body thrown into the river. It was later recovered and is now buried in St. Peter's Basilica in Rome. He was the first saint of the Eastern Church to be canonized by Rome. Josaphat's death brought a movement toward Catholicism and unity, but the controversy continued, and the dissidents, too, had their martyr. After the partition of Poland, the Russians forced most Ruthenians to join the Russian Orthodox Church. In 1964, newspaper photos of Pope Paul VI embracing Athenagoras I, the Orthodox patriarch of Constantinople, marked a significant step toward the healing of a division in Christendom that has spanned more than nine centuries. Reflection The seeds of separation were sown in the fourth century when the Roman Empire was divided into East and West. The actual split came over customs such as using unleavened bread, Saturday fasting, and celibacy. No doubt the political involvement of religious leaders on both sides was a large factor, and doctrinal disagreement was present. But no reason was enough to justify the present tragic division in Christendom, which is 64 percent Roman Catholic, 13 percent Eastern—mostly Orthodox—Churches, and 23 percent Protestant, and this when the 71 percent of the world that is not Christian should be experiencing unity and Christ-like charity from Christians! Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

Good Doctrine
Ep. 99 | Is It Christian Culture or Just Your Culture?

Good Doctrine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 33:17


Is everything you've ever known a lie? Probably. Culture. It's the air we breathe, and we don't often think about it, but should Christians have a unique "culture" that's distinct from the culture of their community? Intro/Outro music from bensound.com

Glad Trad Podcast
Authentic Catholic Communities

Glad Trad Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 60:19


 Come buy our indulgences...  Thank you to Chad Monarchist Jason Yoakam for the episode suggestion! And to all of our patrons who help make this content possible!The local parish should be the wellspring of Catholic culture and life for her members, so we discuss what is required to build an authentic Catholic community, as well as practical steps both individuals and churches can take to keep the focus on the liturgy and brotherhood of believers. 00:00:00 Introduction 00:05:00 Experience Leading Parish Life 00:08:25 Protestant vs Catholic Emphasis 00:12:55 Finding People in Your Age Group 00:17:00 Building Bonds Around Food 00:18:56 Evangelistic Zeal and Charity 00:22:15 Ask the Priest About Forming Community00:29:20 Regaining the Centerpoint 00:32:30 Facing the Same Direction as Others 00:34:30 Offering Yourself to Parish Life 00:36:25 “5% do 95% of the Work” 00:42:15 A Good Parish Facilitates Catholic Culture 00:48:56 Now is the Time – Go to the Latin Mass! 00:54:00 A Vibrant Parish Has All Age Groups Follow us @gladtradpodcastVideo Episodes on Youtube

New Left Radio
Disruption: Why Things Change w/ David Potter

New Left Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 49:27


Fan of the show? https://www.patreon.com/newleftradio (Support us on Patreon)! The status quo may seem permanent and unchangeable but as David Potter tells us, there are significant disruptions throughout modern history that have fundamentally changed the world — sometimes seemingly overnight. What can we learn from our past in making the world anew? How can movements breakthrough? Most importantly, are disruptive movements doomed to becoming centrist? About Disruption: Why Things Change How do things change? The question is critical to the historical study of any era but it is also a profoundly important issue today as western democracies find the fundamental tenets of their implicit social contract facing extreme challenges from forces espousing ideas that once flourished only on the outskirts of society. This books argues that radical change always begins with ideas that took shape on the fringes. Throughout time the "mainstream" has been inherently conservative, allowing for incremental change but essentially dedicated to preserving its own power structures as the dominant ideology justifies existing relationships. In this tour of radical change across Western history, David Potter will show how ideologies that develop in opposition or reaction to those supporting the status quo are employed to effect profound changes in political structures that will in turn alter the way that social relations are constructed. Not all radical groups are the same, and all the groups that the book will explore take advantage of challenges that have already shaken the social order. They take advantage of mistakes that have challenged belief in the competence of existing institutions to be effective. It is the particular combination of an alternative ideological system and a period of community distress that are necessary conditions for radical changes in direction. The historical disruptions chronicled in this book-the rise of Christianity, rise of Islam, Protestant reformations, Age of Revolution (American and French), and Bolshevism and Nazism--will help readers understand when the preconditions exist for radical changes in the social and political order. As Disruption demonstrates, not all radical change follows paths that its original proponents might have predicted. An epilogue helps situate contemporary disruptions, from the rise of Trump and Brexit to the social and political consequences of technological change, in the wider historical forces surveyed by the book. https://global.oup.com/academic/product/disruption-9780197518823?cc=ca&lang=en&# (Buy the book here) About David Potter David Potter is Francis W. Kelsey Collegiate Professor of Greek and Roman History and Arthur F. Thurnau Professor at the University of Michigan. His previous books include The Origin of Empire: Rome from the Republic to Hadrian, Constantine the Emperor, The Victor's Crown: A History of Ancient Sport from Homer to Byzantium, and Theodora: Actress, Empress, Saint. Stay connected with the latest from New Left Radio by https://newleft.us6.list-manage.com/subscribe?u=8227a4372fe8dc22bdbf0e3db&id=e99d6c70b4 (joining our mailing list) today! _________ Support this podcast

Clearnote Church
Bless Those Who Persecute You (Romans 12:14-16)

Clearnote Church

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 46:50


Romans 12:14-16. From the "The Book of Romans" sermon series. Preached by Lucas Weeks.

JR.'s Sermons
Diversity 2021 - Church of Theseus

JR.'s Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 37:15


Diversity - it's a buzzword, a trend these days. Every church claims to value diversity. So why do churches so often fail to reflect even the diversity of our communities? And how do we pursue an authentic diversity that moves beyond tokenism and trends to get to the heart of Jesus' good news for our world?

Moody Presents
2021-11-07: Contrast Series, Spiritual Evidence Part 1

Moody Presents

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 26:00


Welcome to Moody Presents, the weekly, half hour Bible teaching program from the Moody Bible Institute.  Our speaker is Pastor Mark Jobe, President of the Moody Bible Institute.   According to Pastor Mark we'll see that there are a lot of people out there who say they are a Christian, but in reality, they're not. Maybe they were baptized as a baby, maybe somewhere on a document it says they are Protestant or Catholic. Maybe they were born into a Christian family... none of these things make you a Christian. We're going to talk about that today and get you thinking about your life and if you really are a true believer... because if you are, there will be evidence to prove it. And John talks about that in 1st John chapter 5...let's get started with today's study. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Christian Worldview radio program
Why the Reformation Must Be Remembered

The Christian Worldview radio program

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 53:59


GUEST: MIKE GENDRON, founder/evangelist, Proclaiming the Gospel We know the darkness the world celebrates each year on October 31 but it's disconcerting that the day passes with most Protestant churches, generally, and Evangelical churches, specifically, devoting little or no time commemorating and teaching about something far more momentous which took place on that date in 1517—Martin Luther nailing his “95 Theses” document on the door of All Saints' Church in Wittenberg, Germany to protest errant doctrines of the Roman Catholic Church. The document ignited the fire that became the Protestant Reformation, an era lasting more than 100 years and impacting, well, everything—clarifying of biblical doctrines, starting a new branch of Christianity, altering the future of nations, all the way to the formation of America. It would be hard to overstate the importance of the Reformation. This weekend on The Christian Worldview, we will hear a portion of a message by Dr. Steve Lawson about the Reformation and also speak with Mike Gendron of Proclaiming the Gospel ministry about the current Pope, Francis, and his beliefs.

Catholic Conversations
66: Salvation Protestant vs Catholic (Discussion)

Catholic Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 73:33


Conversation between a Catholic and a Protestant on the topic of Salvation.Some of my sources on the Topic of SalvationCatholic Perspective on Paul by Dr. Taylor MarshallDrama of Salvation by Jimmy AkinCanons of the Council of Trent Some videos on Salvation https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PL-CUiR45WxNvZGSgGLL1y_pXMC5N8Gqw7Contact Me:Email: FonsecaProduction@gmail.comWebsite: http://catholicconversations.buzzsprout.comIG: @ffonzeFacebook: Adrian Fonseca Facebook: Catholic Conversations Twitter: @AdrianFonze

Reformed Forum
Roman Catholicism and American Politics during the Cold War

Reformed Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 80:31


Roman Catholicism entered the mainstream of American national life the morning following the November 8, 1960 election when John F. Kennedy won and became the president. While it may seem strange to people who did not grow up in the era, but Protestant voters were wary of a Roman Catholic potentially serving as president of the United States. Yet the Vatican may have been even more wary of “Americanism.” While it did not necessarily inhibit Catholics from being Catholic it also was a form of exceptionalism that potentially risked the expansion of Christendom as understood by Catholics. In this episode, D. G. Hart explains the historical reasons why the relationship between Roman Catholicism and Americanism changed in the 1960s and how it continued to develop in subsequent decades. Darryl G. Hart is Distinguished Associate Professor of History at Hillsdale College in Hillsdale, Michigan.

Christ the Center
Roman Catholicism and American Politics during the Cold War

Christ the Center

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021


Roman Catholicism entered the mainstream of American national life the morning following the November 8, 1960 election when John F. Kennedy won and became the president. While it may seem strange to people who did not grow up in the era, but Protestant voters were wary of a Roman Catholic potentially serving as president of […]

History Loves Company
"Remember, Remember, the Fifth of November": Guy Fawkes and the Gunpowder Plot

History Loves Company

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 17:40


For people outside Britain, the Fifth of November is perhaps best known as the holiday alluded to in Alan Moore's landmark graphic novel (as well as its subsequent film adaptation), 'V for Vendetta.' But despite its place in popular culture, it is, in fact, a real holiday based on a real event. The early 17th Century saw England's Catholic population on the receiving end of persecution by the country's Protestant majority. By 1605, the climate had become so intolerable that a group of conspirators plotted to overthrow the government. What were the details behind this plot? Who was involved? And how did one man in particular give rise to one of Britain's most important holidays? Join me as we take a look at the Gunpowder Plot, this week on the 'History Loves Company' podcast. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/historylovescompany/support

Love is the Message: Dance, Music and Counterculture
A City Called Heaven: Afro-Psychedelia in Gospel, Reggae, Acid Rock and Funk

Love is the Message: Dance, Music and Counterculture

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 84:40


In the second episode of our third series, Tim and Jeremy describe a psychedelic aesthetic appearing in the transformative and rapturous musics of the American Black church, Rastafarian Jamaica and Nigeria, with reference to Gospel, Juju, Reggae and Funk. They counterpoint this with a strain of musical antipathy with roots in Plato and iterating in radical Protestant tendencies throughout history, while also pointing up the specific and slightly scary millenarianism to the utopias imagined through the tunes discussed. Tim and Jeremy also spend a good amount of time on the West Coast Acid Rock scene, contemplating the edginess of the sound and it's representation of paranoid psychoactive experiences; the musical expressions of Caribbean Brits in the early '70s; and touch some more on Afro-Futurism, with specific reference to the playful childlike energy of space-facing Parliament-Funkadelic. Tim Lawrence and Jeremy Gilbert are authors, academics, DJs and audiophile dance party organisers. They've been friends and collaborators since 1997, teaching together and running parties since 2003. With clubs closed and half their jobs lost to university cuts, they're inevitably launching a podcast. Produced and edited by Matt Huxley. Tune in, Turn on, Get Down! Tracklist: Mahalia Jackson - A City Called Heaven The Staple Singers - This May be the Last Time The Voices of East Harlem - Shaker Life Love - Revelation Santana - Toussaint L'Ouverture Cymande - Dove King Sunny Adé - 365 Is My Number / The Message Nairobi Sisters - Promised Land Parliament-Funkadelic - Mothership Connection (Star Child) and some reading for this week's episode: Jayna Brown, Black Utopias: Speculative Life and the Music of Other Worlds, Duke UP 2021 Christopher Waterman, Juju: A Social History and Ethnography of an African Popular Music, University of Chicago Press, 1990 Craig Werner, A Change Is Gonna Come: Music, Race and the Soul of America, Canongate 2002

Catholic Answers Live
#10348 Open Forum - Fr. Hugh Barbour, O. Praem.

Catholic Answers Live

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021


Questions Covered: 06:25 – I've noticed that during consecration some of the faithful will bow when the priest kneels. Is that okay, and if so, should it be encouraged? 12:42 – Was it ever a custom immediately following Vatican II for the Ordinary Form to be celebrated facing east with communion rails? 16:17 – If anyone is in purgatory, we know they're going to heaven and God's timing is perfect. So why are we praying for them? 22:58 – How do you actually pray for the dead? What are you supposed to say? 28:46 – I was talking to a Protestant about how the Church is important because we need an interpretive body of God's word, and she responded that the Holy Spirit interprets for her. How do I answer this? 32:48 – If I'm living in a state of grace, am I in spiritual communion with Jesus? And if that's the case, what would a prayer for spiritual communion actually do? And what does living in spiritual communion mean on a day-to-day basis? 38:00 – Is it appropriate to not kneel during mass? 43:54 – What happens to a person when they're in a state of obstinate mortal sin and they receive communion? And is a Catholic politician in a country that legalizes abortion an advocate for mass murder? 48:18 – I heard that if you're watching a live mass, if you have bread and wine with you, they won't be consecrated so you can't have communion if you're unable to go to Mass. Is that true? Doesn't it put a limit on God's power? 51:52 – What is the determining factor in whether a baptized person goes to hell or purgatory after they die? …

The Pastor Theologians Podcast
Navigating Denominational Tension as an Evangelical | Doug Sweeney

The Pastor Theologians Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 27:48


Doug Sweeney, Dean of Beeson Divinity School, joins the podcast as this week's guest. Doug is a Jonathan Edwards scholar who serves as a theological mentor and sits on the board of the CPT.  He discusses some of his story and how he came to worship in the Lutheran tradition and how he has navigated ongoing theological tensions as an evangelical in historic Protestant denominations.

Clearnote Church
We Have Peace with God (Romans 5:1-11)

Clearnote Church

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 54:45


Romans 5:1-11. From the "New Testament" sermon series. Preached by Stephen Baker.

Intellectual Conservatism
Get to know Gavin Ortlund

Intellectual Conservatism

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 59:46


Gavin and I talk about his life and theological formation. We also discuss classical theism, hell, evolution, and other timely issues. 

The History of the Americans
The Defeat of the Spanish Armada and the Survival of Protestant England Part 1

The History of the Americans

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 36:38


On August 28, 1587, John White, the leader of the last Roanoke Colony, climbed on board Edward Spicer's flyboat and returned to England. His mandate was to secure supplies and more settlers to reinforce the people he had left behind, who included his own daughter and granddaughter, Eleanor and Virginia Dare.  He would not in fact be able to return for almost three years, by which time the roughly 116 colonists back in North Carolina had vanished completely, leaving behind only scant clues. White would take three years to return because an undeclared but existential war had broken out between England and Spain, known to history as the Anglo-Spanish War of 1585-1604. The war was existential not for England the country – had Philip II and Spain won the war, England would have continued to exist as a country, and in their daily lives most English people would have seen very little change. Philip II would have become King of England, as he had already been years before during his marriage to Mary Tudor, and the liturgy at church on Sunday would have changed in ways that we moderns would have regarded as hilariously trivial.  However, the war was existential for Elizabeth I and her Protestant elite who, among other things, sustained English naval power and supported North American colonization. It is very hard to imagine that an England ruled by Philip II and an entirely different batch of nobles, Catholic “recusants” emerged from the political shadows, would have settled North America.  Nor would there have been successful Protestant Dutch settlement, because the defeat of Elizabeth would also have meant the end of Dutch Protestantism as a political force. The city in that harbor discovered by Verrazzano more than sixty years before would more likely have been New Seville or New Lisbon than New Amsterdam or New York. Fortunately, the English had Sir Francis Drake, who in the spring of 1587 would raid the Spanish port of Cadiz and occupy Sagres roadstead off Cape St. Vincent, destroying more than 100 Spanish and Portuguese ships and boats and much of the supplies for the Spanish Armada. And then he would go on to grab a Portuguese treasure ship that would substantially bolster Elizabeth's finances just when she needed it most. Selected references for this episode Garrett Mattingly, The Armada Robert Hutchinson, The Spanish Armada: A History John Sugden, Sir Francis Drake Andrew Shepherd, "The Spanish Armada in Lisbon: preparing to invade England"

Stand Firm Podcast
#74: Protestant Word Games: A Reformation Day Glossary

Stand Firm Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 51:21


Catholic Answers Live
#10340 Why Aren’t You Catholic? - Joe Heschmeyer

Catholic Answers Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021


Questions Covered: 11:28 – I was raised Baptist, and I have an issue with the difference between the books in Catholic and Protestant bibles. 20:31 – I'm not Catholic because of the idol worship. 29:53 – I'm a Jehovah's Witness. Why should I be Catholic? 42:21 – I believe the Catholic Church is a front for false worship. 49:35 – I have a huge issue with how the Church handled all the sexual abuse. …

True Crime Fan Club Podcast

In 2014, Pope Francis and the Vatican formally recognized the International Association of Exorcists, which had 250 exorcists in 250 countries (3). Of course, Protestants also carry out exorcisms, but according to Dr. Andrew Chestnut of Virginia Commonwealth University, the Catholic rites are more formal, whereas Protestant exorcisms are often more theatrical. Protestant exorcists will […]

The Cordial Catholic
133: What Vatican II Really Said (w/ Father Blake Britton)

The Cordial Catholic

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 78:12


In this episode of The Cordial Catholic, I'm re-joined by Father Blake Britton, the author of the fantastic new book Reclaiming Vatican II: What It (Really) Said, What It Means, and How It Calls Us to Renew the Church.Fr. Blake was a guest on this show exactly 100 episodes ago when we discussed Vatican II and what would, eventually, become this fantastic book. A book which has been sent, we learn, to every single bishop in the USA – it's really a mis-read book. Fr. Blake unpacks exactly what happened at the Second Vatican Council, how the agenda of the Council has been misunderstood and misapplied in the subsequent decades, and what we can do to truly live out the intentions of Vatican II as a movement of the Holy Spirit for the whole Church. It's an incredible conversation!For more, visit The Cordial Catholic. Send your feedback to cordialcatholic@gmail.com. Sign up for our newsletter for my reflections on  episodes, behind-the-scenes content, and exclusive contests! To watch this and other episodes please visit (and subscribe to!) our YouTube channel.Please consider financially supporting this show! For more information visit the Patreon page.  All patrons receive access to exclusive content and if you can give $5/mo or more you'll also be entered into monthly draws for fantastic books hand-picked by me.If you'd like to give a one-time donation to The Cordial Catholic, you can visit the PayPal page.Thank you to those already supporting the show!Please check out Hallow, the #1 Catholic audio prayer app. Pray the rosary, novenas, listen to Bishop Robert Barron's homilies and join the 30-day Gospel Reading Challenge by listening to the Gospel as read by Jonathan Roumie who plays Jesus in The Chosen. The app is free but visit hallow.com/cordialcatholic for a 30-day trial of the extra, in-depth features! Thanks to this week's co-producers, part of our Patreon Producers community: Stephen, Eli, Tom, Kelvin, Susan, and Eyram.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/cordialcatholic)

Catholic Answers Live
#10333 Open Forum - Jimmy Akin

Catholic Answers Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021


Questions Covered: 04:30 – What does metanoia mean? 11:00 – Are there any arguments from the early Church Fathers in favor of iconography? 13:00 – I have a question about preterism. Who is the man of lawlessness? Could it be Nero? 17:35 – How would you approach the topic of suicide with someone who hasn't brought it up but might be showing hints? 23:55 – What are your thoughts on Jesus being able to custom-tailor Mary to be the perfect mother of him and the Church? 31:45 – How is the first chapter of Genesis compatible with science? What's the general opinion of the Church on how it should be interpreted? 37:40 – How can I explain to a Protestant our understanding of cooperation with God's grace? 44:20 – What's the Catholic understanding of faith vs works and how they play into salvation? 46:10 – I spoke with some Protestants who talked about an idea of “Mother God.” They believed in the persons of the Trinity, but also believed that, taken all together, there was one “Mother God.” Has this idea come up before? Did the Church have to address it? 48:25 – Is it okay to play Dungeons & Dragons? 50:30 – Is there any circumstance in which a Catholic married couple, under the guidance of a priest, could use condoms? 52:45 – How should we submit to authority when there's so many laws we don't know about? …

Catholic Answers Live
#10330 Which Catholic Doctrine Troubles You? - Karlo Broussard

Catholic Answers Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021


Questions Covered: 06:55 – Do I NEED to ask the help of the Saints and Mary? 14:53 – If the Church has the power and authority to give out indulgences, why is she so stringent about giving them out? 23:52 – Why can't our parishioners receive the blood from the chalice since COVID started? If it's truly the blood, and truly incorruptible, shouldn't they have it? 31:09 – Why did Judas go to hell but the thief on the cross went to purgatory? 37:37 – I'm not sure how to defend the infallibility of the pope to my Protestant and atheist friends. They say that gives him supernatural power. 46:30 – My younger sister wonders why women can't be priests because there's plenty of holy women. …

The Counsel of Trent
#517 – 3 more ways Protestants act like atheists

The Counsel of Trent

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 29:51


In this episode Trent shares three similarities between Protestant critiques of Catholicism and atheistic critiques of Christianity in general.